35 Burst results for "obesity"

Southern Mexico state bans junk food sales to children

America First

00:39 sec | 2 d ago

Southern Mexico state bans junk food sales to children

"A state in Mexico is banning junk food The Legislature of Mexico's southern state of Oaxaca has approved a ban on selling high calorie snack food and Children in a bid to combat one of the world's highest rates of childhood obesity. Bill, the first of its kind of Mexico has drawn protests from business groups, officials in Mexico of blame junk food and soft drinks for Mexico's shockingly high rate of deaths among middle aged people from Cove in 19 They say Mexicans diet younger age from the pandemic, in part because of the country's high rates of diabetes and obesity. The law would find shopkeepers but allow parents to approve such

Mexico Oaxaca Younger Age Bill
America’s Obesity Epidemic Threatens Effectiveness of Any COVID Vaccine

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

03:02 min | 3 d ago

America’s Obesity Epidemic Threatens Effectiveness of Any COVID Vaccine

"One one one one one of of of of of the the the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's nation's leading leading leading leading leading physicians. physicians. physicians. physicians. physicians. Dr David Vegas, also the CEO of the Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine at USC. Welcome back Thank you so much. So Ella's mayor, We talked. We talked about this the other day, but there's been a development. Ella's mayor has issued these guidelines for enforcement against repeat offenders at these party houses for the large gatherings. But just hours after he made that announcement yesterday, there was a wedding that went off as scheduled in the Bel Air area. So if people are not worried about being hit with a fine the first time Oh, and they have more of, you know, forgiveness, not approval, sort of attitude. In your opinion as a you know, a health care professional. Are these new guidelines gonna work? And can we afford to wait and see You know if the mayor had said years ago, you can't smoke in restaurants. But you know, if you do smoke going to do anything, people would continue to smoke in restaurants and we all know secondhand smoke, harms others and causes cancer. Having a party where people aren't very masses akin to secondhand smoke. You're harming others, you know, by not wearing your masks. You're harming others there, and we have to enforce it. Just like if I smoked in a restaurant They would arrest me. We have to be the same year we have to be strict. People have to realize that there are teeth to these rules and we are not in our society in Los Angeles. Allowed to harm others. We care about each other. I wantto move away from the law for just a moment and actually moved to the medicine. I want to come to the pandemic that we're dealing with here lives so much easier than well, and that's why I want to ask you about this because you're the expert. Here's the thing. We're talking about a virus, but we have this report. Just a fact of few minutes ago, the Brian Ping was doing About the obesity in this country. And that of vaccine might not be effective for those that are overweight with a body mass index of over 30. So now you're thinking to yourself, all right? I'm that person. I need to get my weight under control. But I can now I can't go to the gym to sweat it out because the gems were closed. So what are we supposed to do your advice? Well, the data warn that clear what the data had shown. Is that people with the D m IA Bodine Estimates over 30 have a slightly poor response to a vaccine. It didn't say they won't respond to a vaccine. It didn't say a vaccine will benefit them. They have a slightly poor response. So that being said, Obviously, we all want to get to a lower being. Micah's could be healthier. We could live longer. We left less medical conditions. The simplest way to do things your meals the same time every day with nothing, not a zilch in between. When When you you graze graze or or your your snack, snack, your your body's body's metabolism metabolism actually actually changes changes and and it's it's very very hard hard to to lose lose weight weight to to the the key key is is fast fast in in between between meals meals and and have have the the meals, meals, predominately predominately protein and fat based And then obviously portion control. You put those things together. That's the recipe together with exercise and movement. It doesn't have to be at the gym. It could just be going for a walk. Together, they will make you lose weight. I promise. You know,

Ella Brian Ping Ellison Institute For Transfor Dr David Vegas Los Angeles Bel Air CEO USC Micah D M Ia
COVID-19 vaccine may not be as effective in obese people

KNX Evening News

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

COVID-19 vaccine may not be as effective in obese people

"There's bad news for more than 100 million Americans. When it comes to a Corona virus vaccine. It may not be effective for them because they're obese. That's according to a CNN article that science scientists who believe obesity interferes with the body's overall immune response. But that doesn't mean if you're obese. He should not get the covert vaccines has nutrition professor Rise shake at the University of North Carolina will be less effective newbies. We're not saying that it won't be effective so All people should get vaccinated. But the key is we think it'll be like, he says. This is mostly a theory based on precedent a lot of data with one's showing that less effective India be so That's why we think it'll be less effective with be subject with a potential code vaccine. All that 107 million American adults are considered obese, which the CDC defines is someone whose body mass indexes 30 or above.

CNN CDC University Of North Carolina Professor India
Tips For Childhood Obesity Success

Healthy Eating For Kids

04:38 min | Last week

Tips For Childhood Obesity Success

"Hello and welcome back everybody I had a lovely week in Cornwall I. Actually Went Down Because my sister tied the knot with her brand new partner I. It was really really small ceremony I was really impressed. It was very strict guidelines and who can enter. The registry. The department and what is called the registry anyway. So it was very strict on if four people were allowed in. So I had a the honor of being the witness for my sister, and then we had a really small garden party I. Think it was like ten adults and a few kids my children, of course in amongst that group. So we had a lovely time and return to London where it's really hot and of course, during my holiday in Cornwall I. was invited by Channel Five. To comment on in childhood malnutrition, and of course, I was always aware that the new childhood obesity strategy was out but it had to turn it down because my family were really wanted me to have the laptop off. So I didn't get the chance to. Go on TV or whatever share. So I thought I would record an episode on some tips on how to work with your child. If you are worried that they are overweight or obese these because I know this is a really emotive topic I mean I can even see that amongst dietitians and other than nutrition professionals or doctors we're all divided we all have. Dif- way different boards and we have different ways that would like to approach it and deal with it but I guess the stats don't lie. The numbers speak for themselves. As so. If. It's something that worries you and you also have family history of diabetes or heart conditions or any other health problems and you would like to work with your child. To bring their way down in more home in the healthy range or wait that feels good for your child. Then I'm going to share a few tips with you in this podcast episode and I hope that it will be helpful for you. Now as always if you lie to work with me, you can book a coil. It's a free initial telephone call where I can take you through my nutrition packages and coaching programs so that you can decide if it's a might fit for you. Now I just want to put out. I'm not judgmental Dietitian at all. I was an overweight teenager I. Remember you know my parents always valued education. So my dad is a veterinary surgeon, for example. So he really valued education although my parents you know my mom now has a gym membership. and. They did. There are very conscious about healthy eating but they weren't really sporty family I remember playing badminton and Netball at high school but apart from that as a kid I. used to play in the garden and things like that my parents enjoyed walking. So we did lot to wargame. But apart from that, we didn't really want really an active family. We'd be interested in sport it was more about. I did a lot of reading rowing up and painting and things like that. But apart from that, there wasn't a lot of focus on sports which would have really liked because they're held the choices at herb very nutritious growing up. was never a doubt about that but I could have done with more exercise as a teenager. Big is clearly there is a genetic predisposition. To being a little overweight and so when I was sixteen I to Cobb running because I was really unhappy with the. My Body Fluctuate I. Didn't like the way I looked I don't think I've was away but I can't remember actually I am pretty sure I was overweight at one stage and so I started running I started reading a lot about nutrition and that's how I became really interested in this area.

Cornwall Judgmental Dietitian Diabetes Partner Cobb London Badminton Netball
Dr. Howard Fullman: COVID, Probiotics, and the Impact of Coronavirus on the Future of Medicine

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

04:19 min | Last week

Dr. Howard Fullman: COVID, Probiotics, and the Impact of Coronavirus on the Future of Medicine

"We're honored to have. Dr Howard J foam and join us to catch up on medicine, practice and politics prevention, and of course a bit about our fight against. COVID nineteen so may we suggest that you pull yourself a double. Sit back and join us on medicine. We're still practicing I'm bill, Curtis. I are host. The quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care. My very good friend Dr Steven Taback, however you, Steve Hey bill good to see you. We haven't had dinner together for a while I. Don't remember what it was like. They actually have dinner and enjoy an evening. So you know we have one of our favorite experts rejoining. Rejoining us today Dr, Howard J. Felman he is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology will learn more about that. In a minute Howard, served a multi decade tenure at Kaiser Permanente Day as partner board member. President of the Executive Committee Chief of staff and chair of the Quality Committee. He supervised forty three hundred staff over five hundred doctors. Howard is now senior operating advisor. Advisor at the Atlantic. Street capital for their medically focused investments Dr Howard J foam. Welcome back I nice to be here. Stephen nicest to us well Hey Howard. Good to see you so last time we met in our studio in Malibu was only back in February and it seems like a whole lifetime ago in quite a year, and we're only halfway through it and we know. Know there's a lot more to come Howard. I hope you'll forgive me, but I took my nasty pill this morning, so I want to dive into a difficult issue, but as the time of this recording according to Johns Hopkins, Japan although infected early has less than one cova death per hundred thousand population, while the US has thirty nine Cova deaths per one hundred thousand population. Japan more elderly per capita than any other country. They kept their borders open during the Wu Han locked down there, stay home requests by Japanese. Government have been voluntary, as was any of the closing of their non essential businesses. And now for a country with one city that houses more than thirty seven million people. They have less than a thousand deaths countrywide, but the hell is going on I. Don't know that anyone knows exactly all of the differences, but I'll give you. Some and I think that may be different. One is there's probably a genetic component to this disease that we don't quite understand. People were speculating. Why was so much more Italy because Italian get together a lot more than others people wonder with net net might have been some genetic predisposition. She decided kind storms for example, another article morbidity in patient population, so age is one thing you're right. Japanese population is actually older than the US. By other commodities like obesity, which is turning out to be a significant risk factor here is unfortunately. It's still a lot more obesity united. States than there is Japan so just because we've sorted out that the age factor may not explain it, but we have some more chronic illness in the United States spend maybe contributing to it as well and then you know the way we've handled. Handled the public health aspect of this and again I also wanted to be very careful about criticism of even the public health system because I'm sure there's a lot of things we look back and could have done differently, but we also have a lot of public health officers. Some extremely courageous ones and I'll say that I think unfortunately a some of our public does not really believe. Believe in this pandemic, the seriousness that they should, and that may be affecting the outcomes as well. There are certain communities as you know. Where substantial numbers of people were having just seemingly significant disregard, and so that might have been large numbers coming in at a just a bowl of people coming in all the ones that saturated the healthcare system made it hard to take care of. Of someone people possibly people coming in later than they should have because perhaps denial about the significance of the Selma's when it is on severe, and it's not be causing a doctor that I. don't WanNa Fault. The nurses and the doctors and rest of just I've seen what they're doing. My follow it very carefully, and I'm very proud of them, but I think because of the. The differences in population and our public health system is not working well is not resigned the way it should be, and there's not functioning in the way that it has been planned to function the

Howard J. Felman Dr Howard J Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu United States Japan Advisor Wu Han Dr Steven Taback Curtis Kaiser Permanente Day Malibu Stephen Nicest Executive Committee Chief Of S Quality Committee Johns Hopkins Cova Selma Wanna Fault
Toxic Stress

PODSHIP EARTH

06:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Toxic Stress

"Just as we saw light at the end of the covid tunnel, we now find ourselves back in the darkness. The psychological impacts of this pandemic being felt acutely. We live in fear of losing a loved one to the virus, a friend being killed by the police because of the color of their skin. Parents and kids exhausted of being cooped up together. Certainly told school will be online this fall millions who have lost their jobs a terrified by having to choose between buying food or paying the rent. Essential workers as stressed by the lack of effective protective equipment. The list of legitimate to worry about has grown nearly endless. Stress takes many forms and manifesto, myriad of symptoms at its was stress can elicit a toxic shock to our system that changes who we are at the very fundamental level. During covid acts of abuse neglect in household dysfunction are all on the rides while the stay at home orders help stem the tide of the pandemic. There's a mounting evidence that lead to violence in the home, becoming more severe and frequent. When we think of environmental factors that contribute to health problems like asthma, the impacts of stress from abused neglected dysfunction are often overlooked in the last decade understanding of both adverse childhood, experiences and toxic stress as adults has evolved. In large part, this is due to the work of Dr Nadine. Bug Harris an award-winning physician, researcher and advocate dedicated to changing the way society responds to Childhood Trauma. Doctor Doug Harris was appointed as California's first ever surgeon general by Governor Gavin Newsom in January twenty nine team. As California in general Nadine has had a bold goal to reduce adverse childhood experiences also known by the acronym ace or aces by half in one generation Dr Buck. Harris's career has been dedicated to serving vulnerable communities and combating the root causes of health disparities. After completing residency at Stanford she founded a clinic in one of San Francisco's most undeserved communities, Bayview hunters point it was Ed's. That Buck Harris observed that despite the implementation of National Best Practices for Immunizations Asthma. Obesity treatment and other preventive health measures a patient's still faced outsized risks for poor health, development and behavioral outcomes. In Two thousand eleven, she founded the Center Youth Wellness and subsequently grew the organization to be a national leader in the effort to advance pediatric medicine raise public awareness and transform the way society responds to children exposed to adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress. Dr Bernard Harris Is Talk. How Childhood Trauma Effects Health across the lifetime has been viewed more than six million times have book. The deepest will healing the long term effects of childhood adversity was called indispensable by the. New York Times I stopped by asking. What is like to be surgeon general during the time of Kobe? It's a little crazy. Yeah, it's a new role within government. It also feels really important. Because in this moment I think a lot of people are recognizing the importance of public health, and it's coming to a new level of awareness for a lot of people and so i. think that creates a lot of opportunities that I'm really grateful for. We will say this, but we kind of take our health for granted. Nadine we. We we go about our lives and this has been such a shock to the system. That is nearly all that we think about now for a lot of us. We're not just in this moment of covert nineteen, which is has been this incredible health crisis, but it's also showing all the cracks in our safety. Net it showing how much there are so many people who can't live without paycheck at. At showing how many folks are on the front lines it showing how dependent we are on healthcare, it's also showing how mental health is a huge issues, the stress of the pandemic and it's also showing up in the racial disparities right when we look and see that black and Brown folks are dying at a higher rate like there's a pandemic that comes across our country across the globe and yet. Yet in the United, states what see is that black and Brown people are dying at a substantially greater rate than others when I see the racial disparities around Kovin I feel outraged every day and I think about my kids and everything that I'm working for to ensure that they live in a state and in a country where they simply have equal opportunity right now. I'm not asking for a leg. Asking for any kind of you know anything special, and simply asking for equal opportunity for my children to be healthy, and well for my children to have their God given right to grow up and make themselves whatever it is that they will make of themselves, and so from that standpoint, it's been terribly challenging time if I'm speaking honestly because you know, we're all working around the clock, fighting Covid, and then we also have to be fighting all these other pieces fighting racial discrimination structural inequalities, all of these different pieces and for me, the fight has never felt more important and it. It feels like we're right on the front

Dr Nadine Doctor Doug Harris Covid Tunnel Dr Bernard Harris Buck Harris California Covid Governor Gavin Newsom New York Times Stanford Obesity Asthma Dr Buck San Francisco United Researcher Center Youth Wellness Kobe ED
Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

Short Wave

12:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

"As a teen Sabrina strings loved getting to hang out with her grandma even when her grandma was obsessing over one of her soap operas I remember one time. She called me into the living room and she's like Sabrina look at Victoria. McCoy's kept on young and the restless. Victoria is killing herself to him. Why are white women dying to be thin? Fast forward to one three adult Sabrina was working at an HIV medication adherence clinic in San, Francisco, where she witnessed real life, examples of women sacrificing their health to be thin nights, spoken to a couple of women both HIV positive who refused to take their HIV medications for fear of gaining weight, and that blew my mind, and immediately took me back to conversations I've been having with my grandma like gosh onto something so important you know when she was talking about it, she saw it as largely a white phenomenon, but the women I interviewed that day. We're both color. Why were these women dying to be thin and did race have anything to do with? Him. Sabrina went on to become a sociologist at the University of California Irvine and wrote a whole book investigating these questions. If you're like me, you might have assumed that. There was some moment in between Marilyn Monroe. TWIGGY EH in which. Suddenly we'll. We suddenly became fat-phobic in those three years, but Sabrina started digging looking at nineteenth century magazines like Harper's bazaar in what she found was troubling articles warning American women well middle class and upper class white women. They needed to watch what they eat, and they were unapologetic, and stating that this was the proper form for. Jackson Protestant women, and so it was important that women eight as little as necessary in order to show their Christian nature and also their racial superiority. Today on the show we go all the way back to the transatlantic slave trade to understand the racial origins of fat phobia, and how black people are still dealing with the consequences today? I mattie Safai and this is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. So Sabrina. Let's let's get into what you discovered about the history of fat phobia a little bit you. You did a ton of research and you started the story several centuries back in Europe definitely in the ethos that like Renaissance Women. you know we're full figured. And that was absolutely a thing that was valued, and then there was a big shift explain what was going on back then so it turns out that the growth of the slave trade, especially by the eighteenth century led to new articulations of what types of appearance we could expect of people by different races, and also what types of behaviors. Such that by the middle of Eighteenth Century, a lot of French philosophers in particular were arguing that you know what when we're in the colonies, we're noticing that Africans are sensuous. They love sex and they love food, and for this reason they tend to be too fat. Europeans have rational self control. This is what makes us the premier race of the world, so in terms of body. Body size, we should be slender, and we should watch what we eat so okay Sabrina. Are you telling me that? When the slave trade started and European saw that African women were essentially curvy much like European women at the time at that point, they decided that being fat being thicker wasn't ideal anymore, and they built a system of oppression around this idea of needing to be. Thinned to prove racial superiority is at eight am I close. It's not quite as intentional as that. Effectively what they determined was that. You know we want it to be able to have a mechanism for ensuring that we could recognize who was slave, and it was free right, and it was easy in the beginning of the was simply skin color. What did you might imagine? After two hundred years of living in close proximity skin color really no longer works has a mechanism right, because now we have all of these people who are We would consider them today to be by racial, and so what they did was they decided to articulate new aspects of racial identity and so eating and body size became of the characteristics that were being used to suggest that these are people who do not deserve freedom. The trans, Atlantic slave trade eventually ended, but argues that we are still absolutely living with these racist attitudes about body size today. And in her book, she also traces how these anti-fat attitudes worked their way into modern medicine for somewhat arbitrarily, reasons for example take BMI or body mass index. That equation actually wasn't intended to be used to measure individual fatness. Though of course doctors did and still do today, can you? Can you explain the problem with using am I as a measure for obesity especially when it comes to black women, who I know have been told that they have the highest rates of obesity according to that measurement to be am I. Yes, so am. I is a measure of the ratio of a person's weight to their height. And what this does not account for is bone density. Muscular already any other type of genetic influences in your way or cultural environmental influences in your weight, and so, what ended up happening? As many people pointed out is that you might have to people with the same BMI, but vastly different life experiences embody compositions outside of the simple reality of their weight to height ratio, right, and the problem of applying this to them in particular, is that African American populations as studies have shown for literal decades since at least the eighties tends to be healthier at heavier weights than white populations. And so that already is an indication that cross racially. This is not a very useful tool, not to mention the fact that even within race there are going to be vastly different experiences, of an individual body between like their weight and their health profile so surreal this message from the medical establishment that excess weight is the biggest you know reason for black women's health problems or a very central of it. Why do you see it as so damaging? For Black Women, ultimately, the main advice that people are given when they so called obese is to lose weight, and there are so many problems with this. We have been telling people to lose weight for decades. What ends up happening is that they either don't lose the weight or they sometimes do lose the weight, and then frequently gain it back so first off. It could be more harmful to tell people to lose weight in the long run, and then in addition to that there are the psychological effects of telling people that their bodies are wrong. Right at their bodies are inherently unhealthy This type of fat stigma also leads to health outcomes right right right, so let's talk about this. In the context of covid nineteen I'm thinking about the recent New York Times op Ed you wrote about how cove nineteen is disproportionately impacting. Impacting people of Color specifically black people, and how you took issue with obesity, gaining traction as a leading explanation for that disparity, so talked me a little bit about that. This piece was actually motivated by something that I felt was very troubling, which was I had been seeing so many report, suggesting that the disparities in Colbert outcomes between white populations and black populations. They would say things like well. You know there's already the pre existing factor of obesity, and somehow that was one of the first things that come up and I thought there is very little evidence that disparities in quote unquote obesity are what's contributing to these negative outcomes, but there's plenty of evidence to suggest that Kobe. Fatalities or maybe even serious complications with Kobe nineteen are being influenced by people's environments. Are they essential workers? Do they have access to enough soap and water hand sanitizer, and so of course might imagine that the ability to socially distance to shelter in place to have access to healthy foods under Corinthian, all of this is very much being structured by a person's social location and black people tend to live in communities without access. Access to a lot of different healthy and life giving resources. Yeah, in in Sabrina, I'll tell you that as a person that reads a lot of the literature on Kovin prisoner biologists I am seeing a lot of papers coming out that are associating with the obesity without with health outcomes of COVID, but those links tend to be correlated right, but even if we were to find out that there's absolutely a causal link. Link between covert and obesity which I think you're arguing. There isn't one especially right now. At least the rates of obesity and white and black populations aren't actually that different right like it wouldn't necessarily be the thing that made it. So can you tell me a little bit about those rates versus the actual percentage of disparities? We're seeing so according to the CDC, the Obesity Twain. African, American and white populations are. Are Forty two point, two percent for white populations and forty nine point, seven percents for black populations are about that and so we're looking at effectively a seven percentage point disparity between white and black populations in terms of rates of obesity, however, when we're looking at serious complications with covert nineteen. What we're seeing is that black people are dying at rates of two point four to seven times that of white populations. How that's seven percentage point differential is leading to two point four to seven times the disparity in serious complications. Death. No one's really being able to explain that. This is the problem with the kind of cords of studies, which is that they lead people to believe that somehow. Is One of the drivers when in fact it could simply be a confounding in these studies, but we're so used to studying obesity and treating these correlations as if they are evidence of causal link that people are frequently not being very critical when they're seeing studies that show these relationships. Sabrina, you've obviously spent years by now working to understand this issue and to educate folks about it I'm wondering you know like why why this. Why have you specifically taken this on one of the reasons? Why continue to do it? Is I've seen what a difference? It's made to people's lives. I mean I've had so many people reach out and tell me that they felt for the longest time like something was wrong, but no one was talking about it or that I have spoken to their personal experience. I couldn't have imagined when I started doing this work. That could have possibly had the impact that it's had you know I'm standing on the shoulders of giants people who have been feminist scholars medical scholars journalists who've been doing this work at least since the nineteen seventies, but we're at a moment right now where there's a critical mass of people who are aware that the discourse surrounding fatness that we've long accepted really is baseless, and we think about a new way of allowing people to have a positive relationship to their bodies, and to cultivate health within themselves and their communities that does not rely on that stigma. Okay Sabrina I appreciate you. Thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing your life and your work with us. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Sabrina strings. Her book is called fearing the black body the racial origins

Sabrina Obesity Black Women Victoria Mccoy Europe Marilyn Monroe Obesity Twain University Of California Irvin Francisco New York Times Mattie Safai Kobe NPR SAN Harper Kovin CDC
Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:06 min | Last month

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

"Dr Stanford is an obesity medicine, physician, scientists, educator and policymaker at Massachusetts General. Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She also lectures at Brown and Teaches Med students at Harvard. Hello, and welcome well. Thanks for having me. It's an absolute delight to be here today with both of you. We're just we're the most accomplished person ever had this podcast like I cannot even begins. Batum were all you have. You guys are the best and this is. This is what I need to me through the rest of the day as I conquer the world. Yeah! We're honored that you made have the time the time to come talk to us just a little, so thank you so much. Did I get all of that right? You did I I. Guess What I can do is explain it to people because people are kind of like is all of that absolutely so? I'm obviously a mathematician, so the MD is the easiest part I think to understand on my completed my masters in public health nineteen years ago, so it shows you that I'm older than I appear. And that was in health policy management. My masters impose ministration was from the Harvard. Kennedy School, government and government. Currently working on my MBA executive MBA, so that hasn't quite made it to the end of my name, but I may lead US next year. Let me tell you guys. We'll have more to talk about. The the all the that you see after not team for fifteen, but it is nice that it goes with that, so those are all fellowships, so my fellow of the ANC, which is the American Academy pediatrics I'm a fellow of American College of Positions. American college positions represents all Physicians for adult so internal medicine, a fellow of the American Heart Association so basically. I'm looking at cardio metabolic health and being the fellow in the American Heart Association what represents that and then a fellow in the obesity society. Society which is the F. Toss? So you know these fellowships come you know after having accomplished in those different on areas domain, so I see children I see adults I work in this kind of Cardio Metabolic, health space obviously as obesity medicine physician I work in that space, so it really is a combination of kind of who I am, and just looking at Vegas, the letters that come after my name really talks to the work that I really care about and working with my patients patients across the wall. That's amazing. Wow -gratulations. What inspired you study obesity. One of the things that I was always very concerned about as a black one in a black woman who was born and raised in Atlanta Julie obviously in Boston is that's where mastermind Harvard are? I'm I was really. Perplexed I think is the word I WANNA. Use about the disproportionate impact obesity on communities of color particularly I'm the black community. That was what really brought me to this work, so if you go back twenty years ago, I think you've as you're in your twenties for twenty years ago. When I was doing my m H, you're not okay. Across. Our loved anyways Oh! That's Cute I. Love it still have you guys by? Decades! but one of the things I was really interested in seeing was like. I felt like there was a lot that we weren't doing to understand why. Obesity obesity disproportionately impacted certain groups and the groups that are more likely to kind of tackle these issues or the people that are representative, so those scripts so as a black woman and the group that is most disproportionately impacted by obesity I felt compelled to really approach and tackle this headline, so the projects that I was doing back at emory school of Public Health, back in ninety nine two thousand etc, We're looking at specifically obesity in the black community one project I was doing was. Was Looking at obesity in the Black Church community was looking at obesity among African, American, adolescent girls and one was looking at obesity within those that are law resources within the wick programs. It'll women's and children's for Ram, and how could we fix their Their plight in terms of recognizing that we can in some ways with the limited resources that they may have available to enhance their role house. So this was something that was kind of lingering. I didn't anticipate that I would choose obese medicine. 'cause that was not a field when I was twenty years ago. It really was not a field. There was no board certification in obesity medicine. The first Brit sort of patients directly. No Be Madison didn't start until two thousand well, which was well after I finished medical school, but I can tell you I was on. Call in the pediatric ICU when I was in residency and I as internal medicine pediatrics and I literally just googled obesity in medicine at about two thirty in the morning after I just intimated three kids in the ICU in a new. I was going to sleep at nights. I figured I'd just need to keep myself busy. And, the fellowship here at Mass General at Harvard popped up and I was like. What is this? You know I I really interested in obesity. I had no idea there was a fellowship, indeed the first ship and so I came and I spent three years. Doing a fellowship dedicated to understanding the disease of obesity.

Obesity Harvard Harvard Medical School American Heart Association Black Community Dr Stanford American College Of Positions Brown Massachusetts General Black Church Kennedy School United States Batum Emory School Of Public Health American Academy ANC MD
Jay-Z's Made in America festival canceled due to pandemic

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Jay-Z's Made in America festival canceled due to pandemic

"Festival will not Take place over the Ben Franklin Parkway on Labor Day weekend. Producer Jay Z has canceled this year's event. Cable OBESITY Help Bureau chief Pattillo reports go with 19 only part of the Reese A statement from Jay Z's ROC Nation says the country is fighting parallel pandemics. The virus and systemic racism on the concert is cancelled both to protect the health of artists fans in the community and to focus on supporting organizations and individuals who are fighting for Social justice and equality. ROC Nation says it will be back in 2021 in its statement, It says it Ex forward Toa working alongside the mayor's office and returning to the Wonderful city of Philadelphia. The relationship has not

Roc Nation Jay Z Bureau Chief Producer Philadelphia Reese
Should You Beware of Glucose Syrup?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:21 min | Last month

Should You Beware of Glucose Syrup?

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition diva podcast I'm your host Monica Reina. A listener recently asked me to look into an ingredient called glucose syrup. This is often used as a sweetener in processed foods, such as cookies, candy and other confections, and she'd read that it's a very concentrated source of sugar that supposedly contains four times the amount of sugar and calories per tablespoon as regular table sugar, the implication of course that one should avoid foods made with glucose syrup. I tracked this specific claim to an article written by a Dietitian for website called health line now this is a site that I consider to be a very reliable source in general I have found their nutrition articles to be thorough, accurate and very well referenced and sure enough. That statement that Glucose Syrup contains four times. The sugar and calories found in regular sugar, was footnoted and linked to the USDA's food and nutrient database the gold standard for nutrient data. One footnote linked to the nutritional analysis for light. Corn, Syrup, which is another name for Glucose Syrup. One tablespoon contains seventeen grams of sugar and sixty two calories. The other footnote linked to the nutritional analysis for regular table sugar one tablespoon contains four grams of sugar and sixteen calories. Case closed. Actually make that case overturned on appeal. Because unfortunately, this second listing was inaccurate. You see in addition to the tens of thousands of foods that have been analyzed by the USDA to create their amazing food nutrient database, they also include as a public service nutrient information for tens of thousands of additional packaged and processed foods, and they base that on information that's been provided by the manufacturer, and there are frequent errors. In fact, there's a disclaimer right on the page that health line cited stating that the info was provided by food brand owners who are responsible for the descriptions, nutrient data and the ingredient information. Well. In this case, it was just a simple typo. The manufacturer chose the wrong serving size the nutrient info that they uploaded four grams of sugar and sixteen calories. For a teaspoon of sugar, not a tablespoon, and for those of you who don't bake or maybe used metric measures. A tablespoon contains three teaspoons. So a tablespoon of Corn Syrup does not contain four times as many calories as a tablespoon of sugar, it is actually about a third higher. It contains seventeen grams of sugar versus twelve grams, and this is simply due to the fact that sugar crystals aren't as dense as sugar syrup. Something that manufacturers adjust for in their recipes. Look if you're concerned about the sugar or the calorie content of packaged food, it doesn't really matter how many tablespoons of an ingredient were added to the recipe. What matters is how many grams of sugar end up in each serving of the finished product something that's disclosed usually accurately on the nutrition facts label look mistakes happen and I sent an email to the Dietitian who wrote the article, alerting her to the error, and I hope that she and health line will be able to correct it. But. Here's a quick tip for anyone who's using the USDA's database to look up nutrient info. You can filter those listings so that they don't show the manufacturer provided listings. The USDA data is perfect, but it's generally much more complete and more reliable than the manufacturer supplied data. But I still have one other problem with this article on corn or Glucose Syrup because the author goes on to write that quote Consuming Glucose Syrup regularly may increase your risk of obesity, high blood, sugar, poor, dental, health, high blood, pressure, and Heart, disease, and quote, and once again she includes citations this time. She's linking to articles published in medical journals. But these articles are not about corn syrup per se they refer to all added sugars,

Usda Monica Reina
You End Up Where You're Heading: The Hidden Dangers of Living a Safe Life with Jimmy Rex

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:52 min | Last month

You End Up Where You're Heading: The Hidden Dangers of Living a Safe Life with Jimmy Rex

"You know, we'll be talking about the hidden dangers of living a safe life because Jimmy's written a great new book called you end up where you're heading the hidden dangers of living that safe life. Is Kick it right off Jimi. Because what do you mean exactly when you say there hidden dangers of living a safe life I mean don't we just want to minimize? Our risk was to deal with us. And that's what's kind of funny as in the past when you know civilizations, reforming and everything else the whole purpose was the explorers had all the danger, the people that went out and did those things they left the sellers behind the settlers job was to build walls. to around those places that are already mapped out to kind of. Help. Make it predictable surprises destroy. Build walls Ford's till the fields reproduce all those things. And that was the safe life was to be the settler. All the explorers I mean even the good ones that we know about. You Know Marco Polo and others I mean they ended up getting killed on their expectations, but these settlers had kind of this safe life, and unfortunately it's kind of changed now with social and technological advances. We've wiped. Most the dangers of the frontier calories are cheap transportation safe. It's fast plagues, minus the Krona virus is pretty much been eradicated. You know but modern explorers They're the ones that get to venture out the high degree. They have a lot of uncertainty, but they kind of they're gonNA. Return in one piece You know there's you're not worried about getting. Having to sell the sees with unsmooth waters, not having to worry about. People thinking that you're doing witchcraft or here see and things like that, and so where the danger come in now is you know the reality is if you're the person that's sitting in settling just kind of? Staying in your safe place, you're going to have a lot of harsh conditions coming out of that, you're going to have you know. Forms of addiction, obesity, burnout, heart, disease, anxiety, depression, and for what so you can you know? Maybe get a little bit bigger house. You can have a mediocre relationship comfort. So for the whole idea of the book, the whole idea of the title and everything else is we think that leading a safe life is kind of camping in and and kind of building ourselves into this is a small world, but the real value of the real beauty of life is getting out and exploring. What's out there? It is really interesting because when you think about it, and you hear you know all those stories from the olden days you hear that phrase over and over again that you can see who the pioneers are because they have the arrows in their back there the people. That went like we're going West like. We're going to the Pacific and you never heard from them again. Because they went out, they went into native American country, were they? Just you know had exposure because of the rocky winters in. Different thing all those different things, so you know it's really interesting to hear that things have flipped because most people they choose what they perceived to be this quote, unquote safe life so beyond what you've already shared his. You've already kind of shared a little overview of what that happens. It's going to a couple specifics on why we as human beings do this, and maybe we shouldn't. If you picture, there's a map on a table and somebody's got their head over the map and they're looking. Looking at this map and they see that is their entire world, and they think okay. This is what I know. This is what I'm comfortable with. This is where I feel safe, but in most people live their whole lives with that map zoomed in, but if somebody were to come up and go, hey, pull the map back. Pull your head back and you notice. The map is one hundred times bigger than you ever thought. And this happened to me in my own life I was born. To believe one thing and I live that way for over thirty years, and then all of a sudden I had a couple of life experience. I started traveling the world I got to go. I've been over sixty eight countries now. And with my travels every single time I went, there was so much reward. There's so much joy there was so much beauty and these other worlds that existed as like I got to see so many different parts of life and so many different cultures and every time I went. I learned other things I started to realize that all these things I was uncomfortable with once. I got to know them. The discomfort went away and it actually became a much stronger love, so I'll give you one example. I was in Egypt a couple years ago and a good. Good friend of mine hit, invited me to go with him, and he, visiting his family in Egypt, and I've always had this fear, just being honest of Islamic people and his family was there, and they had this beautiful Islamic about thirty of them I was when I first got, there was so uncomfortable, and then all the sudden I saw the love and the way they took me into his mom came up to me, and she said I've been worried about my son in the united. States for twenty years and having met one of his best friends. All my fears gone away. I can see he has he's beautiful France, and it creates his atmosphere that creates these experiences life experiences, where you just truly get to step out of your old map and look at this new form of it, and it's so much more bigger and so much more

Egypt Jimi Jimmy Obesity Marco Polo France
Coronavirus: People Who Are at Increased Risk for Severe Illness

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:35 sec | Last month

Coronavirus: People Who Are at Increased Risk for Severe Illness

"The centers for disease control and prevention is revamping its list of which Americans are at higher risk for Seville severe illness from the coronavirus pregnant women are now on that list but age alone has been removed as a factor the CDC also altered the list of underlying conditions that make a patient more susceptible to suffering and death sickle cell anemia has joined the list for example and the threshold for risky levels of obesity has been lowered the changes are being prompted by medical studies that have been published since the agency first started listing high risk

CDC Seville
U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

Larry Elder

00:41 sec | Last month

U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

"The centers for disease control and prevention resets its list of which Americans are at higher risk for severe illness from the corona virus pregnant women were added to the list Dr Dana Meanie del meant at the CDC says they need to watch they come in contact with wear face coverings and practice social distancing pregnant women are generally a younger population so that that's the good news but we we do see higher rates of admission to the ICU and mechanical ventilation based on that this data set that we have one positive to take away Chris Christie yeah single cell disease was also added to the list the threshold for risky levels of obesity was lowered the changes didn't include adding race as a risk factor despite higher

Dr Dana Meanie CDC Chris Christie
U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

"New a the government centers virus for watchdog disease cases control reports are climbing and prevention more to than reset a near billion record dollars its numbers list and virus of which and Americans relief experts payments think are at they went higher know to people risk why who for could severe not illness they're use blaming from the money a nation the coronavirus that's become the government complacent pregnant made more women than since were one the added pandemic's hundred to thirty the list early million days Dr so Dana at called eight Meanie P. del economic M. meant O. R. at the C. impact CDC center payments for says public they need affairs to watch the government research accountability they come pull in contact backs office them up with says wear nearly finding face one coverings what point was one and million unified practice went social support to distancing dead for people measures pregnant women totaling to are stop generally nearly a the younger virus's a billion population spread and a half so has dollars that that's dropped the good news it's the two latest months but example ago we eight we of do mistakes in ten see Americans higher as the favored government stay rushed rates at home out of eat admission orders at to crisis the ICU now it's speed and mechanical half ventilation tax eight experts and based ten on say had that also this this backed one data the limits was set almost on that we have how many one inevitable people positive can to because gather take away of together a lag in reporting about six data Chris in Christie on ten deaths do now yeah single the IRS cell fewer disease Americans asked was also last are added also month to that the at survivors list least moderately the return threshold worried the for money risky that they levels or but a it of family obesity may not member have was the lowered may legal get authority the virus the changes to require didn't but they're include still that adding a strong race as majority sadr a risk factor mag at despite ani sixty Washington higher eight percent infection rates Sager I'm a made Donahue Ghani Washington

Dana O. R. Chris Christie Sager Donahue Ghani Washington CDC IRS Washington
U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

U.S. officials change virus risk groups, add pregnant women

"The centers for disease control and prevention reset its list of which Americans are at higher risk for severe illness from the coronavirus pregnant women were added to the list Dr Dana Meanie del meant at the CDC says they need to watch they come in contact with wear face coverings and practice social distancing pregnant women are generally a younger population so that that's the good news but we we do see higher rates of admission to the ICU and mechanical ventilation based on that this data set that we have one positive to take away Chris Christie yeah single cell disease was also added to the list the threshold for risky levels of obesity was lowered the changes didn't include adding race as a risk factor despite higher infection rates I'm a Donahue

Dr Dana Meanie CDC Donahue Chris Christie
Fauci and top health officials testify before House

Lewis and Logan

00:37 sec | Last month

Fauci and top health officials testify before House

"Dr Anthony Fauci the nation's top infectious disease expert and three other key officials are in front of a house panel this morning overseeing the administration's response to the corona virus CDC director Dr Robert Redfield talked about a recent CDC study that examined over a million covert nineteen cases the most underlying health conditions were cardiovascular diabetes obesity and chronic lung disease hospitalizations were six times higher for these

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Robert Redfield Chronic Lung Disease CDC Director
Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

NBC Nightly News

02:18 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

"The covert pandemic is widening the economic gap in our country. Exacerbating divides. That were already there tonight. In our continuing series inequality in America Blaine Alexander reports on access to healthy food, and how so-called food deserts are getting even worse. There's a lot packed into this little stand. Fresh fruits and vegetables most grown right out back. But for this neighborhood and Jonesboro Georgia, this stand is so much more. They're only healthy food option for miles. How crucial is this market to the people who live in this community? This market is like an oasis food desert. The nearest supermarkets about four miles away. A food desert the USDA defined it as any urban neighborhood where residents have to travel more than a mile to reach a grocery store, and you're going to see a lot. Gas stations a lot of fast food stations across the country food deserts exist in every state impacting an estimated twenty three point, five million people, disproportionately minority communities, and the areas are almost exclusively low income. We've got some beautiful locally grown tomatoes will sellers with wholesome wave. Georgia is helping with affordability and access partnering with Farmer's markets like Atlanta harvest so. So any shoppers using snap benefits can buy fresh food at half all for those living in food deserts, the two biggest barriers transportation and income problems only made worse by the pandemic recent numbers show an additional seventeen point. One million people here in the US could experience food insecurity because of Corona virus, and the health impact could last for generations and without healthy food without those fruits and vegetables, so we always talk about getting every day. It's not an effect. Your Immune System's GonNa fake obesity diabetes heart disease, even long-term cancers? Burger. King and her children coming here is a lifesaver for kids on new way to experience food. A lot of kids don't even know. Who Comes from the ground? They expected to come out of a box and for Crystal Dalton Son Hunter new possibilities now he wants to be a farmer. It gives them something before. It's giving them a purpose providing equal access to health hope. Blaine Alexander. NBC News Jonesboro Georgia.

Georgia Blaine Alexander King Farmer Usda NBC United States America Burger Atlanta Crystal Dalton Son Hunter
How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

Outcomes Rocket

05:50 min | 2 months ago

How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw Marquez's here and that I had the privilege of hosting Lisa Henderson. She is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer at synchronous health. Her previous experience includes experience as an adjunct faculty at the Vanderbilt Cup. Periodic College chair the Southern Region at the American Counseling Association and also pass President Tennessee Counseling Association among other leadership roles. Her focus has always been on health and also mental health of communities and individuals, and with her work at synchronous health, the impact that they're making at a broader scale in. In Times of great need is just extraordinary, so I'm I'm excited to to dive into the conversation with Lisa and in the work that she and her team are are up to, but before that Lisa at one welcome you to the gas much for having me absolutely, it's a true pleasure, so you know before we dive into what you guys do. At synchronous health I want to understand better. What inspires your work in healthcare sir? So I started my career when I was planning my career and I was in Undergrad. In went straight into Grad school after that I actually got a masters in health education promotion, and so it was really focused on helping people live healthier lives and part of that research experience in that masters program was to be a health coach when police officers. It was really fine. had some great sessions where you know, I would have to kind of barter with them. So if I wanted the person who was leading the SWAT team, his stress levels were incredibly high humans and sleeping well and so I wanted him to do yoga in order for him to agree to do Yoga I had to meet him at the shooting range and. Learn how to shoot a pissed off, so you know being able to kind of meet people where they are and help them learn. New Skills was really fun, but the same time. It was so clear to me that. Those officers were living with so much more than just obesity and trouble sleeping. They were living with anxiety and depression and worry and guilt and. All the things that humans experience and it was just kind of sitting there and my training as a health coach really didn't give me the tools to address those things so I went back to school, and got a masters in counseling, so that I could get into those deeper sorts of issues with folks, and it's been just so rewarding percents to be able to kind of take both sides of health What are you doing on the behavioral side? In terms of lifestyle choices and out. Adherent to your treatment plans in taking your medication and things like that, but also why in what? What is the underlying factor of? Depression or anxiety or family conflict? Are you know other things going on that lead to the decisions that affect your health? Yeah so cool, so you got this this masters in public health education and you said this doesn't really do it i. want to dig deeper help. These people more their stressed. There's there's a lot here and you went to go. Get Your Masters and mental health, and it unlocked a lot of things and you know I. It looks and sounds like you did the right thing lease I mean now you're you're you're part of this this really unique company addressing a lot of these issues at scale. Tell me about how it happened and and folks Leeson. We're having some fun connecting before the podcast that I shared my story with their vow had a couple offers the people wanting to buy outcomes rocket before it was, it was it was a business profitable business and the pressures that I got at home, saying no to those offers. Lisa I. WanNa Hear Your Story. We were saving it here for for us to share it with the listeners to tell me how synchronous help happened and and what exactly you guys are doing. The add value to the healthcare ecosystem sure. So similar to your experience, so one of my co are three of us. Co Founders of synchronised Health Katie, Moore. Guy Barnard, Myself Katie and I are both mental health. Clinicians report together for about ten years and several years ago, we started a treatment center and the first sort of level of programming that we provided as. Intensive outpatient, so we had people with us in our services in our program for nine hours a week and we would have them for. One to four months, and even folks who had been with us for nine hours a week would still come in and say I forgot or I was too stressed or I was triggered to use the skills that we're learning while we're here and then have them show up when I meet them in real life, and so we were thinking okay. They don't need clinical criteria for a higher level of care. We're. We're not seeing the improvement that we WANNA see. We could keep doing more of the everything we were doing. Was Evidence based and supported by research? So it's not like you know what we were doing was in any way deficient. It just wasn't heading them at the right time and place when they really needed it,

Lisa Henderson Lisa Grad School Lisa I. Wan American Counseling Associatio Vanderbilt Cup Marquez President Tennessee Counseling Depression Chief Operating Officer Leeson Moore Guy Barnard Katie
"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Think it'd be more suburban. Chicago'S A little bit too. If you hate big cities. I'll say that what we should go if we go. The annoy is Reagan went to college. Steve hasn't even that school. Although Steve Kamara Eureka Eureka correct. Yeah Rica College. Town populations five thousand two hundred ninety five. Yeah it's us we honed. His comedic chops probably strange. How big is that school? Five hundred sixty seven students so actually there. We could do a live show recall. Kids love us. Yeah we could do that. You want us to do that. How far is that for you? Ooh That's about that's about an hour and a half two hours. You can write nothing all right. Thank you very much Steve. Abraham Lincoln spoke on the campus Nathan Eighteen fifty six and Ronald. Reagan graduated there in one thousand thirty two. Wow that's some history a hotbed of presence. I say that you can have Steve's history tour where he takes you to all the places that when Ronald Reagan do at Eureka College clubs was chasing trimming and beavers. Mike was the thirty clouds open. Eight am on Monday a museum there already Museum Steve. Now that would be fun. Would be sure would be. Was those religious college perfect. Steve Reagan's probably going with the better museums. I would think that's not interesting. Wasn't that one big one in California. Oh it's on the music every four years that big Republican debate there with the big plane all fresh raw right now. We'll talk about great Reagan's just like you have to do that. Or You. Kicked out the party. Steve Progress a thriller. All right. Good evening hello no calls phones if I may explain. I know you're taking Jemmy but was happening. Is Justin said awesome? Why he was saying that.

Ronald Reagan Steve Reagan Steve Steve Kamara Museum Steve Steve Progress Eureka College clubs Rica College Justin Chicago Jemmy Abraham Lincoln Mike Nathan Eighteen California
"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

03:54 min | 2 months ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Slash minihan And you get three months free a one-year Package. Yeah right now express. Vpn Dot com slash Manhattan. Now you head of comedy obviously What what are you already laughing? I see what you're setting up. How upsetting sometimes we talk about what we're GonNa do on the show. Well I mean I would just say yea you've ever you know the master classes. I do. Yes you're about to your about to be part of one I'm willing to take notes Now a lot of people say oh. You shouldn't play this guy sound because he spent a racist against the Asian community out. Yes Yup. That's true in this whole like you know. Remember when you sneeze and he says hi chew and they tell jokes. It's very offensive. I'm offended by it right so just for the record. I'm Steve Wants play this. I don't now that being said is funny as fuck. Okay so fitzy and his buddy. Who's his I guy. I'm ashamed to say I don't know if is my life video. Catch this guy. This guy is p. v. piss and vinegar. This guy is a to me. He's like we`ve. We've done this before fifteen. You know his buddy saying like I'm trying to think for great comedy duos. You need the straight man. The thing though. He's always shaking up. He's got different buddies all the back to back to the guy that we've done. This is the name guy the diner that guy okay which was a boo abacus. Castillo who is the straight man can right Lucas Delo. Yes so you need the I think right man I think I know he was host to comedy show man who was on the edge of the pool. Who's WHO's on first. Whichever one you need the straight man with the great communism all time kwami Chris Screaming. Yes Tim saying. You need that sort of partnership right so when these guys get together just so do need some visual so I should say correct. Yeah we're in quarantine. These guys are sitting far apart. Just imagine to to Bros. hanging out I give myself credit. I made it through a minute and a half of this. Oh boy it's like. How long does it fourteen minutes house three minutes? It's incredible attorney. There is one point. I have to say the worst joke. The least amount of I mean the best thought lease amount of thought. I've ever heard ever seen anything I. Maybe I'm I'm an though is I'll stop and when they can pick well. Yeah that's true. There's been the orphans here. But here's a fitzy. And his buddy is just things pats fans say. Shit Shit Shit. Pats fans say quarantine. Addition this sucks times drink. People have been zoom like no. My House is awesome. Let's see that was it. I think that was it. Can you people ask me to zoom? And I'm like no. It was the first thing that was registered to me is that he said is missing a joke there no so the first the first one is unprecedented conditions. That's part of a drinking game which is why drink right I. That and then a lot of people are doing zoom calls with their family to stay in touch because you're simple of asked him to zoom an inside joke were knows. There's some sort of going play the game and I'm like no unprecedented times. Drink people have been Zuma? I'm like no. My House is awesome brief. It's not Longtime editor Thelma Schumacher. Working this work.

Zuma Manhattan Bros. Pats fitzy Lucas Delo Thelma Schumacher Chris Screaming Castillo Tim editor attorney
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"All right. So I think is how I'm going to frame. It obesity is not really as bad for bodies. As we've been led to believe. I think that that's bullshit because I do think obesity is pretty bad for bodies. And there's a lot of consensus around the fact that obesity, and let's let's say that it is bullshit to have these strict definitions that we need to figure out a way to define obesity. Yes. And a way to dip define metabolic community agrees on obesity can be defined incorrectly and as bad can be defined incorrectly. But that's true. Good definition of. Yes. If you have good definitions of obesity and good definitions of metabolic health. I think that it is not bullshit that those things are bad for your health because we do have a lot of evidence. A lot of longitudinal studies that show that obesity assume we define it. Correctly is linked to cardiovascular health is linked to diabetes is linked to certain types of cancers is linked to sleep apnea is linked to arthritis has linked to. A lot of conditions that you would rather not have your I'm so I think that that is absolutely not bullshit. And the bullshit parts of those are that we don't have good definitions good measures of obesity, and we don't always have agreed upon definitions of metabolic health. We'll fake you Maria kind Cova, and we should disclose that. This segment has been underwritten by fun dip and cinnabon. Yes. And I'm about to have a cinnabon right now. It's going to be heavy cinnabon with extra frosting and many airports near you Maria kind of Cova is the author of the confidence game. And the biggest bluff it's quite a bluff you'll want to read about that. Thank you Maria. Thank you, Mike..

obesity Cova Maria Mike
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"The same things we're seeing plus go and in the eighteen ninety two book which became pretty famous in medicine principles and practice of medicine by William also, titled like that how could it have come? This was the first time that we actually see obesity put in a negative light in a medical textbook neutral. So he writes, he says that obesity is attributed to quote over eating a vice which is more prevalent than an only a little behind overdrinking, and it's disastrous effects. So this is the first time that we actually start seeing people put a judgment on. Why not just like this is this is medical? But, but this is a vice well, we didn't have the knowledge as a medical practitioner at the time. He didn't have the knowledge that words cause injury. Yes. He did. Not right. You did not. So in the in the early twentieth century, we finally see some epidemiological stuff where it's actually starting to be linked to increased mortality. So this is kind of the volition. And then we suddenly start having people saying, uh-huh. Maybe there problems with being overweight. But here was one of my problems with this article that saying everything that we thought is wrong. Because one of the things he saying is wait is not health in nineteen forty seven. This French guy Joan thug at first I thought he was English and his last name was vague. And I was like realized that he was French. That is kind of cool to. Yeah. He actually this is nine hundred forty seven says, actually, wait. Wait, wait, not all wait is created equal. And he's the first one who actually starts saying we should look at where the weight is on the body. Cool some comes with bad health effects, and others is just as he said in French. So it didn't sound quite as bad or maybe it sounded much worse unsightly. Yes. But not but not actually causing any health problems. What is French for junk in the trunk? I'm gonna look this up as we talk. So he so he distinguished between Android ABI city which was upper body obesity, Android, Android. Yes. Let me guy. Kind of quite a b- city or lower body. He said that the upper body, which is what you were talking about with kind of belly fat and all of that that's linked to metabolic and cardiovascular disease, but guide is not. And so now, it gets us to kind of to this question of okay. What do we even need to look at when we're talking about weight? And is there such thing as healthy obesity? And so there's this relatively new concept stems back to nineteen forty seven called metabolic, the healthy obesity. So the original the original idea was that. Okay. When you have a certain BMI, and which is gonna knowledge that their problems with every single one of these measurements a certain percentage body fat. Then all of a sudden you have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. You have a higher risk of dying at a younger age higher risks of type two diabetes, higher risk of stroke higher risk of a lot of. Those types of things and of certain types of cancers. But now, but some people are saying is, okay. No, actually, it's not wait. There are metabolic healthy obese individuals and metabolic unhealthy obese. Okay. So it's not the weight. Yeah. It's your metabolism. And for some bodies, you might be obese by every single criterion. And yet your metabolism is still healthy. And so one would think your risk for all of these things would be normal. Whereas someone could be skinny and actually be metabolic unhealthy that seemed the second part of that is seems obvious. Now, the first part, I wonder this must only exist at the lower ends of the definition of obesity. So so in the last five years, that's when research on this has really picked up it exists at every point and obesity. But it seems that it's not something. That's actually long-term true. Yeah. So I I was able to..

obesity William Joan thug younger age five years
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"And provide the body enough you'll to perform physical feats, although from what I understand sometimes. The eating does go on a bit beyond the necessary. And sometimes the burning of calories doesn't match the ingestion of calories. And then we've got a situation where maybe we don't maybe everything that I think about obesity is wrong or maybe maybe hear me out here. The backlash to the potato. Mash is some bullshit Maria Konakov is here to load our plates with knowledge. You're probably loyal to certain brands. But do you ever wonder about the businesses behind them? I'm Seth Stevenson an enslaved new podcast who runs that. I'll talk to the CEO's fascinating companies that create things people love, what is the impact of having Meghan Markle photograph, one of your products. We see the bump we see the bump. So I won't be able to that on next week's weather with governments in the immediate future. They're not immediate future. Do you try the products on your own face ideal? Join me for who runs that wherever you listen to podcasts. Recently in the Huffington Post, or as I call it the Huffington Post. There was an article headlined, everything, you know, about obesity is wrong. Now, I went in having these as my priors as they say regarding obesity in general, I think that having a higher then lower BMI correlates to some negative outcomes in terms of cardiovascular health, diabetes also think that so-called belly fat might be worse than other kinds. This is what I thought I knew about obesity, and it turns out after reading this article in the Huffington Post. None of that's wrong. So what is it that? We thought we knew about obesity. That's wrong is obesity bad. I think what I said is true. I can't figure this out. So I'm going to be joined by Maria Konakov. She comes by every few weeks to play. Is that bullshit? She's also the author of the biggest bluff forthcoming fr. Penguin press. Hello. Hello maria. How are you doing? Well, mike. How are you? Well, so does obese even have a meaning is that a useful category? I don't mean does someone describes it as this percent overweight. But if there is such a thing as being too fat. Let's not mince words is that a useful thing to think about that. Someone can be too fat. Yeah. So that's I think a really interesting question that a lot of researchers are asking wait, isn't health and health, isn't wait. So we can't use weight as a proxy for health, which I think a lot of people may very well do because wait a something that's very easy to see. So a lot of markers of health our internal. So I can't tell if you're healthy or not healthy by looking at you, always you can weigh more.

obesity Maria Konakov Huffington Post Seth Stevenson Meghan Markle Penguin press CEO Mash mike
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From two keito l l c gets the obesity code podcast with dr jason fund and meghan romme's each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada i'm carl franklin and on today's show we're talking about one patients struck with kidney disease the obesity code podcast is brought to you by two kito llc who strives to support the low carb community with podcasts in other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriarch deng to keito dot com today show centers around ibm patient john collier who was told by a doctor that he had staved off kidney failure for about five years by using a ketogenic diet i was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1918 nine furious after that my mother was also diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and she died as a result of complications from that in nineteen ninety six john's mother died at a young age typical for those of us with type 2 diabetes she was sixty nine years old when she died we are going through an epidemic of diabetes chronic disease it's unprecedented in human populations that's awardwinning author and science journalist gerry tabs bought it's happening worldwide so this here's a disease at in the 19th century in europe in the us was in exceeding lee rare disease i mean estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and the us in the late nineteenth century in hospitals was may be one in every thousand or three thousand hospital patients had diabetes in the va hospitals in the us today one in four patients have diabetes one in eleven americans have diabetes i mean these are enormous increases if you look at the cdc numbers sincerely 1960s there's been a seven hundred percent increase in the prevalence of diabetes i mean if this was any other disease particularly in infectious disease you would have investigative committee teams of scientists people in white coats with electron akiir walking around our backyard's as we speak trying to figure out what was the cause of this.

dr jason fund meghan romme toronto carl franklin deng john collier europe us diabetes kito llc ibm gerry tabs va cdc seven hundred percent sixty nine years five years
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"In modern life that's not what happens when people are facing legal trouble or marital trouble or a child problems their children are sick or getting into trouble with the law financial problems these never go away and that's the problem so whereas in the past this sort of response was really directed as a one time thing after which you would do vigorous physical activity to burn off all that glucose who remember cortisol is one of the counter regulatory hormones as an activator the sympathetic nervous system yossi push glucose out into the blood so that your muscles can use it but then afterwards as she go down but stresses not like that in the modern day you have chronic financial problems you stressed all day your bosses the nasse though he's always riding years earlier instead under stress all day and it's not like you can run away or do some vigorous physical activity right there in the office so what happens is that this sort of thing builds up in what over time your body is now pushing out the glucose and eventually your insulin hass to respond to bring down the glucose was a very unhealthy sort of system where you're chronically activating a your cortisol response and that we know leads to week game there is a synthetic form of cortisol cold prayed in his own which is used in large doses to treat inflammatory disease and that's richard morris by two kedo dudes cohost if he give that to patients chronically then they almost invariably gang white so we know that quarters all uh is a very powerful mediator obesity and it overlaps very significantly with the insulin response because insulin has to take care of the glucose.

cortisol inflammatory disease richard morris obesity
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Okay so is unnecessarily restrict calories to lose weight that's always a question if you want to get thinner you got to eat less her exercise more you have to change the balance of calories your taken and taking out an this is sort of the the bedrock belief and all of obesity research when you read obesity research papers had talked about obesity is an energy balance the sword are i mean i know researchers who have endowed chairs in energy balance research because the ideas you know people get fat 'cause they taken into many calories and expand to less and the point i've been making and others for the past decade now is that this is almost an incomprehensively naive statement it's like saying that somebody got rich because a token more money than they spent i mean imagine uh you i'm give instead of giving electron obesity i'm giving a lecture on on on wealthier socioeconomic disparities and somebody in the audience has to me hey in wise bill gates so rich and i say because he took in more money than the expanded i will be left out of the auditorium but if you ask me why i don't know why oprah is often so heavy she goes up and down but why does oprah struggle with their way nice because she takes and more calories and she expands that's a completely acceptable answer and in fact to say anything else was almost considered on naive.

obesity oprah
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"M n everything that was delicious was kind of off limits for me dr fontelles this why not only does this yoyo dieting inhibit us physically but also mentally one of the things that we have to really guard against this is sort of learned helplessness that people who are trying to newsweek cat because they've tried so many diets and because so many of these diets a failed again and again they short learn that there's nothing they can deal and i think that this is because most diets focus on only half of the piece of the puzzle that is the focus on the foods that you should or should not be eating or really pay no attention to the sort of when that is should you eat once a day twice a day three times a day six times a day ten times a day or zero times a day it turns out that when you eat is just as if not more important than what you eat eating all of your daily calories in one smaller window every day gives your body more time to lower insulin and that is the key to undoing insulin resistance if you have in some resistance your body responds by making more insulin that higher level of insulin overtime produces this obesity so it's really important to jason in meghan that their patients don't give up hope they aren't helpless and it will get better but they've just been focusing on the wrong things what to eat and not when.

obesity jason meghan newsweek
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"But one thing she struggled with was artificial sweeteners i had a lot of sweeteners like that was how i of shored up my feelings of like differentiation if you want to call it back i really didn't have a lot of cravings or like emotional attachment to all these foods that i was leaving behind by you still i mean i do have a food addiction i know that this is true so you still need need a crutch to chronic get you from 1 to the next phase rate so sweeteners were in the equation and i had a bit of addiction to sweeteners for awhile dr fung and megan ramose explain why artificial sweeteners can be problematic in general i don't recommend artificial sweeteners for fasting or really to be taken at all and the reason is that if you look at the artificial sweeteners in terms of their insulin effect sometimes it's really just as bad as sugar now there's not a lot of data on this but really remember if you're thinking of obesity and type 2 diabetes it's really a disease of hyperinsulinemia it's really too much insulin so even if you have zero calories even if you have zero sugar such as a splendid our aspertain or something that's really the insulin which drives obesity and some of these have just as much insulin the fact so the sweetness itself may make people crave more so some people think that that's the reason that they eat more and it certainly possible as a trigger for food but the bottom line really is to see if these things actually works so it doesn't really matter what the mechanism of sweeteners is.

obesity hyperinsulinemia dr fung megan ramose zero calories
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"But three hundred killer calories per day had as the available calories decreased they consumption of calories shrank by 500 kilic hellish per day they caloric expenditure was changing in response to their viable calories okay so the epa status working to keep your body at a regulated weight how on earth do we hackett so how does our body set weight work well remember what we said is that insulin is one of the main hormones involved in determining your body fat so as you eat insulin goes up enslin tells your body to store body fat to store your food energy on the body so body fat when you're is linked goes down your body then gets the signal to start burning some the start energy or burning some of this body fat so what happens during obesity while insulin goes up you game body fat as your fat cells increase then what happens is that your start to secrete a second hormone called leptin so lapd in is produced by the fat cells and tells your body hey i'm getting too fat is travels to the brain and this leptin then towels the body to stop eating so it really controls your appetite it makes you just not want to eat at all so as you don't eat well insulin goes down insulin goes down the fat cells start to shrink and then the leptin level goes down and then you're back to square once you see this is a feedback mechanism very similar to the thermostat in the house that is if your temperature goes up to majet turns on the air conditioning and then eventually gets back down to normal and that turns off this is the same thing insulin goes up gain body fat bodyfat produces leapt then leptin tells you to stop eating inslee goes back down so very nice inefficient and work very well up until about nineteen seventy seven or so when the obesity epidemic started so what goes on in obesity while the member the the the fundamental problem is too much insulin so insulin goes up.

epa obesity the house
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"And she gives this example of them children they would admit experiment and one carla drink and that to run for an hour and a half to spend all the the calories and that's the reality so the amount of calories expended while exercising really isn't that much however there is an upside to exercise even if it's not weight loss i do think that it helped pull the blood sugar i'll out of my blood um and so it did help and the respect i have i never officially got like a prediabetic diagnosis or anything like that so the exercise helped her burn off glycogen so her blood sugar and never got dangerously high but that wasn't enough for her insulin the plo enough over a sustained period of time therefore she wasn't losing weight we should mention that kim has lost some weight but up until the point she started fasting she found it extremely difficult to shed pounds dr fun goes into a little more detail on why exercise isn't the most efficient way to lose weight remember the core problem with obesity is not one of calories the core problem of obesity is too much insulin which is sometimes also caused by insulin resistance so if you have a lot of insulin resistance you your body will respond by producing more insulin so it's a vicious cycle too much insulin can lead to insulin resistance insulin resistance can lead to too much insulin and too much insulin is really the signal for your body to store fat and the real problem is that exercise does not address these court issues yes it does burn calories although very very inefficiently.

blood sugar kim obesity carla
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From two keito l l c it's the obesity code podcast with dr jason fund and meghan ramose each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada on karl franklin and today on the show nonskilled victories ford benefits of fasting and ketogenic style other than weight loss the obesity could podcast is brought to you by two kito llc who strives to support the low carb community with podcasts and other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriotic two qito dot com this week story centers around patient kimberly dumber s like most dividing ends patients kim's been on roller coaster dieting her whole life her mother is one of seven each of which has type 2 diabetes kim is one of four all but one of her siblings has type 2 diabetes and soul ever since they 20s or so i've been struggling against that and trying to do everything i possibly can do to prevent that from happening her undergraduate degree is in biology and chemistry so she naturally thought about modifying her diet at the young age of twenty two kims started a programme called natural hormonal enhancement which was mostly low carb with carbs cycling this approach worked for weight loss but she allowed herself to be talked out of it by just about everybody i got talked out of that by society essentially her mother had done lowcarbon controller diabetes for a while but probably eight too much protein and got stuck.

dr jason fund meghan ramose karl franklin undergraduate degree toronto kito llc kim
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Then if they were to to not have had that problem until they're kind of midthirties kind of thing so this is why childhood obesity is such a problem because it is going to be in the future an even bigger problem because that sort of obesity almost drives itself that is when you become insulin resistance that's going to lead to higher levels which is going to lead to more we game which is going to lead to more insulin resistance so you need to break that cycle in one of the ways to break that cycle is through the practice of fast and being a good friend of mine who's sugar was over six hundred told me he couldn't go low carb because it was hard on the kidneys in his kidney numbers were abnormal likewise when i was in my 20s i was told by a nurse that low carb works but the longterm effects on the kidneys quote were not known unquote that was enough to scare me away from low carb for a long time so let's ask dr fung a kidney doctor what are the effects of a low carb diet on kidneys one of the questions that we always get is a question about chronic kidney disease flee in army kidney specialist them in a kidney specialist for about twenty years now and this question has been really look that in fairly extensive detail but nevertheless is one of the big concerns so let's go back and see when the the problem is in people with chronic kidney disease we often recommend that they avoid eating extremely high protein dieins and there's a number of fear radical reasons why that may be true it may be that for example the excess dietary protein creates a lot of these these waste products to use excess amino acids for energy we have to first turn them into carbohydrates so we need to remove the atoms that not carbon hydrogen and oxygen.

obesity dr fung kidney disease twenty years
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From to kedo l l c it's the obesity code podcast with dr jason fong and reagan ramose each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada on karl franklin get out dr fung meghan ramose and the entire idm staff are constantly answering questions about fasting ketogenic eating and their program since we started the obesity code podcast the volume me these questions has increased dramatically so this week we've picked a few very popular questions for them to answer the obesity code podcast is brought to you by two kito l l c who strives to support the low carb community with podcast and other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriarch cato dot com before we get started with the qna i need to tell you where these questions come from richard morris that's me with the osce accent my two kito dudes cohost in i operate a free keita genic form with about ten thousand members were you can search for answers and direct questions to jason a meghan you'll have to register with the form to ask a question but it's free and easy just go to questions dot obesity code podcast dot com our first question is from a lane who says i see a lot of type 2 diabetes in remission but his insulin resistance forever till death do us part problem the short answer is no insulin resistance is not forever but in order to explain dr fung unpacked the term insulin resistance and what it actually refers to.

dr jason fong reagan karl franklin dr fung meghan ramose richard morris dr fung toronto idm osce
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Which is you remember is the real problem so again if you think about the underlying cause of obesity which is hyperinsulinemia this actually falls much closer to a diet that would really start to target this because again dietary shah of the three macronutrients carbohydrates proteins and fat dietary shot has the least insulin response of all of her so as you have very little insulin response well in a disease characterized by too much insulin eating more dieter shot is going to have the least impact what about marizzi's intern us who said that people can't stick to akita genic diet the biggest challenge that are face when i started in a guy like most people was simply i went cold turkey like i said that afternoon walk not a raucous i decided i was you know i gave up sugar grains everything uh at that moment um so i was pretty cranky for about six weeks seven weeks i could not adjust well uh at least initially losing my sugar friend and my you know i was i loved red as much as i left sugar and i constantly was i was constantly in denial about how much sugar i was eating i thought well are holen but elio can be extremely high starch and it certainly for me was high shummer so that was an issue i didn't get out of nile for while france but having the withdrawals identity crankiness and the tiredness was an indication that i was late sugar uh uh what marie was experiencing is a classic case of carbohydrate withdrawal sump pumps cold kito flute.

obesity hyperinsulinemia marizzi elio nile france marie intern seven weeks six weeks
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Gary goes on with his history lesson by the early nineteenth 60s we had the technology available to measure in from insulin levels from the bloodstream miss had never been possible to be done before and as physicians researchers started doing this they realized that obese people and the kind of diabetes that associates with obesity known as type 2 diabetes that these individuals had high levels of insulin that they were in effect the insulin resistance and if they were insulin resistance that men that they couldn't use the insulin they were secreting of a could use it as effectively so this insulin resistance could therefore explain obesity and type 2 diabetes because more insulin is secreted and more insulin is needed to do the same job as a noninsulin resistant person and at the same time that high insulin is blocking you from utilizing body fat for fuel mooney the new a new food as insulin levels go up as you become more influence resistant you are going to become more of a fat store than a fatburner one way to think about it in your body is going to be on blocked into a hormonal state where you're storing fat and continuing to storing fad rather than to use wood for fuel and so this was an alternative hypothesis for obesity that emerged in the early 1960s and that the researchers and simply quinn wrapped their heads around because they had already been convince themselves at the problems gluckman sloth.

Gary obesity quinn