26 Burst results for "obsessive compulsive disorder"

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

05:04 min | 5 months ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

"Then you know so those are big symptoms. And that's quite a list to me. What do you think about it. Yeah i mean it makes sense immunologically all those symptoms and how it's going to affect the you mentioned the limbic system or and then the hypothalamus pituitary. Yeah that all makes sense so And has spoken to this fact who that mold toxicity is often missed and misdiagnosed so he says to just really have it on your radar that if you're ever seen a client or a patient and they're telling you they have fibromyalgia you need to. You need to be thinking about mold. And he also talked about someone coming in news diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome or anything. That's atypical and i've had this happen. I had a client come to see me who she was. Diagnosed with atypical. Ms and we've discovered it was mold. So atypical ms rheumatoid arthritis alzheimer's parkinson's And also straight up alzheimer's and parkinson's We've had some dramatic stories of people fully healing from you know a serious form of dementia like alzheimer's or parkinson's disease because they had mold toxicity And it's not. I don't wanna give people false hope. Those are complex illnesses. And oftentimes what. I work with clients in our area of dementia. Oftentimes they have multiple things going on and that we can get them some degree better by discovering something like biotoxin illness Anytime you hear about someone having asthma chronic city itis and then even Psych- psychiatric issues like anxiety. Depression people will talk about de personalization. Like they have no sense of self anymore. They have cognitive impairment mood swings. Obsessive compulsive disorder Those are all things that when you hear that you need to be thinking. Wow have i person- about mold exposure. Or maybe i need to do that. Biotoxins survey and have them do the visual contrast sensitively test Those are big flags Excellent and you. You have a case study that you wanted to talk about. What did we get into that. I think that'd be great This is a recent client I thought your listeners might find this interesting to just kind of see what this might look like in a real life scenario This is a man that i recently started working with We were just going on like the two month mark. He's fifty one years old. He lives in the pacific northwest. So there's a lot of rain there..

alzheimer's parkinson's disease ms rheumatoid arthritis alzhei dementia chronic fatigue syndrome fibromyalgia Obsessive compulsive disorder asthma anxiety Depression pacific northwest
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:10 min | 7 months ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Case has been dealing with obsessive compulsive disorder for a decade. For him. That's meant in part washing his hands like I'm constantly getting up from my desk at work to go wash my hands. I keep Clorox cleaning wipes in my bottom drawer. And I'm constantly cleaning things. It got so bad that at one point he's got rid of all this soap in his apartment to break the habit that worked. But then came the pandemic when all of us are supposed to be washing our hands more city. It's a little confused. Sometimes it doesn't know Am I washing my hands for, like, really reasons, or am I washing my hands because of kind of taking over Like this one time when he came in from the grocery store, washed his hands and then brushed against the door frame. There was no reason that anything Covad or anything else would be on that door frame. But he tells me like I got I need to wash my hands and like before I know it. That compulsive behavior kicks in and my hands are in the sink, and I'm washing my hands again. People with the often develop compulsions those air rituals or repeated behaviors that they used to suit themselves when obsessions are unwanted, repeated thoughts pop into their brains. Travis Osborne is a psychologist who specializes in O. C D, he says when the pandemic started, it definitely made me feel really sad of concerned for some of my clients with the city because I just knew Not for some of them. This is going to create more work because of the pandemic. We're all more on edge. But Osborne says that's different from having an anxiety disorder for people with O C. D. Their self soothing rituals take time and interfere with their daily lives. We're really trying to help people. Limit the amount of new ritual izing that they're developing because of this, so that at the end of this, they don't have a whole bunch more symptoms to tackle that they didn't have before. Multiple studies have shown that the pandemic is exacerbating the symptoms of some people with At the same time, some of Osborne's clients have told him I feel like I've been training for this my whole life and I feel like I'm actually doing better than people around me who don't have O. C D because their therapy has been about understanding and coping with their anxiety. Chance. Kennedy has O. C D and some of his obsessions have got in much worse during the pandemic. That's because his unwanted repeated thoughts have to do with his wife and one year old son being hurt in some way, And so now, my two of my biggest triggers I'm around them 24 hours a day because, like so many others he's working from home. There were good, probably three weeks. Where I couldn't shut my brain off as faras making sure they were taken care of. I couldn't calm that I couldn't fight it to cope. Kennedy has developed a new habit. He inspects his lawn to make sure it's watered and trimmed and looking nice. I have to go out and my check it. 3456 times a day even of our dejected today, that ritual soothes his anxiety or what about that spot over there? So I checked that you need to check that in therapy. Kennedy's working on not allowing his worries to become debilitating. Justin Keys, who washes his hands has been in therapy longer. It's helped him learn to accept uncertainty..

Travis Osborne Kennedy Clorox Covad Justin Keys C. D. O. C D
What is Your Working Genius? with Pat Lencioni

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:42 min | 8 months ago

What is Your Working Genius? with Pat Lencioni

"Pat Say what's up to fire nation and the interesting about yourself that most people don't know how you doing fire nation I, have I had obsessive compulsive disorder my entire life I didn't know until I was twenty five and it is so amazing to look back and see how many of my blessings came from my difficulties and though I wouldn't wish something like that on anybody. It's actually shaped me and provided me with opportunities that I didn't have. So I guess I would just say sometimes, the challenges are actually blessings in disguise. Well, I love the you share Dacca's is actually kind of themed today done. Now over twenty six, hundred interviews ends nobody's ever shared that specifically for the first twenty, seven hundred except the person I interviewed two days ago like literally. He's like I can't leave the house if I think a light might be on. Sundays, go back into the house and just like check every room just in case there never delight on he's like but I still have to go check it out. So that's really Yeah, for sure You've ever seen the show by the way HBO. No I'm familiar with it but I haven't seen it. They do a Lotta Great. In a row like three or four in a row or the main character actually like is really dealing with some difficult OCD and that kind of stuff and it's really awesome. But kind of bringing that to the mainstream and showing how that can. Affect you be it's like it's not that uncommon just a reality that a lot of people have to deal with. So very cool stuff all the way around and fire nation as you heard in the intro talked about some really cool things when we're talking about your working genius. So Pat, you've created a lot of awesome things what exactly is a working genius your most recent creation here it's a god given gift or talent that people have that gives them energy and joy and that they're really good at which they're meant to use in the course of getting things done not everybody has all the working geniuses. No nobody does their. Six of these things and two of them are something you love two of them are something you really hate, and there's too many people in the world that are doing the wrong things and wondering why they're not happy or successful. When you figure out what you're working geniuses are and you're working frustrations, it can change your career and Change Your Life Financially I hope you're listening close because I hope you next question's going to be, which is what are these types and I want you that'd be sitting there fire nation and identifying the two that you love the to the you hates it'll be very fascinating won't be getting into some. More details and specifics around that. So Pat, take it away. What are the types? The first type of working genius is one that people don't even recognize as a genius. It's called the the gift or the genius of wonder, and these are people that can sit and ponder things for a long time and they and they contemplate and they think about is there something missing here? Could this be better whether it's is? Is Our product really the right one our customers happy. Is there a better way to do this as their potential here? That's that we're not realizing and people who can sit in that and ponder are genius in the. Sense that every organization needs them. I was just with an executive team of a multibillion-dollar software company and they didn't have any executives on their team that had the genius wonder and and at first they were kind of skeptical and then when we went through their business, they realized nobody ever pondered what was missing at their company and what their customers were going through and the CFO said, if we don't sit and ponder more were never going to be able to come up with a new product, we're never gonna see what's missing and so the genius of wonder is the first one and it's really important in any venture in any activity. But it's not enough. You know it's one thing that to realize that something's missing or something's wrong or something could be better. But somebody asked to come up with a solution and this is the second genius, which is the genius of invention, but genius invention is. People who like to come up with something new original novel out of nothing to solve problems whether it's a product or an approach or an idea or concept. Some people are just naturally gifted and they love creating new ideas. That doesn't mean they came up with the need, but they love to solve the problem. So the genius of wonder need somebody with the genius of invention and a lot of entrepreneurs have this but it's not the only genius because not everything that somebody with the genius of invention comes up with is actually good. They need somebody with the third genius, which is the genius of discernment. Genius of discernment is. Instinct and intuition and judgement. The kind of people that know how to curate an assassin idea or a product, and they just know whether it's good or not, and they know how to tweak things are they know how to evaluate things and they push back on the inventor and they do an iterative process and making it better or they say, Hey, I've seen this before I think and this is a bad idea and they save the inventor from doing the wrong thing. We actually presented the stuff to one of the. Most. Innovative companies in America and the guy in charge of innovation said we come up with inventions and we just throw him against the wall and hope they stick. We have totally missed out on the genius of discernment and as a result, a lot of things failed that they could have caught earlier or tweaked and act, and they're gonNA try to change the way they're organized to make those things work.

PAT Dacca HBO OCD America Executive CFO
Rip Van Winkle

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Rip Van Winkle

"We have some. We have a big show today. We're going to just do our things. Oh Oh man I. I don't know man like I woke up. What's the story about the guy who goes to sleep for like a hundred years and wakes after whatever is that a retail it's not rapunzel it's It's is that echoed crane or. Is that the headless Horseman Sandwich. It's the one In a look at apple look I I could easily Google but I'm not going to. The point is okay. Thank you the point is that. I woke up this morning and I felt like I was waking up from being dead for like one hundred years so I'm tired and disoriented Rip Van Winkle Rip Van Winkle like I said Yeah I feel like Rip Van Winkle but I'm okay like I'm fine but like just I think we would be remiss to not mention that the life is really like tiring right now. Yeah Yeah Wednesday just Just left me. We're recording on on a Thursday crutches. Thursday it's allegedly. Yeah we're all like messed up and like my schedule has totally I? Everything is just is just like kind of a weird Amorphous Blob of time and it's every day is a question of like. How am I going to sculpt this time blob and every day as a surprise? Yeah how fun. Yeah it's a really good time But actually so that's a that's a transition that I'm going to take advantage of talking about this article Yes it has. Oh with the headline training for this our entire lives. And it's by. It's by Todd EMCO. Who's a listener of the struggle bus and the the dog parent of Piggy a very adorable service animal legged SOG piggy offer talk about Peggy for a second piggy is literally the best thing ever piggy is emotional service dog as well and can tell when you're feeling sad and goes up to people randomly and just knows when they're feeling sad so piggies doing overtime? Feel Yeah I feel like yeah piggies like working around the clock probably because picky so good at like human beings But todd takes piggy to schools and and Kids come up to piggy initials relieved beautiful disease. There's a lot of videos about Peggy. But were all linked to this on. Go Bus PODCAST. Dot Com this. Article's really interesting so yes there is really at article by Todd. And it's like talking about how What will the idea is basically that there are many people out there who are what what everyone is experiencing right now in a way there are people who have been kind of you know quote unquote like he says training for this their entire lives so lang todd says as as a severe obsessive compulsive disorder post traumatic stress disorder anxiety sufferer someone with compromised immune system? I know that people like me of spending our entire lives self isolating compulsively washing your hands in dealing with systemic exploitation of our plight and then the article he just he just goes on to talk about the various strategies that He uses in. That are familiar to him for like just dealing with the reality that we're in right now and it's really it's really interesting. It's really helpful. It's published in a mad in Asia Pacific and you can willing to it in the show notes but it's it's really good. I reread at this morning. And there's just like just a bunch of Just like awesome tips in there and not just tips but like just someone talking about you know aspects of a lot of us are feeling right now and it just feels really nice to kind of have that you know be recognized like called out so check that out as someone who has. Ocd and anxiety These are not the things I'm used to like washing. The hands is not my thing. You know checking doors or you know not talking to people and so. I've learned to adapt right so I think it's it's a really beat Florida about adapting and and how our anxiety is you know it can be real and you know we. We talk a lot about What's the word you use the Rip Van Winkle. Yeah no but sort of like just sort of like over thinking things and thinking like Oh. This isn't a catastrophic catastrophic thinking. That's all right. Thank you and and at this point we can think that way and I think that that's in in a very strange way Very welcome for those of us who have catastrophic thinking it's like okay Yeah yeah one thing that like. I can't remember if you and me were talking about this I forget who I spoke about anything on Zoom meeting with the I know. Yeah totally but like I. I've been feeling like Like my in a weird way. I especially felt this way in the very beginning of all of this I when people were like really starting to come around to how serious this was When people finally started to come around I was. I felt like finally relieved in a way. Oh well yeah absolutely but like that my like my like anxiety and vigilance about the world and its dangers and being safe that like other people were finally like thinking about that too and there are many people who think about that all the time because there are plenty of people in our country who are under extreme threat all the time just by virtue of they are but but like. I think that until this happened and like reality set in for a lot of people There were there. Were just a lot of people who aren't accustomed to thinking about what it means to live in uncertainty and to feel you know that the state not only will not protect you but is actively harming you And that there's chaos outside your doors and all the stuff and there's something about like people kind of also realizing that that's happening that made me feel like finally people are getting what I've always gotten like you know just because like we. We all have our own things that were bringing to everything in like my one of the things I bring to. Everything is being hyper vigilant and being like Yeah like thinking catastrophically cause me to spiral and have like not unproductive thoughts but cows probably thinking is also what has like my my like history of catastrophic making my propensity for it is. I think what has positioned me me personally to like. Be Relatively okay during all of this Yeah I'm very surprised. How calm I am during all this. You know I went through my spiral a few weeks ago. Like oh no and now like I'm good right so it's like these are things that we we just talked to our doctors and talk to our friends and it turns out that a lot of people that we know have had this or are carriers and it's very serious and we should take seriously but I like that people are well. I don't like anything about this but I like the people are finally taking it seriously and so when I tell people they're like oh myself as well and I'm like oh now we're sharing and unfortunately I mean this may be we'll go into your your next segment of debris Jabra of I really wish people took this more seriously if they aren't already Know New Yorkers are taking this seriously because we're very close spaces but I see a lot of things on social media where people are like but can I just walk around the block and do this friend and it's like no no. You're hurting us. If you if you heard other people you could be a carrier. I'm sorry to get negative sally. That's fine but do you want to like. How are you feeling are you? Are you doing? Okay just want people to know listening wisely. Yes how allies I am doing. A thousand percent better. I have I still have a low fever which is weird but you know it is what it is and I feel a thousand percent better. I've been just cleaning the apartment and cook and food as much as I can the even though my landlord turned the gas off. But that's another subject entirely

Rip Van Winkle Lang Todd Piggy Apple Peggy Todd Emco Google OCD Asia Pacific Florida Fever
Talking to Your Kids About Coronavirus with Dr. Angharad Rudkin

Scummy Mummies

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Talking to Your Kids About Coronavirus with Dr. Angharad Rudkin

"As we're recording this the Korean various things so kicking off. We've just been told that we should all be staying indoors a bit more and stuff like that and no see kids pick up information. They're getting hand sanitizer at school. All this stuff. How do we talk to a child who has worries about Corona here? It depends on their age and I guess the blanket advice is find out what their worries are a what. They're understanding his kids. They were reason. Understanding of it is can be very different to yours which is going to be very different to your other child because they've different ages and stuff like that so find out. What would you know about Korean virus? What is it that you're worried about? What will the children are speaking to actually the not massively worried about it really? I think that will change when we get into sort of all isolation stuff in the day to day life changes but at the moment allow them on. Because it's not hitting kids no. I'm not seeing kids being really poorly so But for example working with people they see you know obsessive compulsive disorder where the do an awful lot handwashing because of contamination is all of that tattoo shift recently because actually the contamination. Fear is quite realistic. Whereas usually you're able to say what the chances go to. I'd say what worries you don't over do the Info because then it rains just can't take it all in our brains. Come and take it all in this and once. They want to stop talking. Stop talking about it. I think as parents we want to say. Oh and actually this is one more thing. And if they've had enough of it talking about it let them walk away and going to you know. Go Wash your hands. Wash your hands hands face and you know. Let's all enjoy doing. Our thousand piece Jigsaw for the next four months thinking about that. Delivery services are available. Whatever you can keep delivering books games. My father-in-law is literally stacking stocking up on jigsaw puzzles. He's hit that's his response to crisis. Are I love it? That's how that's got writing Richard One. I've 'cause constable on the table a leader. I'm all for that. What about grownups? Then to how do we? How do we deal with our own worries? Because obviously it's very I've found? I have to look a bit less than my phone because even like social media is just everyone panicking. I feel myself. Go into the whole you go and it really is only aggregates of backout. Advises don't really. We know what we need to know. Now we know it's highly contagious. But achy most of his party can be alright so beyond that I reckon can use their stuff because I think we can deal with. Our levels is only going to ramp up so much because the more emotional we get the less logical. We get so actually once. We'VE SEEN THE HEADLINE. You're going to lose a loved one year anxieties sky high. You're not going to be able to logically then look through the numbers and think our chances are. It'll be fine so I would say. Protect yourselves because the more worried we are the more word our children will be and we'd expend everything's sixty boo but we also need to let them know NHL. We're going to be fine. This is just a bit of a change to our normal life. You know what we've got. Lots of lovely tire together. We'll be able to their thousand piece. Jigsaw and actually spend time together because I think I was this earlier but I feel like my brain I have the kind of like nights information like snow all the facts and then I can work out a night. Fine said my brain is like more information on the radio on your phone again. Yes rain someone awesome. What is they give you then also scientist? Dr Like to get more facts. I think I've tried to think about it and I think I'm really doing is. My brain really wants the fat that says. Oh it's all fine and done some news just in we've done an experiment and it's augured. Where every Thursday? And we can all get Donald's it's fine and that's you all over the breaking news. You want the reins absolutely and I think it's that search for certainty isn't it? At a time of uncertainty we when we get inserted unsure about things we want to try and control the situation and I think the news is having a heyday because yes his personal information. British also in industry entertainment industry is going to keep trying to pull is into to find out more and I think our search for certainty keep it domestic keeping you know in terms of where am I going to get my next roller toilet paper. Or what's GonNa be the one hundred lunch I have to make for my children go now? You've got me thinking about toilet paper. How

Corona Fine NHL Richard One Donald Trump Scientist
Clutter vs Hoarding: How to Live Clutter Free

The Psych Central Show

09:47 min | 1 year ago

Clutter vs Hoarding: How to Live Clutter Free

"Tracey. Welcome thanks gave. Thanks for having me. I'm super excited. Well it is. It is my pleasure to have you so it. Seems like decluttering organization hoarding. It's everywhere these days about a decade ago. The television show hoarders. I think was probably like the big flagship but Home Organization. Just seems like it's really hit fever pitch. Why do you think that is you know? I think it's a combination of our easy access to shopping. So cheap. Consumer Goods Amazon delivers in the day. You can get your groceries. I like to joke without even having to put your pants on into cardiac liver right away and then also we live in such a world of visual bombardment. Pinterest instagram facebook. That does being sent these messages of how people think our homes are supposed to look you know before it just used to be a magazine a newspaper television but now it's like you see the perfect home on instagram. You see it on Pinterest. You see it on facebook you see it on the magazine you see it online. You know there's ten different channels coming out. You and I think people are really starting to take stock of how much stuff they actually have and how. It's not really working for them. One of the things that I noticed in preparing for this show is that you really talk about clutter. You don't talk about hoarding now. Is there a difference between hoarding and clutter or de-hoarding decluttering? How do you separate those two concepts? Hoarding is an actual disorder. I am not a therapist. I cannot diagnose it there couple of great resources online. If you're worried that you have cording disorder for a long time. They thought that hoarding was a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder. But in the last couple of years they have separated out as its own disorders so it is an actual mental disorder. Clutter is just having too much stuff. So and that's not to say that there's one way that everybody should live. You know I'm a single person. I live mostly by myself. I have a certain amount of step a family of five absolutely going to have more stuff than I do. But the way that I describe clutter. Gabe is that clutter is the stuff that gets in the way of what you WANNA do. So for instance. You WanNa have dinner at your dining room table. But you can't because it's covered with three four five days worth of mail. The kids sports equipment a sweater. You need to return to your mom or you want to get dressed in the morning without you know having to pull everything out of your closet. A lot of people just get dressed out of their laundry basket because their closet is so full of clothes that they can't access it and use it as a tool so it's really the difference between too much stuff and then that's stuff that you have the clutter you've written in emotional story about so you we have created some story about why we can't let go of it. Either what I called the seven emotional clutter blocks and we all really have at least one some of us have couple more. But everybody's got at least one and what are the seven emotional clutter blocks so clutter block number. One is what I call. My stuff keeps me stuck in the past. You know. These are my parents whose kids have gone away to college yet. They still have their bedrooms. Saved exactly as a museum. This is keeping close that we can't fit into anymore. This is our staff telling us that our best days are behind us and to a certain extent. Isn't that also where our memories come from though like how do you separate the stuff that keeps me in the past? Because they're closed that haven't fit since high school and the stuff that keeps me in the past as in family heirlooms. It's when we attach to that right when we think. Oh I'm going to get back in those clothes you know. Of course the family heirlooms are the things that you look at. You know they make you happy and they remind you of your grandmother. I'm not saying that step. I'm saying if you have a closet. The other day and her linen closet re of the shell the five. Shell were full of artwork that our kids had made in preschool and elementary school. Her kids are grownups now. Their doctors so this stuff that her kids had created which while one or two of the Turkey hands were fantastic. I don't know if she needed all Edebali Right. Like sweet memories and that reminded her of it but she had three shelves in her linen closet that she couldn't use because she was stuck in the past. She didn't want to let go of when her kids were. Little makes perfect sense and then clutter block number two cutter. Black number. Two is my stuff tells me who I am? The best way to describe this clutter block is a client. Said to me with her hand on her hip. How can I possibly be lonely? I have two hundred pairs of shoes. You know this is our identity. This is the designer labels this is. I'm not lonely because I'm out of the sale at Nordstrom's this is really using our stuff as our identity and do a Lotta senior downsizing so it helps seniors move from lifelong homes into smaller spaces and I see this a lot with my older gentlemen. Who used to fix the car? Used to do the handiwork around the house you know really identified being helper in the family and now that they're older and maybe can't get up on a ladder. It's really hard for them. To let go of who they used to be. Emotional clutter block number three. If I am correct. It's the stuff that you're avoiding absolutely and full confession. I am a clutter block number three. I have it. I go a week without opening my mail so this is not opening our mail. This is not paying our taxes. This is not doing the business of being grown up and the interesting thing gave about this one. The people who tend to be very very successful at their job almost always seem to have letter block number three that they're really really successful work but then when they come home they avoid doing their grownup stuff. I completely agree with that. I feel that my day while I'm at work is when I am an adult and my time at home is when I can enjoy life and a lot of the stuff that I'm avoiding is stuff that I know is just going to make me unhappy. We'll just go with GONNA say angry unhappy annoyed so it can wait till tomorrow right absolutely and also this is an absolute block. Because you think I'm so together at work of course got it together at home. I'll get to that stuff eventually. So it's this story that we've told ourselves but what happens with this clutter block especially you know. This is the one that can end up costing you a lot of money right. You don't pay your taxes or you get behind in fees and interest like this is the one that can really do some damage. Also when that's like just put your big girl pants on and open your mail. Just do it. You GotTa do it now. This next one really spoke to me personally because I think that I'm definitely guilty of it. So emotional clutter block. Number four is my fantasy stuff for my fantasy life. I am so guilty of this county. What what do you? What do you fantasize you're GONNA be or should be so for me? I just keep thinking that I need to hang onto certain things because I'm GonNa need it in the future for example as soon as my podcast gets on. Sirius Satellite Radio. I'm going to need all of this equipment. This equipment is not doing me any good and when I'm even going to say when Sirius Satellite Radio comes a calling. They're not gonNA want my crappy equipment but I just believe if I get rid of it. I had limited my choices. And that's really the emotional part right absolutely. I believe that this stuff is connected to my success. Even though your going to tell me that it's not and you're right by the way you're you're so right and the great thing about that example in Vancouver Sherry is that you know what Sirius Xm radio has you studios beautiful equipment. They have the best of the best so while I love that. That's a goal for you like get the fantasy part out of it. Get into the reality of it again. That goes back to. You're not living the life that you're living right now. You're not happy with what you have. You're not focusing on. This is the equipment that I used to do. My podcast and it works. It's fantastic all this other stuff. I don't use but when I look at it. I remind myself that I'm not where I WANNA be. Not necessarily in a good way. It becomes a stumbling block absolutely this one. I see a lot around fitness equipment. These are the people who go. You know what I need to be. I need to be a rock climber. My life would be perfect. If I'm a rock climber. So they go out and they buy all the equipment they don't rent it they don't borrow it. They buy all the equipment. The shoes little bags with the chalk and they get up the rock and they're like I'm scared of heights or I don't like this at all and then they've gotten all this stuff with this thing that they think they should be and they're not and then they get angry at themselves. Why should be that? It's like no if you're not a rock climber you're still a really good

Sirius Satellite Radio Pinterest Home Organization Facebook Amazon Tracey. Turkey Nordstrom Sirius Xm Radio Gabe Sherry Vancouver
Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

People of the Pod

10:29 min | 1 year ago

Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

"Talk about some. I'm pretty heavy issues. Israel Iran Patriot of Jews. So our next guest is a pretty big leap for us. Ashley Blaker is Jewish standup comedian. He is the first Orthodox Fox Jewish comedian to be given his own BBC. Show Ashley Blaker. GOYA's guide to Judaism which returned to the air in October. Two Thousand Nineteen. Now he's in New York for his latest off off Broadway. Show Ashley Blaker Goi friendly which premieres at the Soho playhouse. On February third and runs through February twenty third. While his previous off-broadway production strictly unorthodox was tailored for Jewish audiences. This one he says is not just for the Jews. It tells the story of how Ashley's close friendship with Muslim. Comedian Imron on. UCS completely changed his life with antisemitic incidents on the rise around the globe and even here in New York actually hopes to make the audience laugh but also understand stand a little bit more about their Jewish neighbors Ashley. Welcome to our studio. Thank you for having me so I have to ask you right out of the gate. anti-semitism is not funny. So how how do you address that topic with humor. Well the reality is I think he's anything can be funny. So I'll let you come to Louis showing judge whether I make. It isn't about antisemitism. I should say that there is actually a section is a band. Semitism thought. I think the more interesting is the fact that that when antisemitism is on the rise there are two ways of dealing with. This is a way of kind of hunkering down. Just going. We're we're now gonNA stick to ourselves and and try and protect ourselves and put up the security barriers and let's have lots of armed guards on the on the door in social ones bags and all of that stuff all you can kind of outreach. As it were and try and engage with the outside world and that's what my shows about about the latter it's about reaching out to the outside world and in a way this makes wants a comedy show. You know hopefully nonstop funny. Sound sound incredibly dry but Hopefully demystify Judaism a little bit. That's certainly one of the aims. Okay well I would say you could do both right. Do the security see the undercover getting having no security either. All kind of you know very good at that accused but I actually my playbill. I wrote a Performance note and for Bates Him. But I said something about how you know very good dividing ourselves as a as an in one of the things into I enjoy doing you mentioned my show strictly and also those I I love bringing choose together because we figured it kind of separating ourselves in so many different ways you know on the whole joke about the Jewish man who lands on a desert island and he builds two synagogues one ones that he'll go to one that he wouldn't ever be seen dead and that's like what we're like but I do think that there is it is an important time to actually reach out a little bit and we can. I think sometimes certainly not in any way suggesting that we. We are in any way a foot four and symptom of course but I sometimes think that actually being too insular. Isn't that helpful. Listen so now you are from the UK so well the Labor Party. I have to ask you about the Labor Party. I'm afraid But it's often regarded as the political liberal party of choice by many Jews in Great Britain. And I'm curious how you dealt with the last election and whether or not you felt politically homeless as I kept had reading about the Jewish community. There didn't myself but I'm sure other people did and I think that yes certainly in the post for many Jews the Labor faulty will have. I've been there home by just as much as the Conservative Party would be for many Liberal Democrat. We have quite a different political system. Should know to to to the Americans as many but yes I mean. It was incredible. What happened over the last few years and how symtas I'm just rose and seem to not be dealt with toll within the Labor Party in? Yeah it was a terrible thing we still really really been dealt with properly gone away. Yeah I know there were. There were several vile things said many vile things said ed by Labour politicians but then also Jeremy Corbyn himself was talking about the lack of irony that many British Jews seem to have. I don't know if you recall that particular. Yes it was Avia. Yeah it was a video I think from a while ago. Actually but he had yes he had said something. And there's a lot of these kind of allusions I think is because they. They caught clever then. They don't outright. This isn't the foul right then marking the street saying killed the Jews. It's a very allusive. Quite clever thing of of Hinson these particular weight alluding that Jews and Israel inflating the to and to you know the whole talking about antisemitism and anti Zionism also that that things that really came along with the Labor Party and I saw something videos of people saying no no we. We're not intimately to we like the right to choose. I think there's that thing of the good news and the bad news and I think that's a really good. Jews has ones March against Israel and kind of write letters to the Guardian saying that we support Sanctioned bedia smell that kind of thing uh-huh and then the ninety five percent of the badges. I mean that's clearly terrible things so it's been a really dark period and I didn't know it'll be interesting to see in the the next four five years. How things change? Have you tried to address it with humor. There over showed. I just did a toll in opened in in May with my friend Imran you mentioned draymond so imminent. He did a tour together called profit sharing actually breaking news in profit sharing seek clever title. And it's not address head on there are other people addressing this head on and the the truth is the way to look on twitter five minutes especially around the time the election to see that kind of Echo Chamber people. Don't WanNa hear they. You know you you tweet. Something about Labor Jeremy Corbyn and immediately comes back. This prepared list of twenty times. Jeremy Corbyn has both a motion ocean in parliament. That's been helpful to community Blah Blah Blah say. No one listens to each other anymore. People just spout the same thing. So I'm not sure engaging in that kind of way addressing head on is that helpful she because people just don't want to listen right. I'm sure it's the same here with trump and I'm sure there are people who are vehemently say one one thing you don't want to listen to the side. Yes that is. That is a problem that area. So I think that's something we've seen a lot particular around brexit and all these issues as we've had in the UK and the F. But so my show anyway. Mike show look comedy show. That's the the the main PARV. So I'll tell you briefly I mean essence shows. It's about yeah. Tell us about the show but then I also want to hear more about Enron and your friendship so the show about my friend she was Enron said. So that's the kind of I think in film in terms they call that the macguffin. He's kind of you know that you heard that term. I'm not familiar with that. So it's like using the original star wars. I think C. Three Po an onto d two of the macguffin that they're the ones like sent off into onto the desert and enter tattooing. They've got the messages item. Thank you the whole plot revolves from. Then there's no actually about them but it starts from them so in a way money's the macguffin hit because is a true story we're good friends we went untold together. And he's very interested custody my life he didn't know much about Judaism me belly of June. We spent many hours together in the call. He was always drawing because he he's Muslim. Couldn't in claiming been drinking and he's always asked me questions and I kind of wanted to teach him about Judaism. But where do you start. We've got six hundred thirteen commandments. It's too long to the call I didn't want to spend money on guests so I thought well I teach him about the Ten Commandments. And we started looking at the Ten Commandments. And I unrealized. They're not that practical you know he doesn't have an ox next all so there's no need to worry about not coveting it and I so I could. Maybe set myself challenge of coming up with my own ten commandments. That I could be a bit more practical. But they could actually explain what it's like to be an Orthodox Jew in two thousand twenty and in a way. It was my friendship with him. That made me reconsider my Judaism. Because she had I've been living as an Orthodox Jew for the best part of twenty years but it's only when an outside comes along install challenging us at you start having to think about it you start thinking about your love. So that's what the shows about and it's about me going through these ten commandments. My New Ten Commandments. antiquing this to him okay. So do you mind sharing a few of the talk commanded if you're the one of them is thou shalt develop obsessive compulsive disorder okay. She's an integral Paulsville so shoot as But we cover branch of Judy. Check that box right exactly. So we cover a lot of these areas we cover kosher food and living in a Jewish area. We talk about the curse of praying public and this covers a lot of ground really comes a lot of ground in the show and then And then the story I keep finished. The story has a continuation because of how Im- reacted and then what we went off did something together which I don't want to spoil because that's the narrative But it's a pretty funny chairman. I it really is. I'm super proud of it. So you say I did. This show could street Lennox. It was aimed at a Jewish audience. All Jews knock. He's also dogs. Reform Perform Conservative unaffiliated. But Still Jews and I think it's a really. I really wanted to do something. Everyone could cutting joy That would be in a language WIGGs. Everyone can understand but the is serious does not scrimp on the jokes atone. It's the funniest show of ever done this by miles miles because I've already but still called the serious stuff when we do discuss antisemitism and there are some real takeaways well foam it excellent zone. The show's name. Is Ashley. Blaker friendly it's at the Soho playhouse here in New York City from February third to twenty-third. Thank you for joining us. Thank

Ashley Blaker Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn Israel New York Soho Playhouse Enron Goya Comedian Imron Conservative Party UK Semitism Twitter Louis Bates New York City Great Britain Avia Guardian
I Can't Stop Picking My Skin

Forever35

04:53 min | 1 year ago

I Can't Stop Picking My Skin

"You know what I have started doing. Tell me picking my face haven't rubbed off on you know you ha. I didn't even know you were face picker other than like the Times. We've disgusted here. I don't see like I don't know visually experience it. I don't see you doing it. It I don't see your open wounds I don't know what it is. It's not I'm not in the mirror picking my face. It's almost like Oh interesting searching TV. I S- I rubbed my face looking for like. Oh I'm a hick. Yea I gotta get this okay. It off I'm a mirror picker interesting like you go and seek out the pick you look for something to pick. You'll be like ooh. Is there anything that needs tending too. I mean I acknowledged that this is a compulsive behavior totally. It's not actually. I don't recommend this. We'll in you know as I mentioned before in this podcast. I'm an active busy Phillips. Follow or on instagram. And she talks a lot about her feast. Picking and I had never even won. I don't notice it when I look at her instagram. But it clearly was something that was bothering offering her. Yeah and now that I've started doing it. I understand this feeling of like. Why can't I stop this physical act? Yeah my hands so one thing that has helped me and I don't know if this would help you because you're not a mirror picker but although this has helped me sometimes if I'd had like those big zits that are like under here the skin that you just like that yeah I do find the costs. Rx Pimple Patches. It's not that they make visit. Go Away it's just that they make it so you can't really pick. It's a good little band. It's a good little band aid so I would try those. I have like five current like active. Pick Hick sites on my face right now. So I'm just me covered patches. I think that's fine. Okay I mean I'm not self conscious I would go out like I am out. I did to notice. They're completely transparent. Yeah transparent isn't the right word. I'm looking for their see through through. But what about the kind of compulsive Holst's of obsessive compulsive disorder I have been like tentatively diagnosed with. ADHD which isn't another thing that people have said like it's is correlates correlates for them. Do you find it's relates to like anxiety or depression or anything like that or is it just a habit hard to essay. Because I've been doing it for so long. Okay yeah and this is different in your opinion than like popping 's it. Oh no this is. This is picking this this is totally popping as it okay but like gouging my face to posit audit like the way I feel like sometimes if if I have as it that is relatively small I will make my face look worse so that I can pop it he. Yeah and I know that I'm doing and you make the actual pimple. You're at holy. I just left at the hell alone. Would've just gone away. And instead I have a wound on there and it's like an open construction. Say Yes so you know. I've talked talked about this in relation to my Bikini Line Right which I used to pick out compulsively which was gross. Because I would get ingrown hairs every time I got waxed and then I just got it laser so I remove the I fully remove the temptation. If there's nothing to pick than I you know I couldn't pick it so And actually when I was pregnant I had nothing. I'd knows that my skin was amazing. So you're saying I should get pregnant. I'm saying get pregnant and then not get back. You won't pick your face no but like that was sort of a revelation of like. Oh it's sort of a crime of opportunity and I seek out these little things to pick but if there's nothing to pick I'm like okay. Oh you let it go. Yeah I'm like creating picks very it's very I don't know how to do. I don't know what it is. Have you talked to your therapist amount of no but I am going to at our next sash. Okay get ready there. Has she might have some some suggest suggest especially because it all. I'm sure is connected to some of my mental health behavior. which is you know which is also fine? Like I'm not mad at myself word. I don't feel like I'm judging. It's just like I woke up one day and I'm like oh I'm doing this now. Totally this is a new activity right. Does she do. CB T. Yes oh. Then we'll work and you're good. We'll work on it. I love my therapist I'm glad you brought that up. Well thank you know. I think it's good to share. Sure well you know it's a new thing. Yeah so I'm just kind of trained to observe it without judgment which is

Adhd Times Holst Phillips Crime Of Opportunity
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Obsessive compulsive disorder maybe have a little touch of it or maybe you're married to someone who can okay those categories that you ran down yes when I have these and I don't know why I outgrew them I honestly don't it's not like I sought therapy for them but most of mine were even explain this most of mine were about touching to be symmetrical white give five a I don't explain this to you before but like if I would if my thumb would touch the palm of my hand right on my right hand man and if I thought about it then I would have to go to my left hand and touch my left hand you know with my thumb the same way like close my thumbs and my pops but then we get weird because then if I felt that I did it twenty percent harder on my left hand then I had done originally my right they don't have to go back and try to do it just at twenty percent of what I had originally done to try to make them even now and I would sometimes go like back and forth for like five or six times a gun on that one was a little tougher now wow now over that they're right and I like what category with that hello this is definitely a counter in a ranger what I think will says they're obsessed with order and symmetry I forgot the words imagery and you're right in the face there who who but of course I don't have a numbers thing but I've got like a sensory thing does your wife have a thing with colors in what way I don't know it's just one of the S. superstitions about numbers colors or arrangements I don't think so I don't think so hi Toby I've got the weird thing about that I know that's a separate thing I think it's called synesthesia where when everything is certain colors I assignment something like like what well like okay if I think of the day of the week like Saturday Saturday is always like a burnt orange color but will it be at Lee yeah like a yeah I said the kind of almost backwards I will think of days of the week in terms of color like a Friday always like a dark hunter green what's today today yeah when the Wednesday Wednesday is like a very light pale blue and these have no association with anything else nothing nothing whatsoever I don't know why I ever got that all right so I'm screwed up what about you that's were calling is our one eight hundred two eight three one one point five Susan from Parsippany you're in New Jersey one one point five hi I'm probably going to state the obvious I have a habit of adding things up down to its lowest number and you do realize you work at one a one point five right he is seven seven so that's why she married me well I mean like she's so out of my league I mean it makes sense now yeah all right now it's all clear yeah it is a little bit okay well like how does it manifest with you like how do we give me an example of what you might my sisters are to and she's a true because she was born on September eleventh in nineteen sixty two so you add that up and he was twenty nine twenty nine equals eleven one plus one equals two yeah because this person a lot to go through while wow yeah I I have a habit of ending the numbers up in their simplest form and then I just keep adding them until I break it down to its lowest number no does this get in the way of your life in any way or is it almost just like a fun hobby I find myself doing it like you know if we're driving somewhere and I see a sign you know like you know you get good at three twenty one well three plus two plus one in the US so the everywhere I just had to add things up but not to the point that you drive off a bridge from distraction well my husband might disagree with you so what's your phone number single digit your phone number down to a single digit is what for so since he's already done it that's kind of figured you well played that is a perfect test Susan thanks for your call wow that's a that's a good one that's unique Eddie in old bridge journey Jersey one one point five our Jackson go are you guys good okay about my fiance I love her to death so I can relate to the gentleman that said about his wife the clerk all right where do I start I'm not that the knobs are the urn the other she takes a lot every day put them in the dishwasher and clean issues in the class that they have to stand up right all perfect in a row on the catch up by multiple ketchup mustard quality can't there like March of the wooden soldiers I will like we're never going to eat all this catch up she just never once around out yeah yeah you deal with this not to that now my mo no my wife's her things are different for things different categories yeah I love her to death but I love her quirks but arm yes this is what I deal with every day okay does it put pressure on you do you feel like you can never be sloppy because of her yeah of the nine we've been living together about a year and me and yeah I'm like this you're not the same way she added like what the hell yes ma'am yeah yeah will compromise the wife happy life there you go all right we'll take more of your calls coming up share your O. C. D. one eight hundred two eight three one one point five vandals Portugal can't legally say the name of the football game that's coming up so let's just say it's a big game order gargantuan yet you might even say the game is superb well FanDuel can't legally say the name you can legally bent on that game as long as you're in New Jersey and make the.

Magic Mushrooms Pass First Hurdle as Depression Treatment

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Magic Mushrooms Pass First Hurdle as Depression Treatment

"This is interesting another party drug it's not the first one showing signs of going legit as magic mushrooms have cleared the first hurdle of testing required to become a treatment for depression magic mushrooms key active ingredient is subtle Simon and was found to be safe as well as tolerated when given to healthy volunteers in a study by researchers at king's college in London by the way side effect the subjects got very high yet very stoned kind of figure out a way to get the good part of the mushrooms without the bad part of them so that's what they always try to do I'm not so sure they really should try but I you know what it's not a problem MP walking around high all the time no no that's good but you know so it's a Sir seeking to enlist patients to test the chemical for ailments including addiction Alzheimer's disease anorexia obsessive compulsive disorder and migraines and anything you can do to avoid having to make new chemical drugs if you can use natural in a natural substances well why not I wonder how many people are gonna raise their hand to sign up sure that they'll have

Simon London King Alzheimer's Disease Migraines
Edward Norton Discusses His New Film 'Motherless Brooklyn'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

11:37 min | 1 year ago

Edward Norton Discusses His New Film 'Motherless Brooklyn'

"Everybody. I'm Peter Travers this popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a movie out now that I truly love called motherless Brooklyn which is written directed and starred my guest Edward Norton Great Devere then too long. It's been way too but I talk about long as long as I've known you which has has to be going on twenty years. We've been talking about mother. It was really you've been. That book came out. Jonathan Lethem's book came out and he said I'm going to do that. Yeah this is going to be. But it's finally here. Peter I told you I would and I did I did but you know I can't wait another twenty wanted to do it. But how do you feel now. Really good I when something's been rattling around your head for a long time it is it is nice to get it out. It's sort of like I relate. My character has to read syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder and when he talks about having glass in the brain. And that's a little bit how this project was for me. It was like glass in my brain. I want. It was uncomfortable and I wanted to. I did want to get get it out but apart from that personal compulsion to see it through. I'm happy with the way it came out. Maybe maybe more than I usually am. Actually it's saying the things I wanted to say and I think maybe you commented on this. It's it's sort of. I don't think it would have had the resonance that that it has now ten years ago. Honestly We were talking about this before we started just the difficulty of course as he has commented on very eloquently. I think in his kind of elegy to the how difficult theatrical films have gotten how difficult it has gotten to release original theatrical films. It's it's always a struggle for filmmakers to make original Ville visions. It's always been you see the cast we had in this film. We have Bruce Willis and Willem Defoe and Alec Baldwin and Google about the Ron and Bobby Kennedy Volley in great great actors. But you still have to. You still have to sort of struggle to find the resources is you need to make it. And I wasn't and I didn't need them. Two hundred million easy. My I got all my actors working the free on my actors worked for nothing to help me get it made honestly but you still but you still have to still have to figure it out. Well there's so many things in terms of mother Louis Brooklyn about what you have to do even with a studio backing him. You have a movie that maybe they don't know what the title is. Maybe maybe they never read Jonathan's book it'd be they're saying what's it about right. I'll what is this and that money has to be poured into letting them know what it is. Ask because not presold been John Game. Yeah No to do the property those things and look in my case. I I was there saying look. I WanNa make a big old fashioned period epoch about New York in the vein of the Godfather or L. A. confidential confidential. or any any of these great old fashioned movie experiences I think demonstrably audiences really loved right when they're good. We all love of those films and and I wanted to mash it up a little bit with other another type of movie. I love which you also have a pure you know sort of the underdog the the forrest gump. The Rain Man That idea of a a hero. whose very unusual has an unusual condition edition? That you've never seen before that you feel empathy for and the empathy that you feel for him the the fact that you immediately. You're on his side. That's part of what that's what pulls you through. A murky. It takes is one of the nicest guys you've ever played. WELL HE IS I. I think he's well. It's funny and someone said to me you've done a lot of people with Conditions are afflictions. I said No. I've done a lot of people who are fating conditions or yeah like like primal fear baking the score with Deniro in American History X. There's no faking. He's he's just. He's angry mentally ill and the truth is this character. He's not mentally ill he. Just has he has terrip syndrome so people they call him freak show but he's he's smart and he's intelligent. He's he's susu sensitive. The great thing about watching this movie is that it takes awhile sometimes for you to say my brain isn't working like Lionel's right. Oh He's piecing together this puzzle in his own head his own synapses and we're trying to put a linear thing that isn't there. No Oh but I I actually the only thing that I just. I think that Agreeing in house district buys by a certain point story. I think when characters this goes back to like J D Salinger Holden caulfield and catcher in the Rye when sometimes when a character tells you his own story right from the start you you relate you feel the emotional hook and I think if you set that hook early with a character if in this case Lionel in a classic detective voice over where he tells you I have something wrong with me. I struggle with it. I I have friends. Who Understand? Me like Bruce Willis but not everybody does and it's it's tough. You know you start to go. Oh I inside this guy I understand him. You want him to do well. You don't want him to trip himself up. You're always reform. I I just think what you're doing you're saying I don't quite know how he's piecing it together doesn't tell you know and that goes to what you've done with Jonathan Lethem's book set in the late nineties but you send it back in time as through the fifty S. I don't think anybody ever knew what to read sets the well. That's what you just said is part of the reason we put it in the fifties the the the isolation the characters isolation not just in terms of other people being a little less sensitive calling him freak show But if you know that he doesn't even know what he has your even more sympathetic. It's it's it's even more isolating to not know what's wrong with you in some sense but the other thing was honestly Jonathan and I both really like those movies. The the the old fashioned atmospheric feeling of those noir films from that era. The novel motherless Brooklyn Brooklyn is very interior it's inside the characters head but obviously a film is a big a bigger canvas. You have you've got to create a landscape for people to look cat and it's great landscape. Yeah it's that whole fifties thing that's going on in New York and why. Why no is called called motherless Brooklyn Yeah you know why basically has nobody so no one looking for him? But he has Bruce Willis's character yes when a minutes boys so he he has something. And that's how this movie starts. It's about who killed my mentor. Who did this and then we get what to me? She has a real chinatown by. which is where's what's festering underneath this? It's not just who murdered character. What's going on? It's it's what's going on. Well you had the water in La. That was going on. You Know Chinatown chinatowns. Great because it's about La's original sin. It's not just about Out a mystery it's about the idea that La is built on crime. And that's and that's that's what I like about our foams. They they do. What you said is exactly right? It says hey they say hey yes. It's a certain mystery and a certain emotional relationship is driving why he's investigating but really what what this about is the more he he takes us into the shadow we realize there are things going on in what we call our democratic like Galateri in New York society that are violently antagonistic to everything. We say we believe in which we see through the out Baldwin Characters or Robert Moses type character master builder under a person that says I'm GonNa create the city to look like this and then cuts out anybody who's an outside anybody who is into one percenter right which which is what goes to the topicality. Yeah even now and was a racist t the total race. Yeah and I think that idea of the way that the way that we actually baked people talk about institutional racism but discrimination was literally baked into the Way New York was built into a modern city. They literally did do things like lower bridges to the new beaches. They overpasses they set them too. Low for buses is to clear them. Because they didn't want black and Latino minority citizens coming to the new public beaches so they literally limited access and people think that sounds like a conspiracy theory but it happened though it did happen and we see it and yet these are things that you have in your screenplay screenplay this book added to. Yes what was in the book right when you collaborate with somebody like Jonathan Right. WHO's a really terrific right? I really great writer. Is He with you on. I couldn't have done what I did on. This was bowled you could call it. Yeah but but he doesn't say what have you done. No no no no. I wouldn't do that without checking it out out with him. I I felt that I felt there was reasons to set it in the fifties. We talked about that. He liked that idea because he likes those films and I think he he knew is fill his book we had a certain Surreal Meta modernism. If you WANNA call it data it's really about the interior life of this character. He he wasn't so married to the plot per se. The plot didn't wasn't like the story of my family or the story of my city. It was it's a very Byzantine mazed. It's really an excuse to write the character in some sense. You know he also loves Raymond Chandler and you know those guys marlow at the detective. Active in Chandler with went through a couple of novels right so we kind of approached it like his great character going into another the next another another story in terms of taking a movie which you've described we've talked about it now and putting it on the screen. Do you worry about it reaching reaching an audience putting out kind of putting out work that you do that you you have a deep feeling for is always It's always got Certain emotional risk no matter how thick skin you get over the years no matter how many no matter how many you know. I've been through quite a few experiences like I'm getting a a nice honor from the camera. Image Festival in Poland this year. It's the Great Cinematography Festival right. And they sent me a rundown of the films they wanted to review in this thing. And it's amazing like at the top line of of those kinds of assessments of films. I've done that people think are really Definitive or something like that. You have like fight club. And he's always in there and the twenty fifth and American history x is always in there and none of those films did well.

Bruce Willis New York Jonathan Lethem LA Brooklyn Jonathan Peter Travers Jonathan Right Edward Norton Peter I Lionel Raymond Chandler Louis Brooklyn Terrip Syndrome Google Ville Forrest Gump Poland J D Salinger Holden Caulfield Chandler
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

"Always wanna find no CD specialists and go get a good assessment to make sure that's what's going on. There could be some other stuff going on as well. So we wanna know the full picture before you dive into treatment. But but start with a good assessment. If you have a kiddo start with an assessment on medical clinic, a place like Texas children's hospital, you were here in Houston, or you know, a children's hospital that as a psychiatric clinic or a psychology clinic that they can go doing a SAS men in once you get a proper diagnosis. Make sure you get the proper treatment people say, well, how do I know if someone says they treat OCD how do I know if they do? We'll super simple you pick up the phone, and you call and you say, hi, you know, I was wondering treat OCD what treatment do us in on their own. They don't say Earp e you say, thank you very much and you move on. On because you will not get better without the proper care. Yeah. I think that's so important for forget here. Because for a lot of mental things people say, oh, I went to see someone, and it wasn't very helpful. But knowing that you can say either beforehand or during you can say, hey, what are you doing? Like what explain what's happening? What would you call this? You know, and you're allowed to evaluate that and say, maybe somebody else would be more helpful. I think is good for people to know. Because sometimes I think there's a perception like all mental health, clinicians do everything, and that's just not feasible even for clinicians and certainly not on their part. So you're you're you're invading setting, and you kind of treatment setting you can say, hey, what's what's happening? Right. Like, that's you're there to get better. So you're more than welcome to do that. It's your treatment. But more importantly at share life. Right. And you have to ask questions you need to be informed. So that you can make the best decisions for you for your future. And the reality is is that I probably wouldn't have member needed impatient treatment. If I had gotten proper care when I first showed symptoms. Signs. But you know, the worst longer we go without proper care. The worse are illness gets and just because I've patients all day long commends tried treatment before it doesn't work for me. Well, what treatment of you tried right? And if it's not the right stuff, it probably didn't work for you. So let's give the right stuff a try. And so what I'll say is that if you're listening in you struggle with mental health condition, even if it's not a CD just because you've been to provider, and you haven't gotten better, it doesn't mean there's not hope for you or help for you hope and help are always available. We.

OCD Earp Houston Texas
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

"Tons of webinars we bring in leading experts from across the world for their content area. And so are what we used to do a lot of stuff right here. Locally like conferences in different things. And we realized you know, can't really help as many people's we mean to help and we've got to change that into we've really shifted to this online format because it allows so many more people to be able to listen here and be a part of a community. That's needed. Again. Yeah. No. That's fantastic. Says I'm so glad that y'all are doing that. And I'm glad you mentioned peace of mind to that was is definitely something that I want to be sure that will link in our show notes along with OCD challenge. So that folks can have access to those resources and the things that you're doing. And I I mean me, but you're I'm just thinking as you were talking about other things that I know that you're doing right now. So like in the Houston community, right? You just started. I think working with K O you is that right was see thirty nine. Yeah. All right. I'm their mental health expert on Monday mornings, and we have a mental health segment every Monday. And then the thing I I love the most is the first and third Wednesday of every month. I do live with Liz on my page of peace of mind. It's a great way for people with OCD to be able to submit live questions and be able to get advice in. I I give it right there. But the other thing I'm super excited about is that since January peace of mind, we've launched now an online support group. It's the second fourth nerves damn every month at seven pm central time, and you can go to my website peace of mind dot com and sign up there..

OCD Liz Houston K O
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

"Can help you and they start doing treatment and modalities that not only don't help him. But like you're continuing to get worse. And what we know about mental illnesses that when it's not treated appropriately. Just like any condition. It will get worse. Right. A magin if if you've got an underlying onus yet, you're trying to just kinda do some stuff on the surface, you still treat that underlying illness at the root cause in what's going on. And so received a lot of bad care, and I continued to knock it. Well, in a lot of times, it was people who wanted to help, but who didn't have the resources, and and or who believed they could help and really weren't capable of that I'm in. So when I finally got to the miniature clinic, and for the first time, I was exposed to evidence based treatment, you know, treatment that is rooted in research that we know works in that is affected for this disorder. And of course, there's evidence based treatment promote. Disorders. I that's when my life really changed. That's when I realize, wow, I can live manageable life despite this diagnosis and everybody with any mental health condition should have that same opportunity. And so for OCD in particular, we use exposure with response prevention treatment is a specific form of CBT. And that's a slow systematic treatment model used to help you work through your fears really into the short of it as we slowly exposed people to the things that they're afraid of. And we ask them to not engage in the rituals. Right. So people with OCD a lot of people say, oh, you do exposure therapy. No, we do not exposure therapy. Proceed the reality at people with OCD too exposures every day by to get out of this room and contamination issues and touch doorknob. I've done exposure. But if I walked down the hall and wash my hands, it's not an effective exposure finding my onus now the onus has been reimposed. I in the OCD will continue to live we have to exposure with response prevention. So we we touch the doorknob and we prevent the response of a hand wash. And so, you know, it's one of those things that the community is really really small in a way that is disturbing right? That we all know each other. We know each other by name like, I can tell you who a decent practitioner is pretty much anywhere that you live in the US, and we have to change that. And people always say will how does it change changes everywhere. I mean education has to change when more training social workers when we're training psychologists when we're training masters level clinicians. We need to be teaching them about evidence based care for OCD. Most a lot of people academia don't know how to treat a CDN. So the broad DSM. Course, they're not getting into the weeds, you know. And then these people go in practice, and they may not know how and you know, it's also a problem because there's foreign few between that are OCD specialists. And so very few OC span. Analysts are in rural areas or in areas outside of big cities with medical centers. And then of course, the third leg is the cost right win win. It's a limited amount of providers available..

OCD US
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on CXMH

"It used in kinda this like off handed way of this person is so CD or whatever usually in terms of like, oh, I like my books organized, or, you know, things are I like it when my kitchen's clean, but those aside from not being like harmful. There's no problem with that. There's like a logic behind them. Right. Like, oh, I can find things easier or just like a better when it's clean, which isn't necessarily the level of compulsion or obsession, which is talking about. So I think it is one of those that we somehow it's gotten into the language of using kind of hand, which maybe he is good because more people know the term, but maybe also bad because it makes it harder. The reality of this is the thing that I mean, you said people file stability like this is a very real thing that impacts people's lives. Absolutely. You know, it's a it's a disabling disruptive disorder. And it's important that we recognize it as. That we we understand the severity that it can have for people who live with it. And but agree, you know, it's funny because people know that acronym, they didn't know the acronym years ago. So you're right. Maybe it's a good thing in that aspect, but it's also hard when we have to undo their beliefs in and try to change how people perceive or understand illness. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Well, and ensuring that they're not being unintentionally harmful to those who really do struggle with this in really, do, you know, carry this this heavy burden in a lot of ways of of this disorder, and how manifest on that really kind of links me to the next question. I know you have been so courageous in your ability to be transparent about your journey with OCD, including being diagnosed back when you are twelve officially, but can you tell us a little bit about your journey with OCD and kind of what that looked like when you were younger, and and as you got older. Eamon feeling free to share some of what you know, the role your family has played in your journey as well. Absolutely. You know, I grew up here in Houston, which is where I live now biggest medical center in the world, some of the best health care accessible at our fingertips. And so when I first presenting symptoms. I was about twelve years old. I started doing kind of typical OCD thing. So a lot of contamination rituals a lot of engagement in inexcessive showering ritualized hand, washing cleaning behaviors and also scrupulously the religious form of OCD. So a lot of 'em excessive prayer avoidance of wearing random blacks. I thought it was the colors the double frayed of anything that was associated with the number six because six is the number of the double double etc in lots of reassurance seeking so asking my mom repeated questions and getting stuck in Monday activities going in and out of doorways things like that. And so pretty quickly got a diagnosis. I will say getting diagnosis was pretty easy here in town. I think that you know, the profession. Knew enough about OCD to know that like, oh, this is all CD because some of my symptoms were pretty common in pretty obvious..

OCD Eamon Houston twelve years
Treatment Options for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Invisibilia

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Treatment Options for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

"About someone struggling with mental illness and so parts of it could be difficult to hear. Massachusetts General Hospital may seventh twenty eighteen Megan's obsessive compulsive disorder has been really bad. So she's come to the doctor for some help. She sits in a chair as he fiddles with a hand held, computer. The one that talks to the device that's been implanted in her brain. He's trying to find just the right amount of electricity to make her feel better. While you were talking I slowly ramped it up again anything different now. Little bit. Yup. Wasn't what's happening? Slightly more aware. Really? It's not like in the past where it was like who I feel good. But it's like a different feeling general just sharpening worse like everything got light turned up a little bit. Yeah. That's okay. People say that. Let's try going up. One more step. Anything different. We should dial this one back a little bit. Now, if you notice me it down, then maybe I'll change my mind on that. I just feel it. I don't feel good at all right now. Something just changed. That's why. Because in the process of reconfiguring, it it just temporarily went off. So you really notice that me once? Okay. Hang on a second. Let me get this back to a state. And let's go back to the left side and take a look. Tell me more like, what's. Kapiti? Okay. Okay. Listen. This is visibility. I'm HANA Rosen today, we have a story about a woman who desperately unhappy. So she signed up for the scifi sounding medical trial where she got an electrical device implanted in her brain. We look at her experience. And the man she fell in love with a love affair entwined with batteries and wires and electrodes technology, which might have implications for assault. Stick around. So Elise Spiegel is telling the story today. One note, there are references to suicide in this piece. And this is Megan story, but that's not where we begin we begin with part one Megan's boyfriend until he found Megan Brian almost never had luck with girls. It had been a huge problem, and I had a habit of meeting girls. And then kinda like job interviews, you leave thinking I think I went really well and like you don't hear about. But even when Brian did hear back and things seem to be headed in the right direction. It typically didn't last long his rose always seemed to lose its bloom pretty quick like those wanted to be different at some point. Like, there'd be a point where they'd be like, why don't you? Why don't you more like this? Why don't you do this? I was like they weren't accepting who I was like I felt like even really know why was probably. I didn't really know why. So you wanted someone who accepted you? Yeah. It lease on some level. I got tired of people dating me. But then wanting someone else. The problem as far as Brian Cataldo was his depression. He'd struggled with it since he was seven Brian's, biological father had left a month after he was born and his single mother did her best. But he came to wonder if she sometimes his father's face in his own when she looked at him. He wasn't sure. But in any case he'd resigned himself to a loveless fate until one day while perusing Facebook, he happened across a picture of Megan years before she dated this guy he knew, but apparently she'd recently moved to his hometown in her Facebook picture, she had a friendly smile. So Brian went for it at the risk of being too random. I was just browsing the old f book hip, and so you live in Farmingdale. How'd that happen? Maybe we should hang out at adventure land together. Megan replied, right away. She dropped out of college because of her OCD and pression and moved in with her parents. So sure she'd love to hang out. She was looking for friends in the area to Brian was glad to hear it. But he didn't allow himself to get to excited member thinking if you just wants to be friends, that's cool. So in the night of the date, he played it low key. It was summer. So he suggested that they take a walk down main street, then after they went back to his apartment to hang out. Fortunately, for Brian things went much better than expected back we serve watching movie, and she took my arm and put it around her. And I was like, okay. She doesn't want to just be friends. And that was that was the beginning of their from that moment on Brian. And Megan were thick as the who just make weird jokes and just everything's funny. Like one of the earliest memories was like I have to like voices like this. And and we were watching the two thousand twelve to beat and one of the questions was about deductions, and I was like. And that became a running joke for here's. So just like a lot of just hanging out. I worked for us. So it's beautiful. Yeah.

Megan Brian Massachusetts General Hospital Brian Cataldo Facebook Hana Rosen Elise Spiegel Assault Farmingdale OCD One Day
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"This one's one that I've never heard of interesting to make very curious to see how you're going to respond to this one. From Stephen crossed in Lincoln in the UK. And he says, Victoria, I have an eight month old border collie who's very clever and responding well to training, but I do have one issue with him. He's become obsessed with the pattern on the ceiling from lights and reflections from shiny, objects, moving and stationary. He spends ages just looking up at the ceiling and following them around. Please can you advise how to address this as he does get hyped up, and it can't be healthy for them. Yeah. You know, I have seen as quite Los actually different breeds. Yeah. This is kind of a compulsive. Behavior. You could call it obsessive compulsive disorder or they call it canine compulsive disorder. It's it's an obsession with things that have no relevance in everyday life. So for example, washing your hands is important, right? But when you wash your hands again, and again, and again, and again it ceases to be a behavior that has relevance. It suddenly starts to become a behavior that has no function for disorder normal everyday living. It becomes an obsession. And the same is similar for when dogs have this kind of obsessive compulsive disorder when they fixate on shadows or reflections, and you normally find it with dogs that are herders or hunters. And they like the chase. And in fact, some people can create light chases in the dogs by trading their dogs, even if it's from puppyhood or training, the dogs when they get them from shelters and. Adult at to chase one of those kind of red lights at the end of a pointer, you know, and like there's laser lights, and then they can create a dog that is just obsessed with lights because the chasing the lights is so reinforcing it. That's what's happening here. Your dog has some kind of obsession with shadows with reflections that are on the ceiling, and is kind of obsessively focusing on them, which in turn is making your feel good. But then if it becomes an obsession that feel good feet feeling is harder to get the dog tries more and does longer and still can't get that feel good feeling. And now it's actually starting to become destructive. So you need to step in and step in now, depending on how bad it's got you. I would absolutely right now. Take your dog to see a veterinary behaviorist, not just a vet a veterinary behaviorist because they deal with the medical side and with. Behavior at the same time. And if you Doug needs to have a pharmacological support to kind of break that cycle of obsession, then there are people who understand that know it, and we'll be able to prescribe a medication that might help as you train if your dogs just a little bit fixated, and you can't get your dogs, focus, then you're going to work on breaking that focus. I mean, thirty breaking that behavior. Management means that you don't let the dog in the room where the behavior happens management means you take away things shiny objects that could reflect management also you might have to pull the curtain. So the sunshine doesn't come in. So that you'll breaking the pattern of that Dokes obsession, then you give the dog more outlets in its life. You give it more mentally enriching toys such as puzzles or feed its food for all Mecom toy or another kind of toy rather than just from a bowl. So your dog has mental enrichment like that you might exercise your dog. A bit more. You might give your dog a job as your dogs, a collie, you could do some real herding. So you're trying to redirect all of that suit of that obsession onto something a bit more positive and by breaking that focus have a great recall. So if you see your dog doing it recall, the Doug to you give the Duke something else to do you will hopefully be able to minimize that behavior. But it is it's it's actually quite common and like humans have obsessive compulsive disorder dogs do to well. It's fascinating. Learned a lot. There's nothing that you don't know what I've just the law. I don't know. There's a lot. I don't know. But yeah, but nothing to do with dog. Anyway, very very interesting and good luck. That was that's kind of an interesting, and I hope maybe you could let us know how that goes. Because I'm curious to see how you how you go about with your particular dog in in solving that problem. But anyway, there you go thanks back where do the days go. I can't believe we have to take by. That's it hit. I know our season's done through the season. Didn't we? Yeah. We did. It's been great. We've talked about so much. We've had amazing guests on. And that's my mother always says to me when I tell her to write an article for a magazine mom, and I write for three different magazines. And she's always like where do you find the topics? Dogs is a massive you could talk for days about dogs. We had you couldn't even scratch the surface. We had a bunch of topics. We're going to talk about we didn't even get to that. Exactly. So we love it. We love the fact that you listen, and we we love the fact that we're sponsored by Zouk and their commitment to getting the message out the positive message out. And just you know, they they are. Yeah. They have great treats for dogs at especially for training. They are so useful and the tasty and they really good for dogs. So definitely check them out at six dot com. Thank you souks for sponsoring us. And thanks Holly. Done. This is our seventh season. Holy smokes. Civil doing this. We're going to say at some point you're going hear this is our seventy at the end to get their team those short teeth or mine. Still be here. I don't care if any but nobody's listening. We'll still be here. My mom will always listened to tell you. It's awesome. Thanks for everybody for listening. And we still even though, you know, our seasons ending. We'll start up another.

Doug Stephen UK Lincoln Victoria Los Mecom Dokes Holly eight month
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KTOK

"With the securities and Exchange Commission. Okay. Oklahoma's first news. I'm Leigh Matthews. You know, her from FOX's outnumbered and the five also on FOX the view as well. Jedidiah Bela has written a book hashtag do not disturb. How I ghosted my cellphone to take back my life. Oh jedidiah. You don't know how I want to do this. How can you make it happen? It's very difficult in the beginning. I didn't have a choice. I realized that I had an addiction to these devices. I call it TD obsessive compulsive disorder. I diagnosed myself because I was completely losing my mind. And I made a decision I said to myself, you know, what my my real life has vanishing. I am not sleeping. Well, I am anxiety ridden. Because I never feel like I'm plugged in enough. I am not paying attention to people as I should be when I sit across from them at a dinner table. I'm even in the movies getting nervous like, wait a minute. What am I missing? How do I what do I need to check into? I need to run to the ba-. I mean, I was really addicted. And I said, you know, what I want to figure out A why this is happening. Why why why am I gonna get addicted to this? I'm not even a girl and be what can I what can I do to fix this? Because I still needed a presence on social media for work. I couldn't completely vanish. I still like some of the apps on my phone like my soul cycle app that lets me pick a spin bike at full cycling. Go exercise. And I and I wanted to share my stories with people and say, you know, what this is what was happening to me that wasn't good. I mean a lot of mistakes. And this is what I'm worried about for the world for kids. Former teacher was very worried about what's happening to young people who are completely immersed in these devices and don't know how to have real face to face conversations anymore. So this was my call to just awareness and have people kind of open their eyes and say, wow, maybe the way that I'm using this stuff in my life could be a little bit better. And maybe I can have a much healthier relationship with all this tax. It's kind of booming day to day. I hate to sound like I'm complaining, but Jeter die you, and I are in the same kind of business. I'm in the news business, and I need to know what's going on twenty four seven it. Honestly does get exhausting after a while. And I think for me the pinnacle was about to thanksgivings ago. I was at thanksgiving with my family and a deer elderly aunt of mine was outraged at President Obama, everything you said and did and she was constantly asking me. What did he say about this? What do you think about that? And Finally, I turned off my cell phone, and I looked across at asset aunt be. We're going to be an a news free zone for the next twenty four hours. We're not gonna know what's going on or what Obama said or did or anything. And that was so liberating for me. I try to do that. At least once a week. You have to because the amount of information. That's leading us is not healthy. You know, it used to be that you would read, you know. My dad tells me stories all the time. He says I used to wake up and read the morning newspaper. You know, I'd have my Cup of coffee. I'd go about my day. And I would check in with the evening news. And I'd go to sleep. It wasn't this constant stream of information. All they want people went to work and they did their job. They weren't constantly plugged in. They weren't getting news alerts on a phone. I mean, some people have multiple emails they have their home Email. They have their work Email. They have some people have multiple devices a personal phone a work phone and just combine all of that with the texting, and then the personal emails, and then people actually picking up the phone and calling you which I do I do know is rare. But also does happen. So and I I empathize. You know, people in the news as I'm in the news business as well. But I I do the same thing on the weekends. Unless there is, you know, the cavenaugh hearings, obviously had very plugged in. Unless there is something that is very pressing. Or I happen to that. We'd be hosting on the way. Weekend. I take those weekends for myself from me, and my husband, we we live real life. We go outside. I take hours at a time where I will put the phone away because the news is still going to be there when you get back and the truth of the matter is that you can really as long as you have to talk yourself first, but you really will survive if you take four or five hours, and you will wind up looking back and saying, wow, you know, those four or five hours were well-spent. Whereas if you're sitting on that phone, you could waste six hours. You could get through Twitter newslink's, Facebook, Instagram, texting emails, and then you're like you're sitting in the same position for six hours. And you're like I haven't even boob. You forget to eat sometimes because you're so plugged in. You're doing so many things hours go by you haven't had any water you you're not taking care of your body. So it's incumbent upon us. I think especially people who are around children. I would say to kids see that. And they they're gonna turn into that. And they don't have the benefit of having years before them in the path and in their formative years where they didn't have. All this stuff that was, you know, flooding their life. We have that we grew up, and we didn't have to deal with all that said, you know, seven eight nine ten years old. Three years old. Devices. Here's your device I had enough distractions. Anyway, I can't imagine growing up with all this technology. No forget about that. But even if you know people who have kids that are in high school, and or college, and they're dating the dating well for them. I mean, everything happens over text message. None of these kids are growing up learning how to communicate face to face because they don't have to. They're not learning that I contact is important. They're going on college job interviews, and I know I used to teach high school students there. They don't know how to do that. Because they're like, wait. I have to look somebody in the I'm uncomfortable with that. I don't they don't have the confidence that comes from years of having those conversations face to face. I'm learning how to navigate them and their awkward for everybody at first. But that's how you turn into an adult. They're not having those experiences and the truth is if they see you on your phone all the time. They're going to do it together and say, well, why do I have to take time away from the phone if mom or dad or the teacher is on their phone all the time? So we have to be mindful of that as well, Geno, diabetes. You know, her from FOX's outnumbered and the five also the view the name of the book is hashtag do not disturb. How I ghosted my cell phone to take back my life and gathered the book is available everywhere. It isn't gonna finds a novel. You can get an Amazon dot com, and I also didn't audiobook and people keep asking me. Did you read the whole audiobook or just read the whole thing? So it's all in my voice is a lot of personal stories in there that were hard to heart for me that I wanted really to people to to be able to feel how passionate I was about this. This is my passion project, and I I really hope people, you know, take the time and realize it's not a judgmental book. It's not a book run saying, oh, you're doing this wrong. And I did it right? It's a book where I'm saying. I did this wrong. You may be doing it wrong. You may not but share with me in this journey. And maybe discover something about yourself. And here's what I did to make my life better. You can take it. You can leave it you. Can modify it. But just know that I think we're in trouble as a culture, if we continue down a road where these phones take over and interpersonal stuff just doesn't even matter anymore, and it's all about, hey, the next greatest technology. You know, whatever that is has come down the pike. And I'm just gonna embrace it without even thinking we have to remember that we're thinking people, and we have the option we.

FOX Obama Jedidiah Bela Leigh Matthews Oklahoma Exchange Commission Jeter Amazon Twitter President Geno Facebook five hours six hours seven eight nine ten years twenty four hours Three years
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:01 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Weekend. Northern California Sacramento's high today right around eighty clear tonight, lows forty seven to fifty three the bay area partly to mostly sunny the rest of today. Highs upper fifties to the upper seventies. Inland and the Lake Tahoe area mostly sunny, gusty winds through the weekend, high sixties and seventies through Sunday. This is fresh air. I'm David being Cooley editor of the website TV worth watching sitting in for Terry. Gross. Today's guest John green has a huge following mostly among teenagers who are fans of his young adult novels. These books include the fault in our stars, which sold over twenty three million copies was on the bestseller list for twenty four weeks and was adapted into a film green and his brother. Hank also have a popular video blog called wlac brothers and Hanks debut novel. An absolutely remarkable thing will be published later this month. John Green's latest novel is called turtles all the way down. It's about a sixteen year old named as still getting over the death of her father while also dealing with OCD obsessive compulsive disorder. That leads do intrusive thoughts to get in the way of her day to day life and interfere with her relationship with her best friend and with her ability to have a boyfriend her particular obsession is with all the micro organisms that live on and in her body and her fear that she will become infected with a deadly bacteria. John green drew on his own experiences with OCD which he's dealt with since childhood Terry gross spoke with John green last year. John greene. Welcome to fresh air. I'd like you to start by reading from your new book. I since her obsession is fear of getting C difficile, aka c diff. Why don't you describe with us really horrendous diseases? Sure seed if is a disease that usually associated with antibiotic use in hospitals, and it basically there's this bacteria in your gut, and if it grows out of control, you can become very very sick. And this is something that as worries about all the time and she uses kind of compulsive behaviors, including checking the internet two for her for symptoms to try to manage this worry that she has and just to get a little bit more. Graphic immune see Jeff leads to really extreme diarrhea, and in some people, particularly in elderly people, you can buy efforts not treated, so it's it's a very very serious and very problematic infection, and you're also going to refer in the reading. I'm about to ask you to do to the microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria and micro-organisms in the gut. So the goal is to always have a healthy microbiome. Yeah. I mean, one of the really weird things about being a person is that about half of the cells inside of your body are not yours. They're microbes. And that's also something that is of some concern to Asia. And for that matter to me. Oh, I know. It's a remarkable thing when you think about how your whole body your skin, your gut everything is just like populated with these micro organisms, which is scientifically fascinating. But the more you think about it. They kind of creepy or it is and for her. It's more than creepy. It's disturbing. It's very deeply disturbing. So I want you to do a reading and this is from like a little more than midway through the book, and she has been friends with and his kind of starting to become girlfriend boyfriend with a teenage boy, they're starting to kiss a little bit. And because of this whole microbiome thing it's making her really uncomfortable. And some of what we're going to be hearing is her intrusive OCD her obsessive compulsive thoughts interfering with the rest of her thoughts. So some of what you're saying is written in italics and all the Attala size parts. Are those intrusive thoughts interfering in her mind? Okay. Reading. I told myself to be in this moment to let myself feel his warmth on my skin. But now his tongue was on my neck, wet and alive and microbial and his hand was sneaking under my jacket his cold fingers against my bare skin. It's fine. You're fine. Just kiss him. You need to check something. It's fine just being normal. Check to see if his microbes stay in you, billions of people kiss and don't die. Just make sure his microbes aren't going to permanently. Colonize. You come on. Please stop this. He could have campylobacter he could have nonsense Matic E coli that you could get and then you need antibiotics and then you'll get c diff and boom dead in four days. Please just stop just check make sure I pulled away you. Okay. Yes. I nodded. I just just need a little air. I sat up turned away from him pulled out my phone and searched do bacteria of people you kiss stay inside your body and quickly scrolled through a couple of pseudoscience. Results before getting to the one actual study done on the subject around eighty million microbes are exchanged on average per kiss and quote after six month, follow up human, gut microbiomes appear to be modestly. But consistently altered his bacteria would be me forever. Eighty million of them breeding and growing and joining my bacteria and producing God knows what I felt his hand on my shoulder. I spun around and squirmed away from him my breath running away from me dots in my vision. You're fine. He's not even the first boy, you've kissed eighty million organisms in you forever. Calmed down permanently altering the microbiome. This is not rational you need to do something. Please. There is a fixed. Please get to a bathroom. What's wrong? He asked nothing. I said, I just need to use the restroom. I put my phone back out to reread the study. But resisted the urge cooked it shut and slid it back into my pocket. But no I had to check to see if it had said modestly altered or moderately altered. I pulled out my phone again. And brought up the study modestly. Okay. Modestly is better than moderately. But consistently. I felt nauseated and disgusting. But also pathetic I knew how I looked to him. I knew that my crazy was no longer a quirk. Now, it was an irritation. Like it was to anyone who got close to me. Thank you for reading that. That's John green reading from his new novel, which is called turtles all the way down. So of all the obsessive compulsive thoughts. You could have given your main character ACO. Why did you give her this obsession with C diff? Well, partly because I can relate to it. I mean, I needed a place where I could make a connection with as a in order to write about her. I think and I've long had a fear of contamination from micro organisms that's long been one of the kind of focuses of my particular version of obsessive compulsive disorder. And so I think that was partly it. But also, it's something that we live with all the time. It's something that surrounds us. You know, like in a way bacteria are overwhelming us. We're the dominant species on the planet until and unless you start considering bacteria. So one of the things that she has early start spirals. I'm gonna ask you to describe a thought spiral. Well, the thing about a spiral is that. If you follow it inward. It just keeps going forever. It just gets tighter and tighter, and it never actually ends. And that's kind of how as a experiences her thoughts when she gets stuck into this kind of looping turning twisting series of thoughts about how she's definitely going to get c diff and she's definitely going to die. And she then she has to use these behaviors that she's developed to try to manage that fear. And there there really is no way for her to pull out of the thoughts spiral. And that's part of what makes it. So frightening to her is that once she's in it. It doesn't feel like a thought spiral it just feels like thought it just feels like the way of the world, it feels like she's not wrong when she's afraid of this disinfection or the other things that she fears. That's really. Intrusive. But I actually heard the word invasive for some reason. And that is what it's like for me. It's like there's an invasive weed that just spreads out of control. You know, it starts out with one little thought. And then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have the thought that you're constantly either forced to have or trying desperately to distract yourself from you sprinkled quotes from great writers throughout the bulk in the opening, quote is from the philosopher, Arthur Schopenhauer and the quotas man can do what he will. But he cannot will what he will. Why has that sexual resonance for you? From my experience of being a person like is not so much. The problem of free will it's the problem of not being able to define my will. I mean, one of the things that I as a fine. So scary in the book, and one of the things that I also have struggled with is. If these thoughts feel like they're coming from outside of me, and I'm forced to have them. And I can't choose my thoughts. Then who exactly am I you know, like who's running the ship here, am I really the captain of my consciousness, or or is there some outside force. That's shaping this for me. And so I I'm not that interested in the question of free will, but I'm really really interested in the question of how I experience some level of sovereignty over myself. I guess so at what point did you decide that you would write a novel with a main character who has as you do obsessive compulsive disorder in some ways, the choice was made for me because I couldn't write about anything else. I tried to write a few other novels after the fault in our stars came out. And I ended up having to abandon them. And then eventually I got really sick and coming out of that period of being really sick. Yeah. Yeah. I just had a really poor period of of mental health where for a few months. I I wasn't able to feel like I was in any control over what I was thinking about and and coming out of that period. This was kind of the only thing that I felt like I could write about. And so that became the story that that I ended up writing. So you said that you have OCD tell us more about what form it has taken in your life. Well, I guess sort of dominant form that it's taken in my life is that I get worried I get afraid of having an illness or having some kind of contamination inside of my body. And then I become unable to stop thinking about that. And the worry begins to consume me, and you know, in the face of that you develop or I have developed compulsive behaviors to try to manage that and deal with that. But for me, I it starts. There's a reason. The oak comes first and OCD like in the popular. Nation. We always see people doing their compulsive behaviors. Because they're so visual. And they're so often, so strange and eccentric. But for me, it's the the problem of my thoughts. That is the problem the compulsive behaviors our way of trying to manage the kind of overwhelming fear that the obsessive nece causes me. So what are the things you're most afraid of contaminating you? I mean, there's I'm being superintendent about not saying that. Yeah. That's fine. I don't I don't want to. That's the only thing that. I can I talk. I can't talk directly about it. Because I get squirmy. You get what squirmy? Yeah. Would it be awkward to for us? All to know like say, we met you in person sometime. Would it be awkward for you have everybody know what that most vulnerable point was? Yes. Yeah. Understandable. That's why. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Let's take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guest is John green. He writes novels for young adults and his most famous one is the fault in our stars. Which was a daft it into a movie. Now, he has a new young adult novel called turtles all the way down, and I should mention I think a lot of adults reader bucks to. So we'll be back after a short break. This is fresh air..

John Green OCD intrusive thoughts Lake Tahoe Terry gross Hank John greene California Sacramento David Cooley editor diarrhea Asia Arthur Schopenhauer Jeff campylobacter superintendent twenty four weeks sixteen year four days six month
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Dan news now i'm dan martin the us department of labor says a michigan truck accessories manufacturer has agreed to pay back wages owed to one hundred thirty four employees the department says rugged liner inc will pay three hundred eight thousand one hundred eleven dollars to the workers after an investigation by the wage and our division found the company violated over time and record keeping requirements of the fair labor standards act officials say the awasa based company automatically deducted thirty minutes from some employees work time regardless of whether they took their meal breaks thousands of harness racing fans flocked to a southern michigan track to bid farewell before the seventy year old raceway is demolished the jackson citizen patriot reports that jackson harness raceway celebrated its final hurrah sunday by hosting a dozen horse races the track has been closed for ten years but reopened this weekend so community members could say goodbye ahead of the scheduled demolition michigan regulators have significantly expanded the list of conditions approved for treatment by medical marijuana the department of licensing and regulatory affairs on monday added eleven medical conditions deemed debilitating by the michigan medical marijuana act of two thousand eight the arthritis autism chronic pain colitis inflammatory bowel disease obsessive compulsive disorder parkinson's disease rheumatoid arthritis spinal cord injury to rats syndrome and all sorts of colitis wham radar weather forecast from wham radio sunshine this afternoon high of about eighty six clear skies tonight low of around fifty five then for tomorrow the eleventh mostly sunny high near eighty four that's lamb news now i'm dan martin on lamb talk sixteen hundred she brought you into the this world in an unbreakable bond was formed she kissed your scraped knee and somehow the pain subsided you learned that your.

dan martin jackson harness raceway parkinson us department of labor michigan marijuana bowel disease lamb three hundred eight thousand o thirty minutes seventy year ten years
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Don't have the finances google lowcost therapy in your area there's a lot of good clinics and places like that that can help and check with your insurance a lot of insurances will offer support for mental health as well so today we're going to talk about cd or obsessive compulsive disorder and a lot of the info them and share with you especially at the top of this podcast is coming from the international ocd foundation's website which is i o c d f dot org and a highly recommend that you check that out there's an incredible amount of information up there but i wanna give a little bit of an overview on ocd and then talk about what is the best treatment there are in my opinion there's there's a book called brain lock that i'm going to get to that has it's been around for i think it's almost twenty years and that really is the most evidence based treatment that i am aware of and it is whispered the test of time and it is it is some stuff that i use every day i have some ocd clients dr about every day in my practice and worked with a lot of those but hopefully this'll kind of give some help so i wanna start with this is something that the international ocd foundation on their website they they have a brochure and and i like this i'm gonna read a little bit of this they said imagine that your mind got stuck on a certain thought or image and then this thought or image got replayed in your mind over and over and over again in no matter what you did this image is getting replayed over your mind and you don't want these thoughts and so then it starts to kind of feel like an avalanche or feels overwhelming and now along with the thoughts comes this intense feelings iety and we've know from previous gassing cds your brains warning system so when you feel anxious if feels like you are in danger and your brains going to buy into that and your body's gonna react anxieties and emotion that tells you to respond or to react or protect yourself to do something that's the key to do something on the one hand you might recognize that the fear doesn't make sense it doesn't seem reasonable he still feels very real intense.

international ocd foundation ocd twenty years one hand
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on This American Life

"Pressure on him to stop his impulses his diagnoses started when he was around five adhd obsessive compulsive disorder oppositional defiant disorder mood disorder he pulled his own hair so we had ball patches on his head but leans a nurse has a calm can do attitude in emergency situations blood and guts his matter of routine so she found solutions like pillow therapy she put a pillow over noah and lay on top of him the pressure calmed him by the time he was in kindergarten doctors had put him on a bunch of different meds no asked why he had to take them aleem was like no problem and she explained i sat down with a piece of paper and krantz markers or something i said look this is what a normal brain looks like see how all the pathways connect your brain tried to form right but your brain is kind of like a bowl of spaghetti sometimes the connections are there and sometimes there's a blockage and then it had to grow a different way so when you're having issues your brain is trying to make go through here and then it gets blocked and that's why you have to take medication still they constantly had to change his meds sometimes it seemed like nothing worked as noah got bigger his outburst got scarier when he was about ten at easter brunch noah showed up in the doorway with a carving knife and said he was going to stab himself when noah's family couldn't get the knife away from him they call nine one one the cops got the knife away and the paramedics took him to the emergency room lean start at finding knives hidden under the couch she worried what noah might do to himself she also worried about her daughter bridget she seven years younger than noah a middle school no will go into these rages throw things shove furniture he never heard her but it was scary aisling tell bridget go in the car unlocked the door because i knew i could still see her she was safer in the car he couldn't get in the car and then i would go in the cars well it's some point and then he'd be outside the car screaming yelling in pounding on the car noah's nineteen now explosions were as frightening to him as they were to the people around him.

mood disorder noah bridget adhd seven years
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"That body part they don't get any better and so instead of going about their daily life they will start for severing about something else or maybe they'll feel that the surging did not accurately addressed the problem of people with body just more fake disorder make up about two percent of the population that's more than the proportion of people who have wellknown illnesses like obsessive compulsive disorder women make up sixty percent of those with vdd but they seldom get psychological help because to them the real problem is obvious they truly believe that they are clear that there fan attract asked and they often say you know i don't believe what i have bdp because people who have btt they are actually very good bucking and that's not me staff in times can truly believed that their haiti s and made even deformed that's dr angela fang assistant professor of psychology at the harvard medical school and a psychologist at massachusetts general hospital home of one of the nation's largest b dede clinics they often shelby but at the problem is just a physical and psychological are psychiatric wind today often plastic surgery cosmetic surgery office says event dad tests to cap their parents concerns just text and that even if they pursue those options a lot of times people just keep these interns private and if they shared at all with their family or friends it's perceived as being just kind of that vanity concern not really invalid because it seems like at the general population doesn't really understand by beating south fa seek help from cosmetics search ends what the research challenge she said it's not actually beneficial for these patients that their sent and can even get worse after epic at this factory and when surgery doesn't fix the problem people with bddp can become despondent one in four will attempt suicide that's the very unfortunate reality some other early steffi thing i've looked at suicidal attempts signs behaviors and people at biki showed that the rates or anything higher than some other disorders that we now are later tutu aside our behavior that are like anorexia and oppression shut that they're even much higher than berretta right so we know that these patients can often feel so ashamed and upset by these concerns that day well that's all two right tests had said that.

harvard medical school biki haiti dr angela fang assistant professor of psychol massachusetts general hospital shelby cosmetic surgery steffi anorexia sixty percent two percent
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Needed a place where i could make a connection with aaser in order to write about her i think ban i've wong how to fear of contamination from microorganisms that's long been one of the kind of focuses of my particular version of obsessive compulsive disorder and so i think that was partly it but also it's something that we live with all the time it's something that surrounds us you know like in a way bacteria are overwhelming us we are the dominant species on the planet until henin recipe start considering bacteria so i'm one of the things that she has are these thought spirals i'm gonna ask you to to describe a thought spyro well the thing about a spiral is that if you follow it inward it just keeps going forever just gets tighter and tighter and it never actually ends and that's kind of how is our experiences her thoughts when she get stuck in this kind of looping turning twisting series of thoughts about how she's jeff it only going to get c diff and she's definitely going to die and she than she has to use these behaviors that she's developed to try to manage that fear and they're they're really is no way for her to pull out of the fought spyro and that's part of what makes it so frightening to her is that once she's in it it doesn't feel like a thought spiral it just feels like thought it just feels like the way of the world it feels like she's not wrong when she is afraid of this uh this infection or the other things that she fears and that's really terrifying it's also really isolating for her because she struggles to be able to describe it with language he struck goals for the words that um that would help other people understand which is going through she uses the word invasive to describe the kind of thoughts that you can't control on that take over is that your word i did you get that from therapy i think it's my word when i was first told about bum oecd are her i was told that these thoughts are called intrusive but i actually heard the word invasive.

jeff spyro henin
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And a half a bucket list whatever you wanna call it that's what i've been thinking about all right let's go to the phones debt season desert hot springs california west of the rockies hey dezsi go ahead i uh george i use your and buddy war under full thanks um uh why founder obsessive compulsive disorder for 30 years and i've been on heavy psychiatric medication and i'm having cognitive problems now from momma medication and i was wondering is there anything i can do for this is there any hope for may really uh see i can't answer that because i'm not a medical doctor and that would be crossing the line or your medical treatment uh what i do for some people if my healing work has been very effective in changing behaviour attitude and certain repetitive if your way shen and the healing go within the faith healer level of your body where you're laying down into breathing color in word i take it through a little journey and i've been told that on my healing has done in one or two sessions what might take three years to therapy so it could unlock what might be a fourth or or i don't know without coin inside to see but um i cannot prescribed medication are they get off the medication that's not my job and um legally i cannot so there is there i i believe that this how list it out the news that you can travel then able to help you let go of certain behaviors and psychological issues that can be integrated holistically what do you think of faith healing i believe ah because i know what i do as a healer i have had people come to me one guy was a part of play chick are you handson or not now with by phone i used to be how to solve it that's why i got all the tumor from my body 'cause they get the energy back in my body it came back to get you didn't it yeah i just so i do it also iphone or is energy or if i touch somebody echo to wash my hands immediately 'cause i didn't i.

iphone founder three years 30 years
"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"obsessive compulsive disorder" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"I now a three two km arguing against the motion please welcome i elias abu day elias hi you're a professor of psychiatry and director of the obsessive compulsive disorder clinic end the impulse control disorders clinic at stanford you wrote a book called virtually you the dangerous powers of the personality in which you do sound a strong note of caution about the digital world given your point of view and your expertise on this dup consciously limit your time spent online i do when i'm conscious of it tell us your partner it's i'm happy to introduce dr walter booth water while the boot you've asked us to cause while he so we will move forward that way you are indeed a professor psychology at florida state you direct its attention and training lab same field is your opponent daphne you investigate the effects of video games on technician at the moment you don't think the video games do much to improve brain function is there anything that the does well there's one activity right now with fairly good support behind it that actually improves brain function unfortunately no one wants to do it aerobic exercise aerobics i can see everybody in the whole halls air standing up now doing jumping jacks not really the team arguing against the motion ladies and gentleman and that motion is video games will make us smarter as i said we go in three rounds we're gonna move directly into round one here making his argument in support of the motion and you can make your way to the lectern osce barack chairman of games for change and co author of the book powerplay how video games can save the world ladies and gentlemen osce barak thank you.

director stanford partner technician chairman professor of psychiatry professor florida osce three two km