40 Burst results for "ohio"

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Gary Jeff Walker

Gary Jeff Walker

00:41 sec | 18 min ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Gary Jeff Walker

"Voting is on for November 3rd in the Buckeye State. This is the 11 30 report I'm Rob Carpenter breaking now. Secretary of State Frank LaRosa. November 3rd election will be conducted in Ohio in the same way people have been voting in the Buckeye State for the last 20 years. Stars was sending out requests for absentee ballast all registered voters around Labor Day. We know that Ohioans have voted absentee and trusted that process for 25 years, 20 years were encouraging Ohioans to do that this year. It's something that we want to see a high participation rate. Rose expect about half of all voters to vote by mail because of the pandemic. But he's stressing as well. The polling places will be open for in person Voting mass will be required of all voters and poll workers, plus other social distancing measures will be in place. Rose is looking for a record number of balance to be cast close to six million. I'm Brian Coats, NewsRadio seven. This traffic.

Buckeye State Rob Carpenter Rose Frank Larosa Brian Coats Ohio
interview With Marine Gunnery Sgt. Justin LeHew

Jocko Podcast

07:10 min | 19 hrs ago

interview With Marine Gunnery Sgt. Justin LeHew

"This is Jaakko podcast number two, forty, two with Echo Charles and me Jaakko willink. Good Evening Echo, meet evening. The president of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross. To Gunnery Sergeant Justin de la Hugh. United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism. As Amphitheater Assault Platoon Sergeant Company a First Battalion Second Marines. Task Force. Tarawa. I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of operation. Iraqi Freedom. On Twenty three and twenty, four. March two, thousand, three. As regimental combat to attack north towards on Nasariyah Iraq lead elements of the battalion came under heavy enemy fire. When the beleaguered United States Army Five, hundred seventh maintenance company convoy was spotted in the distance. Gunnery Sergeant La Hugh and his crew were dispatched to rescue the soldiers. Under constant enemy fire. He led the rescue team to the soldiers. With total disregard for his own welfare he assisted the evacuation effort of four soldiers, two of whom were critically wounded. While still receiving enemy fire, he climbed back into his vehicle and immediately began suppressing enemy infantry. During, the subsequent. Company attack on the Eastern Bridge over the afraid he's river gunnery sergeant. Hugh continuously exposed himself to withering enemy fire during the three hour urban firefight. His courageous battlefield presence inspired Marines to fight a determined foe that allowed him to physician his platoon's heavy machine-guns to repel numerous waves of attackers. In the midst of the battle and amphibious assault vehicle was destroyed, killing or wounding all its occupants gunnery sergeant La- hugh immediately move to recover the nine Marines. He again exposed himself to a barrage of fire as he worked for nearly an hour recovering casualties from the wreckage. By his. Display of decisive leadership unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire. And utmost devotion to duty. Gunnery Sergeant La- Hugh reflected great credit upon himself. And upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps. And the United States. Naval Service. And That is. A. Citation. About. One episode. In one marine's life. And it doesn't explain everything in that marines life nor does it explain everything about the Marine Corps? But. It does give eight? Glimpse. into. What Marines do? and. What are American servicemen are capable of, but it's only a glimpse. And you know these these citations. Throughout the military when you when you go to different military bases, not been too many many military bases around the country around the world, these these citations of heroic wards. oftentimes, they're they're posted in various places around the based on on the walls in the classrooms on quarter decks. and. Throughout my career starting as a young. Young. Kid I would stop. And I would read through these. These citations and I would always wish to myself. I would always wish that I could meet these men. And I could talk to them. And I could learn from them and I could see what they were. What they were really like. And with that in mind. It is an absolute honor today to have that opportunity as. Sergeant major retired Justin La- hugh is. Joining us. To share the experiences that he had and the lessons that he learned. In his service in his life. Justin. Honor to have year. Thanks for coming out. It's honored to be here with you today Jaakko and you, etc.. I Um. Every every time I get to talk to somebody and just learn from their experiences and man I've had the opportunity in a we were talking a little bit about this. You know the the opportunity, some of the people that have come on this podcast just unbelievable to to capture their lessons from guys that were on Tarawa e Jima. And just incredible and it's an honor for me to sit here and and be able to. Capture some of these lessons for for people not just not just soldiers not just marines. But just people. So, that we can learn from. Let's. Let's start at the beginning. What started let's start at where you came from. So you were born in. Columbus Grove Ohio is that right Columbus, Ohio small little farm community, but two thousand people. Think it's been upper down of one hundred over the past one hundred years does up there. Kinda was like any Norman Rockwell painting that you would ever say and it was a great place to grow up when I was younger, it was a play she didn't lock your doors. It was a place where parents told you to be in by the time the street lights came on. I truly was like the fabric of America You grew up playing Little League Baseball Pony League Baseball You grew up knowing every kid in the two schools that were in town because it was kind of like a little Northern Ireland it was either Protestants and Catholics wasn't anything else. It was kind of those two choices and for grades one through eight there was the Catholic school that was on the other side of the railroad tracks, and then there was the public school and then you knew by sports and buy. Your neighbors you knew everybody and it didn't matter if it was K. through twelve, you knew the kindergarteners because you were school with their brothers and sisters. It was a really tight very hard working community

Sergeant La- Hugh United States Marine Corps First Battalion Second Marines Marine Corps United States Sergeant Company Assault I Marine Expeditionary Force America Echo Charles United States Army Five Jaakko Iraq President Trump Norman Rockwell Naval Service Tarawa E Jima Navy Cross Ohio Justin
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on ESPN Radio

ESPN Radio

01:26 min | 28 min ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on ESPN Radio

"Let's go to the shell. Pennzoil Performance Line. Bring in former Ohio State tight end Ben Hartzog, who joins us right there on the shell. Pennzoil performance. All right, Ben, let's get into it. Are you at all surprised? I don't think anybody shocked. They were used to put some respect. Let's go. Come on bar. Get him, right. Sorry. I thought you wanted the Ohio State portion and emphasize more in the Jets. Portion. What my thought here, Ben. I mean, two times, 222 times going to the NFC championship team. Right. Let's go. What? Dave's a Giants fan. So you know how that is. That's right. I stick with the Ohio State portion of the career, Ben so so let me ask you Are you surprised that they didn't just try to push it down the road in the fall and went all the way canceled in the fall? Maybe we'll see you in the spring as Faras. The Big 10 is concerned. Yeah, that's that's the big unknown with this. Ah, were I will where I understand The decision is If the Big 10 commissioner and the Big 10 member institutions have decided there's nothing that's going to change their mind, then rip the band aid off. There's no point To belabor it. Nobody likes the unknown. Anyhow, This has all been a march of unknown distance. So if they knew that they were done, then rip the band aid off. The perplexing thing is there's nobody understands. Why now? Why? What information because they had just released The schedule last week. It was we felt like we were a death row inmate that had that had just gotten our last meal in the schedule. And then all of a sudden we walk in and we get our and we and we face the execution chair. It's just so frustrating that they made the optimism of we're gonna have a season with all of the conferences announcing their their schedules last week, and then all of a sudden, two of the five power five conferences decided to cancel the season. And there doesn't seem to be any new information that spooks anybody, and and here's the thing that I think guys is the only way this is right. The only way that the power for the Big 10 in the Pac 12 are right with this. Is, if they know something we don't know. Well, there's some. There's some wrinkle to this virus, and they're there. There. There are whispers about my own card itis that that seems to be the new wrinkle that really pushed the The Big 10. Impact 12. Decision makers over the edge, which is a form of heart damage. That happens in lots of it's a very rare thing that happens, but it happens with other viral infection. So it's not a new wrinkle to the Corona virus that we didn't know existed. Myocarditis is something that has happened and that has made The burden of the standard that needs to be reached for the University presidents but forced them high enough to say We're not going to get there. We're going to go ahead and cancel this, but I'm just frustrated and I It's funny, Frustrated like I'm going through all of the stages of grief like I was in denial yesterday, and everybody was angry afterward. And Nebraska is still bargaining. They're they're saying, like the entire state of Nebraska. Mayans may enter the transfer portal. I don't know. And today I'm like super depressed. I'm just I'm bummed. I can't. I can't believe I'm waking up to this reality. So it's it's frustrating, but there's such a small percentage, a small chance. Of these of these worst case scenarios that it doesn't seem like the right decision to shut down Now. Why not at least give it a shot? Why not? Why not now at least continue to move forward and That's why you see the remaining three the A. C. C Big 12 in an SEC or moving forward, they're going to at least continue until they can't. That's the big confusion is what is the new data? Now there's keeping the Big 10 and the packed wall from doing this well, only have associates degree. So I let you continue to pronounce mild cordite is aware of it said it was, but, you know, I think there has to be the smoking gun, right. The fact that nobody wants to be liable. Nobody want to have to say Hey, No, it was my decision in the worst case scenario happens. Yes, It does happen in a small case of Ah players, But look at the sample size of college football. Look how many athletes we're talking about. So we're not talking about a small pool of people wear. Okay is 1% 1% to be one or two people. You know if they've already had 10 in the big 10 then you were saying, Hey, we put ourselves at risk for A lawsuit no matter how many waivers reacts, the parents or the players aside, and ultimately nobody wants to be the one who has to give that speech at the eulogy and say, Hey, they did that We all regret being here. I think they just want to push it forward and say, You know what? We'll just wait and at the end of the day, we'll figure out this the right thing to do. But we understand that. You know, they're they're They're giving up $100 million they I'm sure they don't take that decision lightly. But at the end of the day, I think the president's don't want to be liable have their name in the record books for maybe being a part of something that happened. We talked about athletes dying from heat stroke athletes down from Ah, multiple different reasons. You know, playing football every year..

Ben Hartzog Ohio Pennzoil Football Nebraska Faras Giants NFC Commissioner Dave Jets President Trump SEC A. C. C
Big Ten, Pac-12 pull plug on fall football amid pandemic

Pat Walsh

02:21 min | 1 d ago

Big Ten, Pac-12 pull plug on fall football amid pandemic

"Other sports news The Big 10 in the Pac 12 Have called off their fall football season's because of the concerns about you. Are you get it, Koven? Taking to college football's five power conferences out of a crumbling season by months after the first spikes in Corona virus cases in the U. S, led to the cancellation, the basketball tournament The pandemic and now is being I'm Terry down a sport that generates $1,000,000,000 for the schools and compete in it. This is despite the pleas of the players, despite the pleas from coach is the President Donald Trump in recent days to play on 40% of major college football teams have now decided to punt on a fall season. The Big Ten's announcement that it was postponing all fall sports and hoping to make them on the second. Making them in the second semester. Came today. This afternoon half hour later or Excuse me an hour later back 12. The Big 10 Rosabal partner called the News common to say that all sports and its conference would pause until January 1st, and that includes basketball. The A. C. C. The Big 12. The SEC are still moving forward with plans to conduct the season is College football's lack of centralized leadership has left everyone conference every conference to really decide for itself. But you have the Big 10 announcement coming six days after the conference. That includes historic programs such as Ohio State, Michigan, Nebraska Penn State and released a revised conference only football schedule that it hoped would help to navigate a ball season. With some potential interruptions. Your disruptions. The decision was monumental. Not a surprise, though apparently. So now. Much of the college football season is done. First Football Bowl subdivision comments to pull the plug on a fall season Mid American conference I was on Saturday Mountain West did the same on Monday. But those particular converses in another revenue, another reach the history. The Big 10 which seemed position to poor resource is into trying to protect its athletes from getting the virus.

Football Donald Trump Koven SEC Basketball Rosabal President Trump Partner Ohio State Nebraska Michigan
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 46 min ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Mark Levin

"The other biggest changes for moving day. Today's just how long this process is going to take. Staff has stretched out moving day to 12 days, as opposed to the normal 1 to 2 days that they're able to get this done and again, that is to increase that distance thing. So there isn't so much of a crowd. ABC Sixes, Sierra Lucas says everyone will have to wear a mask when they're on campus, both indoors and outside. A report from the Ohio Restaurant Association shows 54% of eateries say they could close within the next nine months, President and CEO of the Ohio Restaurant Association says that puts 310,000 employees at risk of losing their job in Ohio. Kroger has issued a recall for select cheese dip sold in the deli section. The products reportedly contained onions involved in a salmonella contamination recall, Kroger has removed the product from their store shelves. More information about that recall can be found on Kroger's website. Discount department store chain. Stein Mart says they plan to close most of their hundreds of stores around the nation after they filed For Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection this week. Their CEO blames the economic downturn caused by the Corona virus Pandemic, and Ohio's Secretary of state, Frank Larose, says this day does have a safe system of absentee balloting. You have to provide your driver's license or social Security number, and LaRose says one big advantage to voting by mail in Ohio is you have an opportunity to study the ballot even further. This news service of a Legacy Retirement group. A good.

Kroger Ohio Ohio Restaurant Association Frank Larose President And Ceo Abc Sixes Salmonella Stein Mart Sierra Lucas CEO
Big Ten, Pac-12 pull plug on fall football amid pandemic

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 d ago

Big Ten, Pac-12 pull plug on fall football amid pandemic

"Two big college football power conferences the pac twelve and the big ten won't be on the field this season the conference's represent schools like Oregon Ohio state Penn state and UCLA in the pac twelve university of Oregon president Michael Schill says because of the corona virus this was the right thing to do there's just too many questions there's too much uncertainty right now that we would feel comfortable I'll be getting contact sports president trump still wants to see college football players on the field to be able to fight it off and hopefully it won't bother them one bit most of them will never get it statistically the big ten had released a revised conference only football schedule in is now considering playing in the spring I'm at Donahue

Michael Schill Donahue Football Oregon Ohio Ucla University Of Oregon President Trump
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 47 min ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Mark Levin

"She knows personally. How immigrant families enrich our country. As well as the challenges of what it means to grow up. Black and Indian American in the United States of America. Her story's America story. Biden promising Senator Kamala Harris will inspire a new generation. The president's saying he's taking action to help unemployed workers and Democrats are doing nothing but Democrats say it's the president that's blocking economic aid. The president, claiming his executive order will give unemployed workers $400 a week on top of their local checks. Nancy and Chuck haven't provided anything that is not true. House Democrats passed a $600 a week extension through the End of the year. It is the president's team that said no and as state's toe add $100 of their own each week to the funds that have not been okayed for unemployment and he field ABC News Washington, Puerto Rico Supreme Court today, ruling that the votes cast during a botched primary over the weekend are valid and that a second round of voting will be held Sunday. It centers never opened or that didn't remain open long enough. And a Florida sheriff making headlines. Berrien County, Florida Sheriff Billy Woods has ordered his deputies not to wear masks or face coverings. In an email to the department, the sheriff says, for the amount of professionals that give reasons why we should wear them. He confined the same amount of professionals that say why we shouldn't, the sheriff said, with the exception of certain situations, which he didn't clarify, he does not want deputies wearing masks while on patrol or at the department. Tony Marino, ABC NEWS, Orlando, Florida You're listening to it. NewsRadio 6 10 W. TV Annam Alison Wyatt. The Big 10 conference postponed the fall season for seven sports this week, including football and today, head football coach Ryan Day, said looking his players in the eye and telling them the season was on hold was painful, but you don't just wake up the next morning. Everything's fine. Not when you invest in this much time and effort into it's not fine. It's devastating, and so it's gonna take some time to heal, but a squeaky put one foot from the other. We're gonna video going again. Ohio State athletic director Jean Smith said earlier this week. He was against postponing the season. He also said the university will not seek to play football as an independent this season as college football will still happen for the Big 12 conference schools. Ohiostate University students, meanwhile, have started moving into their dorms on campus center, seeing some major changes due to the virus..

President Trump Biden Florida Football Jean Smith America Sheriff Billy Woods Senator Kamala Harris Puerto Rico Supreme Court United States Tony Marino Ohio State ABC Head Football Coach Abc News Ohiostate University Ryan Day Alison Wyatt Newsradio Berrien County
Democrats roll out prime time convention speakers

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Democrats roll out prime time convention speakers

"London Democrats have unveiling a long list of party leaders and rising stars who will speak at this year's convention and kicks off next Monday. NPR's asthma colleague reports the names run across the ideological spectrum from Bill and Hillary Clinton to New York Congresswoman Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. Other speakers include Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, the Obama's the former governor of Ohio Republican John Kasich and the former acting U. S. Attorney General, Sally Yates. Democrats had also previously announced a plan to highlight everyday Americans by giving small business owners teachers factory workers in front line health workers, prime time speaking slots. Last week, Democrats officially announced that Biden would deliver his speech from his home state of Delaware instead of the host city of Milwaukee. President Trump has not yet settled on where he'll be delivering his speech for the Republican

Democrats President Trump Senator Bernie Sanders Ocasio Cortez Hillary Clinton John Kasich Sally Yates Asthma Biden Alexandria London Bill Vermont Milwaukee Delaware Barack Obama New York Ohio Attorney U. S.
Fresh "ohio" from KCBS 24 Hour News

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:28 min | 57 min ago

Fresh "ohio" from KCBS 24 Hour News

"24 hour fitness. Karl Snap says the pandemic has hit the fitness industry hard, prompting forced closures. 24 hour fitness is in bankruptcy reorganization, part of the state order. We got closed for a second time way, unfortunately, had to furlough over 90% of our staff, bring them back for a short couple of weeks and then furlough him again. It's tragic, but he says there are protocols in place to open gym safely, which include social distancing and masks and deep cleaning. After each class. He hopes the state will allow the reopening of Jim's as business is essential for the health of body and mind in San Jose Marti Schaefer, KCBS He s news time, 7 50 for money Watch before stocks rebounded from yesterday's losing session. The S and P briefly topped its all time closing high before drifting back. The DowJones industrial average gained 290. Yes and P added 47. The NASDAQ climb to 29. For lift. It was 1/4 to forget is the Corona virus pandemic sent revenue down 61% from a year ago, But the results were not as bad as expected, and the company is still expecting to be profitable by the end of next year. Cisco Systems gave a lackluster sales forecast for the current quarter as it reported quarterly earnings. The network equipment maker posted better than expected results for its latest quarter. Earning $2.6 billion. United Airlines is betting that northerners will want to escape the cold the sweater. Despite the pandemic, it's adding nonstop flights to Florida from seven cities, including Boston, Cleveland, Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis. Larry Kowski Bloomberg Radio. This summer. Get back in the driver's seat.

Karl Snap Hour Fitness Marti Schaefer Larry Kowski San Jose United Airlines JIM Indianapolis Ohio Boston Florida Columbus Cleveland
The Rise of V/One

No Code No Problem

04:47 min | 1 d ago

The Rise of V/One

"Be talking about a new player in the Space v one and the rise of e one, right So. They are a new. No Code. Mobile APP. And they boast as erode learning curve. So that's what they've been. You know hyping themselves up to be. But recent hype suggests that V. One is the next big player in the space with investments from notable individuals like Jason Calkins. They have been building momentum through twitter as they seem to be replicating Elliott's Hi Benji. this is not always a good thing as I used Elliott in it really was just hype. So the question is will be one fizzle out and carry the same disappointing launch the Elliott did. I don't believe so in here's my wife. So number one. The founder so Jeremy. Redmon. The founder and CEO v one is one of the most passionate people that I've ever met. Especially, when it comes to his company, so know he would fight tooth and nail for the success of you one and. Really, focused on giving a true experience Paul has users as he is no coder himself. And it is clear that he's passionate about customer service and the success of his users while that doesn't scale on one level I think it will set them apart especially at first and they'll be able to use that as a catalyst to shoot them until competition in the next six months and I. think that's where they differentiate themselves from all the other mowatt builders that are popping up. Number two is I have seen in used the product. So Jeremy sent me a demo of the product. After we first talked in capabilities and it boasts a short user experience an easy to use drag and drop block to build out your APP and part of the. Zero. Learning curve is you can build out it from scratch rate using buttons, texting all of that, or you can build using full screen modules. So not only do I think that it is unique to code space, but they are adding features by the week with the most recent feature actually being released recently in they dropped a thing on twitter about it and it's a canvas integration with images and buttons. So the in-app version of Cambe opens up giving you the ability to Zayn full screens or images or whatever you want at your APP and publish them into your APP with a single click. So that's pretty big considering. To my knowledge there there's nothing like this out there right now. So that's pretty pretty bad ass, and I'm excited to see how people use that. And then number three is too big to fail. With investors like, Jason Cal Kansas from launch and other prominent firms backing be one. It provides us with a sense of assurance and it's clear some of the most influential names in private equity support and believe in the future of this product. So I have to ask myself why should I and I'm not GonNa lie I had very similar thoughts with Elliott as the community rallied around them, even though the majority hadn't even seen or interacted with the product. And but I I would say given the other two pillars I believe the ones legacy will be much greater than theirs So you know while Elliott had also raised a significant amount of money and had a group of supporters like no other, they had a lot of negatives bogging them down with the way they publicly handle things and I think V. One I've I've already seen. They've they've handled things well. So I think V. One, will succeed based on the combination of the three pillars above and I'm really excited to watch them grow and launch with their upcoming Hackworth on August fifteenth which they said is there soft launch? For underrepresented founders and it's a five hundred dollar cash prize you get unlimited access for seventy two hours and then on. August twenty seventh I believe that's like their full launch and that'll be their public launch in their second act thon for anyone who wants to be involved, and that's another seventy two hours with another five hundred or cash prize. So they have some big things coming up, they have some partnerships with no code space and with underrepresented. Groups organizations in Ohio. So yeah I I think that they're that they're really on the right path and I'm excited to see how they end up in two to three months with their customer success that they're focused on customer success, and then also with you know the easy to use builder because they're targeting really no code people compared to you know. People that kind of have technical knowledge rights they're going for those that are too lazy to learn a learning curve.

Elliott Founder V. One Twitter Jeremy Founder And Ceo Paul Jason Cal Kansas Jason Calkins Ohio Benji.
PRO TALK with Rick Watson

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

05:33 min | 1 d ago

PRO TALK with Rick Watson

"Brick Watson is a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you so much for agreeing to do this all. Thank you for having me Pat and it's a pleasure to be on your show. we were talking before the show. The last time we ran into each other was with the home builders show in Las Vegas, and as you pointed out, the world has changed a lot since then. Things have changed as I said, just a little bit since then but you know what a great show you know. I love when you guys come in and talk to us about our new products and things like that. It's it's. It's an exciting show. I really love to do that show. I'm not in my white coat day. So sorry about that. We explain that you wear a lab coat when you're talking to folks at the builders show yes I do I am the Doctor Watch son if you will of paint. So are you able to to work from home or are you going into the office? What's going on with your work life? Well? I'm actually as you can see, I'm in my office I've been back in my office for two three weeks up to a month or so So we do have some people still in the doing their jobs from home quite effectively, and we have a a lot of number of folks still a coming actually down to the offices. Well. So where's your attended? Where's your office in downtown Cleveland Ohio? Can you tell me? What exactly it is you do for Sharon Williams and. If you've been there a long time and if you worked for other paint. Companies. Well my boss wonders what I do as well but no, that's that's just a joke. So. So when I, again, the Director Product Information Technical Services. So what we do in in my office is a number of things. One we help bring new products to life and you're aware of the new products that we introduced at the ibis So what we do is we help commercialise those products from data pages information from labels that you see on those cans to bringing that product to life in a number of our systems you we create, and we also maintain all of that information over our existing stores. product portfolio. So we also have under under my area. If you will. We also have what's called a product hotline and we have about ten agents that actually take a lot of calls from our stores and all of our field people when they have questions about product or say you would call in your store or something you would call in and need some help on. A. Specific Specification on how to paint this piece him aluminum or whatever it may be We have agents that will actually take care of that as well. How do you train those people? They must have to know a ton of stuff. Well yes. Yeah. Typically you know what we what we talk about is. When you're in the field, you kinda get It get trained really quick in the field. Put it that way you know you're dealing with contractors coming in a lot in there, asking all these questions. So it it's kind of like repetition. So if you've been out in the field ten plus years, you've seen a lot So all of our agents of. Roughly twenty I think it was around twenty two years of service with Sherwin Williams on average. So, we have some agents that are thirty five years and was Sherwin Williams I have thirty three years in with Sherwin. Williams. So you know what's a lot of knowledge that you gain over a period of time working on the phones or in the as well? Did you start in a paint store or as a painter or are you a chemist? What's what's your background? How does one become this person? Well actually. In order to get myself through college a friend of mine I started a paint company little paint company painting houses in the summer, and when we come home from from school and the brakes, we would go to houses and pain inside or outside whatever. And it just so happened one day. There was a career fair at Ball State University where I went school Sherwin Williams was there. You know I was a little bit cocky I said Hey I used your paint and a the manager there said why don't you come and interview I said Okay I will. So long story short I interviewed started as a management training person. And went to commercial store in Fort Wayne Indiana. And from there I worked as the operations manager for a few months and then became a sales rep and from sales rep. I did that greatest job in the company. I love being a sales rep going out talking with contractors you know getting my hands dirty getting closed you know closed dirty you name it a great job. But I wanted to change. So I went into managing a store. And then from a store, went to open up brand new store. And then realize you know i. you know that that's a lot of lifting you know my ankles and the knees hurt. So I said maybe I should use my head in my mouth and then came to Cleveland and worked in our product hotline for a number of years, and then just basically progressed up into the director of product information.

Sherwin Williams Cleveland Brick Watson Las Vegas Director Product Information T Fort Wayne Indiana Ohio Operations Manager Ball State University PAT Director
Democratic convention speakers announced as Biden VP decision looms

Tony and Dwight

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Democratic convention speakers announced as Biden VP decision looms

"We're preparing for political convention season, The Democrats have released their schedule of speakers for next week's event includes several high profile names. Several major players, including former presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton will speak at the mostly virtual Democratic National Convention, as well as a few surprises and newcomers also scheduled Republican former Ohio Governor John Kasich and Congresswoman Alexandra Cozzi O Cortez, plus former White House hopefuls Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar and Pete footage. Joe Biden accepts the party's presidential nomination on the convention's final day next Thursday.

Alexandra Cozzi O Cortez Barack Obama Joe Biden Bernie Sanders John Kasich Bill Clinton White House Elizabeth Warren Pete Footage Amy Klobuchar Ohio
Power Five conferences consider cancelling 2020 football season

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:16 min | 1 d ago

Power Five conferences consider cancelling 2020 football season

"There's been a big push from coaches and some players to convince the power five football conferences to play football this fall. The season is on the brink. The Big 10 and Pac 12 will hold meetings with their medical advisers and school presidents, and they were likely be a vote on whether or not to cancel the fall football season. The latest concern Heart issues as a result of the Corona virus that had been discovered in five big 10 athletes and several athletes around the country. Meanwhile, Ryan David head coach at Ohio State, says his players are all in. Regardless, here's the major talking point that they feel like And this is this is coming from them. They're safer here in our facility playing football, then they would be without it. I'm not the only one to say that our our big 10 coaches we get on the call. They've all said that they want to play football. And so we want to support our guy's the best we can and advocate for them to give him the best chance possible to play doesn't matter what the coaches and players want. The decision on whether they'll play will come from the school presidents period. If the medical advisers say it's not safe. And the schools will vote to shut it down. The Mac conference shut down all fall Sports Saturday and the Mountain West followed

Football PAC Ryan David Ohio
College football stars push for regular season as cancellations loom

Joel Riley

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

College football stars push for regular season as cancellations loom

"Debates heating up over whether college football should be delayed or cancelled this season due to the Corona virus boxes. Jonathan Syria reports A decision from the Big 10 Conference could come today. How are five conference commissioners met on Sunday the way the the risks risks of of playing playing during during a a pandemic. pandemic. No No decisions decisions there there yet, yet, But But analysts analysts say say it it does does not not look look good. good. Clemson's Clemson's Trevor Trevor Laurence Laurence and and other other stars stars of of college college football football tweeted. tweeted. We We all want to play football this season, they went on to list a series of proposals, including Universal safety protocols, the ability to opt out of play and the establishment of a college Players Association and reports say incoming Ohio State President Dr Cristina Johnson's in favor of postponing this season, not canceling it.

Trevor Trevor Laurence Laurenc Football Clemson College Players Association Jonathan Syria Dr Cristina Johnson Ohio President Trump
The Fate of College Football's 2020 Season

ESPN Daily

04:22 min | 1 d ago

The Fate of College Football's 2020 Season

"Ridden Berg thank you for taking a little bit of time after what is zoom is an incredibly chaotic day to chat with me. GREAT TO BE WITH IT'S A. Very historic and like you said wild and crazy time right now in college football, we figure out whether there'll be a season if there is who way. Adam Ridden Berg is scrambling to cover college football including the big ten. conference. For ESPN. Adam I want to start by rewinding a little bit actually from your perspective. What last week looked like because as a Friday, it kind of looked like we were GonNa have some college football. There was this path moving forward on that front and so if you had to make a chart. Of how things stood last week of who is in who is out who was on the fence for actually playing college football what would that chart have looked like? It's like an optimistic chart going back to two marsh but certainly even last week I still felt fairly optimistic about the possibility of a season. We had Yukon that announced on Wednesday that they weren't gonNA, play but they're independent. They're not connected to these television contracts like others are even these these group of five. Leagues. And then Thursday into Friday. He was hearing from sources around the sport that, Hey, this Mac meeting that was on Saturday in the mid American conference that was to be significant. That, there was a chance that at least one school was not going to play and others might be in the same boat and the whole league might decide at that point to postpone the fall season and football. It Yo it became clear that we were heading a lot closer to a you know a national postponement or at least a large groups of the College Football Leagues deciding not to play this fall. And so Adam you and I are talking at about six Oh five pm eastern time right now on a Monday so. What happened today and it will I guess what was the first thing that happened today on your feet? Well, again a lot we reported ESPN and others that the the big ten presidents were strongly leaning towards postponing that was on Sunday, and then you're the news that broke overnight was significant that this crash tag we WANNA play movement From Trevor Lawrence of Clemson and Justin fields of Ohio state. Some of the most prominent players in college football were getting real traction I mean this is your became the number one trending topic on twitter for a little while that was sort of the big story overnight and then today it's just monitoring. You know what's going on in the big ten. There's been reports that they've already canceled. That's not a at least as this recording that's not true. The Mountain West. Late, this afternoon did decide to postpone their seasons. So that's the second FBI's conference after the men American to decide not to play football and other sports this year. and You specifically cover the big ten that's your beat, and that's the conference. Everyone seems to be waiting to see what move comes next. So what exactly as we speak now is happening with the big ten this evening. Right. So it appears that the athletic directors are or speaking that's not a huge deal because they talking all the time now in the League but th, there's a sense of when they'll be a formal vote among presidents that hasn't taken place. I haven't heard from many sources that vote among presidents it's imminent but in theory I, it wouldn't take very long for that to take place if the League was ready to move forward with the postponement. So I think the discussions now are regarding timing whether some of the positions have changed around the conference. You've had a number of prominent coaches speak out about their desire to have. A season the big ten Pablo has always been a league. I I've covered it for a number of years that's been largely unified on the big topics and I can't remember a time where you've had a group of presidents that seem ready to postpone for the most part. But then you have many others loud voices in the league like the coaches like the players saying this isn't right. You can't do this. This is a wrong thing to do at this point and so that that's that's a unique spot for a conference has always prided itself on your equal revenue sharing and you're trying to be unified in its messaging.

Football Adam Ridden Berg Espn Yukon Twitter FBI Trevor Lawrence Pablo Ohio Justin Fields Clemson
Washington DC drops Delaware from list of 'high-risk' states

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Washington DC drops Delaware from list of 'high-risk' states

"The city's department of Health is revisiting are revising. That is its list of high risk Corona virus states with requirements for all out of state travelers coming into Washington, D C States added to the list this morning include Alaska, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Minnesota. D C is removing Delaware, Ohio and Washington State. Your Muriel Bowser, you'll remember recently issued an order requiring all people traveling into D C from high risk states for non essential reasons to self quarantine upon return for at least 14 days and all there are nearly 30 states now on the list. Maryland and Virginia are exempt. Updated list. You can be found CE I click away double duty lp dot com.

Muriel Bowser Washington State Washington Department Of Health Alaska Delaware Kentucky Maryland Indiana Illinois Minnesota Ohio Virginia
Power Five conferences consider cancelling 2020 football season

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:10 min | 2 d ago

Power Five conferences consider cancelling 2020 football season

"There's been a big push from coaches and some players to convince the power five football conferences to play football this fall. The season is on the brink. The Big 10 and Pac 12 will hold meetings with their medical advisers and school presidents, and they were likely be a vote on whether or not to cancel the fall football season, the latest concern heart issues as a result of the Corona virus. That have been discovered in five big 10 athletes and several athletes around the country. Meanwhile, Ryan Day the head coach at Ohio State, says his players are all in. Regardless, here's the major talking point that they feel like Oh, and this is this is coming from them. They're safer here in our facility playing football than they would be without it. I'm not the only one to say that our our big 10 coaches we get on the call. They've all said that they want to play football. And so we want to support our guy's the best we can and advocate for them to give him the best chance possible to play doesn't matter what the coaches and players want. The decision on whether they'll play will come from the school presidents period. If the medical advisers say it's not safe. And the schools will vote to shut it

Football Ryan Day PAC Ohio
Best place to be a teacher? Washington, DC area ranks No. 3.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

Best place to be a teacher? Washington, DC area ranks No. 3.

"Teaching is one of the most demanding careers not just professionally. But financially. Teaching in the D C region means you're likely doing a lot better than the rest of the U. S. A new survey from financial technology company Smart Asset has ranked the D C area. Third best for teachers, Everything from teacher's salary to student to teacher ratio toe homes with Internet access were measured. Those metrics are where our region scored. Highest teachers in the area earn on average about $81,000 a year, But we have to deal with some of the highest housing costs on ever. Ridge. The Baltimore area rates well on this list, coming in 12 the rest of the top five. Rochester and Syracuse, New York, Our first and second with Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and fourth and Dayton, Ohio, in fifth. Brandon Millman. W T O P

Brandon Millman Smart Asset Dayton Lancaster Baltimore Rochester Syracuse Pennsylvania New York Ohio
Washington DC drops Delaware from list of 'high-risk' states

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 d ago

Washington DC drops Delaware from list of 'high-risk' states

"DCs Department of Health, revising its list of high risk Cove in 19 states, with requirements for all out of state travelers coming into Washington states added to the list, including Alaska, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Minnesota. DCs removing Delaware, Ohio and Washington State Mayor Bowser Only issued an order requiring all people traveling into D. C from high risk states for non essential reasons to self quarantine for 14

Washington Department Of Health Bowser Alaska Kentucky Delaware Indiana Illinois Minnesota Ohio
Washington, DC revises coronavirus quarantine list

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Washington, DC revises coronavirus quarantine list

"Of Health is revising its list of high risk Corona virus states added to the list today. Alaska, Alaska, Illinois, Illinois, Indiana, Indiana, Kentucky Kentucky and and Minnesota. Minnesota. The The city city is is also also removing removing Delaware, Delaware, Ohio Ohio and and Washington Washington State State from from the the list list bear bear balls balls or or recently recently issued issued an an order order requiring requiring all people traveling into D. C from higher estates for non essential reasons to self quarantine For 14 days in all, there are a total of 29 states now on that list. Maryland, Virginia are Exempt. We have updated the entire list on w GOP dot com Here in the

Washington Washington State St Minnesota Alaska Kentucky Kentucky Indiana Illinois Delaware Ohio Ohio GOP Maryland Virginia
As COVID-19 upends fall sports, student-athletes face uncertain futures

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 2 d ago

As COVID-19 upends fall sports, student-athletes face uncertain futures

"See Cove in spreading at sporting events in Maryland High School sports in the state have been postponed for the fall and winter seasons until February 1st 2021. Students will still be able to practice in the first semester as long as they mate state and local safety guidelines. More details are expected before school starts. That delay can have an emotional impact on the student athletes who were looking forward to competing with routines upended James Hula sports psychologist who works with college athletes at the Ohio State University. Wexner Medical Center, recommends the three s is for students. First, he says, stay present and try to enjoy what you can right now. Second, he says, Shift your focus, possibly by finding other activities to fill your time catching your mind going to all these uncertainty and come backto. Well, what can I do right now? And that they're finding joy and other new avenues can bring a lot of solace during a time of uncertainty. Finally, he says, to seek connections and talk about your struggles with others.

Wexner Medical Center Ohio State University Maryland High School James Hula Cove
Trump $400 unemployment benefit gets mixed reviews

AP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 2 d ago

Trump $400 unemployment benefit gets mixed reviews

"President Trump's plan to extend an additional $400 a week and unemployment benefits is getting mixed reactions from the nation's governors. It requires states to provide 25% of the funds. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine is praising the president for trying to do something. But New York Governor Andrew Cuomo dismisses the move. It's laughable. Many states are already facing budget crunch is caused by the

Governor Andrew Cuomo President Trump Mike Dewine New York Ohio
Trump allows some unemployment pay, defers payroll tax

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

00:52 sec | 3 d ago

Trump allows some unemployment pay, defers payroll tax

"Two weeks of negotiating congressional Democrats in the White House could not reach any agreement to help those American families who are struggling just to put food on the table at. This point lawmakers have no plans for further talks president trump who did not attend those negotiations and spent a long weekend at his golf resort. In New Jersey said yesterday that he would bypass Congress to sign executive actions addressing pandemic relief including asking the federal government to consider halting evictions Deferring Student Loan Payments Reallocating money. So the governor's could partially replace the extra federal unemployment benefits that expired last month and temporarily suspending the payroll tax but already, there are lots of questions about how effective those actions will be and whether or not they're even legal last night one Republican senator criticized the president for Congress's role with quote unconstitutional slop.

Congress President Trump White House New Jersey Senator Executive
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> so if I had to choose <Speech_Male> one takeaway <Speech_Male> from reporting <Silence> this story <Speech_Male> he'd be that <Speech_Male> as consumers. <Speech_Male> We all <Speech_Male> need to be asking <Speech_Male> bigger questions <Silence> more often <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because this technology <Speech_Male> will be used <Speech_Male> in some pretty damaging <Speech_Male> ways <Silence> and we'll have to deal <Speech_Male> with that <Speech_Male> even Paul <Speech_Male> as optimistic <Speech_Male> as he is <Speech_Male> admits that <Speech_Male> there will be some pain <Speech_Male> points in the short <Speech_Male> term and <Speech_Male> yes we should be aware <Speech_Male> of all the waste <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> can be <Silence> used <Speech_Male> but for <Speech_Male> him. The question <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> should the fear <Speech_Male> of that. Negative <Speech_Male> potential <Speech_Male> outweigh <SpeakerChange> the hope <Speech_Male> of something. Better <Speech_Male> so yeah. It's <Speech_Male> the unknown of <Speech_Male> how it could <Speech_Male> be used. But <Speech_Male> you can let your mind <Speech_Male> wander. Just choose not <Speech_Male> to a lot of times because otherwise <Speech_Male> shift trouble. Sleeping <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> example. I always give to make people <Speech_Male> feel better because <Speech_Male> I usually. It's not it's <Speech_Male> not a good way to end. It <Speech_Male> is the Internet <Speech_Male> and in <Speech_Male> like Nineteen ninety-five <Speech_Male> again. The Internet was <Speech_Male> twenty three years <Speech_Male> old at that point but <Speech_Male> when it became <Speech_Male> widely <Speech_Male> used in the public <Speech_Male> with Internet explorer <Speech_Male> and Netscape <Speech_Male> and AOL. <Speech_Male> You could <Speech_Male> have looked out to the <Speech_Male> future and said man. <Speech_Male> This could go so wrong. <Speech_Male> And you <Speech_Male> know you could think about eventually <Speech_Male> social media <Speech_Male> and bullying and <Speech_Male> you know what it would <Speech_Male> do to people's <Speech_Male> psyche and <Speech_Male> the creation <Speech_Male> of the dark web <Speech_Male> or elicit <Speech_Male> things happen all the time <Speech_Male> and would you <Speech_Male> in nineteen ninety <Speech_Male> three ninety four ninety five. <Speech_Male> Would you stop <Speech_Male> the Internet? Would you say <Speech_Male> let's just not <Speech_Male> do it? It's it <Speech_Male> could go too many bad <Speech_Male> ways <Speech_Male> but then you look at all the <Speech_Male> amazing things <Speech_Male> it's done and how it's <Speech_Male> connected the world and <Speech_Male> Janesville communicate <Speech_Male> and brought people together <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> you think where <Speech_Male> some place you <Speech_Male> can sit here all day and <Speech_Male> theorize <Speech_Male> about this dopey and <Speech_Male> things and they <Speech_Male> may come true <Speech_Male> but I could give <Speech_Male> you ten <Speech_Music_Male> times as many amazing <Speech_Music_Male> things that it could do <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> the end of the day. We <Speech_Male> don't really have <Speech_Male> a choice. It's GONNA move <Speech_Male> forward one way or the other. <Speech_Male> My feeling <Speech_Male> is we'll <Speech_Male> try and do our small <Speech_Male> part to make sure it <Speech_Music_Male> moves forward <SpeakerChange> in a

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"The engineers who develop that they implement values into the system and the system starts working based on these values and almost always they are not reflected. There are not thought about in ethical terms. They are thought about another term. Such as you know profitability or you know finding something that we want to find and So we have this problem that we're creating a level of intelligence that's fairly independent and very sophisticated but it is not Ethically trained so to speak and I suppose to at least many. I wouldn't say all you who are ethically trained or ethically in tune but as a human you have at least a potential to be ethically aware and to ask yourself questions about your the ethicality off your decision making and things like that so in this quest design machines that are more human. Will we ever break through this barrier or are these systems destined to simply reflect back the ethics or the intent of those who built them? And if so. Where does that leave the rest of us? Where does that leave? Government's ability to regulate creed is leave private companies responsibility to protect consumers and the rest of society. But these are big questions then. No one can fully answer yet. They're certainly trying. There's a lot of research being done in these areas but Dr deb eighteen and I spoke for nearly an hour and a half and it still felt like we only scratched the surface but again perhaps the answer lies more in the question itself than any specific conclusion with that in mind. We're going to do something a little bit different for us. We're going to publish my conversation Dr deb team in its entirety. We're doing that really for two reasons. One we went way beyond just a high covering a lot of these same issues have come up with technology of all kinds and throughout history and too. I feel that a discussion of ethics shouldn't be trimmed down to just a series of soundbites. No matter how thoughtful you are about it so checkout part to this episode if you WanNa hear that full unedited conversation.

Dr deb
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

11:57 min | 6 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Tried to emulate human intelligence. So they can only do what humans can teach it to do so. Everything else has been programmed every piece of software. We've ever uses been told what to do by humans. These are machines that don't sleep that can learn from data levels we can't comprehend and they can learn to do things that humans can solve problems. Humans can't so it's different because we've never created anything like it before and you know the quote I always go back to his Sundar. Pichai from Google says. It's the most profound thing humanities ever worked on it's more important than electricity or fire because it can change everything so when you look at these major problems we have to solve climate change in poverty and hunger and cancer and like really difficult things that the human race has been working for decades to figure out and we can't say I in theory can there's no limit to what it can eventually solve. So we've just we've never created anything like it and then when we're done creating it as when it just really gets started because it can improve learn on its own and that's the stuff you see in the movies this idea of general intelligence which we're not there yet and that's a lot of people think that's what it is and they're just frayed of it because it's not a right now is still program to do. Very specific things and learnt from Dayton keeps getting better at those things. It doesn't think of other things to solve. It's not consciously US doesn't use imagination and creativity but it will probably in our lifetimes and when that happens then everything changes. And here's what Else Sets Paul. Apart and this is big. He recognizes the enormous opportunity. Ai Presents and seizing it but he also recognizes the danger of the technology. He asked big questions ethical questions human questions and he wants people to confront these big questions before they just jump in blindly because they I can go very wrong. If it's if people don't approach it the right way it'll give people superpowers which is what we said on stage and they have to be. You have to start from the ground up thinking about the ethics and the morals of how you use it so when I go give talks oftentimes and even when we spoke to the students here though you the questions rarely focus on marketing. After I give a marketing I talk. They always go to what is going to do to society. What's the government doing about it? What do you think about? This is ethical to use facial recognition and profiling people. They just they start connecting the dots and understanding the bigger impact and the more time. I've spent an AI. The more you realize how much of an impact it will have on society and humanity and so our small piece of this world is marketing but marketing touches every consumer and so to me. It's just critical that as we talk about how to do marketing smarter and make it more effective. We don't do it on ethical ways. Because you're gonNA have the ability to do it and I know from having talked to big brands. They struggle with trying to understand where the line is. What is ethical? And what's not and so I just feel like nobody was probably coming to the conference thinking. Oh I hope we have a topic on ethics but I was not going to let people leave without listening to a topic on ethics and will do that again. This year. Like it's GonNa be a staple in we're GONNA start cutting a lot more content around it because I just I feel like otherwise you could look at. What we're doing is just teaching people to better predict and influence consumers and that's not at all what we're in it for so. I I think is a chance to kind of raise. The Bar of what marketing is and the standards that uphold. It can go the opposite way real fast. And that's really it the speed and scale inherent in a high tech. That's what makes it dangerous. Here's Karen Jim. Software is much easier to deploy as technology than other things and a in particular once you find powders. In some kind of data you can then like us. Those patterns to make thousands of decisions at a very rapid rate and it can affect many many many people. And it's it's it's a little different from like actual physical objects that you might have to manufacture for example like you can just deploy it over the Internet like this decisions that facebook makes for example when they are using machine learning those decisions get deployed to like over a billion people. I actually probably more. I don't know how many users they have but whatever like billions billions of people or Youtube another example of unintended consequence of Youtube recommendation. Algorithm is that it's it's become like a pretty intense tool for radicalization. Because if you end up falling into a youtube our the whole you keep going and going and going and you end up getting radicalized. There's there have been studies that show that tears organizations for example. Actually use this to their advantage where they will try to make their content seem related to like very benign content. And then you could just accidentally trip into this like whole that radicalizing you a what. I think is so unsettling about Karen's youtube example in particular is the fact that the danger how it went wrong it was completely unintentional like this kind of outcome is bad enough. And it's not even someone using this technology to purposefully do bad things and before we get too far it's fair to point out. Just how complex so out of these algorithms are what Youtube and facebook and all the other social media platforms are trying to do just in terms of the technical challenge. It is not easy so some respect is owed just because of what they're attempting to do but going back to Paul and Cairns point the speed and scale of the negative consequences are what make this also problematic failure and reiteration are fundamental to technology development. But what happens when the failures can be felt immediately by billions of people and moreover how do you control the bad actors people? Who are out there using this technology with some malcontent. In today's era of fake news. One particular example of this kept coming up in almost every conversation. I had deep fakes right. Fake content fake videos. Lots of things that appear to be real. That aren't deep fakes. Are I would predict as an almost certainty whether next year or four years from now or five years now. This election or the next on the fakes will be an enormous issue. That was Nikos and Paul again and then that last voice was of Mike Kaput who has worked on Paul's. Pr Twenty Two thousand eighteen for about seven years and is now the director of the Marketing Institute and just to quickly explain. What deep fakes are? In case you're familiar. They're basically fake videos generated by a I powered software that makes them indistinguishable from authentic footage as Nikos explains this is made possible by a particular type of AI called GAAP NS or generative adversarial networks. So you can watch a video. It could be Donald Trump doing something controversial wrapping beat boxing. And you in time less than five years. You won't be able to tell the difference of whether or not that video was real super scary when that stuff starts going onto the web so you're GONNA have to regulate that so what can be done. And WHO's responsible for protecting the rest of us from these? Harmful applications of the technology for my responsibility needs to be shared by everyone this stuff impacts whether you're interested in the technology or not. That's okay like not everyone geeks out about this stuff. But it's going to have an impact whether you're technical or not the Internet certainly has a huge impact on you and this stuff will too so I think we're all going to have to get a lot smarter and a lot more curious about. Okay how do we move forward responsibly? In a world where. It's a lot harder to kind of tell okay what's actually true. What's not what is human generated. What's machine generated and things like that to me? This gets to the heart of the debate. The Big Questions Mike and Paul and the whole pr. Twenty twenty staff and lost. The People I met at the conference are asking. Those questions are really more important than anything else hearing those questions. That's what impressed me most about Paul. And how he framed the whole topic of Ai for the hundreds of marketing professionals in attendance and in a lot of ways Mike asking how do we move forward? Responsibly is the answer to his question. Keeping the conversation centered on what is right and what is wrong and keeping that conversation going. Through new unique circumstances that's ethics so since expiration of this new tech of A. I really ended up as an ethics discussion. I wanted to bring in another expert from right here at Ohio University. My name is bound heart debuted teen I'm a professor of journalism. I'm also the director of the Institute for Applied and professional ethics. I asked Professor Deborah Team to start by breaking down when he sees as the ethical issues at stake with Ai to me. The core is probably transparency in a very general sense because we don't know what the Algorithms and Im- implemented values are that are at the bottom of what an artificial intelligence does so there's a high level of transparency which we have already with computer technology or any type of complex technology so with artificial intelligence. We have a situation where we as users probably have absolutely no idea why the system is doing what it is doing how the system is doing what it is doing and so on and so forth so it becomes very opaque and at the same time whenever you have Complex processes and decision making which artificial intelligence ultimately does you have values and ethical decision at stake. And so what happens in effect? Is that we delegate decision making to assist them. That is pretty opaque where we don't know which values which set off Potential preferences are used for decision making and that may or may not be problematic. We don't know and that many fields of application you know anything from medicine where you have a lot of those systems already in place To let's say you know resource exploration there are like oil exploration or things like that. This is where the first expert systems which is early. Artificial Intelligence were developed. And they're they're really good but We have to keep in mind. Each time we do that. We implement.

Paul Youtube Mike Kaput Ai facebook Karen Jim director Dayton Google US Sundar Nikos cancer Twenty twenty Donald Trump boxing Professor Deborah Team
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:13 min | 9 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Been bouncing ideas off of each other and trying to figure out you know what might be helpful. She was working on some resource manuals or resource pamphlets for their women Asked me for some information for those but I would say it's more of like consulting back and forth versus me planning alongside them because they know what their members need or want. It's what's going to work for the community in a way that I don't because I am old and outdated so I would say it's more of like giving them information that they're asking for and letting them lead the charge because you know that's what students are good at you. You all knew what is going to connect well with other students in a way that administrators might not on But I'm really excited about the work that they've done and that they're going to continue doing in this realm because three important to you know as leaders on campus is to show that support visible way especially to Coming from someone in a position. You know you're very educated on the issue you I've done a ton of advocacy work things like that. What advice would you give to students either? WPA students more involved in the issue or maybe students outside the issue. WHO JUST I want to make a change in their own individual way? So don't underestimate the power in your voice your opinions because we're all here for Students Blake even though sometimes you might feel like people just clock in and do their job and go home like we wouldn't have a job if it weren't for the students and so ultimately timidly like you are consumers so if you have opinions about how you want to see your university handle things or what programs should be available or even if you just. I have an opinion but you have a question. You're curious about why things are happening the way that they are like. Ask those questions. Ask Hard questions and try to understand why things are being done that way and if you you do understand and you just don't like it let us know that because we need to all work together to solve this issue and especially with like preventing sexual assault. I think a lot of time students think it's all on us as administrators to fix this but like we're not the ones out there. They're doing these things and until we start holding each other accountable as a group not just administrators and not just students. These problems are. We're going to persist so we have to call problematic behaviors when we see them. We have to let her friends know that. It's not okay to you. Know engage in sexist behaviors or remarks or create unsafe environments and create a culture. Where it's just it's it's way more accepted to be a better bystander to be a positive influence instead of this kind perpetuating rape culture that we see not just at Ohio University but throughout our country by the time I met with him? It was mid October about that. Same time an issue other than sexual assault was rippling through the Greek community on campus. All fraternities three sororities and several other organizations Sion's were suspended due to hazing allegations but when I heard the news I couldn't help but think of ran knowing all she wanted to accomplish this semester in regards is to sexual assault prevention to have a major issue like this come up unexpectedly. Seemed like it could derail all her plans. The WPA S- first response was to meet with the organizations that were still stated so that they could converse about the culture surrounding sorority and fraternity life. What was working? What wasn't just like she did during its on US ran engaged in difficult conversations this time about hazing and its consequences with the hope of coming to a deeper understanding of this issue? How people are affected and how to stop it from happening any time that you're just doing something because that's always the way it's been done? That's how you fall into the trap appeasing behavior because well. That's what my big did to me. So that's what I'll do my little repetitive. And this gives everybody an opportunity in in our whole community and campus to talk about. Why do we do the things that we do? And what is the result that we want to see. You know because if if you want to see stronger sisterhood. There's so many ways to accomplish that without having to hurt someone the organizations yes. They can't do any social activities. These which can seem trivial but they also can't do any philanthropy activities or raise awareness spell any of their service organizations or things like that and that's a serious this thing because that's something that raises money helps out people not something that makes a difference in Athens community and in the world so it stinks folks that this is happening but at the same time. It's a good opportunity to make sure that we're healthy and strong and existing for the right reasons sins and not just existing to hurt each other despite the obvious pressure ran and her team on. WPA were under in light of the allegations. I saw no signs of her activism activism and passion wavering the social media campaign was still in full. Swing the HASHTAG. WPA believe survivors had dozens of comments re tweets and replies echoing messages of the movement. The final time we met ran filled me in on the work. She was doing with the governing body of the nine historically glee black sororities and fraternities on campus in addition to her conversations with Kim. Caster these ideas that were in part inspired by it's on us But grew as rans activism grew slowly steadily and naturally ran herself had grown and I saw in the confident way. She expressed herself with each difficult question or topic. We tackled whether it be sexual assault hazing or personal experiences. The Passion in her is it's never dimmed to sum it up. How have I grown? And what have I learned all of those things from it's on us. It's that like the driven driven toward a goal. The be willing to accept that there are things you can't control in there things that you don't know and there are things right now that I'm talking about that I don't not that I don't know and by the time April comes around the project that WPA and could be working on could look totally different because so many other factors have come in right right. But I think the biggest way that I've changed since August that I've grown since August. Is that no matter. What sort of things you might come our way between now and April still no? I'm going to get April. I hope I don't go into situations leading with white privilege by by. I have to admit that I was when it came to sexual activism I was leading with my privilege I was leading with a privileged lens on the situation. Ration- and stripping that back and taking off and looking at everything else you know and admitting that there's areas for growth and I think that that's the same thing that we're doing right now as a community with the hazing situation we're taking off our lens of everything being perfect and rosy right right and we're trying trying to determine where can we grow and that involves tough conversations so whether you're talking about how we treat each other as brothers or you're talking about how now I'm only a good activist if the victim or survivor looks like me. Any sort of tough conversation. I think that this is the year for those in this worry. Am Fraternity Life Office. And so we're just trying to have a lot of them right now. I'm like Oh God. I hope this comes together but with the videos with the better by center the things like that. That is something that I'm just so pumped about because that was an idea that way back in August and then after everything happened that happened that what has happened within the past three months four months. It's a little bit like Oh God I don't know if I'm actually able to get this done. And so the fact that now it's back back on track is like okay. Yes like it's possible to balance everything at once. It's.

assault US Fraternity Life Office Ohio University Athens Sion rape Kim
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:27 min | 9 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"I would love to see something like that where you know that. Someone's going to be there and it's GonNa be long then we stopped at Alpha Delta Pi. Whose Banner said ask her what she's asking for for Hashtag? Ad Pie believe survivors. We chatted with Elliott junior studying psychology. Can you describe in your own words what you think I think the culture around sexual assault awareness is on this campus I would say for the most part like especially through. WPA people are so supportive. And we're doing a really good job to spread the news. Get Word Out Oh you especially is doing a lot of new stuff to help Like the APP. They came out with with the safety. Stuff I think is super super helpful I really want more people to like actually download that encourage more conversation around it But I definitely definitely I think the first couple months of school are rough because so many new people are here so many people are in a new environment and don't know what to do don't know who they can trust us So it's tricky but I definitely feel like oh you has a really good community as a whole and lots of people can rely on absolutely. Can you speak now from your perspective as a sorority woman. What kind of steps you in your chapter and can take you know to make this a more friendly environment for survivors? I I definitely think something really important is just making sure you're talking about it. You're talking about what to do if you're in situations where you feel unsafe. You're you're talking about people you can rely on before we wrapped up. We made a stop at Ryan Sorority Alpha O.. macron pie where I was given a full tour and invited to sit down with the chapter chapter president in two other women so as already women how what steps do you guys think you can take a little things. Big things like banners this year. What do you think you can do due to continue facilitating this culture of believing survivors and making women We need to make sure that women who have been affected for anyone who's been affected by sexual assault on campus feels like they are heard welcomes via community because feeling ostracized shot or ashamed. That sort of thing you know is a productive. We want people to be able to grow from their experiences and search move-on Yvonne rebuild their lives. I think within our community Iraq's it's still making sure that we watch out for other women in waters on and it's not only that are watching out or women anywhere if you're like out and see woman who's intoxicated like of making sure that every woman who's Greek associated affiliated knows that it's our responsibility to watch out not just far sisters but for any woman on this campus for anyone you encounter and I think too it's important you don't just hang banners that we shall offer things the big community here at Ohio University and if we can mobilise when it comes to those like it's on us events or take back the night things that are big statements. I'm going to go a long way. That was Katie Bolinger president of Ao Pie at Ohio University. What Katie said not moment about mobilizing in taking care of one another sparked something within Ryan that I hadn't yet seen in the time I'd spent with her? She shared a story about an uncomfortable situation. She had been in that though it was somewhat quickly. Resolved left an impact on her. I didn't join a Until my software here but my freshman year spring semester. I got drunk at a party. I spilled my drink on the stewed and He and a bunch of his friends came came up to me. And we're just aggressive just like trying to see how the Party and I started crying because that was the drunk and just like freaking out on this woman came up to me. She like intervene Rabin in the situation. Basically like tongue these guys to fuck off you know basically it was just like okay lever alone. That's fine. She turned me and she said look like where do you live. I told her dorm. I was goes okay. Let's get I'm going to take back to my house and get you cleaned up and you'll go crowd and she brought me back here and like sat apnea one of these tables and got me water and food in tissues and all these women that I'd never met like kind of descended down on beat Em. We're like you'll be okay. You'll be okay. Who's going to walk her home? WHO's GonNa do this? Who's going to do that? And then a year later I went through formal recruitment and I ended up in this chapter and that woman who intervened ended up being my chief big And like is you harmon is like my hero. She is literally like a shining shining angel but so when TV talks about how like we don't only need to look out for sisters. We need to look out for everyone like that was that living embodiment of that. Like they didn't know me. I did not event and when she said I'm going to take you back to my house. I thought it was the end up like some Random House on Congress to get into like further for my destination the no she walked me here. After after hearing ran story it shed light for me on where her passion for her sorority came. From in the situation she described she was clearly nervous and wanted to weigh Out which came from an unexpected place a complete stranger who happened to be a sorority woman. One of the most prominent qualities I see in ran is her courage judge and outspoken nature her willingness to step outside of her own world and consider other safety and happiness. Sometimes that was demonstrated in clear public way day like through her sexual assault activism but it also became clear to me when she brought me coffee only the second time we met when she regularly texted me to check check in and just talk about life when she invited me to her birthday party. It was so clear to me that she was genuinely considerate. Thoughtful person who I saul was inspired by the women's she surrounded herself with in her sorority. And that also translated directly to activism in the way she cared enough to constantly educate it herself in areas where she wanted to make change in all the discussions. I had with students. Since it's on US I grew curious about the other people on college campuses working toward into safer more accepting culture. I wanted to hear about their work and their perception of the issue. My name is Kip Castro Director of survivor advocacy program here to University Eighty the survivor advocacy program or sap is a campus resource that provides a supportive environment for survivors to talk confidentially with trained advocates giving Kim's experience with the issue of campus assaults. She had a new perspective to offer me on the topic of the Red Zone that provoked the idea for banners last fall. I think a a lot of universities are free to talk about it because if you talk about it you're going to get reports you're GonNa hear stories you're GonNa hear about situations that are happening. which can lead to media media frenzies where it looks like? You have this huge problem on your campus that no other campuses experiencing and we've kind of seen that out of Harvard University where we're getting national media attention because of the number of reports which if you don't realize that that's actually a good thing that people are finding the resources to report whether that's confidential reporting reporting or reporting to police or to title nine like if students survivors or finding the places that they feel comfortable in reporting to. That's a good thing. Even though it means that our numbers are going to look a lot higher than other institutions. So since I've been here I've really seen a recognition of that in an appreciation. Shen of kind of this work. Even though it means that people could question this culture Because we know that that we he wants to be a university that's not brushing under the rug or not pretending we have zero reports on. Because that's really unsafe to do it that way. Kim is a two-time Ohio University Alumna who acquainted with student life on campus though her office work separately from student organizations. She's always eager to help young activists however she can are are you involved at all with WPA Greek life sign of things. Yeah so I have been in contact with Rianne of WPA president A little bit here and there She's really interested in kind of finding ways the WPA can get involved in this work so we've.

assault Ohio University Kim Katie Bolinger Alpha Delta Pi Ryan Sorority Alpha O.. Elliott Iraq Yvonne Harvard University Ao Pie Rabin Shen Rianne Ryan Congress University Eighty Kip Castro
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:34 min | 9 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"During the second week of classes. We met at Front Room Coffeehouse to talk more deeply about Ryan's activism activism to do so we started at the beginning Going into the conference. What did you hope to get? I know you have some concrete goals. So maybe talk about that also but you know initially just preparing for the weekend and everything to gain from that. Yeah right off the Bat Are I think that confronting the issue of sexual assault in the place. Where I was sexually assaulted was something that I wanted to do? And you know I'm definitely definitely ahead on person so you know It was something that I guess. I just felt that I we needed to do like I needed to look at in the face and I wanted to learn more. I knew my own experience which is you know specific and not pretty but I need to hear other people's experiences to and beyond that what is the experience for or a person of color? What does the experience for someone who's on the LGBTQ range? What is somebody else's experience? Who isn't me assists white presenting woman? You know And I dealt with sexual assault and one way and I got justice and so what does it look like for people who don't get justice and you know. Obviously you hear about those stories. As I'm not naive I know about them but I wanted. I guess to have that experience where I'm really being faced with with the reality is I had had a similar experience confronting my own ignorance. It's on us in. Although I was doing in a space I'd spent almost four years at Athens. I felt somewhat similar to how I did. My first month's on campus as a freshman one hundred and eighty miles from the comfort of home in high school friends it was shocking to be suddenly presented with so many options for where to take my education. Listen what to do with my free time and how to interact with and even befriend people with totally different experiences from my own at. It's on us. I think both Ryan and I revisited feelings of our first years of college and since that first year we had both grown into ourselves and the college environment finding a sense of confidence and well being in the aftermath of it's on US Ron wanted to channel a similar type of response within herself by using her new perspective on sexual assault to start a new campaign for WPA the name for the campaign is WPA believes survivors and so it has like three tiers. The first tier is social media. So on social media media will be doing Hashtag. WPA believe survivors and sharing graphics and information and connecting them. We hope to be able to tweet out things in support of the women's center here in sap and things like that so if you search that Hashtag at any point so let's say you're a freshman men and you're on twitter and you see to be supports. WPA believes survivors. Okay whatever keep scrolling and then in December you are a freshman who just experience sexual assault. Now you can think back in search that Hashtag and all that content is still there. The resources are still there. The information is still there. The phone numbers. Jason hotlines are still there and so that's the goal of the Hashtag is to actually use it for what Hash tags are meant to do. And aggregate information right and so to keep all of our information in one place where we talk about helping survivors. The second tier is banners. We're going to have all this wordy remake the banners that they did last year and they will be up the first week of school and again the purpose for the timing on all of this is because of it falling right in the red zone and so we're calling this preventative activism. We WanNA on a show that before you even go to your First College Party. We already believe you. We already support. You were already there to help you the two other facets of the WPA UPA believe survivors campaign are tabling events to distribute handouts with information related to preventing assault and collaborative efforts with black sororities and fraternities on campus best to push toward a more inclusive environment and if we only care about WPA we're excluding all the other parts of your identity and all these other parts of our community and that's not how you get things done you get things done when the whole community can come together. The banners ran mentioned are reprise of the banners that sororities and fraternities on campus hung around around the same time last year in two thousand eighteen. The university in Area Police received a number of sexual assault reports during what is called the red zone which refers here's to the time period between the first week of classes until Thanksgiving break when sexual assault and violence occurs. Statistically more frequently the banners were response to those reports and included supportive messages about believing survivors and the importance of consent. I appreciated the public acknowledgment. These organizations displayed but at the time. I didn't think much about it. I think that to understand the importance of that. You have to understand that the only time forty women hang banners normally in celebration of something so we hang a banner going into spirit week which is next week. We hang a banner during homecoming and Greek Week. We hang banners when we're are doing. Are you know. Philanthropy events sometimes fraternities to raise awareness about their philanthropy events. We'll do a banner contest so all all the sorties will make a banner and then the best one gets a certain amount of points or whatever so I think that is a big key. Part of this is that normally when you see a banner outside of a Sorority House it saying something let's like you know and like bright colors and something to be excited about right and so to walk across campus and to see all of these black and white and red banners that say things like no means no not asking for it. Consent is mandatory things like that. That's going to grab people's attention and the thought of it on their own and it was a domino effect. You know one SORDI thirty put one up and then the house beside it said okay. We can do that too. We can do that too. And it's spreads and then it spread to the fraternities and the fraternity started hanging signs. That said you know similar similar messages and I think like that was impactful because one it was truly like inorganic thing. It came came up from just women's saying enough is enough and then men supporting us and saying you're right enough is enough and like let us support you. In that that domino effect culminated mandated in a large student led rally on College Green. Last fall called. It's on us. Bob Cats it garnered national attention and played a part in the national. It's on US organizations nations decision to host the summit here and just as Ryan had described a few weeks into the semester. Another slate of banners went up outside Greek houses. I wanted to know more about the women behind these banners who people I knew little about so ran and I walked from house to house to see what banners were up and what these students had to say okay so this search story fraternity row. Just it depends on here asking okay. I think he's like remember Chat Salad. So there's this Alpha Delta Hi this is Julie can you guys introduce yourselves and your year. I mean they can't see you they can only hear you better. My name is Khloe. Oh yeah I I am a sophomore hero you. I'm studying retail merchandising and fashion product development. I'm Isabel York. I'm a junior Ohio. I'm studying marketing and management. I'm Erica. I'm a junior here. Oh you and I am studying marketing. And how would you guys describe the culture around sexual assault awareness on campus I think since last year everyone's just been a little more cautious but I think we all know how to be smart and aware of our surroundings and I know if I'm ever in a situation nation where I am alone. I can feel concrete hauling any of these girls to just have him on the phone with me. Who and what do you hope to see out of this this movement? Maybe the university has to Shin this year regarding sexual assault awareness. I what kind of improvements would you guys like to see. I'd like to see more options of places where you're walking eighteen on campus and you can see those blue lights have the emergency poll on and have a phone that you can pick up like our someone that you've been helping them please. Coming within I know some campuses have like a minute and.

assault WPA Ryan Front Room Coffeehouse US Athens First College Party twitter Ohio Sorority House College Green sap Jason Bob Cats Khloe Isabel York
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:54 min | 9 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"There is no singular way to define activism for some activism means taking to the streets to march in protest or gathering signatures for petitions. Maybe these are time sensitive. 'cause like a political election for others it defines their day to day experience and identity. It's an ongoing fight. Against perceived injustice for rain ends worth activism is part of the fabric of her education activism means challenging herself to confront her ignorance even on issues she studied experienced invoiced. It's a continuous cycle of learning and growing and using her growth to find find new opportunities to make change and this continuous cycle starts with honest an often uncomfortable conversations Part of the reason that I wanted to get into sexual sexual assault activism it's because and especially sexual assault activism in sorting fraternity life is because you have to have those kinds kinds of tough conversations to move forward and you have to identify problems in your community before you can find solutions and if we don't talk about the problems if we don't address them if we pretend like they're not bear whether you're talking about hazing or sexual assault or substance abuse if you don't identify and acknowledge edge that they're happening then they'll never stop happening. I met ran over the summer in Athens. And we formed a perhaps unlikely connection that developed during the first few months of school Ryan is in a sorority something. I never once considered as a college student. It wasn't that I had a completely negative view of Greek life. Because truthfully I didn't didn't know much about it. I just sort of mentally separated myself from girls who were in sororities. Because I determined we wouldn't have much in common and that they had enough friends anyway so when I first met ran I was pleasantly surprised at how easily we conversed we are both seniors which sparked the immediate discussion about out anxieties of Post Grad life. But we were also able to talk about deep an uncomfortable topics. The reason I followed Ryan's Dernie in the first place was to who understand her role as a student activists confronting sexual assault on campus. So much of our discussions centered on her personal connection to the issue and how she hoped to make a difference for ran her activism is intertwined with her sorority and her role is vice president of public relations for the Women's Panhellenic Association which is the Governing Body for ten member sororities on campus that oversees over eighteen hundred members. The two of US met at an event that drew hundreds of students from from across the nation to Ohio University. This August. This was the first ever. It's on US National Student Leadership Summit a weekend conference that gathered fellow. Hello student activists together to discuss the issue of sexual assault. Students attended workshops and Ellis Hall listened to keynote speakers and Baker Center and bounced the ideas off each other on how to create a campus culture where abusive behavior is not tolerated. I just WanNa take a minute and ask everybody to look around the room. It's really really incredible. How many people have come from far and wide from Miami New York California to be here this weekend that was tracy ventures the executive director of? It's on us. Which is the National Nonprofit Organization that organized the summit and chose to hold it at Ohio University? It's on S. was founded in two thousand fourteen as an initiative by the Obama Administration meant to educate and engage college students on the widespread issue of sexual assault on Campuses Ryan and I were to about a dozen of how university students present the rest of the more than one hundred. Ten Dis came from all over the country and brought with with them their own experiences as advocates survivors and staunch supporters of the cause high I Made Sheridan. I went to the University of Minnesota. Twin twincities hi. My name is Ben Kayla. I attended spelman college located in Atlanta Georgia. Which is an ATC you? My name is Adriana Brandon. I'm about to be a senior at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. It's located over near Pittsburgh. Everyone my name is David Sanchez Pronouns. He him his. I'm from the University of Utah and I'm the campus organizer there. Hello my name is Celeste. Arrowhead I am at the University of Maryland College Park. Those five students are all leaders on their campus affiliated with. It's on US during the conference. They had a panel discussion. Were the fielded questions from audience members about how to raise awareness or on the issue of sexual assault and how to reach college age individuals in addition to the panel and other speakers they were three workshop. Sessions offered each day of the conference On topics like how to be a better bystander. I was blown away at the vast array of experiences. I heard from students while we chatted in between sessions. Here's here's Dr From Baylor University essentially. I'm here to one. Obviously engaged with other students from across the country on sexual show bounce issues awareness and prevention that only talking about the issues themselves also finding out ways to educate People back on our college campuses across nation on how to engage. Inform them on these issues in to just to learn lessons from They're called chances on what his work was. Not that worked there. The weekend's keynote speaker was Lynn Rosenthal. who was the first ever senior adviser on Combating Violence Against Women appointed to the White House as someone who had chosen sexual assault activism as a career? I knew she would have inciteful advice for students hoping to make change after Roland speech and Baker Ballroom. I had the chance to ask for some advice. I would say to come to events like this immerse yourself in the work read. Study talk to your friends. There's there's no substitute for one on one conversations and you know organizing is really about just talking to people in a very intentional way about the issue and that's how how you mobilize your friends and colleagues on campus Lynn's emphasis on the importance of conversation was exactly what I experienced during its on us. I had never considered myself an expert on the topic of sexual assault prevention but after hearing from so many other students I realized there was so much. I didn't know that I thought I did. I wondered what other students were experiencing. And what had brought them to the conference in the first place. So I posed the question to ran. I think me being at this campus is is multilevel on the first level. I'm a survivor myself. And I Did I was assaulted on this campus and so it was important to me that on show not only myself but other people that Ohio University can be this incredible place where incredible things happen and you know I still feel safer. I still feel welcome here because of that the other level would be as my position with. WPA It's important to me that sororities and fraternities on our campus. This one feel empowered to take a stand and then to take a stand not only our own community but for other communities as well and so last last year unfortunately after we had the high rise of sexual assaults at the beginning of the year which is very common on our campus Sorority women a and fraternity men put up banners on their on their home on their fraternity houses and they organized rallies and we made a stand that it is not Oughta okay and that at least in our community. We're GONNA make it stop and we hope we can make it stop in the Greater Bob Cat community so I wanted to come today because the WPA is really invested in leading survivors. No that that was not a one off thing. That's our passion. That's our belief that we are supposed to be supporting women on this campus abyss whether you're Greek affiliated or not and so. I came here today to gather information for all of the other vice presidents on. WPA So that we can move forward the next year and think of what other things can we do. How else can we support students in the days after the? It's on a summit. I couldn't stop thinking about how those Principles Lynn mentioned the importance of conversation the value of how much I saw those Iran. I wondered how she was going to use her knowledge from the conference to accent her. Impact beyond the Sorority fraternity community. So I decided to follow her her story through the first weeks of the semester. I wanted to be her shadow to learn more about her activism and what drives this clear desire to make positive change on the community..

assault Ohio University Lynn Rosenthal. Ryan Sorority fraternity community Athens US Indiana University of Pennsylv University of Maryland College University of Minnesota Dr From Baylor University University of Utah Pittsburgh Atlanta Adriana Brandon Ben Kayla Women's Panhellenic Associatio Ellis Hall Sheridan
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

10:33 min | 10 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Things that I am passionate about so it could be. You know for example will a position in church the principals and the concepts that I've learned in a spiritual sense I could be about working in the garden. I enjoy gardening so if I have a conversation with somebody and they are asking me like oh well how do you do this and you know I I just really kind of go into that teacher mode and just say okay okay. Well let's talk about this and let's kind of work out You know the things that you're curious about and I'll do my best to help you understand what has worked for for me. The field of meteorology is deceptively complex and it requires a lot of skills in math and logic was all that in front of eighteen into twenty one year olds who are also in the business of figuring out life in general. What obligation does Janet field toward her students? First of all. I think it's my role to bring out the best in them so I recognize that not all students are going to be a plus students But I don't want to diminish finish the students who aren't at that level and the experience that they get as well so I really want regardless of where they lay on that spectrum of whatever whatever it is if it's like a just natural gift or if it's a you know a true love or maybe not so much or trying to get through. I want the students to understand things better at the end of the semester than they did at the beginning of the semester wherever they are on that spectrum I truly like to live by the motto of there is no such thing as a dumb question because anytime a student has a question. That's an opportunity to enhance the hands or augment their understanding and even if it's a very basic question that question needs to be asked in order for that student to put the pieces together to try to make the bigger picture Fila and to make those pieces. Connect and click in their obligation to Jannah is to be prepared for class How's your uses a hybrid of the flipped classroom model where students ingests the lecture material in advance of the class meeting then worked collaboratively in groups to apply what they've learned and grow to understand what the didn't from the lecture? It's an effective tool for teaching complex field. So we're going to unpack impact this a bit because it unveiled so much about. How janitor remained so effective? Teaching in illustrates. Would a winning professor student relationship looks like here's how it works. powerpoint lectures posted on Friday in the following weeks first class session. Each student takes a quiz to see but they've grasped then form into groups and take the quiz against one. They submit their individual quiz which enables them to have some accountability. She says then they turn turned to their group Quiz Results and brainstorm the answers for what they got wrong. I find that when you recognize something that you don't know and then you go back and you research that thing that you didn't know you were much more likely to remember it in a longer term that if you just put down the class talks through the quiz questions to everyone's on satisfaction Anjana surveys the group about the material. They found most challenging through polling system. They access through smartphones. It creates a word cloud God. I'm not even trying here that everyone sees in the classroom screen. The most commonly misconducts appear larger generates says on the board and then systematically unpack each one in what she calls many lectures because it's not necessarily even a cohesive lecture from one topic that verges nicely to the next is kind of chunks of. Let's talk about this that you didn't understand. Let's talk about this and then let's piece it all together. The weeks next class put students into groups that answer multiple choice questions collectively sometimes. All groups submit the same answers sometimes. The answer's differ. The latter is a lot more fun. She says it's and it's really kind of fun when there's diversity and the answer is because then I can say okay well group a you know you chose answers. Let's talk about that a little bit. Why what made you choose the answer? C. Need and when she sees the light bulb go off for one student or as a group that is pure magic. You know here's a map or here's a series of maps look got these maps of temperature and of wind at the surface and upper air wind patterns halfway through the atmosphere. And tell me where in the country Would you expect a mid latitude cyclone to form. And so then they have to kind of work through this process and that discussion that ensues also with their luther teammates. I've seen that bring together the lightbulb sue and then sometimes there are questions where the whole team is struggling and then I can go and you know I. I walk around as they're doing these assignments and I ask them how they're doing having questions. And it gives me the opportunity then to talk to the whole team about okay. Well let's look at this. Yes and what are some opportunities or what are what are some clues that you can look for to help you solve this problem. Gifted teachers put a lot of time into building. They're teaching format tweaking them when they needed to ensure their students get the most out of class. Time does Jonathan. Today's digital distractions hamper her her ability to connect to students. She like James. Say No this is because of another strategy. She uses the open door policy. The door to her office is open while she's in the building. Not only during office hours in students take advantage of it mostly to talk about concepts in the class but sometimes he's just to talk so I work really hard to try to maintain that face to face communication. I think it is easy to sort of fall into that trap of let me just do all of my communicating via email and that would diminish. I think the relationship that you have with the student student because there is something to say for that actual face to face time with those students and what you want about the students and the. Hey how's it going. You know the informal conversation and that happens when you are just you know spontaneously meeting with somebody or somebody walks into your office before. They even get to the questions that they have. Have you know that sort of five minutes of what's happening in your life kind of opportunity really allows me to feel a little bit more connected On a personal level to students Gifted teachers don't hide human side from their students either. They don't limit sharing what they know to the course material when asked they will share what they know about life skills to the freshman especially though are oftentimes just kind of trying to find their way trying to decide if the major is right for them trying to work through the social navigate that social scene of being at a university working through separation from family. And there's a whole lot of non-academic stuff that's going on in a freshman's life. That oftentimes comes at the expense of their academic experience. So be they are just sort of feeling. The water is trying to figure out how a college test is. What is expected of them in class? What is expected for the homework? How do they succeed succeed in getting good grades but occasionally I will have students that come to me as freshmen or or sometimes even sophomores and say I was a straight A. Student in high school and now I have a d. in your class and you know I'm feeling like I don't know what's going on and how can we get through this unusually? What ends it's up happening? Is We have a discussion on. How are you studying? And what kind of time are you putting into this class and I recognize that. This isn't the only class that you have But how are you prioritizing is in your time and you know what are you. What are you spending your time focusing on and so forth? Paradoxically perhaps Janice case. If a student who is also advise advise e is putting in the time and effort and is still struggling Geno will be plane about the reality of that. Student's future is is truly gift to be able to relay this message without diminishing the student self confidence and I have had to say to some of the students who advise you know. You're sure this is the second time you've failed calculus one. You know if you can't pass it your third time you can't continue on in the major and that's just by virtue of the way. The degree is structured So I I try not to paint the picture of. You can't do it because I feel like even if the student can't do it I feel like that's something they need to come to a decision on their selves. And I don't think it's my my personal place to make that judgment So I believe that everybody can. I want to be that person that squashes somebody's dream. You know I want people to be able to feel like they can dream. Big Dreams are sort of you know delusions of Ranchera so to I think I think we all can benefit from reaching a decision point and a and a reconciliation within ourselves. Much better than what. If somebody else tells us that we shouldn't be doing something works as well look proposition. Remember what Tim Vickers said. At the beginning of this episode combs occurs. I feel like I could burke. Gifted teachers yearn to bring about a true understanding for their students. Yeah they won't stop until the information is made clear and they used their best tools to do it. They come in prepared to make their knowledge relatable and they share that craving craving for knowledge with the ones sitting before them ready to know about our world actual understanding of what these terms needs that we can look. There's something awakening meaning. They awaken in students. And I don't know how we can under estimate the value of that when we're talking time of not just recruitment retention and and students finding theirself their passion their way and I just can't stress how hard teaching it gets harder and harder and harder Uh the responsibilities and to see how these people do the so relatively effortlessly gift.

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

11:19 min | 10 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"At Ohio University popped up the position they were looking for mets the balance teaching as an important component in their faculty not just in their this opportunity did have but I wanted that research to be well-balanced students but really she's game to teach you about anything she knows I think it's Abou so position in church the principals and the concepts that I've you do this and you know I I just really kind of go into that teacher mode and just say okay for me. The field of meteorology is deceptively complex and it requires allegation does Janet field toward her students first of all I think it's my role to bring out initiative the students who aren't at that level and the experience that they get as well true love or maybe not so much or trying to get through I want the I truly like to live by the motto of there is no such thing as a dumb question because that question needs to be asked in order for that student to put the pieces together to try to how's your uses a hybrid of the flipped classroom model where students ingest the it's an effective tool for teaching complex field so we're going to unpack here's how it works powerpoint lectures posted on Friday author individual quiz which enables them to have some accountability she says then they research that thing that you didn't know you were much more likely to remember it in a longer term through polling system they accessed through smartphones it creates a word cloud board and then systematically unpack each one in what she calls many lectures piece it altogether the weeks next class put students into groups that answer it's and it's really kind of fun when there's diversity and the answer is because then I can say okay well group is pure magic you know here's a map or here's a series of maps look would you expect a mid latitude cyclone to form and so then they have to there are questions where the whole team is struggling and then I can go and you know I yes and what are some opportunities or what are what are some clues that you can look for to out of class time does Jonathan. Today's digital distractions hamper her the door to her office is open while she's in the building not only during office hours in communication. I think it is easy to sort of student because there is something to say for that actual face to face time with those students and as Lee meeting with somebody or somebody walks into your office before they even get to the questions that they have gifted teachers don't hide human side from their students either they don't ain't find their way trying to decide if the major is right for them trying to work through the social non-academic stuff that's going on in a freshman's life that oftentimes comes it is expected of them in class what is expected for the hallmark how do they succeed and now I have a d. in your class and you know I'm feeling like send I recognize that this isn't the only class that you have but how are you prioritizing advise e is putting in the time and effort and is still struggling and I have had to say to some of the students who I advise you know just by virtue of the way the degree is structured I feel like that's something they need to come to a decision on their selves and I don't think it's my that person that squashes somebody's dream you know I want people to be able to feel decision point and a and a reconciliation within ourselves much better than I said at the beginning of this episode combs occurs. I feel like I could tools to do it they come in prepared to make their knowledge relatable and they share that craving meaning they awaken in students and I don't know how we can under estimate stress how hard teaching it gets harder and harder and harder.

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

13:30 min | 10 months ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"With no maybe not even consciously but intuitively what they're good at and they'll try AMC myself from it is that they also care very much about teaching a lot of preparation in your organized and you've put time into it ingenious or charismatic or inciteful but I do try and show up prepared talking in terms of the psychology of my motivation it's much less my thinking eight more on so that's that's a big part of the reason. I think I prepare as much as I do. Honor Society Teaching Award and the University's genetic or Sally Brown award is Tim what he felt was at the core of his obligations to students the consumers that is to deal with the students fairly and consistently in terms of grading policies they get involved in class and put forward a suggestion or possibility so at least a kernel of insight into what the if we see teaching as an opportunity to make ourselves look sophy you would think so but James says no in the sense I in a particularly good position philosophical training is learning to look disposition after studying philosophy to be able to plug something a person that I think for the most part students are just fumbling around very good things to say and I would sort of give the students a compliment here in terms of interacting with students in the class even with the Digital Age Those Digital Distractions No surfing the web the one place you do see it is you have to stay on top of them like students today are just incapable of following along one as I did twenty years ago so James Puts that idea to rest he's long since lost any sleep over the performance aspect of teaching right suppose individuals. I've been doing this for thirty years and I it's not James Introversion side makes teaching difficult better so it is a case of highs and lows many a character in the Canon of philosophy dialogue with that craving for knowledge with the students it makes me think that one I need to know it's just a natural need human beings we just love teaching career a lot of Google as a threat and I think google hiring wisdom acquiring critical thinking skills you can't get that just by reading who have thought about it and maybe profs who've had some extra training and how to think about that's true why else would people pay to go to a place to learn with in through others eight of an elephant in the room what's the value of a degree in philosophy the teacher philosophy but if they're owning students to teach you to what then is of tech jobs the startup culture and the more professions centric models of higher education standing the why behind the study of business finance engineering medicine what really thinks in the next few years and he gave this in twenty seventeen he thinks specifically and precisely because of that ability to engage in critical instance financial planning you're getting computer algorithms such as the data out much greater utility than people think James doesn't disparage profession center careers air about medicine because we care about our own lives and the lives of loved ones engineering it's learning to play the cello or spending time with friends or traveling so this foundation of basic values Mr critically reflect on what really matters the most to you and related it to an anecdote involving two philosophers to illustrate the point it's about him in the politics that he had a habit he was at a habit of wandering and studying the sky and the heavens that he walked into a dry well he fell into a well and had to be rescued in reason to try and study patterns in the sky he was able as he put down money to reserve the right to rent the olive presses at a low rate student sitting in the chair she faces as a professor being a guide in really enjoyed trying to help other people understand concepts and Ryan spoke while growing up and then went on to Penn State to study meteorology she and the job.

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"None of them ever actually splendid, they all collapsed down to a black hole. And, and if the laws of physics were slightly different and the balance of gravity and fusion, different. That's what would happen. And so actually this connects to a class of philosophical arguments that astrophysicists have cosmological, particularly call the anthra- pic- anthropic principle that why do laws of physics, you know, the strengths charges of electron masses of electrons, protons their strength of their interactions. Relative strengths of interaction of electromagnetism versus gravity? It's why do they have the values they do? And one of the philosophical questions or answers is well, if they were much different from the way they are. We would never be able to form complex life in the history of the universe because stars claps the foreign black holes or stars never four or something like that. And the primordial soup of hydrogen helium form the big bang, would never form more complex Adams. So people can't take that as an argument for why laws of physics have to be within the sort of rough regime in which we live, because beings, like us would not be around to. Perceive that the universe is like that, and study it, so I'm not a strong believer in the anthropic principle, but at a weak version, yes. Yeah. So many people are made deeply uncomfortable by these sorts of arguments. But I think that is actually a big philosophical debate, and cosmology, that comes up well beyond, you know, explosions of stars or anything that high study, but. One of the big worries. When recent studies of. Subatomic physics and things like string theory, which you may have heard of is that there are effectively almost infinite possible number of combinations. And why do we live in the university? We do why the answers is because we're here. Again, I take a weaker view of that, but it is sort of uncomfortable that we can we can we can determine what the laws of physics with our, but it doesn't mean that we have any understand why say, the massive electron has to be what it is. Just just some constant that appears in the equations, and boom use it and it works. He while. Yeah. With all our talk today about proof and all the work researchers like chore. Not put into moving down that road of understanding, you know, sometimes with, with what just seem like these tiny incremental steps. There will always be bigger questions. More pieces to fill in the puzzle. I don't know. Kim can we leave it there? Is that is that we're place to end? Yeah. I think it seems appropriate leave it right. Where we all are on the edge of understanding with a little bit of knowledge and a lot of questions. All right. Thanks to hire university, Ryan shortage, or through all this, and to George berz for the great stargazing experience, we had in this episode was produced by U, P tuner, and you Kelly respect. And it's always a big. Thank you to WB studios in Athens where this was recorded and to Adam rich sound, engineer and all around awesome. Dude. Thanks, everyone for listening professor neck would probably want me to remind everyone at this point that there is some non zero chance that they're entirely wrong about all this. That's just how it goes. With speeds, the hair are endless possibilities. Unless it's just aliens yesterday that have most papers and to all of this unless just. We try not to say that out loud.

WB studios Ryan shortage Adams professor Adam rich Kim George berz Athens Kelly engineer
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"And you spin it too fast it'll fly off. So that's one of the best pieces of evidence that the supernova explosion that occurred almost thousand years ago, left behind not only exploding nebula, but a single compact object, which is the neutron star. Okay. So. You wanted some proof that these relatively tiny city size objects can be created in supernova explosions. So what do you think? I mean was that enough? I mean, yeah, I think so it's still seems a little circumstantial, though, would it surprise you then to hear that this line of evidence around the crab nebula, and these Chinese astronomers and this spinning object, that this is sort of as good as gets when it comes to proof about what's left over from supernova. Yeah. You know that just seems so weird to think about it just seems like so often, we not we but other people astronomers talk so confidently about space. You just assume that they have this definitive proof. Yeah. Well, I got news for you. Because when it comes to the other outcome of a supernova explosion that a black hole might be created. The evidence is considerably more limited. Oh, great. Yeah. But let's get back to square one with black holes first black holes are a prediction of general Titi, that, if you compress matter, eventually, compress, it enough, that light can longer scape Albert Einstein made this prediction, when he formulated, his general theory of relativity, that the pass of that the locations of stars located behind the sun would be affected by the presence of the gravitational mass of the sun. And so, in nineteen nineteen two expeditions were made to South America and Africa to observe. The Sandra solar eclipse, and so during an eclipse, you can see stars when the sun is blocked out obviously, and what they did was. Is no Twitter. Some of the stars close to the sun appeared during that clips. And then looked at those same stars six months later when the sun wasn't in the picture and just compared to observe Asians. They found that the locations of stars were distorted because the Paz's of light taken by these distant stars around the sun, we're bent. And this matched the predictions of Joe relativity. And that's what made Einstein household name. So if you just crank up the gravitational field you get to a point where not only as the light path bent, but the light can no longer even escape. And so this is the defining characteristic of a black hole. So explains that at this point black holes were really just theoretical. They were mathematical curiosities he called them. But in the early twentieth century during the same time, astronomers were looking at that crab nebula and tracing its origins back nine hundred years more and more people started studying what happens when these massive stars collapse. So these neutron stars were known to be one outcome. But later, it was determined that there was a maximum mass than you start at have of around two to three solar masses to three times, the massive our son. We don't know exactly where that boundary is even today, there's some, hints and people can argue about it. We know it's more than two because we see two solar mass neutron stars these models all predict that. There's a maximum mass. And so if you were to pile more matter onto neutron star, eventually would not be able to support itself under its own gravity, and then it would collapse. And so then the question is what else can happen. And the conclusion is that the neutron star if you keep on adding stuff onto a neutron star. It will collapse the form a black hole, and so Kelly. This theory was just tossed around without much supporting evidence until the mid nineteen seventies with the development of x Ray astronomy, which allowed astronomers to see x. Ray sources out in space for the first time and what they found or these star systems where you have to stars sort of an orbit together called binary systems. Oh, that's like Star Wars where they had to sunsetting same time. Yes. Yes, tattooing the fictional. Planet was in a binary system. So, so, yes. Think of those two sons from Star Wars and. A few of these systems instead of two stars..

Albert Einstein Twitter Joe relativity Ray South America Paz Titi Africa Kelly nine hundred years thousand years six months
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"And then the core starts to collapse it forms. What is known as a neutron star or black hole, and the process of formation releases enough energy that the rest of star explodes. And when explodes it really explodes a supernova can be so bright. It produces enough light to be briefly as bright as one to ten billion Suns. Ten billion Suns. Yeah. These things are big, and they are bright. And so the cow event. What tore knocks all is one of these. Yeah. Exactly. But now that we have this general idea of, what supernovae are. There's just one more part of the story. We kinda need to cover before we get back to the cow. Okay. What's that? Well tournament said that when these massive stars collapse and caused these huge explosions. They also form one of two things either a neutron star or a black hole. You've probably heard of black holes, or, or at least have some idea of what they are. So let's talk about the other one, I neutron stars. Yeah, you're going to have to explain that one to me. I think. Yeah, so neutron stars as I understand them. Are these super dense objects out there in space, and they're made up of nearly entirely neutrons and tournament explains that? Their properties are really extreme because it's so compact. So when I say compact, I mean, something approximately the size of a city that it's something that is about forty percent. More massive than our sun. But compressed to about the size of a city, and that means that they're so compact at the protons neutrons, protons electrons, recombine to form neutrons. And that means they're very dense, but they're also spinning very rapidly and have extraordinary magnetic fields. Okay. So question if neutron stars are so small relative to regular stars, which are, obviously way bigger than a city. How do they even know that they exist? And how do they know that they are in the center of these giant explosions? Yeah, that's a great question. And it's a turns out evidence supporting all this actually dates back, nearly thousand years. So in the case of neutron stars, we have a lot, better direct evidence, neutron stars can be formed in the explosion. So one example, is with a thing known as the crab nebula, which is a large cloud of gas and dust about sixty five hundred light years away in the Taurus constellation, it turns out that around the in the year, ten fifty four Chinese astronomers had recorded the parents of a very bright star that appeared in that spot in the sky. And the star was so bright that it could be seen during the day for several weeks. But it's up to faded and this description really lines up with what we believed a nearby supernova would look like to the naked eye in the early twentieth century. It was determined that this crab nebula was expanding that if you compared photographs taken decades apart you could see a little bit bigger each time. And so if you did the very simple calculation of how big is this nebula and how fast is expanding activities? You how long it's been since explosion occurred, and it was about nine hundred years earlier perfectly matching up with the reports by those Chinese astronomers in ten fifty four this nebula, then was subsequently studied in great detail, and after in the mid twentieth, century after discovery of radio waves is founded, there was a star near the center, this nebula that was rapidly flashing that is it was rotating thirty times. Per second. So we could see a light, blinking on and off thirty times per second. And so what we think is going on. Is that that light is associated with the neutron star in the center? And the reason they know it's a neutron star is really because of how fast it's spinning. Yeah. Thirty times per second. That is so fast..

sixty five hundred light years nine hundred years thousand years forty percent
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

14:07 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"So let's do. We'll show you some stars. Hey, there listeners, welcome to another episode of Ohio today radio, I'm Pete sooner. And in this episode we're going to talk about space. That's Georgie birds and astronomy instructor who took a group of us on a little stargazing. Walk back in April. Let's start with the constellation. That is the all time favorite of everybody all the grandparents on the porch, point out to the kids, the big Dipper. Yup. There it is. Thank god. It's visually obvious. As it is so Kelly respect is here with me. Hi, kelly. Hey Pete, Kellyanne. I helped produce the show and for this episode because it's about space. We're going to go through all of this together so you ready Kelly. Yeah..

Kelly Pete instructor Ohio Kellyanne
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"To hire. Today. Radio a podcast. Bob cat stories told one tail time. I'm peachy. And this episode we traveled to a place has been attracting thinkers learners, and all those seeking broader view of the world to a remote area New York for more than one hundred and forty years. It's a place that has also without much to liberate effort on anyone's part attracted numerous so higher university students studying journalism design photography for an enriching and breakneck summer internship program in the world of newspaper production, an experience you'll see is as unique as the place it self. This is should talk. My name's Dave munch. I'm a two thousand nine graduate from Ohio University. I went through the vis com program specializing in photojournalism on now, I currently work as the multimedia producer for Chautauqua institution. And I also serve as the photo editor for our daily newspaper the Chautauqua daily which publishes six days a week during our summer season should talk institution is a place really committed to lifelong learning for many people, pre professional development, we have in in house opera company theater companies school of music school dance school of art. We have all of these schools were young people are training to grow into the world into the relevant professions in our newspaper. The Chautauqua daily follows that model to pre she the rest of this story, you I need a little background on Utah quo founded in eighteen seventy four as the Chautauqua lake Sunday school assembly. It was an educational experiment focused on summer courses for Sunday school teacher. Here's the rural setting on the shore of New York's lake Chautauqua was thought to enhance the learning experience. Its success was immediate. And it's expansion was rapid by eighteen seventy eight abroad and curriculum in academics arts music and religion, led to a structured correspondence course for those who couldn't travel to Stockwell and that program success spurred its participants to hold their own Chautauqua style gatherings at locations across the country. By the turn of the century. The movement had swept the nation and traveling tent Chautauqua would tour hundreds of cities and towns each year. If you've heard of Chautauqua already these traveling tented events are likely the image. You have in mind, although popular these circuit Chautauqua, which focused more on ener tain -ment an education strayed far from the original mission and values of the camp along the lake so this is very much the kind of old town, so to speak where these were I don't know how much, you know, about the background shit taco. But this was a camp like a meeting can't campground. These were all tent plots that turned into log cabins that turned into houses. So these have been sort of set in stone for very long time as you walk around the seven hundred and fifty acre community that history is palpable. It's seventy five hundred residents can see up to one hundred thousand guests after the grounds each year to take in the world class opera, dance theatre, lectures, and music. Over the course of the nine week summer program. But should talk is very hard to accurately describe it's a lot like Athens in that way, and like Athens, it seems to pride itself on its unique characteristics. Perhaps this is partly why students as well as some alumni from Ohio scripts college who have made up as much as half of the Chautauqua dailies staff over the years have flocked here to intern at the paper where they can practice their craft in a unique yet familiar environment. What probably is the greatest benefit for our interns that we provide a really rigorous real world workload that they can expect an in many of them. We told them very early on that this is the hardest. You will have ever worked up to this point reporters come in day. One get their beat notes and have a story do in two days. And they've never been here before photographers have photo assignments to shoot the very first day they show up and it doesn't stop their shooting. Tigers shooting three to four photo assignments a day six days a week for nine straight weeks on reporters turning out one two stories a day every day doesn't stop when I visited late off. Guessed the season was nearing its close. The Reverend Jesse Jackson was speaking that morning and things were coming to ahead at the paper as some interns had to return home to prepare for the new school year leaving the paper slightly short staff during its crucial final weeks. Luckily, I was able to catch up with a few of the remaining Bob cats. My brain is very tired. We had late night layout last night. And we're here until like one thirty. My name is Gina Rayo. I'm a rising senior, and I'm in the school official communication's pursuing a publication design degree. I do a lot of interactive design as well and a minor in marketing. So what I do here. The shot. Talk daily is design editor. And I hope with some of the illustrations and just everyday process of laying out the paper. It's just been a lot of really good practice. I would say like I feel like I like move a lot faster to the pages than I did at the beginning of the summer and like a good way. But I feel like I'll take some of that back to school with me for my senior year like just knowing like if I can handle this. I can definitely handle the workload to come. Money is holding Kirsch. I'm a second year. Graduate students studying photo journalism. I am interning this summer at the Chautauqua daily as a staff photographer. Hold on. I walk the grounds. We came upon the heart of Chautauqua the giant forty four hundred seat Tampa theatre where much of the programming takes place. We check us out. Yeah. Yeah. This is the amphitheater. The giant disco ball for the Avak hover band was playing tonight. Jackson Abba cover band in the same day. Being year has been interesting because I've been able to just practice graffiti every day, I wake up I come here. We work six days a week, and I making photos, and sometimes it's the same thing that I pretty much made photo of yesterday, we shoot a lot of lectures, and a lot of performances so I have to photograph in the same building with different person speaking to a crowd, but that's also kind of exciting because I have to find a way to do that in a new way. But home says there are other unique challenges to feel most other internships, there might be four five interns. The most probably in different departments definitely not living together. And here the entire newsroom as interns. There's twenty five of us. We're all trying trying to figure stuff out and make our best work and improve ourselves, and we're all living together and trying to get along. And enjoy the summer to you heard that right in. Addition to working together as many as sixty hours or more per week, these interns also live together, I think Dave put it best. You put thirty pre professional journals and students, and you make them live in a house together and work side-by-side six days a week for ten weeks. They all get to know each other really well, besides unparalleled access to speakers and performers like Jesse Jackson and yoyo mall. It seems this element is really what sets the whole experience apart from your average internship. Not only are these students technical skills put to the test. But they're giving a crash course on how to work with one another with all the professional and personal stressors that are so common out the real world. And this shared experience is what makes this internship, truly should talk on these Bob cats to share a remarkable and fully unique experience. And then have the time to process it reflect on it and grow from it together. This idea is what this place was founded on and it's these enduring values that make it what is still today. This is should talk. Special. Thanks to Dave much and the daily's editor Sarah talk and the whole staff for welcoming me into the newsroom this episode of Ohio today radio was recorded on site can should talk with New York and in the WB studios in Athens, Ohio. Visit Ohio today dot org slash radio for more episodes of the show or find us on itunes, Google podcasts or spot fine.

Chautauqua daily Bob Ohio Chautauqua institution editor Chautauqua lake Sunday school Dave munch Athens Jesse Jackson New York Ohio University school teacher ener tain -ment Tigers Tampa theatre Utah Gina Rayo producer
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"My son. Yes, Susan rhymer. Please. Thank you. That's Frank Robinson, a graduate of Ohio University for his dissertation. Frank wanted to document the status of women working at the university during the late nineteen sixties to the nineteen eighty s. December twenty nine nine hundred ninety eight I'm in the law office, Beverly Jones in Washington DC, and that really wanted to begin by telling me about your undergraduate education, and what brought you to he found and then interviewed on tape. Yes. Actual tapes. The analogue kind thirty eight women who were on the Ohio University campus during that time. Frank asked the women to think back thirty years or so to reflect on the reality back, then coupled with the hindsight of having experienced successful careers sense that shows up in the late sixties, the issue women towers or undergrad. Like almost every other university and college campus in the country and around the globe the late nineteen sixties and early seventies. Or a time of upheaval to hire university. So much was changing so quickly. The Vietnam war was raging Americans were divided on its role in that conflict. US leaders were being assassinated, John F Kennedy Martin Luther King junior. Robert Kennedy, Malcolm X, the person at the very top of United States political office watched all his walls were coming down around him after the Watergate scandal in the release of the Pentagon papers by the Washington, Post and other media outlets. The impeachment resignation of president Richard Nixon loved America, collectively on moored university and college campuses across the country operated as collection of ground zeros for trying out change toward a new normal. Some of it easy to make some of. Radical and harder to swallow. Hi, university was no different. And in fact, it champion change in higher Ed in the state of Ohio. So when Franks files showed up this spring in Ohio today radio's offices. We went to work to see what if anything there was to learn. There was plenty to learn as it turned out the breadth and depth of Franks interviews and reporting from almost twenty years ago created more stories than we can handle in one sitting through the recordings. Frank created a rich in authentic narrative of these women's lives as they reflected on their time as either high university students or employee's if their time in Athens, Ohio was a chapter one the recording created a kind of chapter two informed by the passing of two decades filled with careers, marriage, kids and perspective. We wanted to know so many things. Things. We're are these women today? Would they say today if they heard what they said in the late nineties about the barriers they faced as students and young adults studying and working in higher Ed about the absence of women positioned in key leadership roles during their time there, and because no one in those roles, look like them who do they have to look up to who do they emulate? And we wanted to know in today's me two times what it means to be feminine and to be a feminist. We found three of those thirty eight women who were interviewed and they agreed to meet with us. From how today radio this is chapter three. I'm Kelly respect. We met for lunch and September in Washington DC on a rainy Monday. We then recorded an interview at the National Press Club here, they were again about to add another layer to this narrative almost fifty years since they left college. Veered is Devon and blatantly right there. We met alumnae and golf Susan Rymer and Lee Jones, she goes by Bev at the Delhi close to the National Press Club. In was the first to arrive. Then susan. Honest last, but not least. In golf recently retired as vice president of research after twenty four year career with the h Lee Moffitt cancer center and research institute in Florida and graduated in nineteen sixty nine with a bachelor's degree and political science and in nineteen seventy one with a master's degree in education. She worked at Ohio University in student affairs while in grad school and also served as coordinator of student life programs at Ohio University from nineteen seventy three to nineteen seventy eight and was one of the original administrative interns at the university, Susan rhymer retired in twenty fifteen from the Baltimore Sun after thirty six years. The last twenty two is a columnist. She graduated from Ohio University in nineteen seventy three with a bachelor's degree in journalism where she was a reporter for the post Bev Jones, graduated in nineteen sixty-nine also at the bachelor's degree in journalism. And then worked in key offices at the university, including university president Claude souls office while she earned her MBA graduating with that degree in nineteen seventy five. She was the first woman to enroll in universities MBA program. After leaving the university Jones was an attorney and more recently is an expert in leadership coaching in Washington DC. I

Ohio University Frank Robinson Washington DC Ohio Beverly Jones Susan rhymer United States president reporter National Press Club America John F Kennedy Martin Luther K Robert Kennedy susan Richard Nixon golf Susan Rymer Washington
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Welcome to high today radio a podcast of Bob cat stories told one tail at a time. This is Jennifer belly. And this episode you'll listen as high university students dig deep in order to access their personal grit, which is the theme of the summer. Twenty eighteen edition of Ohio today, magazine, grit, or the stamina and perseverance required to achieve goals and long-term success is widely discussed in education circles, scholars argue that grit may be as important as I q for success in school in career and in life. But what does it look like ten grit and resiliency skills be taught and nurtured in this episode follow along as students undergo subtle yet significant personal transformation, you'll hear as their language interactions and operations begin to change to make a difference in their success, both as individuals, and as a group all thanks to their personal and growing grit. Ohio assistant professor of linguistics Machel, Molly who joined me and twelve Ohio students for a collaborative Ohio University Teton science schools program in may will take on. This journey from their first steps on a hike up logo hill to their final reflections. Michelle will help us witness when the students demonstrate their personal resolve and growth as they take on challenges. Physical emotional and academic during the intense week long program in Wyoming. Hi, michelle. Thank you for joining me for today radio. Hi, jen. It's good to be here. Great first things. First, please explain to our listeners. What in the world linguist was doing at Teton science schools with twelve undergrads that is kind of the elephant in the room, isn't it? And if it, but one thing to remember as a an advisor to the void scholars I also have an opportunity to explore other interests and being outside when I'm not at work is what I prefer to do. So in the opportunity to lead students to the Tetons for some leadership training and for an opportunity to stretch themselves. You know, there was no way. I was saying no to that at the same time. What I had the opportunity to do. Do was exam and the changes in these young women and men through their languages while they were enduring the challenges, right? As you alluded to the the physical, the emotional and the academic challenges that we too experienced with them, but experiences like those that are provided at the Thanh science schools can be truly transformative and some of the most immediate evidence of these affects are observed in the language of the participants. And so what I was doing much of the time was examining it from two perspectives one very, discreet and looking at how individual words program lingo begins to emerge in their exchanges, and how they progress to using it in a very intentional way from perhaps more joking way in the beginning. But then also global scale we watched their body language and their interactions and their general references in language really transition from a focus on self to a much larger focus on. An intentional community. Great. Thank you. So let's jump in at the beginning of the school experience and give our listeners and example in an informal classroom setting inside, what was a pretty rustic structure complete with Taxidermied animals on the walls, Wyoming, the students begin learning about he goes systems with Teton science schools faculty member, Kevin crasner. An include that ashes between the. Non things. Go system or any serviceable because they're like you could say like preserved natural spaces be like all things that were there to begin. Or you say like an ecosystem like human created break bushels. We different ecosystems. They have different definitions. Great question. So this muscle definition of a natural ecosystem or and he goes to the world. But everything that you've included question could also be referred to as Nikos, and that was Imani one of our program. Participants who day one jumped right into the content. She was involved in a totally different academic pursuit being out here in the tons, but was also really engaged from the start. I mean later that day even while we were out hiking. She was one who brought up a question as we sat on Lobo hill that you do referenced earlier looking out and recognizing the physical lines between these transitions from one ecosystem to another and offered a very artistic interpretation of what she was seeing. But she was one of the students who very early on started playing around with the vocabulary of the discipline and of the week, and integrating it into the way, she behaved, you know, from the start and the students all progress on. Pathways. But she was one of those early examples for us. Great and not an ecology major in any right, right? Right. This. I had I was like thinking about homes. Cleveland's off the. Sykes news. Like

Imani Ohio Michelle Ohio University Teton science Wyoming Teton science schools Kevin crasner Jennifer belly Bob Tetons Thanh science assistant professor of linguis Molly jen Cleveland advisor Lobo hill Sykes Nikos faculty member