20 Episode results for "nygaard"

The Pussy Centipede #41: All Scorpions Are Born In Late February (featuring Safiya Nygaard!)

The Pussy Centipede

11:43 min | 2 years ago

The Pussy Centipede #41: All Scorpions Are Born In Late February (featuring Safiya Nygaard!)

"It's pussy time in America. The time has come for another episode of the pussy centipede. Can you dig it, man? Can you dig it? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Now, the pussies. Now. Ha ha welcome to the newest episode of the pussy therapy. I am the vampire Putney and your creepy furry dick sucking os. Episode forty one. Is a very special episode. It will be the first ever recorded on more get set. I pod cast in history ever recorded on a cassette tape technology. The most futuristic technology ever. The future is calling the pussy. Senate peed has answered. Today's episode number forty one scorpions or whatever. Scorpions and junior Dr kitties destroyed their towns, you're on the way to Wendy's. To rescue Vincent Price in Michael Jackson from the creeps. They were forced to hitchhike along roadway. Let's revisit them and see what they're up to. European of shit. Yeah. I can't believe you just crafts challenger. Yeah. We're gonna end up back in prison. Your fact up. No, not be here. He's Karbi Anderson. Why are you so marriage? Now, what side are you? Anyway, scare PL. Now, that's a factor of stereotype. Yeah. Everyone takes scorpions scarpie as but we're actually Pisces. Yeah. Ow. Pack scorpions be Pisces being because. Yeah, I'll scorpions are born between February nineteenth, then whatever it is in marched gal. That's what our eggs hatch. It's the malting season of Skopje. Paul chat. Now, why do you think up so sensitive you have? He's good Pisces mad at foul like most negative up killing themselves. Yeah. Like calvin. Whatever back you just head to ride. So we can get your Wendy's. How and then Dr kiddies and scorpions and hailed a he'll metro that pulled up in a girl with black hair and funny face world and the window. Hello, I'm Safina Ord YouTube celebrity. Why don't you join me in my Brown deal metro? I'll take you where you're going. Okay. Yeah. Thanks for pulling over how we're going to the Wendy's. It's about like ten miles down on the highway rest up hoping I'm know or home. Do you want to hear more is more voice? Nice to meet you. Fan. I heard. Yeah. I don't like that AM SR shit. Yeah. Own story. Let's do. And then the drove along the road in Sofia Nygaards Brown metro geo metro and then scorpions junior Cup look out her face, and he was all weirded out. He looked to her while. Ha ha and was like, yeah. Oh, why here face of mix? Yeah. It's like you look like you're Eddie and Danish and shit. Yeah. Oh, you said Sophy Nygaard, I'm half Indian Hindu. Tina, I guess you could say undimmed Indian. That's that gap. Yeah. Appear scarpie. And. Yeah. Whatever I mix I'm half Russian blue and have calico dad say, yeah. Yeah. I thought you were saying be. Oh, I forgot happy. Put some use on on the stereo, or do you guys mind? Plays in tears. Yeah. I'm at board. Okay. And then what severe Nygaard? She put the stereo on. And the latest radio hit came on who let the cats out. That. But. Yeah. Among dean, boom, boom. You number in the MU the open the cat. Gauge is boom. Limbo, Mundine, boom. Let the cat out. Yeah. Yeah. Let the cat out. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Tear them easy off. Yeah. It's mad foul, man. On story. Anyway, said Sophy Nygaard. Wondering instead of going to one DS which you like to join me at the Cincinnati Bengals game up to true tickets. Yeah. Yeah. The Bengals are mesh valley. Yeah. I like the giants. And then Sophy and Neiger pulled out a giant knife. Anyway, we'll report over here in kill you. Okay. Why are you what are you talking about? You lose. And then Safiya Nygaard. Hit scorpion sin Dr kitties over the heads with the knife handle. So they were not out. And then she pulled over the highway and dragged them off into the woods. After a few minutes. They both woke up. Second. Drove road and kill people. What I'm not making a YouTube videos. Does why take like an entire month between videos, it's because I'm busy being a serial killer. I'm going to murder you as a moral choice at more. Ha ha, and that's Nygaard start to stab scorpion sin junior and Dr kitties in their but holes tie die you piece of Thai Thai Thai Thai. And then as they were bleeding out of their assholes. Sophy and Nygaard dug shallow graves and threw them both into them. Okay. Go on your take your soulful, also while you bleed to death and your booties leaving you for dead and just then Dr kitties is cell phone rang and the ringtone happened to be who led the cats out. Oh. So it was like. Yeah. Out. Now who this is. Who's calling? I'm word and poop in far tell Dr kitties and scorpions junior. They're too late. Those fucking Astles took too long Vincent Price and Michael Jackson, her dead. Tell them to come back to prison immediately there. Oh, or you can forward. I'm sorry to tell you go kitties and scorpions and junior both been murdered. Hub annoy, stay in Intuit. My is more voice. Okay. Sophy Nygaard smash Dr kitties is phone and got back into Brown geo metro and drove away. But scorpions junior and Dr kitties. Still we're alive and they dug themselves out of their shallow graves bleeding poop in blood out of their stabbed up as holes. Cucchi? It's cool. Yo you hear that. With that bitch. Tell the warden. Yeah. She told them we are dead where free now we can create new identities man, we just gotta get her assholes fix. Let's go to VAT. What do you mean? Yeah. We'll make new names new identities and shed. Yeah. Oh, I heard there's this town. We can go to where. No one gives us back. Yeah. It's called Arkham. Okay. But why did I can't be? No. Yeah. I'll start going by the rap name. I always wanted instead of scorpions era scorpions junior I'm going to be skewed zero. Yeah. Anybody about me? No, something of Kennedy's yell. Right. Well, I can no longer be Dr KENNY'S begging be professor of Kennedy's. I I'm minored in English. Gabby. I could be an English professor in my new, man. Yeah. I'd addity. And now the newly rechristened professor of kitties and scoop zero walked off into the woods to find their way to vet to get their butthole soon up state to for the next creepy episode of the puts ten of pede, and I hope you enjoyed our new cassette format. Recorded on the most futuristic technology ever. I am Bunyala and please make sure to follow us on Instagram at Jill banner, sixty nine and tell your friends about. Create is podcast ever pussy Senate pede. Bob.

Sophy Nygaard Wendy Dr kitties Safiya Nygaard Senate Vincent Price Thai Thai Thai Thai professor Michael Jackson America Skopje geo metro Cincinnati Bengals Kennedy Dr KENNY YouTube Nygaard Karbi Anderson Sofia Nygaards Brown Bob
#15. Gina Marks - Gypsy Psychic Con Artist

Real Talk with Mary Contrary and Starfish

21:26 min | 5 months ago

#15. Gina Marks - Gypsy Psychic Con Artist

"I'm not waving. You wanna fight the warrant. Let's say you're so it was nice and a jill. You'd have to pay rent get meals and you get medical care to you know marie marks a self proclaimed psychic. Didn't see herself getting arrested when she tried to. Skip town at miami international airport. Investigators say marks has a long history of scanning victims hundreds of thousands of dollars across the country posing as a psychic. And she's also known as regina melborn and natalie miller geeta yep well starfish I have a great prediction for today's show I predict that it's going to be awesome. So let's get into it. I'm excited so this is the gina mark story gina. Marks is a psychic. She's a self proclaimed psychic that basically duped people out of well in this case three hundred and forty thousand dollars from about five clients. But it's said to be anywhere into the millions with her so she so we're gonna get right into this one so i'm going to start with a miss marx's background she is romani the started in florida so this is a florida story. You know high love that state. They're always got love it or tech. I know right like every single time. I don't know why those states just have all the fraud. i don't know maybe vegas to. I don't know but anyway. She basically grew up in her culture. Romani people so that's a nice way of saying gypsies a So because i thought all them you know they died out at some point in the eighteen. Hundreds i don't know but like i guess they're still around. Yeah in pretty who live and kicking so But anyway so she's a gypsy issues. The mother of three her family was actually involved in a lot of psychic fraud. Her mom was in trouble in the nineties. Oh yeah i mean. I noticed that as a pattern is well you know with all of our crazy fraud stories here that you know. There's always some sort of like family ties or just kinda runs in the family or something. I guess to be a c- fraudster. Now you you see what you see what. They're doing that and make sense. Oh they they're successful in doing it separate jail time. I don't know right right. Yeah so she lived a lavish lifestyle of course and it is said to be that. She's profited in like the millions with all of our victims now. Her victims unfortunately a really hard to find because like a lot of them are so embarrassed by this. I mean just because like we're talking like you know these aren't just your average joes that just get duped off the street. This isn't like joe. The plumber or bob the electricity in you know these are like you know people that have doctorates Engineers nurses These are just like everybody but like even you know people are always out there looking for answers right. Yeah i mean. I've called i have to. I don't do it regularly. But i know people who claim to be psychics right. It's not like. I think i think for the most part. We all know it's for fun. It's just right. You feel a little bit better. It's like a coach is like a mentor coach. I don't know not a mentor. But maybe just like a makes you feel better. I don't know like reverse. Yeah like and some of them. It just feels like a therapy session. Quite honestly you know. I don't like to put a negative spin on that. Because i do think that there are people out there that you know some of them are fairly legitimate and not out there to like screw people over. Yeah or anything like that. They make it clear it's about yes. I have a little bit too about the sorts of laws that they can put in place to make it a little more safe. You know like yeah like brian right. Oh yeah yeah so you know. These people are just trying. There are some people out there. That are are really legitimately trying to help people with their life. Yeah and i commend them. But there's also a lot of fraudsters. Unfortunately that are kinda like gina marks that are just in it to the scam people. So we're going to get into some of that and how you can kinda spot some of those Yeah because what i like about this story. Is it talks about how she kind of did some of the things that she did. Which though i'm going to go into powers i oh yes magic powers that they have and so i'm gonna go over her rap sheet. I okay so the started in two thousand seven. She was finally busted by a detective named bob nygaard Former nypd drug investigator He used to work in the bronx and he retired and moved to florida. And that's how he kinda ran into the whole genome mark. Sing out of boredom. He opened up his own detective agency and then he was the first to get her convicted of a crime because it is hard to get them convicted of a crime. Because it's not a crime to get your fortune told right now. I could listen to abney guide. Oh yes i love bob. Yeah i mad respect for him. One of nypd finest. I'm sure so in a great detective to this reminds me of the anna. Sorokin thing how you know. Rachel gave her her money. And it's the same thing with these psychics if you give people your money. They don't think it's a crime while you gave it to them. You know right. Yeah exactly so easer. Just such hard cases to prove in court in their hard to deal with you know on the prosecutor side because of all of ad But anyway so he was able to do is due diligence. And when you're a private detective like that you don't have jurisdiction so you you don't have all the red tape Where you see. You can't go across state lines to do things so he has a lot more power in that regard but he also doesn't have a lot of backing either so he has to rely on a lot of his his rolodex than i'm sure he has of of people in the different areas. Because you know he has to chase these people all over the us right because they move all over the place. Yeah so because the local jurisdictions don't record the data and that's been happening for centuries that just move around and they can keep committing the crimes because they don't track so right. Yeah totally so it's like these poor people get duped out and then they can't go to the cops because they gave these people all their cash would just again. Why you don't use cash for things like talked about that So there's no way to track anything. There's no receipts. There's no credit card if you're just giving people cash might as well just flush it down the toilet that point out really the there's nothing they can go on when you do stuff like that. So if people are listening they can learn. Don't do that. Yeah so but anyway. So he busted. Bob nygaard buster two thousand seven. She pleaded no contest to grand theft charges related to agreement to cleanse souls. A total of sixty five thousand so after that she was on probation for eighteen months in order to return the money back to her clients and then in two thousand nine she was arrested again for a similar crime so like bob nygaard since he did that now. They have a rap sheet on her which is a good thing you know because you want to go after these stupid people so then in two thousand ten. She was again arrested in florida for defrauding. Get this over three hundred thousand on someone and violating probation than a month later. While she was still in the broward county jail she was arraigned again. On further fraud charges which involved another victim who came forward due to the media exposure following her arrest so at least some of the victims. You know kinda came forward to kinda get this lady. Because she's obviously a danger to society and how horrible the do this to people but anyway we'll get into more of her crap in a second so on september first twenty ten. She pled guilty to counter organized fraud in in addition she admitted to violating her probation so at her sentencing she had to hand over a four hundred thousand dollar check to partially repaid her former clients and then she was paroled. I on june of two thousand eleven and then she served nine ever eighteen month sentence in was sentenced to probation for eight years. So then you know because these people just can't stop. I mean that's all they know right they just can't like go get a job at home depot or something. They just have to keep doing this. So on april second twenty fourteen. In another case she was sentenced to ten years of probation. So it's like she just keeps moving all over right like she's set up shop here and there you know to all over the place i think she's been in california colorado. There was a case of her doing something here in colorado. So it's just crazy then. In twenty eighteen marks was convicted of stealing more than three hundred and forty thousand from five victims over three years using a different name. Natalie miller so they changed their name to you know like i don't know it just kind of reminds me i. I hate to kind of be like this. But it's kind of funny to like where it's like. They have the covered wagon and they changed the name on the wagon and move it somewhere else. Now rebranding so branding yourself you re branding yourself another thing. Yeah so then. She pleaded guilty there. She blames though like oliver convictions on racism against gypsies saying they're racist on my culture. She says we do have power. We're just not allowed to talk about it hand once again. What right what is she do. What kind of powers does she seem to have. So that's her bob. Nygaard comes into play so she kinda like like she. Does this weird stuff where she speaks to her victims about generational curses right like your whole generation has been cursed. And you have this curse over you to cleanse it from you associate uses like these little hocus pocus like black magic in love spell. She coaxed him into like bizarre rituals involving candles cleared. Is that turn red when applied to scan pedals magnets sling on top of a massage table with necklaces hung over them to gauge energy levels. I mean it's just like your classic weird crazy crap you know basically and she would get clients to believe that the cash was crucial to fixing their problems like she would take the cash from them and be like okay. I need to have all the money you have in your purse right now. All the cash. Give it to me. Now i'm going to take it to my church to the altar and cleanse at all. And then i will and then i will return it to you so then she would only return like of small portions. She's like here's a couple. Of course you know. Here's a couple of bucks a pack of government. Anything shoop thank you thank you bye-bye wow. I can't believe people would think that she could actually cleanse their physical cash. Yes so they would just you know she would say oh. You need to go to the atm. You know i'm doing this for free for you. You only pay the sixty dollars for my session. And like she would have him get fifteen hundred bucks or whatever five hundred bucks whatever. They can get out of their bank. It'd be like you need to bring me the cash and i will cleanse it for you now. These people had tons of money so you were talking earlier about well. They gave her doctor. I think one of them was like a hundred fifty thousand dollars. You have money. Yes one of them was like a professional athlete to like. She totally got duped and told about that. And it was like thousands of dollars because her son was autistic. She was going through marital problems. You know these are people that are having issues with their life. You know the snaps whole comes in with under fake pretenses. Like let me your money. You know and it's like i'm bob nygaard. I mean i love him because he is such a such a pragmatic man. you know. He doesn't take shit from people. He's your typical work new yorker like whatever you're full of crap now lady like you're your hocus pocus crap isn't gonna fry right with me so but the funny thing is like he wasn't like seeking her out like the victims. Were coming to him. Yeah you know to. We have. We have this. I will link it in the in the posts. Yes so you know if you guys are out there like you're getting frauded by some weird psychic tells you that they're gonna pass them spell to like end your curses. That's like the biggest dumb shit. I don't fall for but if you do or you did i would contact mr bob or up. Nyc are link that for sure he fights against a lot of these fraudsters and he's great. I really am always interested in the victims and how you can be convinced of this. I see that you know if you give them your cash. It's not like. I was imagining that. They were calling into some phone hotline. Or whatever you know. And then then they take your you know like cleo never cleo and the ninety five dollars down again i thought love fraud because you called in and it says for entertainment purposes only i mean i think she did end up being in trouble but still. I didn't imagine that they were physically pulling their cash out so reading the stories of them and hearing you know like one of them. She said after dating Her boyfriend for nine years they broke up. He suddenly broke up with her. And that was like this impetus for her to start calling and she says she felt alone. And that's another thing i imagine. Is that people after they Have a may die or something like that you know. They just really need that comfort of knowing. Oh can you talk to them for me you know. Can you get them to come back to me. So this lady she like. Natalie performed a ritual to kind of help bring the boyfriend back. You know so. It was like in that. Our of desperation. Yeah yeah and actually nygaard even said like. I have some of what he said. He's like you know as far as the victims go like. who's rational. When they learned their spouses been cheating. Like who's rational when they diagnosed with terminal cancer and all the scammers needs just one victim a month or if the victim has money one ear to scam. People like this now. He's like lawyers business owners all of it. He's seen them all. Go into and you know i'm gonna i'm gonna play a little bit of audio of the victim and then we're going to talk about bob all day long mazing so look. Let's go back and we'll talk about how you can reach bob. The amazing yeah. Prosecutors shared these photos with the court showing marks posing with luxury items. They told the court marks had the victims by the items for her when they ran out of cash irresponsibly. Eighty two thousand including credit cards and cash order. She paid marks eighty two thousand dollars over six months. She claim that she had the power to fix everything and she said that. I have something black man. Jay bob in there. He's the one who tractor down at the miami airport and finally caught her. And i'm sure he was loving it every second i know. Yeah oh yeah. I finally got her right there. Yeah we love you bob. So bob bob anyway. You talk about bob yet i do. I love bob. i think he's amazing away. he does. I'm so glad that he decided to do that as a retirement project because honestly these people would never get caught. If we didn't have people like bob you don't even know about it. I never really thought like oh. Of course they're not really doing anything illegal. So i was reading about what he is doing and how he's helping people and a lot of what he's does is try to your right. Get them caught for something so that they have the rap sheet there and then i was interested in what the laws are surprised. There's none like but there's a few places that are trying to make it. You have to have a background check in some places now which is good because she would never pass that Maryland is one of those places because of her probably and then other places they require like some of the stricter requirements for being fingerprinted paying an annual fee. Again having to do background check but also have a license like you have to have a license to cut hair you know. Why shouldn't you have to have a license to take hundreds of thousands of dollars from people and claim to be helping them. I mean if you really are claiming to help them and you have these powers but how is that different than a massage therapist or then a doctor then a therapy and you know all the people who help you exactly exactly hundred percent. Yeah like these poor people. I mean some of them. It's like losing Like a hundred and fifty three thousand like because she kept saying. Why need all this money or your curse is going to get worse. you know. She'd call him and spoof them on the phone. It's just insane. The length of these people go to get money from people like it's disgusting and it's like how could you even sit with yourself after that i. I think that's the thing they don't have the capacity to feel guilt or shame. And they actually. Don't you know if you're if you saw your parents Basically explaining a lifestyle that meant that you stole from people and you took advantage of people because that's how you live is that you live off of people's stupidity basically. Then what are you doing wrong. You were taught that in your mind you know. And even though she's been caught several times she's going to continue doing this. She was only sentenced for what six years three years ago. So she's out in a few years you've probably got out. I don't even know where she is right now. But cova making all these people get out. Ticking me off kobe. So she'll be coming to a carnival. Male suits so called bob because bob from from new york. He's the best goes down florida. He goes over to california. He'd go anywhere because he's a. Yeah mazing dude who Just to spend your extra time doing this. Like thanks bob. You're great yeah totally. His fedora wearing detach yarder among the actor to noticed on his twitter. It says he's also an actor. So i really wanted to be inaccurate the whole time but i just decided to go into policing psychics right. Yeah yeah so now. He's a. He's a psychic deteriorate scrape so was mary. Oh for sure. Absolutely so my prediction came true and here. Oh yeah psychics. I don't know we're gonna we're gonna do the psychic still think so. Yeah i need some of your money. I need some of your money surface. And he's going to cleanse it for me. You know. I heard this. I'm gonna say you're this crazy one where this lady gave her money and Like there's something with a grapefruit under her bed and and then i don't know i mean like these people. I'm so crazy that they're willing to just over stacks of cash all because of some little parlor trick you know with the there was like an orange or grapefruit and she put hair in it or something nasty to make. It seem like r. Spirit had through the anyway it goes. It goes so much further. And honestly i know this is gonna sound kinda crazy but like as if i was doing this to people i would kinda wanna video of them doing the craziest tell you right. Let's have hung doing episodes of people like for eighty grand. I'd like to see my reaction to it. What were you thinking right anyway again. Great one looking forward to psychic from day. Oh yeah thanks everyone for listening to real talk. Don't forget to subscribe to our podcast. Wherever you listen we look forward to having you on our next one.

bob nygaard florida regina melborn natalie miller bob gina miami airport Sorokin Bob nygaard Natalie miller Nygaard marx jill marie colorado mr bob
Examining cybersecurity and the threat of ransomware attacks

The Current

21:37 min | 4 months ago

Examining cybersecurity and the threat of ransomware attacks

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app. he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. The world's largest meat processing plant ground to a near halt in some locations. This past week. Some of its operations including here in canada where paralyzed by cyberattack known as ransomware remember that pipeline shut down in the. Us last month led to people panic buying gasoline. That too was ransomware. The targets are global in ireland a cove nineteen testing portal was targeted and shut down here and attack compromise the government of nunavut in two thousand and nineteen and now the. Us government says ransomware tax should be treated as urgently as terrorism. Joe utilize is a senior reporter with s c media. It's an online cybersecurity publication based in washington. Joe good morning morning. How would you describe what ransomware is. What's a ransomware attack. Well ransomware attack is one business operations. Organization operations are held hostage through some means That could be encrypting. All the data on the network It could be through threatening an attack that shuts down machinery It could be threatening to leak data or it could be all three and how does how does that happen. I mean how do they get a hold of my data in the first place. Well it's through traditional hacking so a ransomware operator will break into network and operate from there. How common is this. I mean i mentioned a couple of examples in the introduction the the pipeline shutdown but also the meat processing plant. Give us a sense of the scale of this. Well it's one of those things that sense. It's a crime that involves a lot of secrecy and one that companies are traditionally loath to admit to that goes unreported but some estimates put it at about three hundred fifty million dollars globally a year And what. What's the range of the targets. I mean those are big. Companies the The company that operates the pipeline the processing plant but is it all enormous companies are sometimes they smaller entities as well. It's a crime of opportunity so it's basically any network which they can get into But there is obviously An incentive to attack the biggest networks that they can get a hold of it ultimately it ranges everything from hospitals to critical infrastructure to schools to local governments at could be anyone and the point of this is money. is that the main motivator. That is the only motivator. The point of ransomware is you started view it as an asymmetric attack to the people who are being attacked. It's obviously a shutdown of major major operations. It can be dangerous a commune national security threat but to the people who are attacking. It's a petty crime. It's just a way to steal money on a large scale. How much money we talking about here. the best estimate of seen is about three hundred fifty million dollars worldwide. That's all but per about her per attack. How much would would those who are doing the attacking want to to make from each one of these. These ransomware efforts oftentimes scaled to the size of the company that they're attacking And a lot of the time. They have The information on the insurance that the company has so they know the amount of money can request but the law firm. Bigger hostetler on the united states estimate calculates that on average of their clients who've paid it was about eight hundred thousand dollars. What do you make of the idea that the us government wants to treat ransomware attacks as seriously as terrorism. What i make of it is that less important than the language that they use but metaphor. they're comparing it to whether its terrorists or pirates or however is that we are finally taking it seriously as a national security threat for years this was viewed as a nuisance as something that was only important for businesses to consider defending against and something that governments could leave to the companies to handle on their own but increasingly. It's clear that if critical infrastructures can be Could be put on hold that there's a real danger to allowing these attacks to go on a better do we know who's behind the most recent attacks attacks on. Jbs processing plant. It's the the brands. Mer-khamis are very complicated. And so we know. Generally what group of people designed the malware in each case in one case it was a group called Reveal and when another it was called dark side But the groups that designed the malware aren't usually the groups that install it A lot of the times. These are run as affiliate programs so of the hackers that installed the program are really just licensing. The use of the ransomware and sharing cut with a major with the person who designed to who. Who's at the center of it though. I mean if you trace it all back and we're going to speak about negotiations with these people in just a moment but as as you understand it who's at the center of these operations desert a criminal groups that are Separate criminal organizations oftentimes based in eastern european countries or russia itself. And are they ever caught for what they do not frequently It does happen The problem which we tend to run into Is that countries that harbor. A lot of these Criminal organizations don't tend to prosecute crimes or even investigate cybercrime that's directed outside of the country We see with a lot of these ransomware. A groups Revolt dark side included that they specifically check to see if they are of the networks. They're are looking to in fact use ceramic keyboards so they checked to see if they are located within russia There's a tacit understanding. At least there's a belief that there's a tacit understanding between the russian government and these ransomware groups that as long as they aren't directing their attack or attacks domestically they're pretty safe and so when it comes to prosecuting these For the united states or for other countries There's really no way to get extradition unless they can capture these criminals on vacation. Which happens occasionally. But it's obviously not the best option for justice when you're counting on vacation plans of the criminals involved joe. It's good to speak with you. Thank you very much like you. Chill is a senior reporter with sc media online cybersecurity publication based in washington. Curtis mander has found himself in the strange world of negotiating on behalf of companies caught up in these ransomware attacks. He is the chief executive officer and founder of group sense. It's a threat. Intelligence company curtis good morning to you. Good morning thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. How do you get involved in ransomware cases as a negotiator. What are you doing well. How involved is typically driven by either the victim themselves reaching out to our firm or Law firm or cyber insurance company often calls us the assist usually. And then what do you do once you get that call. Well we the first thing we usually do is engage with the company can help them come to a business decision on whether they should negotiate at all or proceeded all is ultimately a financial transaction in a business decision in many cases And then if they decide to do that we we act as the liaison between the victim and the threat actor and these are companies whose data has been held. And the you know the perpetrators are saying. Pay the money or else we're going to do. What with your data hold onto. Its still or release it or what. What are they threatening to do. It has evolved over the last year or so where the the typical mo of the threat actor is to one infiltrate the network in exfiltrated or or take a large amount of the clients critical data. keep a copy of it then to lock those files inside the networks so they're no longer usable using an encryption algorithm similar to what joe was talking about with the malware and then on occasion they will also launch campaigns with call denial of service attacks against the company. So there's two to three methods at the threat. Actors will will watch against the company. The exfiltration of the data is typically used from an extortion perspective. Where if someone is not negotiating in good faith or moving forward they will threaten to leak that data or alert. The affected clients of the company. How do you start. Negotiating with a ransomware hacker. Well the the tip is the it depends on the type of threat. Actor that is perpetrating. The attack there are several different kinds but the typical Attack is perpetrated by one of these ransomware gangs. Joe talked about are evil and dark side games like this. They're very organized. Very template based organization. And what you typically find is a when you come into your office on all your systems are down. You'll find a ransom note. Which is typically file on your computer. The ransom note will actually give you instructions on who won who attacked you. They usually announce themselves. It gives you a short list of of things that you should not do. Like for example. Please do not try to retrieve or repair. these files yourself You will call cause damage trump but then it will. It will give you a location to where you can communicate with the threat actor and that's typically dark web site The note will also give some basic instructions on how to access. I because it's not you know typically accessible through a normal web browser And then the. The actual negotiation occurs on that dark web site to a chat function. You can imagine the people whose data has been seized could be rather upset By that action. Do you is part of your role to kind of talk them down a little bit so that they don't go into hot against the attackers and perhaps exacerbate tensions that are already playing. Yeah yeah it is the the typical victim especially when you talk about the the smaller businesses. Where the person is person their livelihood. The personal livelihood is involved. It can be very emotional In even in the larger cases where we're talking about a multinational organization. We do several of those as well. The the the people who own the cybersecurity infrastructure like this this oh for example the chief information security officer can can take personal offense to this and so one of the things that we bring to the table with some objectivity in the and yes i in. Sometimes we're we're as a counselor at hand negotiator simultaneously. Do you know who you're negotiating with. Are these kind of you know repeat offenders or they new players that you have to engage with each time. It's a combination the the the groups the ransomware gangs. We see them on a regular cadence but as joe illustrated the also have what they call ransomware as a service. It's basically an affiliate program where You can you can license the platform that they used to execute the ransomware And so those in those cases a lotta time there's a there's a large number of new actors that we haven't seen before that are just licensing. The existing platform and is your goal is the definition of success that you would get all of the data. That's being held back. Yes yeah in reduce any ransom payment to his lowest number possible. How do the attackers wanted to be paid. Cryptocurrency is is definitely standard operating procedure the typical typical actors still asking for bitcoin in most cases but Let's say twenty to thirty percent of the time we're seeing other cryptocurrencies like minero. For example that are more difficult to trace being used. How do you ensure that the companies are going to get hacked again you you you don't And i would. I would caution pokes You know who are working with security companies that make superlative promises around that but You don't it. But the there are some basic best practice security hygiene things that most companies can do that not only protect them after the fact but prevent ransomware from occurring in the first place. And we're gonna talk about that in just a moment finally from you. I mean how busy is your business these days in negotiating with ransomware hackers. We're we're overwhelmed. But i think a lot of them. Negotiators in the industry are But we're managing curtis good to speak with you about the work that you're doing. Thank you thank you. Curtis under ceo and founder of group sense from cbc podcasts and the fifth estate brainwashed is a multi part investigation into the cia experiments in mind control from the cold war and m. k. Ultra to the so called war on terror. We learn about a psychiatrist who used his patients as human guinea pigs. And what happens when the military and medicine collide. Listen to brainwashed on the cbc. Listen app or wherever you get your podcasts. Everybody should definitely the baltimore. We had to find a different way to put our passionate work. If you love your job in love what you do every day goes on as you want it. I think how we look at art can be world changing all. These businesses are taken precautions to make sure that everyone safe. We're ready masks. Distancing and frequent cleaning are just the beginning. Learn more at baltimore dot org for more on what this means for canada and how companies could go about protecting themselves from this joined by david shipley. He's the co founder and ceo of both iran security joins us from fredericton. David good morning to you. good morning. How serious of an issue is this in canada. According to his canada one in five canadian businesses have been hit with syria cyber attack including ransomware in twenty twenty And we know from your previous guests. That cybercrime and ransomware particular are dramatically. Underreported and i can tell you. It's affecting every community across country you just don't see it in the headlines. I've received calls from small businesses. That are down independent paper trying to run their business through the pandemic all this chaos and now being victimized by international criminals does the pandemic exacerbate things because so many people are working from home and security at home might be different than security on the you know the company network in the office there are two aspects of the pandemic that affect the security posture. Negatively i is the technology as you know. We're no longer in the office with all of those traditional corporate security measures in place and so the home is more vulnerable. But we're also more stressed out. We're tired were exhausted. And we're more susceptible to the techniques. Criminals use things like phishing emails to break into the network in the first place so it is both human and technical and that is why criminals have made more money than ever before. So we've been talking about the fact that the united states is stepping up. Its approach to cracking down on this. The uk and australia have done similar. What about candidate whereas canada add in fighting this so according to our our current strategy we will have our full capability for police. Coordination across canada fully stood up by twenty twenty three which is ridiculous and our current strategy calls for the coordination of police forces and intelligence across the country within a center created within the rcmp. And that sounds fine in principle. We're talking about intelligence sharing but it is not the same of policing you get in the united states with a national police agency the fbi with agents trained to the same standard and resources across the country. What kind of cybercrime policing effort you get in. Canada today depends on whether you're lucky enough to live in an with a good size municipal or provincial force with the resources to deal with it. Does that suggest i mean. We talked about this being under reported. Does that suggest that even what's being reported as not being taken as seriously as it should be in this country. Oh a hundred percent. Like i i can tell you the the the triage. That's happening right now. In canada was policing you have to have a crime of a certain amount of dollars before using gonna make it to the death to get some files pushed around and he'd better be huge before you're able to get the resources and this is not a slight against our police forces. They overwhelmed they do not have the tools training and resources and we need a different kind of police officer for this crime. Then we've ever needed before what's at stake here. I mean if these threats continue and the attacks continue to escalate. Wh what is at stake in this country. Well we've already seen the implications around the world energy sectors being crippled like the same attacks that happened to the colonial pipeline can easily happen here and our pipelines are as unregulated as theirs are so it's a ticking time bomb for that kind of disruption. We've seen the irish national healthcare system in a multi week crippling because of an entire ransomware attack. And the only reason we haven't seen the same thing the same scale and size and canada is because our healthcare delivery is so decentralized that we haven't seen these kind of hundred hospital tax like the states the uk or ireland so healthcare our schools. We've seen large school districts in ontario crippled ransomware attack. This is affecting every facet of society and is pushing some businesses over the edge so just in the last minute or so that we have. What would you want the government to do now to better protect companies from these actually need to do a couple of different things. We need a national police. Force fully resourced With officers trained at the national level to deliver crime and the jurisdiction to deliver cybercrime protection to canadians. We new tax regime that actually gives businesses. The same thing we've done for energy retrofits cybersecurity retrofits some tax credits to help them invest particularly now that they're already struggling in the pandemic and we need to have a conversation about prosecuting canadians emboldened. Cybercrime it's interesting to note that one of the affiliates now charged in a major attacking. United states is an accused of quebec. Who is reported to have made up to twenty seven million dollars according to american officials. So this isn't just about russians hacking us. This is also a bow canadians. Also being involved in cybercrimes affecting our allies just very briefly people have also talked about the idea of regulating crypto currencies. The way that these attackers are being paid. A hundred percent we. We cannot continue to have a global. Financial system that operates on the side unregulated and that allows for the movement of tens of millions of dollars. And that's the attacks that we're seeing and you know we have to regulate of the ransomware The cryptocurrency business. If we're gonna bring ransomware to control and we have to stop paying ransoms the fact that the insurance industry and negotiators exist so that businesses can look after their self interest. But just perpetuate this industry is causing this chaos. David great to talk to you. But this thank you very much. Thanks so much david. Shipley co founder and ceo bosa ceron security for more cbc podcasts. Go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

peter nygaard nygaard government of nunavut Joe utilize canada Us government khamis cbc United states russian government Curtis mander bill cosby joe russia Joe washington Jbs Cbc
Jamy Ian Swiss 2 (Part 2)

The Insider

30:19 min | 6 months ago

Jamy Ian Swiss 2 (Part 2)

"Was the line. Let's pretend the darren doesn't do the the the caveat at the beginning saying that he's cheating because people people percent okay. So what's the difference between gala pretending. He can read minds using nlp as he was wanting to do originally and somebody pretending they can bend metal easing the paris their mind. Yeah yes so You know i'm not in charge here right. Sure so people going to do whatever the hell they want it okay. Let's let's establish that right. I'm just a guy with an opinion. But part of my opinion is a discussion of opinion with other human beings on a day-to-day basis is about morality. And if those discussions are going to be interesting one hopes it's one can that once conversation mates can articulate a sense of morale understand. I already described situation with bhai someone who made it clear he has not done. So we'll even though we leave the sociopaths out of the conversation. I generally try to avoid them anyway although they can be really charming company. I've known a few. I've known several in my life and they can be really fun but there were also dangerous so so the rest. Though i like to hang around with people can articulate their sense of on a sort of day to day basis the choices they make in their lives. So here's one of the principles guiding principles for me is. I want to try and make the world a better place. And i don't mean in some grand sense that i'm some superman who's changing the world i don't i don't mean that at all i mean when i walk out the door in the morning people. I encounter when i park at the parking lot to supermarket. I put the cart back where it belongs instead of leaving to hit somebody's car that's a pro social choice. My part it has to do with my moral standing in my community. So i like to try and leave the world a better place day to day basis even in the smallest ways like moving the shopping cart. And certainly when i'm on stage in front of a thousand people who were depending on me for some information that they probably shouldn't be depending on me for but they're making that mistake. I want to leave them when they leave the room. A little better better off a little better prepared to lead their lives in a safe and productive manner. I think the way you do that as human being is first and foremost to have the respect for your fellow humans to speak the truth especially to speak the truth as you know what. If you're asking. I tell a story about that in the book about a prominent mental list who. I added conversation with about that many years ago. But i think that speaking the truth is you know is sort of the first responsibility of a more human being so even though i do mental ism and i do strongmen eliza and i've written about my beliefs about artistic beliefs about the difference between mental mental magic. And i do both but in different contexts than i have done shows in the context of key what i consider pure. I'm very clear. I try and be really clear with my audience. I don't just say one quick sentence that has to relevant words before the show goes on and nobody will remember. I tell them an anecdote in the front of the show. It's designed to raise their skepticism and kind of tells them that tells them explicitly. I'm going to be lying to them for the next hour I raised that subject again late in the show where i make a very clear. And impassioned and explicit statement about my inability to do anything they have seen on that stage that night and the inability of anyone else on the planet earth to do the same as well. And then i do another piece that is designed to lock that idea home now. That's my. I'm not telling the world how to do it. I'm not. I don't get to make those rules. But here's the thing. Here's the important thing in response to your question. And since you mentioned darren. I had this conversation with dare. You know the longest interview deren ever did for the magic world. I did with him for genie. And you can find the published review Interviewing genie but you can find the virtually unedited the much longer version my website. If you just it's easier to just google my name and darren's name and then it'll come up. It's buried somewhere in the menu but it's there and we discussed. This isn't many years ago and we discussed this at the time. And here's what i have to say about this. And i'm pleased to say that although he hasn't really mentioned my name since you can find examples of darren using this exact model in interviews since then that i've seen him use on a number of occasions so make what you will of that. But here's my vision of this. The audience and their world views of the paranormal and the ability to read minds. Minimalism show is like most things in life on a bell curve and at one end of the bell curve there are people who are never going to believe anything real no matter if you walk on water right across. The stage doesn't matter not going to believe it doesn't suit their world view on the other end of the bell curve. There's a people who are going to believe your real no matter if you jump up and down and show them how to trick work didn't matter they're gonna believe now mental lists when the subject of disclaimers comes up the dreaded disclaimer They are very quick to say they are very often like to say. Someone's always going to believe no matter what you say so therefore it doesn't matter what you say. These sentences come out of people who cannot connect the two parts a bad thought and discern that they actually have nothing to do with one. Another except the speaker's inability to think rationally or take respond more responsibility. Because i am well aware i will so stipulate that he percentage of my audience will always believe no matter what i say. I'm not interested in them. I'm interested in the great unwashed hump of the bell curve. The people who for better or worse think that they're going to learn something from my mechanism show about the science of parapsychology Use the term science loosely. And for those people. I am going to try and be as explicit as possible and also gonna try and challenge them just the way. I challenged believers. I try and make minimalism as convincing as possible. So that the skeptics will go might think. Wow this is so. I don't if i didn't know better. I'd think this might be remind re. I'm not sure i'm i could tell the difference. That's a very good thing for skeptics to ask themselves and at the same time i wanna challenge believers who look and go. Oh he's reading their body language. Whatever to say by the way all your conclusions about what you're seeing here are wrong. I in the luge. I can't do any of this and neither can anybody else. And that i liked to think creates a little frisson of cognitive dissonance in those people. Because i think that's a cool thing for magicians and mentally should do i think one of the beautiful essences of the magic experience. The experience of mystery is that dissonance right that most magicians in general whether metals medusa whatever are terribly afraid of my friend maximum and likes to say that magicians are afraid of magic. That's what i believe. He means when he says that. and he's right. that magicians run to become lack. Lapdogs lipping licking fingers to to to quote diversion back in their desperation not to offend anyone. So they can get the next booking and therefore being pleasant performers pleasant dull uninteresting for gettable right. Because some way i'd once said i don't know any sure fire formula for success but i sure know sure. Fire formula for failure triumph please. Everyone now if you're getting the most bookings and that's your idea of success. Maybe it's not a formula for failure but to me if you're if you're bland pleasant forgettable to me. That's that's a failure especially if you're trying to create art of some sort so i'm interested in those people in the middle. I'm interested in challenging them. Provoking them in the sense of thought-provoking and also trying to give them to think about and inform them a little bit and leave them a little better off so that the next time this comes up in conversation they might say you know. I so sure now because i saw this guy and he did this and he said that so you know this idea that when men don't accept them analysts definition of a disclaimer because their definition of disclaimer is always above everything completely uncreative an unimaginable. The only example they ever site is oh. You're you're just standing up and saying there's no monsters under the bed and edge. An actor is reading his lines. Well actually. I don't see any of that my show. I like to think that. I say it. A lot. more creatively my show indeed. I like to think that. I say these things more entertainingly in my show. And i even given excerpt about what. I say in the book in congress conundrum about how i say it and that was probably the paragraph. I was most lows to put in the book. Because i know there's gonna be mental is gonna copy that little page out of it and put it in their show. Okay so be it right so the idea that someone will always believe i stipulated. It's not interesting. It doesn't speak to the point and it certainly doesn't speak to one's human responsibility to have the respect as one human being to another to try and tell people the truth as you know it right in. Today's increasingly she. We say godless society. What do you think is the home for people to have a little faith in something a little. You greatly complicates the question by adding the word godless. Okay because that to me. Scratch that to me is into taste another question entire and i and you know we see not to make this a in an elaborate discussion about atheism of which i am one and so was randy but The headlines are filled every day literally today every day with Supposedly god fearing god promoting people who are who promote hate and ignorance and predation on a daily basis. Pretty much daily. So godless has nothing to do the notion that godless an ethics god or ethics. Go together godless and now. I think i meant that people like to have something to believe in and as the decline of the church is happening people that going someplace else. Do you know what i mean. So i mean there's a couple of different things aspects here to even even putting the the the god ideas inside. Yeah there's still a couple of different implications of your of your question here and one is sort of you. Know the notion of phase. Another is Why do people believe these are. These are very different questions. All of which are fairly answerable not necessarily answerable in crisp. little sound bites As far as you know why people believe human brains are wired for people to believe because we're wired on the african plains millions of years ago to seek out to recognize quickly cause and effect to detect that. And it's really important that we do that because if you here a a snapping branch in the brush it might just be you know a bird landing on it but it also might be the footsteps of a predator and if you assume that it's the bird you might get eaten but if you assume that it's the predator and you run and it turned out. It was a bird you don't lose much. And so human beings are evolved to think that way to deal with risk and problem solving and associations and causing effect. Exactly that way. But so our our intuitions where very powerful in terms of those quick associations were very powerful survival tools at a time when we were hunting socially and chasing animals that were much bigger than us and capable of killing us unless we hunted socially right so the risk the flaws in those patterns of thinking the cognitive biases that we also evolve just like the bird versus the predator at the sound of the broken branch the benefits greatly outweighed the costs however the cost are great in the long run because humans are pattern seeking animals. Right you know. Every kid looks up at the sky and says oh that cloud looks like a unicorn. We are pattern seeking animals. And sometimes that's a great thing that's part of our creativity but sometimes all of that is just plain wrong even though it feels like a perception of reality and the only way to tell the difference is what the scientific method. But we've been here. Millions of years and the scientific method is about four hundred years old depending on how you want to date it. Talk about galileo's time. Greeks touched on it a bit and the scientific method is counter intuitive way of thinking about the world just like what i was talking about truth in evidence right. It is countered to him to accept. Someone's abstract experiment result. Experimental results that you will never apart of over your own. Intuitive sense of what is and is not true. It's counterintuitive so the point being that because of these cognitive icees these patterns seeking habits selection bias for example notoriously. What happens is if you were having a year. Long drought and one night. You held a dance and the next day it rained until you come up with the scientific method you end up dancing rain for the next thousand years and sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't so this is how humans minds are wire and human consciousness not to go too far off on this but human consciousness. The so called. Big brain was probably an accident of evolution. That's my feeling about it. That human brain was enlarging for other reasons eyesight communication so we could hunt better and socially live socially but but evolution was not natural selection was not moving towards consciousness that was evolutionary accident but when consciousness came human suddenly unlike really virtually any other non human animal there is there are some degrees of self awareness and a handful of higher mammals. Elephants might be of death but for all intents and purposes. they're not building cities fraud tencent purposes the self awareness of consciousness and especially mortality was uniquely bestowed or cursed upon humans and the and the all buried his dead with food and tools thirty thousand years ago. We don't know exactly what he was here. She was thinking but we can. We can speculate that. Maybe it had something to do with the notion of the afterlife and so the idea that you suddenly learn about deaths about your own mortality is going to lead you through magical thinking the same magical thing that makes you dance for rain. That there's you know an afterlife right burr. You're dead with food and tools. Egyptians right yeah. Thousands of years later millions of years later. So so we're wired for that and you don't find your way out of that until you come up with the scientific method simple as that. So it's not really mysterious that we know we know. You can create superstitions even animals with with behavioral experimentation. I was reading about a new experiment recently created superstition in in animals. That once you train them of where they got the food reward. What how they didn't and then introduce certain random elements and they would begin to grasp onto these random elements and thinking that maybe it had something to do with the reward. well that's superstition. Superstition is magical thinking so. That's a natural part of our wiring. The hard part. It's not hard to think that way and feel that way. The hard part is overcoming. It right and so i always tried to preach and it's hard to follow on a day to day basis that you should have some embassy with victims. You know if you're going to blame the victim it's very common for people and it disturbs me when it skeptics. Who want to blame the victims of phony psychic con artists for their own culpability for their own cupidite for their own guy listeners. My friend bob nygaard. Have you ever come across him. Bob nygaard bob. Nygaard is a retired new york. City cop who moved to florida became a private investigator. Now specializes in in working for victims of psychic scams. But because he's an ex cop what he tries to do and he's successful often for his clients is not just even run these people ground and try and get their money back but he creates cases. He creates all the case materials and tries to pressure police departments and prosecutors into taking these people to court. And in fact there's a wonderful new series as just in the middle of watching on cons. That's airing here on hulu streaming network. I think bob is featured in one of their episodes. Just watch the other day pub nygaard. Nyg id and this guy is a superhero really is a superhero friend of mine is really a superhero and one of the things that bob preaches and i agree is to have empathy for victims because the because i gave a talk many years ago randy conference. It's online on youtube. It's called credit to comment and it's about the fact that you should never blame the victim. You have to credit the con man because the con artist is using professional experts skills that they have refined over decades if not centuries the monte operator three shell game operator the phony psychic all these people they have a faith healer which i talk about my book at the end of my book. They have highly refined skills. And if you simply look at it and say well keep people. These victims are just goebel which is unfortunately what police and prosecutors often think. that's why they resistant to prosecute. Then you're never going to help people out of this you never if you run into a person a friend a family member who was maybe in the midst of being victimized. You're never gonna to talk him out of it by telling them they're stupid and it's not just about what you tell them. It's about how you understand. The mechanisms involved so there are all these mechanisms that make people believe these things and phony psychic for example that's redundant but con artists psychics prey on people's grief. They prey on people in their weakest moments. These talk to the data mediums to me are moral criminals of the worst the lowest order and i talk about that in the book too because they prey on people who are wounded they they prey on people's grief right. That's a that's a horrifying moral crime. So as far as you know. I think it is glib to say there is value in false hope. I think it's terribly. I don't want anyone's false hope. I don't want anyone helping me telling me telling themselves that they're helping me by lying to me. I want people to have the same respect for me. That i talked about before of having to respect to look somebody in the eye and tell them the truth There may be special instances of exceptions to that of people who deal perhaps people who deal in hospice. I don't know. I don't pretend to know the answer to that. Everyone But i certainly know plenty of cases where of rational people who would who would face a death sentence a medical and didn't want to be lied to famously. Christopher hitchens for example we had the pleasure of knowing a bit so I think the idea of false hope doesn't help anybody. I think real hope comes from self reliance reliance on community reliance on values and there's real hope and all of that. It was real beauty in all of that it always astonishes me i mean you don't get to my age that knowing people who can taken by cancer or also who who who fought off cancer and and and seeing the other side of it i know both and it's always i have friends who i know someone who was in a you know some support group online support group and was helped medically with one case cancer another case where the birth and when people were saying. Oh it's a miracle. Thank god and and you know know people who said well actually i think we should give credit to the scientists and the medical people. I think they probably deserve more of the credit and they were thrown out of these groups. Okay so i think the truth gel set you free and i think that i don't pretend that. The scientific worldview. And i address this in the introduction to my book and that little anecdote about my brush with fame college. Yeah yeah. I don't believe that science has the answer to every human problem. I don't think it has the answer to every relationship problem. And i've had my share. Which is kind of. In a way. When i was talking about but i do think that the greatest pass towards the greatest solutions the widest greatest solutions to the problems. We face as human being on a day to day basis on a global basis whether it's global warming or pandemic or fascists were elected two presidencies Or racism or sexism. I believe that the greatest answer to these poor addressing these problems lies in the scientific method. The scientific method tells us what's true and what's not true in ways in ways that lead to solutions to planet to planet wide solutions. You know if we didn't waste three billion dollars a year on homeopathic remedies which are little bottles of magic liquid their magic. That's all it is magic water salt sugar and magic. Imagine if we didn't waste three billion dollars a year on that what we might accomplish. How many could we feed hungry people. Could we feed with that three billion dollars so everything people who who preach doomsday invariably do it with their modern eyeglasses on their high tech computers. Computers didn't come from faith. We didn't get to the moon on faith. We didn't solve diseases. We didn't discover vaccinations. The middle of saving the world. Right and the people who stand in the way of that our ignorance of the are the are the ignorant people educate sadly uneducated people or miss educated misinforming syndicated. And it wouldn't be so bad. If it was dr wynne and they just killing themselves but unfortunately are killing us and the anti vaccine movement that predates this but is affecting. It is a movement of people who are very often educated and successful right but not all paranormal beliefs. Come from one side of the political spectrum or the other all of these things are born of worldviews. And that's the difficulty to bring this all the way around in trying to talk someone out of any of this because people actually don't decide what they believe based on necessarily quality evidence they make they come to these beliefs based on world view. And you have to pry dig into the world view. Which is why the best thing we can do is raise children who are educated in science. Want to save the world. Get your kids interested in science. There's there's no better way to preserve the future. There will be no better way to preserve the future and maybe anti vaxxers will become an extinct species. That would be great. Jamie thank you very much. Indeed for giving us so much of your time appreciate it. Thanks so much damian. I appreciate the conversation.

darren deren bhai eliza paris randy bob nygaard Bob nygaard bob Nygaard google galileo congress bob goebel cancer hulu Christopher hitchens florida youtube
The Mysterious Case of Larry Hillblom (GT Mini)

Ghost Town

10:16 min | 8 months ago

The Mysterious Case of Larry Hillblom (GT Mini)

"Support for this. Podcast comes from progressive. What would you do with an extra eight hundred dollars. Buy a plane ticket. Pay down your student loan. Treat yourself to those shoes. You benign with progressive. You could find out drivers who switch and save save an average of seven hundred ninety six dollars on car insurance get your quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you can be saving national average annual car insurance savings by new customer survey to save with progressive in twenty nineteen first class scandal. I'm rebecca lee. Jason horton and this is ghost town. larry hillblom who was the h. In the shipping company. Dhl was in a plane crash on may twenty first nineteen ninety five on a flight from pagan island. To the bodies of the pilot found the body of his business partner. Found the body of larry hillblom not found now before you feel any kind of sympathy sadness. There's a reason that this person is not around and it's probably for the better okay so dhl. We've heard a very familiar with this company. One of my favorites favorite shipping dummies. A top ten. I have five top fifty. Whoa okay my own. Personal goes down shipping top. george yes. You're the tea and the gts don't ask what the ts. One thousand sixty nine. but by nineteen eighty larry. Hillblom was not feeling kind of started. Shirking his duties in kind of passing them off and very successful company still around today. Yeah made a lot of money was very successful hated that i hate when my company's super successful and makes a lot of money. But what happens when you get rich in board. You might start by buying an island. Yes off of guam. Like right around there guyland. Oh boy. so larry. Hillblom had a few interests one being real estate development. Okay okay rich. People stuff hotels and golf courses. Sure totally being a sex tourist might be at the top of the list. That's also as we've learned rich. People stuff i mean. The term sex tourist is in itself. It's like okay. it's not good. It's very bad. Trolling the dives and brothels vietnam and the philippines for underage girls. This is a tale oldest time for rich white guys who are making money round the clock and who fancy themselves like of the world. I told you that was listening to evil by design. The peter nygaard podcast. Incredible put up by the cbc. Same thing literally same thing. Not an island off guam. It's you know in the caribbean. But like while larry hillblom he was a regular in the islands. Like you know vietnam in saipan and and everything he would he would get into tussles like with business deals and in and out of court a an eccentric in some way and still had that kind of business savvy but also definitely way out there and a horrible life style and behavior that maybe he's like well. I can't get away with this. In the united states but can get away with it in the philippines or vietnam. Yeah our seipat or you know one of these countries and one way or another. He apparently did until he didn't and the sea plane crashing on may twenty first nineteen ninety-five his body. Not being found. That's possible yeah talk about these things all the time. Yeah i it it very well might not be found or is that sound like somebody that wanted to get away with being under scrutiny Like he was for his horrible horrible. Horrible indiscretions yeah and just starting a new life. So when he again like. I don't know. I don't think he's dead. Absentee a- or what the cases because there is a may twenty second nineteen ninety-five article one day later saying that the body of larry hill bomb was found but i that was the chicago tribune. But all the other things that i've seen including wikipedia don't list him as dead and that's i only one article. Miss chicago tribune. This they found his body was like an island. Washed up there or something like that but everything else is that he is thought to be dead but not dead. So it's a very strange thing. I don't know what the cases with him by four different women came forth claiming they had children by larry. Hillblom probably had a bunch. Yeah either way. And they were confirmed after testing and because he'll blow had not updated his one thousand nine hundred two will he didn't have a clause including future. Children are addressing any future children in any way and it eventually included over two hundred attorneys on two continents lately. Hillblom's children were awarded sixty percent of his six hundred million dollar state making them among the wealthiest residents of saipan at that point so edible. The people coming forward saying hey listen. I had his kid. You know what i want. My money texted me when i was honestly probably underaged probably thirteen related and also like the upbringing of the child to that point probably was really hard. Probably in a strange way became extremely wealthy in that and the fact is he just didn't update his from nineteen eighty to correct. I mean that's like best-case scenario is guys. Stors may twenty second nineteen ninety-five article it says. Dhl founder discovered dead. The body of reclusive. Us billionaire larry. Lee hillblom has been recovered from a remote island the us commonwealth of the northern. Mariana is in the western pacific officials. Said i don't know i thought he was just assumed. Ed i don't really know there's just only this one article there is a larry hillblom foundation though okay l. I h. f. dot org. That's a. I don't know if they give grants or whatever but it's like it's up in like he. I don't know who runs it. Or what is it. What is the what is it for. It's kind of a foundation to give information in. You know in in grants and stuff like that people in business and stuff like that helps. That's where his money. Following someone who ingested a lot of jeffrey epstein. Peter nygaard stuff in the past couple of months like this seems like best case scenario. Honestly something different though larry hillman foundation. Yes you could. But i'm sure there's some legal clause and calling it that and be able to give money you're calling an organization or something even with the missing person thing. I think it's like someone has to say that they are family or friends to be like no. They're formerly debt. I actually not quite sure. But i think that might be the case. Someone has to decree it either way probably is dead but i think there's this thing of like well audie winning an eccentric millionaire who has means be able to get away if they wanted to. Yes yes it's like it's a seaplane it's not like he you know he wasn't looking at a seven forty seven. Yeah how but i mean. Also plausible body. Was there an animal gobbled up. You know also a good way for someone like to go just a little gobble gobble. This episode is brought to you by ten ten. Now you may have read about this in the new york times. Oh folks and we're excited to tell you about ten. Ten is an exclusive collection of ten one of a kind engagement rings designed by ten of the most distinctive designers working today using only diamonds responsibly. Sourced from botswana ten design masters have each produced a uniquely beautiful commitment ring launching lucidly on january eighteenth at blue nile dot com. And when they're gone they're gone. We all know that the diamond engagement ring is iconic. It's a timeless expression of the deepest commitment between two people and with ten ten. It's been beautifully rian visioned in the hands of ten modern designers working exclusively with sustainably sourced diamonds. If you're making twenty twenty one plans or on the hunt for the perfect ring to with her of. 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Mark Sakamoto on his familys experience in Japanese internment camps

The Current

09:55 min | 4 months ago

Mark Sakamoto on his familys experience in Japanese internment camps

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. Far exceeds jeffrey epstein. He far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds anything. That i think our worlds as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. As i mentioned earlier in the program we have been doing a lot of reflecting on what candidate means this year. And we've been putting the big questions to some big name. Canadians in the lead up to the first of july we have seen the grim discoveries of hundreds of remains on the sites of residential schools the deadly attack on the muslim family in london ontario anti-black an anti asian racism. All of this is driving a national conversation about this country's past present and its future joining me now is mark sakamoto. He is the author of the memoir forgiveness a gift from my grandparents. His grandmother was one of thousands of japanese canadians. Interned by the canadian government during the second world morrow mark. good morning. good morning. Thanks so much for having me. Thanks for being here. What are you thinking about this candidate. Yeah certainly not fireworks hotdogs. Obviously as we're unearthing a hurt that is beyond words. And i think collectively we all feel like. It's the tip of the iceberg. These numbers that are sort of thrown into our heads. Right now are i think are going to get much larger and reveal a sort of an evil that is we conveniently placed on distant shores. But i do remain if the question is. Am i optimistic. Yeah maybe at times. I feel like i'm clinging to it but i am still i wanna come back to the optimism in a moment do you think given you know the the somber nature of this moment the hurt and the pain that so many people in the anger that so many people feel. Is this something that we should be celebrating candidate right now. Well it's kind of an old cliche but you know you need to know your darkness to know your light. I think that the parts of me that remain optimistic. Lie in the promise of this country and so i think we need to really really look at our dark and are hurt in one hand. Hold that and the other hand really hold that candle at the same time. I would hate to have the the candle of the promise of canada snuffed out. Maybe when we need it most you know this is a country that has hurt your family deeply. A mentioned that your grandmother and her family were interned in alberta during the second world war. Tell me a bit about you've written about this extensively told me a bit about what they went through sherm out. I mean it's a terrible story. My grandparents were were canadian. They were born in canada. They lived rich lives. I don't mean that material. But i mean they had to boats and they fished and they went to english school and then japanese school and and they couldn't vote yet but they were really living up quite a wonderful life and there were anti-asian forces that really used national security. It's the oldest trick in the book. Wrap yourself in the flag and do things that folks otherwise might not get on board with and all japanese canadians were evacuated one hundred miles from the coast and that was after the heads of the rcmp navy. The military establishments said there is no japanese canadian threat and they lost everything. They went from a rich life to living in a chicken coop in southern alberta where folks got sick and they lost all of their belongings and they clung to their dignity and really clawed their way back over time but my the canadian government really did cause great harm to to my family at one point in time and a lot of japanese canadian all japanese canadian families. How has that shaped how you see this country then well sort of reflected on this. I was in dufferin grove park. While i was one one afternoon while i was in the midst of this research and i was really kind of down on my on my government and the country at that point in time. Just just really uncovering the hurt in my own. Familial history and i was kind of in my own head but i was pushing my daughter and shared a very brief moment. We had a language barrier but a very brief moment with a mother who was pushing her son and she had just come from syria. We did sort of manage to get that. And i looked at her looking at dufferin grove park and the way that she looked at the park and the people in it it looks like matchy was witnessing heaven and i sort of had you know look afresh and. I'm sure you've walked that parker. Bring your through that park and you know what you see is what i saw that moment. Which was a that. I think was from korea. Having a picnic. There was a family that i think was from the caribbean barbecuing jerk. Chicken on a hibachi. There were kids with turbans playing with you know jewish children. I mean it's it's this and the promise. That is the promise of canada. That's not canada everywhere. That's not even that park every day but it does exist in that place and for me it was just sort of a slap in the face of. Hey you know yes harm exists harm exist in your family and your family history too but look at this. There are few pieces of real estate in this world that exists on a regular basis. So when you come out of that. I mean and you talk about the optimism around the promise of this country in the moment that were in where you finding that optimism. Now that's I think that's a that's a great question and it's an easy question to answer. I think you find it in the folks that the folks when they first saw that one headline of two hundred fifty you know it's just like that almost felt like the inverse of crosby's golden goal goal where you felt that morning just a silence a real recognition that holy smokes this is. This is something that we've known but but to have it in black and white. So i see it in. I find optimism in the reaction of many many people that truly want to get some semblance of healing. The numbers of folks. That i think want to find that light and get through this together is the space. Where optimism lifts. Let me. just ask you finally about the word that is the title of your memoir which is forgiveness which is also hard to get to. What does that word in the context of what we've been talking about. What does that word mean to you. Now yeah well. It sure doesn't mean forgetting that's for sure. I think forgiveness really does recognize the harm and really examined the harm. But does its best. My grandparents did their best not to bequeath that harm onto the next generation. And you know just to go full circle on this differing growth story. I mean every summer. There's a massive paolo indifferent grove park. And it's beautiful and and the sights and the sounds in the sharing of tradition and culture and at the end every year. There's a circle that that everybody's incl- allowed to participate in and invited to participate in. And you see that circle with indigenous drummers and and children from literally around the world participating enjoying and sharing in that moment. I mean if if that can't bring you often miss of not much can markets could to talk to you as always thank you very much. Hey thanks a lot mark. Sakamoto is the author of forgiveness gift from my grandparents for more. Cbc podcasts to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

canadian government peter nygaard jeffrey epstein nygaard dufferin grove park mark sakamoto morrow mark sherm canada Bill cosby rcmp navy alberta Cbc cbc ontario london syria parker korea
New report gives some provinces an "F" for conservation efforts

The Current

09:54 min | 4 months ago

New report gives some provinces an "F" for conservation efforts

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app seen he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. eleven years ago. Canada's set some conservation targets. The government promised to protect seventeen percent of this country's land ten percents of the marine environments by the year. Twenty twenty it is of course easy to set goals. Much more difficult to actually meet them. In a new report. The canadian parks and wilderness. Society has given every government in canada grades on the progress they have made in the past decade federal provincial and territorial three provinces alberta newfoundland and labrador and ontario. Got fs quebec. He met on top with a minus. Allison woodley is the senior strategic advisor at the canadian parks and wilderness society co author of the report and she joins me now alison. Good morning. good morning matt. Thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. When people think of conservation people might think of conservation being important in places like the amazon. Not here but in places abroad the window and they might think that things are just fine. Here how are we doing. What is the state of this country's biodiversity. Well i think you're right madoff and we think of it as something that's important elsewhere but it's also important in canada The state of canada's bio-diversity is grim. species are At risk of extinction we have more than eight hundred species that have been affected as being at risk of extinction and that's on par with the proportion of species elsewhere in the world that are at risk So we're really we're all facing A crisis a fighter versity loss which compounded with climate change is really a serious threat to the future Of our that we have our planet and the state of the environment that we're going to pass along to our children so we need to act here. We need to act globally and locally. And it's really an urgent priority that we get moving on. Let's talk about the report card. It is report card season. So we'll walk through the grades The federal government. Because they're the ones who set the target We'll start there. You gave the federal government and a minus for land and a b. plus marine protection. Why those grades in particular. Well it's it's important to canada to realize and recognize which governments have authority and jurisdiction over what And in canada the federal government does have jurisdiction primary jurisdiction over the ocean of what happens in the ocean and so They can do. They can take action on conservation in the ocean on land. It's primarily the provinces and territories that have the responsibility for land management And so in the ocean we actually met the target we we made it from Well move from from about one percent protection to thirteen point. Eight percent Protected and conserved by the end of the decade however so that was good however the work concerns in many areas about the quality of the conservation measures that were put in place so we gave the The federal government a b. plus. They did an enormous amount of work but there are quality concerns. so that's an issue going forward On land we actually gave them a minus not because they delivered on the target because they can't actually protect land but because they made a political commitment to the target They brought together the provinces and territories under what was called the pathway to target one which was a they convened them to work together on the target They also made to historic investments in a federal funding that was available for both Provinces territories partners across the country to actually help deliver and so that was a key element of Of why we gave them a good mark did fairly well. Nobody got perfect marks and nobody. You know there's room for improvement everywhere. But they did well within the jurisdiction of what they can do on land. Let's talk about disagree. Parental phrase room for improvement alberta newfoundland and labrador and ontario got what's going on in those provinces particularly in alberta and ontario where you say. Those provinces are actively undermining conservation efforts right well in both albert and ontario and we grading the current government. Some that's kind of what what the meaningful upgrades would be In both places not only were they not making progress in moving towards the targets but both governments were actively undermining the conservation framework and the conservation laws and policies and in some cases the actual existing protected areas so to give you an example in alberta last year the albert government proposed to deliver one hundred and seventy five provincial parks that were existing provincial parks and it was only a huge backlash burton's It really protesting this move. That got them to backtrack and they then went and announced that they were opening the eastern slopes to cold development and exploration and so including in areas that were had already been identified as very important to protect for their water values and their biodiversity value so they really literally are going backwards not forwards on on conservation and so that's why they earned an f. and then on kerio similarly was very little progress made over the last decade less than one percent was added to the protected areas system and that was Early in the decade and in recent years there have been efforts to undermine both the endangered species act and the environmental assessment processes so really Going backwards on conservation not forwards and. That's what earned them enough. What is the balance just briefly. I mean those are both jurisdictions where governments have talked about the need to figure out some sort of balance between conservation and development. How do you strike that balance. Well you know this is. We're at a point now where the science is very very clear that we are in serious trouble if we don't act and if we don't protect more of our land and ocean the number one reason why Species are at risk ecosystems are collapsing is because of habitat loss. It's because Human land use activities ocean effectivity are destroying or damaging habitat that other species. Humans rely on for for our existence and we have to remember that we are all part of nature. We rely for our wellbeing. Our very existence on what nature provides us. Whether it's the air that we breathe or the water that we drink or the food that we eat We need to take care of nature and scientists have have looked at how much of the planet needs to be protected in order to do that and they said that basically somewhere between thirty percent and seventy percent of an ecosystem needs to be protected. And so you know we had these seventeen and ten percent targets and They're just they're are just very small milestones towards what's needed canada and the rest of the world are now moving targets Of protecting at least thirty percent of land and ocean by twenty thirty so we really did the report card as a way to look back and kind of learn some lessons from the past decade to set up to do better over the next decade. Just in the final minute or so that we have you have said in the report that the involvement of indigenous people is key to any successful conservation. Plan like perhaps thirty percent lance and oceans being protected by twenty thirty. What does that look like in your as well. There is indigenous. Peoples indigenous communities and nations across this country are demonstrating enormous leadership by identifying areas for protection That are both important to them For for the maintain their cultural practices and connections to land and also for biodiversity and so You know there are opportunities across this country to work with first nations with any. We'd made see to actually protect much more of the landscape and much more of the ocean and this will not only You know based on science and indigenous knowledge and there's an enormous knowledge base to us to help us achieve conservation goals and to make sure that we take care of nature going forward and so you know we need provinces and territories really saw as the biggest barrier to achieving the twenty twenty goals. We need them to step up and we need everybody to work. Together and supporting indigenous leadership in conservation is a key way that we can find a path to success over the next decade nelson. Great to review the marks on this report card as a roadmap to where we may go in future. Thank you very much. thanks so much. Gnat thousand woodley is the senior strategic advisor at the canadian parks and wilderness society co author of the report on conservation in this country for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

canada federal government peter nygaard nygaard canadian parks and wilderness alberta newfoundland Allison woodley ontario labrador alberta bill cosby albert government Cbc cbc madoff
Naomi Osaka withdraws from French Open

The Current

09:36 min | 5 months ago

Naomi Osaka withdraws from French Open

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking far exceeds jeffrey app. Seen he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. This kind of started yesterday like yesterday. I just will goldman. I was really depressed. By don't know why. Dang so saturday night. Kind of star. Naomi osaka at a post-match press conference in two thousand eighteen. That is the year that she won her. First grand slam title against serena williams and the year that she said she started suffering long bouts of depression just last week. Naomi osaka announced that she would stop showing up at those press conferences citing her mental health. It was not a popular. Move with tournament organizers or with some other players this week asaka the second highest ranking. Women's tennis player in the world walked away from the french open in a statement. She said it was for the sake of the tournament the other players and my wellbeing julie decastro is a senior sports editor at deadspin and the author of sidelined sports culture and being a woman in america julie could morning matt. You wrote that. Naomi osaka was bullied out of the french open. What is your understanding of what led her to walk away from this major tournament. Well i think that she On social media was fairly open honest as best she could be about the way that she is feeling For for whatever reason and you know as someone who's also suffers from anxiety depression. It's it's not surprising to me. She didn't feel like this is something that she could do and still maintain her mental health. you know. Unfortunately i think she tried to ask for a reasonable accommodation from the french open. Powers that be a in just saying you know she wanted to play. She wanted to be there. She did not want to do these. Press conferences and they were unwilling to do that. I'm she was told that if she didn't do these press conferences. Not only could. She bounced from the french open but she could have not be allowed at wimbledon not be allowed at the us open so it really felt like a young woman Taking steps to put her mental health. I which is something were always telling people. They should do and All the adults around her of who should know better being unwilling to even help her out in the smallest way and said they sort of tried to put pressure on her. And i think they thought that would be the end of it. And she sort of called their bluff and was like okay. Well that i'm not going to do this at all. Sort of reaction. Are we seeing to her decision. I mean it's shocking. She's one of the most exciting players in the sport When you take a look at what's what's unfold in the last couple of days. How have people responded to this. Well first of all i mean. I think there's been two different responses. The first is that you know a lot of people You know something. Like forty million. Americans suffer from anxiety and depression. So there's a lot of people who understand what she's going through and how you know it's not really something that you just sort of you know buckle up and and a push through it that the depression lies anxiety lies and making make things in your life seen so insurmountable that you just can't get past that so i think there's a lot of understanding on the other hand. There are a lot of people who really subscribe to the shut up. Dribble approach that. You know you're an athlete. You're in an enviable position. You should be thankful for what you have and You know that this is part of your jobs or just do it. And i think there's a real sense among a lot of sports fans that you know. The money insulates. You from from having the same problems that other people have that you know your job is to entertain me so get out there and do it and you know that there's a i think in in some corners of and there's a pretty vocal minority that really lacks a lot of compassion when we come back to that in a moment naomi. Osaka is a young woman of color mixed race and in what is still a very white sport. How does that do you think Shape in some ways how she was treated not just in this incident but over the course of her career over the course of the past couple of days. People have been sort of pulling out questions that were asked. Not only her but serena williams as well and other tennis players who are women of color and some of them. Are you know. Sort of upsetting and shocking. They've asked naomi osaka. Serena lands that just because you're black you know and she identifies as being of japanese and haitian descent It's hard to imagine that her feelings don't stem at least in part from having to move through this white world as a woman of color And the way that she is treated you know we've seen male tennis players behave absolutely abominably and Nothing really comes with. It's certainly not an international conversation like the one we're having right now And and i do think that you there is a segment of the fandom and possibly of The people in the tennis world that really do not like seeing a woman of color. Tell them no and set up boundaries. And so i think that impart is probably what she's going through. As well you mentioned serena. I wanna play you. Something that serena williams said at a press conference. This was from the us open last september sometimes harder than others. Every day. having serena on your back is a massive target for the tour for press for stress. But as billie jean king said Pressures privilege so. I wouldn't want it any other way so i just try to think about how fortunate i am to have been in this position. Honestly to be syrian and it feels weird to say that pressures privileged. What do you think that says about about what we expect. From pro athletes. We expect a lot from pro athletes. And i think that we don't necessarily acknowledge them as fully formed human beings with emotions. I like i said. I think that people feel that. You should be grateful for the position that you're in that that they wish they could do that. Therefore it should be everything to you. It should be the most important thing in your life and again that that money solves all problems which is untrue and You know i. It's just a a strange sort of way. I think that as naomi osaka has gotten as she's gotten The pressure has gotten bigger for her. Maybe than she can handle right now and i don't mean that in a in a negative win but you know she rose to start on very quickly and people talk about her early days in press conferences. In how affable she wasn't how funny she was. That was before she was the highest paid woman athlete in the world. That was before she was the number two ranked woman in the world. Who would run. Forego land grant slaps. She is twenty three years old and dealing with the mental health crisis. And that is something that a lot of people can relate to unfortunately do not relate to it as well as they should. Do you see this story but athlete empowerment have said that this is beyond tennis. It's beyond naomi osaka. It's about those athletes as you said that are human beings their superstars but they're human beings as well taking back control. Do you see that. Yeah i look at it as civil disobedience. I think john lewis would say it's good trouble. You know she. She is not harming anyone she's setting boundaries and saying i will not go any farther than this and that is something that a lot of other pro athletes steph. Curry have talked about kevin. Love is talked about that. D'amato rosen and talking about their mental health and trying to set up boundaries. And not going past that. You know the pitcher. Zack ranking for the astros that he almost quit baseball in two thousand six because he loved pitching but he hated everything around it and You know for athletes have the same abilities to suffer from mental health crisis as the rest of us and so to have to go through that while you're on the world's largest stage i think has got to be really sort of you know overwhelming and not only that navy asakusa someone who has always used her voice. You know she. She spoke out at the us open by wearing masks of all the people that had been killed by police in the past year. She is of japanese descent. There's going to the olympics in tokyo with covert happening I you know i. She probably is very concerned about putting a foot wrong upsetting someone on those very nuanced in complicated topics. So i think there's a lot that went into this decision and you know the people that like to sit at twitter and throw stuff from the peanut gallery you know i. I wonder how they would handle a situation. Like this absolves truly great to talk to you as always thank you very much. Thanks julia. Carol is a senior sports editor. Deadspin and the author of sidelined sports culture and being a woman in america for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

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A fourth wave for whom?

Front Burner

20:49 min | 2 months ago

A fourth wave for whom?

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. Far exceeds jeffrey up. He far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that i think our world as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He is hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. Hi i'm jamie whistle. All right so. I know that this is absolutely not a topic that you had hoped that we'd be talking about at this stage. I am feeling that very acutely right now to yet here we are suddenly looking at the fall back to school season and the experts are saying we need to brace here. They're saying that a fourth wade could get real serious very quickly despite the majority of the country being vaccinated in response to rising cases in icu. Admissions british columbia. Manitoba both brought back into our math mandates this week bc will join quebec and implementing vaccine passport system where you have to show proof of vaccination to say go to a restaurant where concert meanwhile in ontario top epidemiologist recently quit an advisory panel of scientists. He said politics are getting in the way of ontarians getting the information that they need information he says we'll show just how dire things could get. Today how bad could a fourth wave actually get and who's likely to bear the brunt of it friend of the pot and epidemiologist at the university of ottawa. Ray what demand in is here hiawatha. It's great to have you as always my pleasure as always so look. We're hearing me alarm bells right now. being raised by experts on infectious disease doctor. Toronto talk about up to seven thousand cases a day in bc possibly twelve thousand cases a day if stricter health measures aren't taken these huge numbers. And i think. I'm just trying to wrap my head around this. I don't really understand how that's possible at this stage in the game. It's possible because we still have a large susceptible. Population epidemics are all about susceptibility. And you become susceptible when you're not immune who's not immune people who haven't been vaccinated and people who haven't got the disease and recovered already so we have a large number of people in that category still plus we have this new variant delta which is raging through the unvaccinated population is almost like a new disease entirely hyper transmissible. Kind of chicken pox. Some people are saying. And if you don't know chickenpox is really contagious. So that's why this The seriousness right now Because a large number of people can still get infected and that those people are likely to get infected because of the hyper transmissibility of the virus. And i just want to be really clear here is is this only affecting the unvaccinated population like are vaccinated. People getting sick vaccinated. People are always at risk of getting sick but at a much lower rate. Vaccination is not a bulletproof vest or as one colleague says it is a bulletproof vest. But that doesn't that doesn't help you if you're shot in the head so the amount of virus circulating matters if there's a lot of virus in the community it will find holes in our defenses. We should always expect a certain number of breath. You infections however overwhelmingly this is going to be a pandemic of the unvaccinated. They're going to be the ones who fill the hospital beds. Those breakthrough infections. Are those people actually getting really sick though like are they landing in hospital well so will but to a much lesser extent. Okay and who are they really They tend to be people who didn't mount a strong immune response in the first place. So they kinda resemble the unvaccinated to some extent but some are going to people who mounted a limited immunise bonds. So they're going to get leszek. And how would you know who those people are. I guess you don't. You don't know which is why it's important to keep the amount of virus in the community as low as possible because you might be one of those people who didn't out responsible moving back to the unvaccinated population which as you mentioned is going to bear the brunt of this. I guess there is this huge group. That doesn't have a choice right now. Whether or not they should get a vaccine and that group is children. And i wonder if you help me understand how this variant is affecting. Children are children getting sicker. That's a really good question. And there isn't a straightforward answer. Unfortunately most of the data we have for the extent to it's the delta there it affects populations differently is on adult population so we have studies in canada's scotland singapore that have shown to some extent that delta might be more likely to lead to hospitalization issued mission and even death but there is not firm evidence that disease is more severe and all those studies were done in adults. It's what we do know. Due to the fact that delta is so contagious it's affecting a lot more people so more infected kids means more hospitalizations even if the risk remains low right now the. Us is averaging more than one hundred and nine thousand new cases each day nearly one in five of those infected is a child in some places. I see us our full even pediatric covert beds. Eleven month so in the usa kids account for about fifteen percent of all known cases of covert however in the past week. That's gone up to twenty two percents. It's affecting kids more not because of targeting kids because they're the ones who are as you noted on vaccinated right so it's like a it's still a small percentage of kids are going to be hospitalized but a small percent of very large number is a large number right right i. I know that percent in the us the latest figure. I it's hovering around two percent and look Maybe it's worth bringing bringing up here. You and i both have very young children. So children would not new who do not qualify for vaccine right now who are not able to get vaccinated. So could i ask you personally like how how worried are. Are you right now. I'm quite worried. And that's because i'm a new parent and worry about everything that that is true. I can feel that. I feel you can control some things in your life. You control at school. They go to you control what they eat. It can't control their exposure to a disease that we barely understand so it's the inability to control his safety that concerns me. And it'd be nice if vaccination was available to him and i would jump at that personally because i think the benefits far away the risk but absent that opportunity. I want society to take care of them. So it's important that all of us do our bit to keep covert out of the community so that our children do not become exposed to. I want to talk about how you think we should do that. Just one second. I do we know or do we have a sense right now when the vaccines may be made available for younger children for children. I believe it's under twelve right now right so. Clinical trials are underway at data is expected from pfizer. At least and possibly from derna by sometime this fall in which case governments can make a decision relatively quickly what the data shows. I don't know. But i anticipate the data show high safety and high effectiveness as it showed for kids between twelve and eighteen. So when that happens. Hopefully the governor pulls the trigger relatively quickly. If i were betting man and i am i would say Maybe by november. Okay not too not too far off and do you think that that it will go all the way down to two infants or are we looking at maybe five up. I know that. I know that it's being trawled on kids as young as six months but i would not be surprised if we are careful and only allow it for those five years now and so. Now let's talk about how we protect children in absence of of the vaccines right now and other unvaccinated people in this country and i guess maybe we talk about getting vaccinated ourselves right because for many many months we heard from experts like you that this is how we protect other people to to get to hurt immunity and so here we are at seventy five percent of people over twelve in this country fully vaccinated which i remember at one time seemed like a pretty good target and so why does this no longer seem sufficient it's no longer sufficient because delta has changed the rules so about a year ago when we first started talking about her immunity some rough calculations suggested that maybe seventy seventy five percent of a total population had to be immune before the virus could take hold population again and that's based on the effectiveness of the vaccine and the degree to which the virus is contagious. Delta is at least twice as contagious as cova classic and has diminished the vaccine effectiveness by a little bit not a lot a little bit and that changes the threshold for heard immunity significantly moves it from seventy to seventy five percent to over eighty five percent probably ninety percent if higher the population. That means we don't get there unless kids get vaccinated likely so so we we really have to maximize the number of eligible people who get vaccinated should be hundred percent without exception are actually people spreading this variant. Because deceive seems like there's a lot of information floating or i find it very difficult wade through so first of all vaccinate people can spread it but they have to get infected. I and the probability of a vaccine person getting infected is quite low compared to an unvaccinated person. Then it looks like once you are vacs once you are infected. Rather vaccinated person has a similar viral load to an unvaccinated. Person would suggest they can pass it on just as easily. However a- vaccinated person carries it viral load for a shorter amount of time which means that over the duration of their infection. Vacant infect fear people bottom line is vaccinated people in fact far far far fewer people than unvaccinated people. Right now our lives are our phones and with our phones. Full of live streamed exercise glasses. Midday work calls and nightly family video calls. There's no room for fraud calls thankfully. At and t. Makes customer security a priority helping block those pesky calls. It's not complicated. At and t. Active armor twenty four seven proactive network security and fraud call blocking to help stop threats at no extra charge compatible device slash service required visit. At and t. dot com slash act of armor for details. Hi i'm michelle. Shepherd host of uncover sherman meany from cbc podcasts in nineteen. Ninety nine fifteen year old charming and on devel- disappeared on her way to a job that police believed in exist. Four months later her remains were found in a wooded ravine. I revisit the case that a stayed with me for over twenty years. Ever since i i covered it as a cub crime reporter for the toronto star you can find uncovered scher meany on. Cbc listen or on your favorite podcast app. i know when it comes to vaccines. You're on the show a little while back and you talked about how important you think it is to work and educate the vaccine hesitant and push people even with things like vaccine passports because it makes their non-vaccinated lives more onerous. And i assume you're going to be huge proponent of of the vaccine passports in quebec and that means. Abc vaccine card will soon be required for nearly everything deemed not essential. This is our way of getting through this next phase of the pandemic that we've been dealt and to make sure that we can go through the fall with safely reopening schools but just back to kids for a moment. They are going back to school soon. But i guess my question for you is is should they be. That's a tough one. If you'd asked me a few months ago said yeah absolutely should be now. I'm not so sure anymore. Only because we can use a few extra weeks to upgrade ventilation systems and ventilation systems aren't a panacea. They won't solve this problem but they will help. You have to layer on protection so we have to ventilate. We have to make sure. There's mask wearing endorsed high-quality mass perfectly and ninety five. Tom asks we have to make sure that everyone that these children come into contact with our vaccinated if we can achieve those things that i think the schools should be open and we should have surveillance systems in place so that we can pull the plug quickly. If need be. Are you seeing any yard. Achieving those things heterogeneous possibly but not universally heterogeneous. I mean that some places are doing better than others. Some schools are so old that the windows are painted shut and he can't open windows in the middle of winter and the schools are classroom just over pack. That even could open the windows. This probably isn't sufficient ventilation to offer sufficient dilution viral particles. It would need more time and more money to do that. Well as well getting sufficient high quality mass into schools takes time as well. I think it's advisable. The school boards look into procuring high quality and ninety. Five style respirator masks fitted for children sufficient. So that paris don't have to buy it for their kids yet. It is a bit of an expense but probably worth it at this point and additionally hopefully they're spending time looking at small class sizes and a rolling kind of symptom check that can be applied across the board. Those are administrative challenges again. It takes time to organize that. Well so i don't know if there is sufficient time to do all of that as well as it could be done. What would you say right now to a parent who is weighing whether or not to send their kids back to school including perhaps may be some questions that they should be asking of their school before they make that ultimate decision. Exactly i would ask the schools. How many of your staff or acted they may not have that information that might be legal for them to ask but if they do have they should probably offer it up alaska schools while you're masking policies What are your policies around detection and symptom checks If you haven't got a clear answer. I'd be concerned if there's a solid answer if there's a plan in place then i'd be more Of more confident and also look at your community. What are the transmission rates in our community. What are the vaccination uptake rates in your community. If it's not in the community surrounding school is unlikely to get into the school. So that's our first step is looking at. What can we adults do around the school to make it safer. And if you're a neighborhood your. Your community is not looking as if it's on board with preventing covert transmission. I'd be more concerned. Okay now i think the obvious question for a lot of people here is in addition to to to schools. Like what will our immediate future look like here because i think myself included a lot of people were thinking like we're heading back to work this fall Are we like are. We headed into more lockdowns are. They're going to be more orders to to like shh like say within your household I don't think that's going to happen. I think we're going to have an open society with some controls in place for number of reasons. I don't think that tolerance for lockdowns. They already more. And nor should it be because we have tools to prevent it vaccination. We have mask wearing. We have symptom checks and surveillance as we see in other parts of the world. It might be possible that are vaccination rates and are nudging upward of of community. Immunity might be sufficient to blunt the size of this wave. All this might be unneeded panic so it was a possibility but it's better to prepare for the worst than to be caught off guard so i think if we are responsible and we keep our wits about us and we do not do things towards like having raves. Throwing the borders wide open Not having masking policies in our places of work then. I think we have a really good chance of weathering this while we wait for vaccination penetration to get most of our butts on fire. And i guess just one last question for like mean meantime. You're you're an epidemiologist. You're you're a father too young child as we've talked about and i just wonder like how are you navigating your daily life right now like. Are you going to the gym. Are you going to restaurants or eating inside or you seeing friends and doors. Are you making different decisions around around those things because you have a young child. Yes absolutely so. I only associate endorse with facts. Data people almost exclusively family members. I don't go the gym. I don't go to restaurants that. Never leave the house except to visit close family members who i trust nor vaccinated and lived on symptom checks and sometimes rapid tests as well. And maybe i'm over the top that way but I think i could not handle it. Emotionally if i brought covert back to my child so So i err on the side of safety and conservatives. I think most parents would probably understand that absolutely an ice day i keep keep using this example of the gym mike Really wasn't something that i was doing very well before coming up anyway. fair fair Okay thank you so much for this We appreciate it otherwise before we go today. I wanna give you an update on marian ahmed. The couple stuck in afghanistan that we told you about yesterday. Meriem the canadian citizen was able to make contact with global affairs yesterday. So she's in their system now and she's eligible for rescue flight out of the country and as her immediate family her husband. Ahmed is eligible to go with her. But when we last heard from them they were still waiting on more instructions from global affairs and kabul is so dangerous right now that it's unclear when and if they might be able to get out at all according to a government source who spoke to the cbc on wednesday. Canada could have just twenty four to forty eight hours to get planes in and out of kabul as part of the afghanistan evacuation effort. That's because of the looming august thirty first deadline for us combat troops to withdraw from the country. That is all for today. I'm jamie croissant. Thanks so much for listening to front burner and we'll talk to you tomorrow for more. Cbc podcasts to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

peter nygaard nygaard jamie whistle leszek cbc Cbc derna delta Bill cosby quebec university of ottawa chickenpox infectious disease Manitoba sherman meany jeffrey
DaBaby, Lil Nas X and homophobia in hip hop

Front Burner

21:45 min | 2 months ago

DaBaby, Lil Nas X and homophobia in hip hop

"Hi damon fareless host of hunting warhead from. Cbc podcasts in the norwegian newspaper. Vg hunting warhead follows a global team of police and journalists says the attempt to dismantle a massive network of predators on the dark web winner of the grand prize for best investigative reporting the new york festivals and recommended by the guardian vulture and the globe and mail. You can find hunting warhead on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. Hi i'm jonathan mobility in for jimmy wazzan before we get started with today's episode. I wanna give you a heads up. We're going to talk about the rapper. Dabibi and some comments. He made the caused a lot of anger in the lgbtq community. Some listeners might find them distressing a couple of weeks ago to baby stopped in the middle of his show at rolling loud in miami to go on a rant uday so they were hiv as associates. Disease that making god's threes. They were hateful and homophobic comments about hiv and he went on telling the audience to quote raise their lit up cell phones if they weren't gay men having sex parking lots. The follow was quick to baby was dropped from a bunch of big events. Business deals and some radio stations won't even plays music anymore when the outrage got louder. The rapper posted a formal apology on social media. But this week. He deleted that apology from instagram. These developments cut a lot of people in the hip hop industry. Talking way my husband shoulder to me. And i was like you know. Because i never thought another would like a fan of the baby at thought like a rapper. I thought he was cute. Or whatever but you know like the way. He's talking about girls and women and he's very disrespectful. But i never expected that like i never expected of rapper to get on stage. And say if you ain't got hiv and you ain't gonna die in two weeks puts the phone because it was li- okay. He just proved that this is really high. He feel and we kinda used to that. That's bugs gutter aka william bailey. He's a rapper. Based in new york like a lot of other queer hip hop artists. He's come across people like the baby his entire career. I've met so many straight men who felt this way like the way the baby feel and other people about gay people and then they have a chance to be around him and they would send to be okay around you but they never fully accept you and they just tolerate of and i think if we as a community especially this new generation. No we're not trying to be tolerated. You'll hear more from william billion a bit. But i i'm talking to canadian rapper. Rollie pemberton aka cadence weapon about two babies comments. And how they've set off a conversation about homophobia and toxic masculinity in hip-hop. He really thanks for being here. Yeah thanks for having me. Let's start with what the baby said. What did you think when you heard his rant. Well when i first heard it my first thought was. This is really ignorant in any little embarrassed to just be in the same profession. 'cause i feel like spreading so much false information to this huge audience and young impressionable people. Not only that. But it's also something like hiv and aids that really affects the black community allot disproportionately and further demonizing people. Who are i think. The most vulnerable people in society. You know it's just a really shameful moment. Any any said the set the largest hip hop festival in front of a massive audience. We're talking tens of thousands of people. How significant do you think that was well. I think that was really significant. I think maybe that might be why. The backlash is so extreme because not only was like ten thousand people in person but you know this festival streamed online. It's the biggest thing in hip hop like. That's like our woodstock nowadays so he took an opportunity to say these comments at the the biggest possible audience. He could so there. There was obviously a lot of outrage but there were also artists who came to the babies defense. Some of his fans said this is just another example of cancel culture. Tell me about the range of reactions. We've heard yeah you know. I watch a lot of the instagram hip hop pages like academics and stuff and i look at the comments on there. And you're seeing a lot of people talking cancel culture and talking about how he shouldn't he shouldn't apologize stick by his guns and everything and there's like a lot of support for what he's saying you know he's that the that he's entitled to his opinion things like that and to me watching it. I feel like suddenly being a hip hop fan. Like it's like. I'm a part of like some kind of right wing leg reddit page or something like it doesn't feel like the politics of hip hop as i know them does it. Does it break down by a generation of hip Artists at all. I would say like when it comes to artists. You know the older artists for sure. These are the people who were defending the baby. You know people like ti. Who was in the news for you know talking about his daughter in really creepy way. You know and like lapd investigating rapper ti two women one in los angeles in one in las vegas accusing ti and his wife. Tiny of drugging and sexually assaulting them more than a decade ago. Now the lapd confirmed nbc. News that they are investigating ti but would not say if it was over. Those particular allegations the lapd says uc. Who is a person who's always saying really ignorant like thoughtless comments to say this is gay stuff on the world. save y'all trying to ban audit y'all save is say but i also think there's like a young segment of i would say white suburban rap fans who you know they feel like this kind of behavior is like. Oh he's like an outlaw. oh he's he's like trump. he just says whatever he wants. I feel like myself and a lot of hip hop fans. Don't want be a part of either side. Okay i want. I want you to hear a bit. More from william bailey. He's the queer hip hop artist. We heard from before. He says that he's dealt with homophobia since basically since the start of his career. We're when i i i i thought it was like in the early part of the two thousand back then. The people who are dealing with one it meets to not be openly gay. They basically wanted me to hide that so that was probably the reason why will say probably. That was the reason why i never pursued music after that because i felt like i couldn't. I felt like there was no place. Now bailey did eventually pursue music again but he also told us that being a gay man in the hip hop industry was really difficult some years ago year like it will times where i cover. I don't like to the eyes of the normal. I don't come across as gay. You know so. I've met people in you. Know they heard me rap and one i got. I actually have songs with people that can't come out because they found out i was gay. It's like a person not knowing you gay and give you all the profit wanna work with you but once they find out it's like it's been times where people would like i'm good. I don't want to be associated with that really. What's it like to hear that from a fellow artist. That's definitely real. I mean hip hop has had a lot of massage a lotta homophobia from the very beginning. First thing i think of you know even on like grandmaster flash the message. There's gessler and that's all early on like turns up kid. What a make all tang songs like brand nubian like all the stuff that we grow up on and you still hear these things. I think that's one of the most important things about having more diversity in hip hop music. Because i feel like the audience doesn't want to hear this stuff. I feel bad recommending some of these bigger rappers who say things that are hurtful to large segments of society in this is a a real turning point moments for hip hop in. What sense is it. Is it attorney point. Where where's it coming from. And where do you think it's going. Well i feel like there's been a lot of hip hop fans who've had this like simmering feeling of embarrassment about some of the things that rappers of said over the years what they've wrapped about over the years. And and i feel like you know you're seeing a lot more diversity with artists like little nausea six who i would say arguably is the biggest rapper and he's just by being himself in creating a lane where there wasn't one before you know and people are really gravitating to that. If feels like there is a bit of a power shift happening within hip hop coming coming around the world. More than eighty women have accused. Peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds. Jeffrey up seen far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that i think our world as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. All right really let me. Let me ask you straight on. How how prevail in is homophobia in hip hop in your experience in my experience. I mean when. I was first starting out just as an underground rapper. In evanston like it was a very male very hetero normative environment. It was very sexist. And yet you'd here you know in battle rap. That's something that was standard. That was one of the reasons why i got out of battling really was is about. You know saying the other person's gay or whatever or like you know saying there are feminine. That was never anything i wanted to do. It did feel a little bit like it was a part of hip hop. It's a shame. But i think it goes from even my local scene all the way to like the biggest rappers back in the eighties and nineties. It was commonplace lick. So why is it. A part of hip. Hop and hip hop solve is non monolithic. But why why is there that presence in hip hop do you think i mean. There's a few reasons i mean. Hip hop is really reflective of the culture. That is in. And i feel like if you were to go. Look at a movie from the eighties. You might think that. The cultural touchstones in the way that they spoke would be totally out of step with today right and it's the same with rap like i feel like you don't hear that kind of stuff lyrically in rap as austin today than you would in the late eighties early nineties but i think one of the reasons for that would be you know. There's a connection to like kind of pimp culture that a lot of rappers are influenced by. There's a lot of prison culture where you know. Being gays really frowned upon. And then there's also like the kind of catholic upbringings that rappers have where it's totally frowned upon. Billy also talked about how this has to do with a fear of an agenda to emasculate black men with hip hop. It's like okay well. We can't allow yards to represent us. Because if you represent us as a rapper and you gay then that makes us all gay. It makes us all look soft like they have this crazy idea that it's an agenda to skirt the black man of his masculinity and i guess make everybody gay. Does that does that resonate with you. I definitely have heard some things like that. Like one of the things i think of is like when dave chapelle talked about the whole phenomenon of black. Comedians black actors being forced to you know. Put on drag you know and this being away of emasculating. Them in in the mainstream the gap. I mean i'm a conspiracy. There is to a degree. Like when i connect dots that maybe shouldn't be connected. I don't know but certain that's like when i see that. They put every black man and movies and address at some point in their career. It'd be connecting delhi address. This happened to me. But yeah i feel like that's more enwrap. It's more of like a conspiracy way of thinking. And i feel like okay. Conspiracies have been deeply connected to hip hop from the very beginning so much of wu tang all conspiratorial wraps and i feel like this is a lot of people in the comments of read pages comments instagram. Being like. yeah you know. they're platforming this gay rapper. And like there's this agenda to like. Turn our children gay or something and to me. It reminds me of like looking at like info wars with alex jones. Or something like you know i. It makes me really embarrassed to be rap fan because it's like this is not why got into rap. I got into rap. Because i believe in creativity of language i believe in the progressiveness of by freaking beats and sampling tracks and do things differently having different perspectives in our in the mainstream. And to see what. I consider this very conservative way of thinking like seeping into hip hop more and more. It's really embarrassing. So we just heard from william bailey about the homophobia. He's lived through in industry and some of the reasons why. It's so prevalent but at the same time i can't help you think about the rise in queer representation that we're seeing now in hip hop with somebody like leila's nasdaq's who's a huge star. What does success tell you. Well it tells you that there's definitely an audience that's hungry for something different. There's there's there's a large segment of hip hop fans who feel that they haven't been represented over the years. I think representation matters in music. This is somebody doing something. Not only musically different. Because i feel like it's this really cool combination of pop in hip hop sensibility and his personality is so unique. And he's a child of the internet. But i also feel like this is a part of something that has been building over time whether it's with someone like frank. Ocean retitled creator scholarship scholarship. But that is what i was idea. That was where i was the ownership ownership authorship in my mind off just people being more open about their sexuality and having different perspectives. And i feel like we'll see x. Really blew the doors open for this way of thinking. Yeah and william. Billy told us that little zack's his open open doors for artists like him to to be more visible and and to kind of you know have have careers in the industry. I call them my niece. it'd be like get at neath. Airtime i up there dancing and stuff. I appreciate it so much. Because i know i remember growing up and i couldn't i didn't see that on. Tv at all so for young black gay little boys to be able to see if a job. I wanna be. I wanna do that. I think that's amazing. I is allow us to be more visible absolutely. Yeah there's there's one thing about rap you know it's like men lie women line numbers don't little ause xs one of the biggest artists. You can see the real engagement with his music. It's really touching people in a different way. It's people who have been hungry and thirsty for wrap this about something else or rap is coming from a different perspective. And they're speaking with their dollars and they're speaking with their streams in life. We hide the cars of ourselves. We don't want the world to see we lock them away. We tell them no bashed him but here we don't welcome to montero so speaking of streams montero with the track will. Now's released earlier earlier this year. You know it was hugely praised by the lgbtq community for for being so unapologetic but he but he also became the target of some pretty ugly homophobic attacks because some people took offense with the imagery used in the video which involves satan in a laughing from all get on his horse. These musical seeking attention. What's most outrageous. Is the timing of this. It was intentionally dropped on the eve of holy week. Try this with any other religious group than christians during their holy days and nasr might find himself sliding down that pole for real. This is desperate and really what stands out about the backlash to monteiro. Well i think a lot of the backlash is definitely a lot of these older wrappers or establishing rappers being afraid. But i feel like a lot of it goes back to that kind of like old school conservative christian upbringing that some of these rappers have back in the day with hip hop is like there are certain rules that you had to abide by. There are certain things that oh yeah like it's not cool to be satanic. I feel like that's one of the things that makes little gnaws acts like one of the most important artists today it's like a really radical shift in what is allowed to be rap. So he's he's he's bringing new content to not only the the style of hip hop but also just like the. What what you can rap about what you can. What you including your lyrics exactly exactly like there's so much about what he does. That's really subversive. And i feel like anyone who complains about what he's doing. they really out themselves as homophobic. You know because it's like if he wasn't gay and he was doing the same thing they'd be right behind him really what what needs to happen now in the industry for real progress in dealing with homophobic and misogynistic attitudes like what do you think artists and producers and record labels need to start doing well. I think you're seeing it with what happened to the baby like we need to divest from artists who have these totally wrong viewpoints. They need to be in. My opinion excommunicated from the industry. You know and they don't need to be platform. The baby was one of the biggest artists in the world before he did this. I think it's it's it really shows how much our culture has shifted. That festivals are dropping them because they wanna be more in tune with a certain set of values that more fans have nowadays. I really think the most important thing is just to keep going like little nausea x. That's one artist. I think we need more gay artists in hip hop. I think we need more trans artists. More women artists people of all different diverse backgrounds. Because that's what's going to keep rap alive. We need different perspectives. We need different ideas really. Pemberton thanks so much joining us. Thank you dr some news before we let you go. Prime minister justin trudeau is expected to visit rio hall on sunday to ask. The parliament be dissolved triggering an election. This is according to sources with knowledge of the plants who talked to c. b. c. news on the condition that they not be named the campaign is expected to run for thirty six days which means voting day would be monday september twentieth. That's offer this week. Front burners brought to you by cbc news and cbc podcasts. The show was produced this week by katie toss alley. Jane's imaging pressured and bassey are sound design was by derek van. Dyke and mackenzie cameron are. Music is by joseph chabason of boombox. Sound the executive producer of trumper. This week is elaine chao. I'm jonathan multi. Thanks for listening to front burner. Elamine duff mood will be with you on monday for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

william bailey Cbc damon fareless jimmy wazzan Dabibi Rollie pemberton gessler Peter nygaard nygaard new york instagram cbc dave chapelle jonathan william reddit miami uc Bill cosby aids
Muslim Canadians call for concrete change after London attack

The Current

20:23 min | 4 months ago

Muslim Canadians call for concrete change after London attack

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app. he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. We leave together. We don't need to fight together. It is in good to fight together so we should love each other. That's abdullah carmel. Little boy around the same age as fires off sol speaking at a vigil in london ontario this week fires is just nine years old and he's still in hospital in london coping with injuries and the loss of his family in what police have described as an attack motivated by hate muslims. Around the world take part in friday prayers today and worshippers in mosques. Not just in. London will remember the lives of off. Sal medea salman their fifteen year old daughter and her grandmother talaat of a twenty year. Old man has been charged with four counts of first degree murder and one count of attempted murder. The current spend jamieson has been in london. This week he is with me now. Ben good morning. Good morning when you got to london. What were your first impressions of that city. Well london is really kind of your classic. Southern ontario town actually reminded me a lot of where i grew. Up in peterborough. it's farmlands. Then you work your way into these sprawling suburbs. You have this historic downtown. But as i'm driving through. And i never been to london before i realized the streets were empty and maybe it was just in my mind and that was what i was thinking it would be like or maybe it was covid by tuesday night. That definitely changed. How did it change. The streets are packed. So i drove down to the vigil. We're talking bumper to bumper traffic hundreds of people lined the sidewalk all walking towards the mosque. And then you get to where the mosque is and the street the moscow and we're talking blocks of people just all packed together all standing together. People are talking people. Are you know meeting new people seeing old friends and the sound system of where the vigil was happening didn't really reach all the way to the back. Just how big this area. What and so. Then you'd see people who are the kind of huddled around cellphones watching that livestream that everybody else was watching but they were there in person and so everyone has a different cell network right and so everyone is having kind of a delay so then you're hearing multiple versions of the speeches happening all different times. It was really powerful. It sounds like quite a crowd in that crowd of thousands and thousands of people. Was it just people from london. No definitely not. I mean i was walking around. And you'll hear people say oh. We came from a saga. We drove in from toronto. You know oh we got in from you know ottawa. That's a big drive. I mean people really wanted to be here and you could really hear and people were saying you know how important it was to be there and not just be there but also be seen in public to be be seen with the community. What were people telling you about why they were. There will towards the end of the night. So i mean again. We're talking so many people also took a while for the crowds to kind of clear but by the end of the night. There's only a few people left. And i met omar engine. They're kind of stand in the middle of the street and there's a curve that they were standing on top of and i walked up to them and introduce myself and ask them if they'd be willing to speak with me so they started telling me a little bit about their day why they were there but then they started saying how their middle son have. Three kids actually goes to school with faez. The little boy who's still in hospital. I couldn't explain this to an almost nine year old. So i had to tell him it was an accident. The guy just drove through a red light and kill the whole family. But your friend survive. And he's going to be okay so the next question woz where is he gonna live the family going to take him and he actually was crying and asking me if if he can come with him. That's really tough. I mean as a parent you want to shield your kids from the horror of something like this And actually they couldn't really shield them for that long. I mean by the end of that night because of what was on the news they had to go home and actually tell them what happened so i ended up actually meeting up with them the next day. to hear about what that conversation was like they run a chain of restaurants in london. And so i met them at one of the restaurants last night we had to talk to them because it was all over the news. All their friends are talking about two. We explain to the kids what happened and of course they were confused at risk person that can have this hate and in his heart to do something like that and the first thing that my son told me after that he told me. I'm never walking on a sidewalk ever again. I'm so scared to walk on. I'm not doing so man. Omar explained to him that this is the whole idea of a terror attack. He want people to be scared and they want. They want muslim visible from ought to be out. So we're not gonna let this happen. And then his older brother told him. No we're gonna go and we're gonna walk but if you see a car coming we're gonna run back inside and this actually broke my heart that this is how we can fix it that they they are really scared. Like it's too much for their letter brains to see something like this happening to one of their colleagues as a father. The first thing i think about is trying to protect my kids. I try to protect them from the smallest things in as one thing that i don't want my kids to be scared that i feel helpless today. There's nothing i can really do that. I always tell my friends. Like canada's home i feel home here and i feel safe here and i really love london And i never imagined that they will come what i have to explain to my kids. That being muslim is something different. Because for me it's natural to be different what we had to explain that some people are not okay with people being different. That's a really difficult conversation to have with your kids. And it's definitely one that many many parents in london and across the country or having right now i actually ended up meeting with Dr takara he also knew the family and he's a child psychiatrist and also a dad himself so i met him at his house. And you drive down these streets that are actually tunneled with trees like this beautiful neighborhood. His neighbor fisher price Chalkboard with tomato plants for sale written on it. I get to his driveway and he set up these folding chairs and it looks like a scene that many of us know now cove. That's how you gather our he doing ya not. Well i mean. He looked exhausted He'd been inside all day with his kids doing online school like any other day but he was saying it was impossible for him to concentrate today and to really focus. You know he really knew. This family always smiling hearts of gold. Always making you feel special when you're around them. They were immigrants and they came here for something better. And it's heartbreaking to me to know that they were murdered for being muslim. I'm going to be thinking about every black pickup truck that drives by. I'm gonna be thinking about what we're wearing and what we identify as i'm going to think about how we look to people But i'm also going to be thinking about. How important is if. I'm with my kids that they not be afraid to be who they are and again. I mean this is a sentiment that we've heard so much this week. It's a lot to think about when you're just leaving your house Definitely and that's that. I heard time and time again but also in that idea that this was a family that other family saw themselves in such evita's also chaired the linen police board. So he's in a lot of research bias and says it's given him this unique glimpse into what is bubbling under the surface. in canada. We have a culture of denial ism. We tend not to name things you know. Even in my research is early as eighteen months ago. people said. Don't say the word racism it makes people uncomfortable. We like to imagine ourselves. As some sort of multicultural utopia but the reality is that there are many canadians who aren't accepted and don't live freely as their authentic selves for me personally as an outspoken person who tries to make our communities better but also who publicly identifies as muslim. I do it with the knowledge that many people are gonna tell me that. If i don't like it i should go back to where i came from well. I was born in scarborough ontario. If there's anything. I ask my friends my neighbors. It's to not look away. And it's to think about how our culture of denial ism an avoidance and fragility actually upholds hateful ideas in rhetoric again. That is a call that we're hearing from any muslims right now but what about outside of the community. What's the reaction being like that. You picked up in london well matt. There's this facebook post this week. You probably saw. It went pretty viral by this former progressive conservative candidate in london. Jeff bennett. I saw that. Who is he so he was running for the provincial. Pc's back in two thousand fourteen campaign haven't actually just ten months. After there was a by election where one of the candidates was his friend. Al each avar people were expecting alley to knock on the door and then when it was me people would say wow. This is a pleasant surprise. Or wow oh boy. Are we happy to see you here. And at first i was like what. What do they mean by happy to see you here. And then i even had somebody i remember. Somebody saying to me well bennett. That's a good english name and it was. It was just a lot of stuff like that. And what i regret looking back is you. Don't you don't even question it. You just you just go. Thank you for your support but it became very evident very quickly that alley. He faced a very different. Welcome all these doors. So we met up. We walked around the neighborhood where he went door knocking. And it's actually not just the neighborhood where he went door knocking anymore. The incident act of terrorism really. It happened just two hundred yards of us and this this would be the spot where that family was walking. This is the neighborhood. That would be just like you. And i but you and i to white middle aged guys. Don't walk through a neighborhood like this and think for a second that those people are going to look at those guys and think why are why are they here. Those those aren't realities that you and i have to face but that's not so for everybody in this community and that's why we're not addressing the problem because everyone wants to point over there and say they'll gets them yes. Racism is a problem but has nothing to do with me or even my friends or my community. People in london will say. That's that's the sort of stuff that happens in downtown toronto. What a load of crap. We haven't been honest with ourselves about our past. I think a lot of political parties need to be honest about who their supporters are too and And call that. We need courage from the leaders to To to not pander to groups anymore just in an effort to get votes or even seeing that and backward nobody wants to lose the quebec vote so we we we let things slide. And i feel like enough is enough. Hi i'm dr. Brian goldman if you haven't heard my new podcast the dose. This is the perfect time to subscribe each week. We answer your most pressing health related questions and right. Now we know you're grappling with covid. Nineteen on those we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own at the latest evidence in a way that's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose. It's your guide to getting through this difficult time. You can find the dose wherever you get your podcasts. And the idea of enough is enough and we let things slide and pandering. That's something. I heard a lot after the vigil is well. You've all these politician show up. They're giving speeches and people were were happy to see them there for sure. But there's also this question of you know what happens now. What happens after the visual. What specifically is your sense that people are looking for. They're looking for concrete. Change at the vigil. I met with layla and lama. Bush malla their sisters and they brought their families to the vigilant. You couldn't miss them. You know it's like this group of little cousins all playing together. They're drawing chalk on the sidewalk. It was this beautiful scene for them to be putting the effort to coming here and talking to us and Hopefully they had some sort of legislation. Right pass something say do something about it and hopefully it's not just empty words and You know actions follow that you know. We feel safe in canada. Do they feel safe. Canada will so the next day i went met up with them and we went to the park behind. They're they're building so we slipped to the back fence. And there's this beautiful park and we went with lila's daughter rua and we're walking around and it kind of triggered this memory of of a recent incident that had happened. We don't are actually always feel safe in this area. I want to just say just the other day exactly. She's like nodding at me. Thank you because i just remembered it because you don't think of these things before but now that it's happened you think about it. We're actually Confronted by a A random stranger in this area. I'm here with my sister. So we we live in the same building and decided to quarantine together since day one because we have little kids who play together so which was amazing that we do live in the same building so we quarantined together from day. One and so. We took our kids to play. And so they're five. Kids running around and to adults and this lady decided to videotape us. And i guess she wanted to tell the authorities that we were having a gathering during the lockdown. This is already a stereotype or prejudice. Right because how do you know what is going on in our family. How do you know like she just assumed to us what it was like another day. Nobody it was just another day. Like a micro aggression that happens towards muslims. I wanna say like me specifically as a visible minority with job. I don't know if she was being racist. I don't know if she would've talked to anybody else if they were in that area but you can see. There are fields there are parking. There's a playground like it's huge. So she comes out to us and tells me my is afraid to come out here because you are all in this big area. And you're all like gathering during covid and we're like but you can come talk to me. I don't videotape us. Like have the conversation so yes no. It's not always safe to go for a walk. It's not always safe in the community because there are people that act on their prejudices. So yeah i don't. I didn't yell back or anything but i was. I was annoyed. I was annoyed. And i was angry. Because you've videotapes. You didn't approach to talk or ask questions. And i i even offered her an explanation. Like i like who are you. Why would i see the difference in my personality. Kill of like. I feel like i have to justify myself so people don't think i'm doing the wrong thing and it's just i feel like i don't see myself as somebody that's different and that's i think what gets me the most about these kind of situations because i feel like i should be like a representation for all muslims and i have to be the nice sweet little girl. That's like no. I'm sorry oh you can go ahead and it's like no like i. I probably lived here longer than you have like. I have the exact same rates as you me on the other hand. No i actually ev. I'm very careful about leaving my spot with litter. I have to pick it up and my mentality behind that is. I don't want them to think. Muslims or dirty. I have to keep up that you know persona of we have to keep good and i was telling. I even tell my students this you know. Don't fight You know just talk to people. The i always tell them like Use your words when you're talking to strangers even if they no you Don't don't act on the prejudices and the stereotypes that come along with being muslim And and those are sometimes human. Being angry is human. Like you know what i mean like. We always have to be on guard and always ready to like defend ourselves all week. We have been hearing stories like that. One I guess the question what we've heard from so many of the guests that we've talked to is. Where does the community go from here. What happens now. Well that's something that dr manera. Al has been thinking a lot about and struggling with. He's the imam at the islamic center of southwestern ontario. Honestly i have a responsibility and a feeling that i need to balance. The responsibility is that. I have to show strength. Maybe i may have to put a show of strength in front of my children and my grandchildren to show them that. No life goes on. But a feeling that i may have to conceal. It's a feeling of of warri and fear. What if i would be associated by taking my grandchildren to the park by when they will ease restrictions. That if i will invite them. Now i don't know if they will ever respond. Let's go as a family you know. I have a large family. I have six children. I have five daughters and one son. All of them are grownups. And they have their own families and We love our summer union if that becomes possible and if i invite them they may be reluctant because they said you know dad. We don't want to be so visible and already. They are worried about me. They said make sure. You're careful where you go there. But i can't. I can't relinquish my responsibility as a leader in this community to provide some guidance some direction on where we go from here. Life has to continue given all of that in the balancing. Act that he's talking about how is he holding up woman. He was actually out for a walk on sunday night with his granddaughter. Less than a kilometer from where the attack happened so all week. He's been thinking about that. But i mean he also is thinking about his grief and his own anger but he's also a leader in the community right so now he's thinking. How do i show my community how we go forward. How do we heal. We will have levels of healing. The community has to heal collectively and individuals may hide their state of injury and may suffer internally. I say the community will heal but this healing shouldn't come in an empty space. That okay we dealt with this issue now. Time will remove the pain. No we want to go from here to a point where we know that islam phobia which the cause that led to. This crime is eliminated. However i want to say that what we really need to do now is not to issue statements of condemnation. We've talked a lot. We've got to have the task force that hopefully will be put together. Look at the root cause of islamaphobia and phobia in general and understand what we have to do as canadians. I honestly feel that. Canada lost big potential for the future by losing this family so mad that task force that he's talking about there and that's the task for the muslim groups across the country have been asking for and so basically. They're looking to have municipal provincial. Federal leaders all come together and really look at the root causes of discrimination systemic discrimination and islamophobia and really. It's that the loss of this family lisa. Some real change ben. Thank you very much for this. Thanks matt ben. Jameson is a producer with the current for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

london peter nygaard nygaard abdullah carmel Sal medea salman faez Dr takara bill cosby ontario Southern ontario jamieson toronto Cbc peterborough cbc jeffrey Brian goldman omar fisher price
Preparing for the consequences of a warming climate

The Current

15:06 min | 3 months ago

Preparing for the consequences of a warming climate

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey epstein he far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that. I think our worlds as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. The world's attention turned to a tiny town population. Two hundred fifty last week. That town was lytton bc. I it's smash canadian. Temperature records three times the highest being over forty nine degrees celsius. Then it was tragically overtaken by an out of control wildfire people in canada. Nbc feel like are living in a temperate climate and it has been a temperate climate. This is a warning. We're the canary in the coal mine. Climate change is happening now. It's happening fast and things are. It's just that's that's that's the lesson from this. Everything seems the same and seems fine and so it changes in an instant. And everything's gone gordon. Murray and everything is gone for him. He lived in lytton and fled the flames to safety in vancouver. He told us his home had burned down for him and being the canary in the coal. Mine as he put. It is personal for the rest of the world. It's a warning joining me. Now is mark maslin. He's a climate change professor at university college in london. Good morning. Good morning mark from what we've learned to people have been confirmed dead in lytton. Hundreds died in a sudden deaths in the heat waves across bc. When you hear about this when you hear about these temperature records now in the fire evacuation what what goes through your mind when you hear this team. I think it's really tell. I mean well really upsets me. We've had many of these warnings before. About extreme heat waves and climate change and people are only now just starting to listen. And so i think for me. It is awful. What's happened in british columbia. But i'm really hopeful that sort of firstly the canadian government and then other governments around the world was suddenly take notice and go hang on. It's happening on our watch. We need to do something about it now. I was reading someone describing this as cognitive dissonance where it may be happening. But it's it's happening somewhere else in there for you. Take some sort of comfort in that why you know. This has been seen as a wakeup call or a warning. Why is it being so long for people to actually listen to that warning. I think there's been lots of things i think. One is is only in the loss five to ten years. But we're starting to get these extreme weather events which are showing again and again which actually now the public attorney round going you know. I'm seeing climate change. I can see in my own garden. I'm seeing it all around me. And i think that has helped. I also think of course. There is a huge lobbying of the fossil fuel industry. That goes no no nothing wrong here. Nothing's happening no. No no no. Each just natural climate on soy forty nine degrees in the middle of british columbia is not natural so so if this is a warning who needs to hear it so i think there are two groups of people that need to heed the sort of warning. The first is governments and companies whereby we can think about mitigating. I reducing our carbon footprint. And we've seen some incredible places around the world so you the us written or going to go net carbon zero by twenty fifty. Even china has said we are going to peak out emissions by twenty thirty and then we will hit zero by twenty sixty. So that's fantastic. But we need to actually put policies in track. She'd get to the point of the same rhetoric and that actually means canada. Usa europe needs to reduce the amount of emissions by about hof in the next nine to ten years which is a huge undertaking. But we can do it. The other group is again help professionals as public policy people to think about. How do we adapt to these extreme events. How do we support and look after our vulnerable people in cities and in areas that can be affected by extreme weather. I wonder mark though did does does it. Take your town to burn down for some people to get the message. I mean wh what does what's happening in a town of two hundred and fifty people in canada. Why does that matter to the rest of the world. I think why it matters is because people respond to individual stories. The idea that the planet is warming up seen so far fetched the idea that each of us individually can affect climate. Just seems really silly. Because we're so small and we feel individually insignificant but when we see actual families houses being really badly affected people dying. And i have to say one of the real problems we heatwaves and we call them silent killers because actually most of the peop- the pass away during extreme heat waves all necessarily recorded it and we don't see because he's mainly be on. I have to say these kathy the mature all the elderly people who also way at nighttime. 'cause they call them actually manage their body temperature when they'll asleep and so when you look at the excess deaths as we've got used to with cove it you can see that. He weighs causing huge pete in excess deaths. But we don't notice it so this canary in the coalmine. This one village is one town really screams off. This is real. Climate change is real. We need to deal with them. I know mark. You've experienced a severe heat in the in the rift valley in kenya to tell me about what it feels like in the end. The effect on the human body geno. I cannot feel for those people that have actually. I mean for me. When i've been doing field. Work and research in africa are very fortunate. It's only in the late afternoon. You get these incredible temperatures in the high full chase. And i'm really lucky because at some point all undoing. His lying in the shade panting literally panting drinking water to rehydrate and just keeping my fingers crossed the big four by fours. Turn up all the time so we can get into. The air conditioned caused the idea that people have had to survive these temperatures without air conditioning. Without all those extra bits of civilization that we take for granted on you know. I just absolutely feel for this. Like being in hell on earth really is i cannot tell you that also the thing about africa. It was a joint. I i think what people forget is when it gets more humid. The human body's ability to do with extreme heat drops and so therefore if you have the combination of hotter temperatures and more humidity which we will do to climate change. I body just kennel cope with those flight conditions. I experienced fifty plus degree heat in afghanistan when it was there reporting on canadian troops and so i felt it but what struck me as i looked around and this was you know a dry and desolate country where there was not a green leaf. In at least where. I was so yes. There's the effect on on the body as you're mentioning but i'm also wondering about the effect on on the planet when we're talking about growing for example agriculture huge in canada with with the impact will be of this this extreme heat one of the things that we are most worried about in the future is food security because what people forget. Is that about how the food produced in the world. He's pit used in the tropics in the subtropics by small farmers. They own a small amount of land. They make food They grow food and they work outside and they pass it on and sell it to the local towns and cities now as we getting hotter and more humid conditions. We've already tracked the number of days that have been lost. Are you basic logically cannot work outside has increased so therefore we're really starting to get these warning signs food production in the actual sort of tropics and subtropics is going to become more and more problematic because we all have these view farming. Which is it's huge fields with air conditioned tractors but actually the majority of the produced in the world isn't produced like so. That's my greatest nightmare. There's also a bit of a push and poll to this because on the one hand is you're saying we need to do things to mitigate this. We need to do things to prevent that. They keep from from getting more intense on the other hand. Isn't there also a question of what we need to do to adapt to this so so in terms of infrastructure are there steps that should be made to be prepared for more extreme heat absolutely and actually some of them are can be really quick to be put in so After the huge heat wave in two thousand three northern europe where seventy thousand people died the french realized that they could completely and restricted how they thought about healthcare and so these are really simple. Things you can put in one you work out. Where are your vulnerable people. And that is your elderly people. And if you have your wonderful of meteorological agency saying there's a heat wave coming you contact them and you make sure that you can move them into places that have air conditioning. Okay so you start to look after them and you make sure that the vulnerable then picked out you also think think a little bit longer term about infrastructure. So it's about thinking about building. Houses retrofitting houses that can actually cope with the cold of canada. But also extreme heat now. This is a win win because one of the things we want to do is move away. Calm gas and oil for actually heating homes a move to heat exchanges and he exchanges a great. 'cause they work off electricity. You can have renewable electricity Actually powering them but they heat the home in winter when you need it and then it also cools the home and some so really thinking through these things. We also weirdly enough we have to think about. How do you make your power tables. How do you actually make your roads. And you'll always because it cools we saw in british columbia but some of the power lines just failed because they literally melted in the heat. So we have to think about all the structure and mostly we didn't have to think about. How do you design your cities. How'd you actually make cities khuda green leaves Making sure that you have a does through cities and things like that which makes the city More healthy to in actually improves environment. The people actually live it but that makes me wonder then. In your opinion mark is is extreme. Heat here to stay is lytton today and in another village and other town tomorrow. absolutely whether it's going to be siberia as it was launched year whether it's going to be You as it was in two thousand eighteen or whether it's going to be the west coast of the americas in in twenty twenty one extreme heat waves extreme wildfires more droughts intense winter storms heavy rainfall with putting more energy into the climate system. And of course they're focused for. It's gotta go somewhere and so what's happening is going to get more extreme weather than in places that we don't usually get them and of course we humans. We can actually adapt to almost every condition. But we have to have some morning. We have to have some pre panning. We have to have to why infrastructure to actually deal with. The climate is going to be so natasha in the future year. Someone shouting from the rooftops. What you what you're talking about is is a lot of change. Do you get the feeling those politicians you mentioned before are starting to listen. I have to say. I'm an optimist on hearing lots of fantastic things from politicians all around the world but also i'm hearing things from companies so you'll see huge companies actually making incredible places and meaning it about reducing. They call them. But i think that actually what's happened is that we have individuals p pleurisy saying a knock is enough. I don't want to be back village. I don't want to be in that e clay and actually because they realized that all the things that way suggesting we should do a win win. So it's about well if we actually take away also like Diesel and petrol costs and protean electric cars. Air pollution suddenly improved markedly. So our children don't have to worry about asthma so much you know all the things that we all suggesting to deal with. Climate change those to reduce that carbon footprint but also to adapt to win win. They improve people's lives they make them healthier and also they actually make them want to be in the area. They all i promise you they all say money mark great to get your insight today. Thank you so much. Mark maslin is a climate change professor at university college in london for more. Cbc podcasts goto. Cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

lytton peter nygaard jeffrey epstein nygaard mark maslin canada canadian government british columbia Usa europe Bill cosby Cbc cbc university college Nbc Murray gordon africa vancouver
187 - Dominion CEO Testifies - Battle between Good and Evil

Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

47:25 min | 11 months ago

187 - Dominion CEO Testifies - Battle between Good and Evil

"A to the republic keeper broadcast. My name is brian kelly. I will be your host for today's adventure broadcasting from the forest in cottage lake washington just outside. Seattle russian-made octavia m. k. To nineteen microphone. This is broadcast over one. Eighty seven a little late for patients. I'm learning a little deadline to start earlier. Start earlier to stop really really so. Thanks for joining. welcome. Dr better okay. So episode number eighty seven broadcasting from the forest and. Let's kick off by thanking god for good health and the ability to be here sharing with all of you and love the music. Well that's great. A lot of people hate it vicky. So i'm glad you like a lot of people hate it and trying to get the The volume that right challenging so It is an epic battle between good and evil. Ladies and gentlemen don't get confused. This is like liver and spinach came. Nobody's neutral k you. You either love it or you don't and this is kind of where we're at on the on the us constitution and the way we do things around this country. You either love it or you don't and there's a side that doesn't and it seems pretty clear that they don't and so i got a lot to share with you guys today a lot and it's going to be kind of a Yesterday we did a deep dive on one topic. Kind of driven drove into the the new attorney general guy and what i hear from people is The people in the industry. Oh oh you're gonna kill your show but if you do one topic you're killing the show that's just you can't do just one thing you've got to have four or five topics queued up and you gotta tease the topics at the end of the show at the start of the show so that people get hooked right. Okay so what you're saying. Is i got to manipulate my audience. Pass okay but today's a day where i've got a bunch of stuff and partly because i didn't have time to do deep dive one thing and there's a lot of things that are in the news at interest me today so and i some of is correcting the record and clearing things up a little bit So let's get right into some of the video that i have and and so because you don't know the epoch times the epoch times is a newspaper and online newspaper that now also has a tv channel in td. And i. i wouldn't say that everything that i would see in the epoch. Times would be something that i would find high-value in but a lot. A lot is really really good. And there's some really excellent writing their and their tv station ntd Seems to be Really doing some great work and they have released a one and a half hour documentary on ninety minute documentary on the election. And i'm gonna share to from with you the first is i think. Four minutes. the second his Just a couple minutes This really if you sheer just these two with anybody. Who's what what is this all about. Why do people think that there's something that happened. untoward and this really does answer the question. I think extremely well Just into why is it worth looking into at least so Take a look and again. This is the epoch times as work. And it's really good work And i i want to share it with you. So here's the started. That four exhausted spectators were in a deep slumber and america was in the pitch black of night but the sun came up with never surprise. Trump's lead in several key swing states disappear. I've turned on thunder new booze earlier this morning. We started looking like that's going more biden. What was unusual was that wisconsin and michigan had resumed. Counting on four am and six am and both states showed a sudden spike in votes over one hundred thousand votes in each state near the all for biden. It wasn't long. Before biden's large deficit behind trump became a small but sustained lead which was declared a biden victory by most mainstream media on november seventh. Even those state had certified it's results and no electors had been appointed. The election hasn't officially ended. The trump campaign says they're suing in a number of states which could potentially changed the election results. We have now second by second. I had watched the voting data come in on election night and account that came in on the morning november fourth. Just didn't add up. What exactly happened before. Dawn on november fourth. Not a single news. Agency provided an explanation and the opinions portrayed by the public on social media and the announcers mainstream media or in huge opposition is no evidence that refusing to concede the election repeating baseless claims that the election was a fraud lower. The impacting people there in georgia. Who have another runoff election to look forward michigan election law. Meanwhile the white house president trump spent his holiday continuing to push baseless claims about voter fraud. It's certainly not easy to separate fact from fiction when it comes to allegations of election fraud but it is clear especially with the ongoing legal process that the mainstream media prematurely declared the winner. Nbc news project says your president without investigating it themselves. They hastily denied any fraudulent activity in this election. Which had a historic town. I have to ask. Where is the independence the objectivity and the professionalism than we expect from the news media the new york times sources voting data from edison research edison receives real time election dad from each state office directly including from voting systems analyzing this data i calculated the percentage of votes obtained by trump and biden against the total votes counted and i founded on november fourth within seven seconds after six thirty one a m michigan saw a sudden influx of one hundred forty nine thousand seven hundred twenty two votes of which one hundred forty one thousand two hundred fifty eight votes or ninety four point three percent more for biden only four percent. Were for trump. This abnormal spike in votes directly resulted in biden closing the gap in michigan and overtaking trump. Checking the new york times election database. I saw wisconsin also displayed similar abnormalities during the five minutes between three thirty seven and three forty two. Am local time one hundred sixty eight thousand three hundred. Eighty six votes for tally of which one hundred forty three thousand three hundred seventy nine or eighty five percent or for biden and twenty. Trump's tweet that one day what happened at three forty two five thousand one hundred sixty three or fourteen point nine percent were for trump before that five minutes trump had always been in lead this abnormality reversed the situation. Wisconsin gave biden the lead in currently contested. Wisconsin results biden leads trump by only twenty thousand six hundred votes yet. Three forty two am on november fourth binding received a peculiar influx of one hundred forty. Three thousand three hundred seventy nine votes more swing states so just pennsylvania georgia and arizona all had similar anomalies in their election. Vote count you despite these normal statistics surfacing one after another the mainstream media have continued to present only one-sided interpretations at clearly favored biden right. Then i can't tell you how many times stuff that i have posted has been marked as false. And it's it's minimally in dispute right but the fact checkers over at or at our betters You know they're employed on the payroll of the of the chicoms. As near as i can tell and so Anyway i just thought that piece was excellent from epoch. Times i wanna give you the or for ntdtv. Actually which is epoch. Times as other alter-ego here's the second part of it which i also thought was just really really good stuff and this is again just two minutes but i think worth the investment here. This gives you kind of a clear view of the whole you know. Does a candidate have coat tails or not kind of an issue. The gap between reports of mainstream media and the actual data really puzzles me. But what is even more. Puzzling is the difference. Between the number of votes received by biden versus the senate democratic candidates according to pew research center survey a significant majority of trump and biden supporters indicated that they will vote for the senate candidate of these same party and results from the traditionally blue democratic states and the republican states and this election certainly confirmed the survey results and the non swing states of maine delaware. South dakota and wyoming trump and biden votes are not equal to those of senator candidates from their respective parties but the gap is small in comparison however in swing states. biden's vote count far eclipsed that of the senate democratic candidates for example in michigan biden received sixteen nine thousand ninety three more votes than a democratic candidate. Gary peters this is almost ten times more than these seven thousand one hundred thirty one vote count difference between trump and the senate republican candidate john. James the case in georgia is even more exaggerated where the vote count between biden and the senate democratic candidate differed by ninety five thousand eight hundred one votes. That is one hundred seventeen times. The eight hundred eighteen vote count variance between trump and the republican candidate know micron. So there's the i got the chat up on the screen. Hopefully that works. And that's a quick look at the epoch times documentary that they're working on regarding the the election so It's an hour and a half the whole thing and it will be up on the facebook page after the show. Okay so he has her laughing with the mike thing again so Right up the show. That'll be up on the facebook. Page the whole ninety minute documentary already. schedule the post. So if you're following and liking the facebook page it'll be up there you can find it also on ntd's youtube channel etcetera So I set up the show. Saying it's an epa epic battle between good and evil. What the heck am i talking about. Well i think that Lynnwood has been saying this. And i think he's saying it well and so i'm just going to show you his tweet from yesterday and Here's what it says Soon you'll realize that this is not a battle against at real donald real. Donald trump versus. Joey bribes biden. This battle between good and evil battle between freedom and tyranny about between the usa and the ccp. Be on the right side. Choose freedom choose freedom. So is this hyperbole. Are we really talking about a choice between freedom and slavery. Well let's see back in the battle days in the. Us we actually fought a war over this there were There was a whole bunch of the country that thought that it was okay to keep people enslaved to actually own people as property and That would be that was cool and a whole bunch of the rest of the country. Thought it wasn't so cool and so We went to war over it and after we One of the big issues and that war was that the slaves were used for what picking cotton right. Picking cotton was the thing that the slaves were used for. That was so. I mean it was all agree. Just but that was the The the trademark profession. That was us right. So new article yesterday China using forced labor to pick cotton choice between freedom and slavery freedom and tyranny. Good it is for them over there. They used forced labor right. They used child labor. There's every manner of evil is done over in. China is a battle between good and evil and those are the people who are trying to take over and opt our country right and so then lynnwood went on. The guy was on a roll yesterday. And i'm just gonna share a few things from him because he was just on a roll. And here's what he says Have you ever noticed. The evil incorrectness in our country and world is at a level never seen in our lifetimes. Remember almighty god creates only good. He wills evil to exist so that on his time in in his manner will defeat it and when he does his children praise and glorify him amen. Well i don't know if you with that. But i do agree with that. God creates good. He wills evil to exist so that he can defeat it so he can demonstrate the difference between good and evil right so good and evil exists. And you know there's this let's see. Here's this There's this guy here who you may have heard of Let's see his name. Is peter nygaard. You you heard of peter nygaard yet if you haven't you're about to sorry headline peter nygaard arrested faces extradition a us on sex assault racketeering charges. Canadian fashion mogul arrested monday night and currently being held at winnipeg remand centre. This is december fifteenth nine hours ago. So he was arrested monday night. The articles came out yesterday. And one more sex trafficker put in jail. But he's not just any sex trafficker. He's a multimillionaire billionaire Sex trafficker who you know you see the picture on the screen. If you're watching the livestream you know Tens fancy events around the world with fancy people including Apparently this is from the sun in england. Fourteen february twenty twenty two so just about a year ago Prince andrew visit billionaire tycoon. Accused of raping ten teams at bahamas mansion. Peter nygaard seventy seven. Is the second of the dukes associates to be accused of sex offenses so prince. Andrew hangs out with jeffrey epstein and hangs out with peter nygaard. Now what do you think the chances are that. There's no Coincidence they're the. It's just coincidental that it just happens to be. That printer knows a lot of people right. So it's just going to happen to know a couple of guys that he be vacations with and spend time with who happened to be arrested later as pedophile. I'm telling you this is a battle between good and evil at a level that people are not prepared necessarily to embrace or understand and so part of this court campaign stuff. That's been going on as we're in the process of helping to Get the public ready for the information that they're going to receive because the information they are going to receive is gonna shock people and blow their minds and and i think anyway. We'll just say it that way. So we got this guy mitch. Mcconnell you've heard of mitch mcconnell who's the guy from kentucky right mitch. Mcconnell yesterday went on the wall of the senate and Said this congratulate. President elect joe biden. The president-elect is no stranger to the senate. He's devoted himself to public service for many years. Also want to congratulate the vice president-elect our colleague from california senator harris beyond our differences all americans can take pride that our nation has a female vice president elect for the very first time. We could all take pride that we have a female vice president-elect well we don't we don't and so you know what do we. What do we make of mitch mcconnell. I've for a long time. Nobody's more mobbed up then. Mitch mcconnell right so here is ken. I said lynnwood was on a roll yesterday. Here we go mitch. Mcconnell is not a patriot. Ask his wife. she knows. Mcconnell just wants power influence and money is willing to sell america to get what he wants. Mcconnell is a traitor to american patriots. Well i don't know about that. But here's what i do know. There's no way to get to mitch mcconnell any lane chows net worth on the government salaries that they are no way. You'd have to you if he could actually do the Somebody's asking the livestream world through. Podcast it's on facebook. it's on youtube. It's on the republican dot com website. it's gonna be looks like we're gonna have our own dedicated channel at some point That won't be able to be shut down by anybody. That's in the process but Periscope is ending in march but that will also understand convert to just a twitter. Broadcast so periscope is ending as brand but live broadcast on twitter. I don't believe is ending But anyways you know. Mitch mcconnell how these. There's no way to get to his net worth if he could. If he could do that kind of financial work he'd be running. Goldman sachs okay. I mean there's just no way the just doesn't work. The math just doesn't work so let's see what else is on. I got what is rush. Says the stack of stuff. Right so Yeah the stack stuff so these guys I don't know how many of them are are involved in the sex trafficking thing but a bunch of moore involved in the in the money trafficking thing right and the bruce thing i heard a steve say yesterday that ukraine was never the story. Ukraine was always just a sideshow ukraine. Ukraine was just a a place where things leaked out. China's always been. The story is what bannon said yesterday. But regardless it on ukraine Declassified memo is now coming out trump as declassifying things and one of the declassified things has come out is that says that a biden was briefed about corruption shortly before the demand for the prosecutors firing so Joe biden was aware of the stuff that was going on a barista as part of his Briefing before that Getting rid of that prosecutor. So he can't say he didn't know he will. He can't say he didn't know Next thing to cover Let's see tucker. Carlson mocks jill biden by going by dr and compares. Dr bill cosby and dr pepper. I think this is just wrong. I think tucker's dead wrong on this. A doctorate in education is a doctorate and there are lots of people who have doctorates in lots of different fields. And it's i don't care unless it's an honorary degree. I think bill cosby's honorary degrees. So if he's trying to say there were honorary. Do hers is an honorary degree. That's one thing. But i don't think it is. I think she's an actual doctor of education So we'll see what the What else do i have here. the election's over right so so the american medical association. Now be honest and doesn't have to worry about being charged with the idea that they're helping trump and so they they Now said that hydroxychloroquine safe and So you know I guess we can actually be honest about medicine. So maybe after joe biden's sworn in they'll tell us the truth about the pandemic From john brennan stuff. And then we're gonna get into. Dominion there was dominion testimony yesterday. And you saw the ceo. John paul's was on the stand yesterday. And we are gonna get into that here in a little bit Lou dobbs i think has been doing great work and one of the things he said. Yesterday i was reminded me of the Thing from domain number. So you're saying. I got a chance and here is Pg and education's not means nothing. They're a dime a dozen. Well they are. Let's just agree that that it's easier to get a doctorate in education than it probably is a doctrine in nuclear physics. But i i don't want to denigrate. Who have doctorates in education by saying. It's valueless degree. I i think that's an unfair charge to make So lou dobbs regardless i think has been doing some great work here. He is on this. Like i said the dumb and dumber thing. So you're saying there's a chance here. He is seven states. Have chosen a slate of electors for both joe biden and president trump they are pennsylvania georgia michigan wisconsin arizona nevada and new mexico now if the house and the senate cannot agree on which electoral to accept and untested constitutional procedure could result in each state being given one vote wish they would allocate to either biden are trump and since the republicans hold twenty six fifty state houses there would exist that leaves the mathematical possibility that president trump could be named the constitutionally elected president however if the electoral processes and completed by january twentieth. Get ready now speaker. Nancy pelosi would be sworn in as the new president quite a mess. We have on our hands as well. That ain't gonna happen so that's just a that's just fever. Pitch baloney nancy. Pelosi is not going to be sworn in as president. No no no the congress will over to entre donald trump. i You know but regardless it's going to be interesting is to see what happens after. Donald trump is declared president on january. Sixth when the congressman's because that's what's going to happen you know on the six the congress meets. And they'll it'll be by state delegations and the either the republican electors will be accepted by the congress or the congress will go to a contingent election and donald trump is going to be elected now when that happens These guys are gonna lose their minds right. And so i want to remind you in. This is not me jesse. Watters did a great job of pulling this together Jesse waters pulled this together. Reminding you of how the democrats behaved the last time. An election didn't go the way they like to. The core difference between how republicans and democrats reacted after the last two elections. Donald trump filed a couple lawsuits. And then he tweeted about it Totally normal totally legal and not unprecedented. This is what the democrats did after two thousand sixteen. I had to write this down. Because even i was unable to memorize it. Are you ready. Yes swat team raids riots. Fbi stings national security leaks illegal leaks of tax returns secret recordings undercover agents doctoring evidence planting evidence. Twenty-fifth and attempts wiretaps racial hoaxes collusion. Hoaxes gang rape hoaxes politicizing vaccines postal service conspiracy fake news. Censorship cover-ups news blackouts inauguration. Boycotts party line. Election year impeachment debate commission underhandedness partisan whistle blowers partisans special counsel election fraud and covid relief game so i hereby announce that this is the definitive list of the savage illicit and unprecedented attacks from that again. So you get the point that the democrats didn't accept the change in the election and you know at donald trump and that they've done everything but I can't say they've broken the law. They've done everything under the sun to try and keep donald trump's presidency from succeeding from being seen as legitimate everything else. So what are you guys. Think going to happen. Just thinking out loud here. What do you think is going to happen when they swear. Donald trump in or when they declare donald trump to be the president. What do you think is going to happen well. I think it's i think people are going to get violent. I mean that's what's going to happen. I think we're gonna have real problems. And i think that the violence is going to have to be dealt with by president trump. So again lynnwood Tweeting last night and he had a tweet. That said i love to read and what i love to read is i love to read the us law and he had a reference to the us code. And so i went and got the us code that he referenced in here it is it says the president by using the militia or the armed forces or both or by any other means shall take such measures as he considers nassar to suppress in a state any insurrection domestic violence unlawful combination or conspiracy. It so hinders. The execution of the laws of that state and the united states within the state that any part or class of its people is deprived or right privilege immunity or section named in the constitution and secured by law and the constituted authorities. That state are unable. Fail or refuse to protect that right privilege or immunity or give that protection or to opposes or obstructs the execution of the laws of the united states or impedes the course of justice under those laws. Tell me where there's room for sanctuary cities. Tell me where. There's room for mayor ted wheeler of portland to say we don't want federal troops here. Let me read it again. Okay when okay. The any part of his classes people deprived of a right privilege. Immunity protection named the constitution. Okay and the constituted theories of that state are unable fail or refuse to protect that right privilege or immunity. What can the president do if that happens. He can the president by using the militia or the armed forces or both or by any other means came the will will defend preserve and protect the constitution of the united states. He will he took an oath and he's going to do it. And all of the other people around him have similar oaths to that effect and so this idea that the left is going to be violent. And they're going to be so violent that no one is going to be able to do anything about it that they're gonna take over. It's just not true. They're not gonna be able to take control. The government has of resources and the federal government has been staging those resources. And it's not a. It's not coincidental that all the changes at the top of the dependent defense department are happening around the same time here so I'm going to take a two minute. Quick break. And when i come back we're going to get into the testimony of the ceo from dominion john policy. So that'll be in just two minutes back. And i welcome back the republic keeper broadcast. Thanks again for your time and attention today. Smadi states interesting sometimes. A twenty five hundred people yesterday today. Hundred and five people so interesting how. It's different day to day. And maybe a maybe i got a. It's depends on the topic wine writers or something. I don't know interesting trying to figure out how that works and so regardless I'm doing it either way and the main audience on the podcast later. So make sure you subscribe there and by the way For those who are new to the broadcast the way. This works pretty straightforward. I ask people do three. Simple things for me Number one Pray for me number two Subscribe in share and number three. If you can throw a couple of bucks at the broadcast You'll find a way to do that up on the Up on the livestream and share the show if you think this is good stuff. Gordon shared out that Really helps so john. Paulos is the ceo of dominion and. He was in front of the state of michigan yesterday. Giving testimony and his testimony was under oath and probably Like you. I put a lot of weight in at one. Someone knows that they can go to go to jail and So again maybe. At some point you know a guy maybe gets to a position where you know you're going to jail anyway so you're trying to just hold it off so you might as well lie not sure how that works but regardless john paul did appear in front of michigan's senate yesterday actually think it was in joint session and he he was under oath. And here's his opening. Statement dominion voting systems. Did not now. Nor has it ever used solar winds or ryan which was the subject of the d. h. s emergency directive dated thirteen twenty. Twenty dominion is not and has never been a front for communists. It has no ties to hugo chavez the late dictator venezuela we have never been involved in venezuelan elections. It's machines have never been used in venezuela the company also does not have any ties to china whatsoever including no ties including investment or source code. Transfer there are no ownership ties to any political parties nor to foreign governments dominion has no ties to the pelosi family. Feinstein family click family. George soros additionally dominion does not have any servers in germany or spain. No votes are sent overseas. Let me be clear. Ballots are sent anywhere not overseas not over state lines and not even over county lines. All votes are counted by local bipartisan. Us election officials in the united states. The us army has debunked claims of secret military rates. Overseas okay so make of that. What you will. That's that's him saying unequivocally they're not involved in this stuff now. Lying is interesting. Art isn't he said we have no connections to hugo chavez no connections to venezuela. We've never been involved in venezuela. Well no one ever said that dominion was did they. What has been said that smart matic the company that was involved there that was founded by hugo chavez money that was a venezuelan. Cook the books election company that company was acquired by sequoia systems which down apparently was acquired by dominion or so they say And so his statement that dominion wasn't involved in venezuela might very. Well be true. So he's not lying under oath but it's duplicitous and incomplete and seems like not I don't know we'll see now You guys have seen the the news about this audit that happened in Michigan of the dominion machines. That the aisaw group which is In a private group led by russell ramlet ramsland. The allied security operations group are revealed a sixty eight percent ballot. Error rate Eighty-five thousand times than the election commission guidelines allow. So i read the report from russell. Ramsland his team. And i'll tell you what it didn't show what it didn't show is an algorithm that changed votes. It did not show that and it may show that but it did not show that that the algorithm changed votes. What what it showed is that the algorithm created a The error rate was too high in other words when it when it should have been able to read a Ah ballot it was causing it to go into a adjudication file where someone had to make a judgment call on it so the way the machines work is the ballots are read automatically by manage through right and but if the theoretically if they're working properly there comes about two can't be read for some reason that goes into a separate file and someone has to look at it and say who it's for okay the dominion audit that you guys have seen the articles right this sixty eight thousand Error rate Or sixty eight percent error rate eighty-five thousand higher than the fcc allows was on the Ballots being going to adjudication which meant that introduced the human error pa or human factor into it. Because somebody had to look at it right so we'll see what happens now. The machines in maricopa county have also been an ordered to be forensically examined and it appears that the machines themselves may in fact count ballots as as voted but you can set the error rate such that. Somebody has to look at it and then. In the upload process there appear to be vulnerabilities and openings. So here is What the next thing. He said that i thought was. This was really disrespectful. And it was an attempt to throw this woman on the bus. I don't think she did herself any favors. When she testified either but melissa cronin the woman who was working for dominion who claimed that she saw some regularities there. Here his his statement on her she was for us. One of several thousand one day contractors her roll out was really limited to a type one type of technician who provides she would have been told how to clean the glass read heads or at least she should have been But really the main job was flagging down. If there's any questions on technical nature that election officials have to flag down one of the two Dominion engineers who were there who could answer the question okay. So she was basically there to clean the glass. That's what melissa koran was there for. She was there to clean the glass to make sure that the glass got clean and so she had a really important job. Vote according to this guy right. So he's not showing her any kind of respect to speak of and You know. I'm not sure that that she's due respect as an employee or whatever. I don't know how to say that. I mean she's due respect as a person I think that she went on much in her testimony about venezuela and etc and. I think she probably spoke got up beyond her skis and didn't help herself. And i think a lot of the people who have testified have done that and unfortunately it's it muddies up the legit testimony from people who appear to actually know what they're talking about so the big argument in the whole thing has been dude. Machines connect to the internet right. Can the machines connected the internet and is where he basically says. Well yeah they thermal tape. It has all the results in tally. In the number of ballots that correspond to the number ballots in the ballot box. We're good on that. So we call those tabulated results from the printout then we have the centralized computer that is designed to amalgamate. And and tally the results from all of the eighteen tabulates together in a way that it can be reported easily from the county to. Let's say the secretary of state's office or the media. so what what. K- reported easily. Now remember the video from earlier from the epoch times. Where they're showing the real time stamps coming through okay. How's that happening. That's from the reporting. The reporting is happening because they supposedly they have this. So here's what he describes that the computers have network cards in them. You know network kersey you can put a regular you know. I don't have one handy. I thought i had when i got one in the officers too far away Raillard rj forty five network cable plug in. They have them in there because what they do is create a land a local area network in the counting building supposedly and then that local area network then is not connected to the internet that it's then they take the one machine the tablet or and it connects to do an upload right so You know apparently you know every one of those machines translation. He talked several times about how they don't have wifi carts they have. Rj forty five. Jacks a hundred percent of everybody knows that you can. You can connect a computer with rj. Forty five jack to the to the internet. That's it's got a network card scott a network you can connect to the internet not rocket science. Somebody who maybe knows could correct me if i'm wrong. But he basically says that they're all networked together. so the guys just to flip liar Which i guess is on a big surprise. We kind of knew that right. So i guess that's it on the him so there's one other They wanna share. The i love this. Let's see i got it over here on the didn't make it over here. Saw a middle east. I'll skip it till tomorrow. But i wanna sure a couple more things so franklin graham Got himself in a little trouble. And here's what he said. That got him in hot water. He said people have asked from disappointed about the election. When i think about my answer. I have to say honestly that i'm grateful. Grateful to god the last four years. He gave us a president of protected. Our religious liberties grateful for president of defended the lives of the unborn standing publicly against abortion. And the bloody smear. It's made on our nation Cripple per for president nominated conservative judges the supreme court and two our federal courts grateful for a president who built the strongest economy and seventy years with the lowest unemployment rate in fifty years before the pandemic grateful for president strengthened and supported our military grateful for a president who stood against the swamp in the corruption in washington grateful for a president who supported law and order and defended our police And so on right so well. I'm grateful for a president who recognize the importance of prayer. Were not ashamed of the name of jesus christ. I'm thankful that the president stood against the seculars won to christ out of christmas and brought back the greeting. Merry christmas so as we come to the end of this election season i look back with a grateful heart and thank god for all of these things. It's unfortunate that many people got confused the election about personalities rather than the policies of the candidates president trump will go down in history as one of the great presence of our nation bringing peace and prosperity to millions here in the us and around the world may god bless him and melania and their family as god leads him to the next chapter in his life. And the only thing. Franklin graham's wrong about there is that the next chapter of president trump life will be anything other than being president of the united states The next chapter of president trump's life is term number two and he references there the idea of christian commitment and I really think that I like this quote from george washington. And i don't know if this is Some people say this is an actually washington. I don't care if it's not him. Whoever said it is somebody that i would look up to at least for this statement The thing that separates the american christian from every other person on earth is the fact that he would rather die on his feet than live on his knees. And that is who you are. You are listening to this program and watching. That's who we are where the people would rather live on our feet than die on our knees and I think i'll just leave you the one last thing in this is there's a guy who You know. I'm i'm a capitalist and the reason a capitalist is because i believe that you Get paid by creating value and It's interesting. I'm looking at the livestream today and then i. I know what's going on with the audience. it's facebook. They've they've decided. The show doesn't work at one post overnight That they've marked false news and that's today. They're not distributing the show so terrible But there's a. I believe that you you get paid by creating value that if create value it's inevitable the that That things are going to work for you and value is the service that you render to your fellow human being right and Most of us watch some television and we do in our house and one of the shows that we watch that gives us a tremendous amount of of enjoyment is diners drive ins and dives and the guy fieri show on the food network and also his guy's grocery games Our shows that we have enjoyed a lot and and this guy whatever success and economic success he has. Here's guy fieri on the screen Kudos to him the they don't wanna share with you kind of end. The show is this is a great american story. We've got politicians in congress people and everybody fighting over how to help our food and restaurant workers and guy fieri says you know. Screw that i'm going to do it myself. And he started raising money for people with Who work in the food industry and to date a guy. Fury has raised twenty one million dollars of relief funds for people with the Work in the food industry and That's the exact kind of thing that we want to do. So for those who again Welcome and you can get the episode. Go to Republic uber dot com slash. Subscribe and you'll find all the services. There are apple. Podcasts service iheartradio. All that kind of stuff and you'll be able to get the podcast and it. All of the stuff as publishes and No interruptions so thanks again Small audience today but thanks again for sharing. And maybe we'll be back up to the twenty five hundred tomorrow depending on what the facebook god's do and just living in it thanks again for your time and attention or willing. I'll see you tomorrow. Six. am right around them mexican.

biden peter nygaard donald trump trump senate michigan mitch mcconnell Mcconnell united states georgia octavia m lynnwood facebook edison research edison mitch wisconsin
Designing homes equipped to beat the heat

The Current

12:58 min | 4 months ago

Designing homes equipped to beat the heat

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app. he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. We live in a townhouse and it's pretty hot in there and because because of the pandemic we're working from home and so i called into work this morning and said i we can't work from home and i'm not going to have our son and school either so we had to take take today off and just looking for shade. We live in an apartment. It's senator it's a main floor. Yeah so it was really hard there and it was impossible to stay longer and because they don't have air conditioner there so we couldn't stay inside for longer live in a condo and of course it is well 'boring there and so we're using news bringing grandchild down who's going to water and so in a little while probably stepped my toes into that. Water is nobody looking There are we have fans of course in in our portable fans in our condo. There is no air conditioning and it is extremely extremely hot. Voices in downtown vancouver is a heat wave sweeps through western canada yesterday lytton bc. Hit a canadian record with a temperature of forty seven nine degrees. that's forty seven point nine hotter than it's ever been in las vegas. The advice from doctors is to take refuge inside from this kind of heat put. What if your so called refuge is the place that you live and it's feels more like a sauna then a cool retreat hannatised scher thinks a lot about what to do with buildings that were not designed with forty plus degrees summers in mind. She's the researcher in residence for the built environment. The pacific institute for climate solutions. She's in victoria. Hannah good morning. Good morning matt. How are you dealing with the heat so far. Well i'm doing okay i'm in air conditioning. But i know a lot of people do not have that fortune telling me about which buildings i mean we were hearing about people who in condos who you know. They don't have air conditioning. There they are just having a fan that moving. He's moving around kind of hot air. What are the buildings that are most concerning to you this week. As the temperatures get into the thirty forty degree range Well i mean as you look around vancouver and all the building. That's happened over the past few decades. All of those towers are glass. And that's going to be an increasing problem. I mean it can be good for the view but it's definitely not good for energy and for heat And so that's something. We're really going to have to think about a lot going forward. I think we're going to have to to look at seriously. Retrofitting both buildings and the spaces between buildings. You saw those photos perhaps from squamish where tempered glass panels on people's decks that just kind of exploded in the heat yesterday. I mean when you say that those tall buildings just wrapped in glass are not suitable for this. Tell me more about that. and what. The issues are aside from. Exploding glass panels. That would be present themselves in hot weather. Yeah i mean i don't. I don't think the buildings are going to start exploding so that's good but This good yes. There's there's just a lot of a lot of solar heat gain as a heat says being down and those windows and there's no external shading all of that heat is coming in and heating up the spaces and so one of the simpler things that we can do is exterior shading because that prevents the heat from entering the building to begin with and when we're building new buildings. We really need to think about how we're orienting those buildings to sign reducing the amount of glazing adding exterior shading and using cool roofs Those are just some of the things we can do. But i mean obviously we're not going to entirely rebuild a city for For heat and so we also have to really look at retrofitting the spaces between buildings so that means a lot more vegetation trees and plants those who green roofs and walls and cool roofs and cool. Pavements so there there's a lot that we can do. That isn't the urban spaces and not directly the building itself. So we'll talk about the new buildings in a moment. But i mean for the old building stock. What do you do if this is. The way of the future and the temperature is going to keep increasing. How do you factor adaptation into that. What what specifically can you do. Yeah i mean. There's already a huge move to retrofit buildings for energy efficiency so in a way that can be an opportunity now. We really need to think about adaptation for all types of extremes no including flooding and extreme rain events and heat so we need to consider all of that as we retrofits buildings and be really comprehensive in those retrofits and get as much as we can so so like. I said i mean one of the simplest things going to be exterior shading If you're going to go further you can increase the installation and the walls which can help with both of cool and we know the vancouver's already one of the most expensive cities to live in. And how do you square affordable. The conversation john affordability with retrofits. That could be expensive Yeah it's not. It's going to be cheaper easy but in terms of cost we really need to think about avoiding future costs because right now Weather related disasters and extreme weather are having more and more economic impact so it's already having a noticeable impact on gdp. Gdp is just one place to start. You know it doesn't begin to capture all of the social impacts who. We really need to look at avoiding those future costs and this is going to require major investment from all levels of government was going to. Do you need government to pump money into those retrofits soul. That the cost is then not downloaded to the people who are still. You know already struggling to find a place to live. Yeah i mean we absolutely do affordable housing already major issue and we cannot just have the cost of this onto the residents of those buildings. The buildings that are yet to be built that are still in the planning stages what has to happen to rethink what those buildings might look like Well in the building space people talk a lot about future climate. So we're still in a trend where we tend to design for the climate of the past and we know that that that climate is gone. It's not coming back so the climate is only going to get more extreme from here on out and there is really good data and really good projections that we can use to design and build two and so we need to be building for the climate of forty twenty fifty. You know just like we're looking at net zero pledges out to twenty fifty now. We need to be looking at that time. Horizon in terms of what the climate is going to be and what our buildings made to look like and so for those. You mentioned green roofs for example. Is that the way to try. And think about how to reduce the you know the heat footprint of building like Well i mean you've probably heard about the urban heat island into a major issues that urban areas can literally already be a few degrees hotter than surrounding areas. And so there's a lot that we can do with surfaces both in terms of roofs and pavements in la there have already been tests on some some lighter materials that you can put onto pavements to make some cooler and so that's something that we should increasingly look at and try to use strategically to bring that urban heat island down so it just housing. I mean schools across many parts of british columbia close yesterday because of the heat. What's the urgency in fixing schools and other public buildings. It's very urgent and a lot of those. Buildings are already undergoing retrofits as well. Even you know for seismic about the a huge risk out here and so in gun and every retrofit we need to start integrating these considerations. I mean we should have seen this coming. But may maybe we didn't and so now we can see what it's really going to mean to start to live with extreme heat and we've got to factor that in part of dealing with this current heat wave. People have seen it at hardware stores. Is you know trying to figure out how to get your hands on an air conditioner. The international energy agency says that most families in hot countries have yet to purchase their first air conditioner but over the next thirty years that is going to change and two thirds of the world's households will get themselves a see. What is that going to mean in the larger conversation around climate change. Do you think It's definitely a concern. Because air conditioning uses electronics will tend to increase emissions. I mean of course. We're hoping to get to a less electric being largely renewable. But we're nowhere close to that now and that's really just a hopeful projection at this point so we need to think a lot about using passive strategies so that we're not just increasing emissions with cooling that we choose to use hard to tell people that when they're sweating in their apartment though it is really hard and so that's why we also just have to work on the electric grid and increasing renewable supply Near the optimistic estimate. is that by. Twenty fifty will be getting ninety percent of our electricity from renewables and so we need to also put a lot of resources into developing renewable capacity again. Nbc we're lucky that way we have hydro but a lot of places are not like that so we need to need to be switching to renewables. If the twenty ninth of june summer is just underway and there is still a potential for forced fires. Air quality concerns that forest fires bring there could be further heatwaves. Is your sense that politicians are doing enough. If we're having this conversation about not just what's happening now but how to future proof those buildings and larger society. Our politicians having the conversation at an urgent enough level right now i mean the conversations have become pretty urgent. You hear a lot of talk about the climate emergency and the climate crisis and it's not just politicians. I mean it's all of government and government staff and also ngos and businesses. I mean everybody's starting to talk about it much more seriously but clearly we also need to do a lot more There have been a few reason. Assessments of adaptation. In canada and canada is a little bit behind in developing adaptation. And so maybe events. Like this are really good impetus to start working harder on that I mean we can see that. Climate change really impacts every area of our lives from public health to the economy to resource management. It's an urban issue. It's a rural and remote issue and it transcends all those boundaries. The solutions need to do. The same is your sense. I mean when you say that everybody's talking about this but when they hear that the you know the temperature is warmer than it's ever been in las vegas That that's the kind of thing that's going. Move people in a meaningful way from talk to action. I mean i. I hope so. It seems like the proverbial wakeup call And i think the wildfires are very much in people's minds. I mean in the west across bc. Last year we experienced the wildfires coming up from the western us and so on top of not being able to go outside because of covid. We couldn't go outside because we couldn't breathe the air. So i think there's a lot of worry about that and That all of that will come together and and start to spur. Some real action had a stay cool. And i appreciate speaking with you this morning. Thank you very much. thanks a lot. Hannitized is the researcher and residents focusing on the built environment at the pacific institute for climate solutions for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

peter nygaard nygaard pacific institute for climate vancouver bill cosby scher Cbc cbc squamish jeffrey Hannah las vegas canada victoria matt international energy agency british columbia john
Architect Douglas Cardinal on how Indigenous teachings can be the foundation for our cities

The Current

21:03 min | 4 months ago

Architect Douglas Cardinal on how Indigenous teachings can be the foundation for our cities

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app he far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast no matter what visit around us. Destruction of our environment and global warming. The indigenous teachings can be the foundation for replanning and redesigning our city so that they can be truly sighting places to create in. What's important to me. And the abolition of indigenous architecture right now is for us to act as advocates for our tribal communities as well as students giving them a voice within the subject of architecture. The voices of the first first nations woman architect in canada. And the country's first indigenous architect wanda da costa and douglas cardinal and along with five other indigenous architects across north america. They are being celebrated for their work in a new documentary. That's called from earth to sky and it's being released across the country today to mark national indigenous peoples day. Douglas cardinal and wanda pasta. Join me now. Good morning to you both morning. Good morning this is a wonderful film in celebrating your work and celebrating the work of the next generation. And i wanted to talk. I douglas cardinal just about your introduction to this world you have changed in the face of this country in many ways and you've changed architecture in this country. Why did you want to be an architect. I felt that It was very important to to build environments that would be in harmony with the land and more nurturing to the people that was serving and i was very passionate about getting involved and doing something Was all those. Said's your mother told you that you'd be an architect. Yes my mother. She said i'd be an architect. Because i i loved. Buildings was my father. And i was always interested in the arts. What happened when you arrived at. Ub see what sort of reaction did you get. When when you went there to study architecture. I was told i did not have a family background to be a royal architect and But i met Some very interesting people and encourage me to continue. And so but i felt that the way that canada treats Anybody of native background. That i would never be able to Fill my vision in this country. So i pointed my car. Celts and wenches far south as i could get ended up in mexico. Unending came back to texas. And went to university of texas. In austin. And i got a job at a firm that was trained in the buzzards in paris so so add good. Trading in the field of architecture a went to arizona and met frank lloyd wright and he also encouraged me to continue my profession and it is in arizona that we have reached one dollar cost. Who is the first as i mentioned first. Nations woman architect in canada. What was it that inspired you to to follow this path. Well i i had a bit of a different path. It wasn't one of those people can talk Or say that they've you know aspire to be an architect since there were small for me. It was backpacking journey. That i took after my undergraduate degree and i was supposed to be gone six months to australia on a work abroad program and ended up coming back after over seven years later just loved exploring cities landscapes seeing all the beautiful cultures that live In this globe and just became really addicted to learning in a sort of a more immersive way. you know. Learning from books is one way. But as we know from the indigenous world you learning from actually experiencing things is really powerful and so for me it was that it was the introduction to global architecture through me and my backpack just Traipsing around the world a couple times as an indigenous woman. What do you think you mean. How do we define what indigenous architecture is. And how do you see your space in that world. Well i think this is really interesting. Time because there's so much in the news right now about Our history and how they've been disconnected from who we are as people. I think we're in a process right now in architecture. Were doing A rebirth or a rejoining of our original worldviews with our current lifestyle. So i think this is where our pushes right now. is really that notion of reconnection. Reconnecting ourselves you know. Returning to ourselves is an initial ave. Saying that i think is really powerful and aptly describes indigenous architecture at this moment. What does that mean in terms of the work that you do. I it means you know. We spend a lot of time and every project. I'm sure douglasville Confirm we spend a lotta time understanding place understanding the meaning of that place to the people understanding How they've lived their ways of being ways of knowing doing in that location and so i think our preparation process is a bit longer and a bit deeper at the beginning of every project and ultimately what were you trying to do is to create something meaningful for the local community. Something where they can see themselves in the architecture which you know architecture for so long has been borrowed from europe or from different regions of the world but what if we created a homegrown architecture beyond canadian but more localized what is it mean to have a sad lake Style of architecture. You know really really specific. I think that's what it brings to the conversation in architecture. Douglas in the film. You talk about the vision sessions that you start each project with. Tell me about that and and to to wanders point what that gives you in terms of a sense of place well for me. If i'm working with the community and truly serving the community. I want to hear from the community. We gather ali stakeholders together in a circle. And i asked them to tell me what their vision a of what they want. What kind of environment they want. And so i. I do that with every building. I do including the museum garin. Ottawa is get the stakeholders together and listen to their vision and make sure that i hear every word from them and then i dropped division and presented to them to make sure that i've Written down it is truly their vision and then my job is to bring their vision into reality and not is. The traditional process was talked to me by my elders back in alberta. You mentioned the museum in ottawa. The canadian museum of history. I wanna play a little bit from the film. This is us speaking about your design for that museum. But i designed. The museum was really court. Green marble symbol of architecture the related to the river the water earth sculptural beauty gland and in twining with Email my message was that we are part of nature. We should respect nature living in harmony with nature. You talk in the film about when you grew up and and you live off the land. How has that influenced how you see your role in terms of thinking of of of our our relationship with nature and the fact that we're part of nature well My other was a hunter and trapper and Lived off the land I learned so much from the lessons of the land and and how we need to respect all of our life givers a jewish life from the land that we have to honor and respect him. We're not above nature. We are nature and were part of nature. And we you learn from big part of the land in nineteen ninety-five. A college student disappeared on a trip across the usa. Portia missing right away. But they wouldn't take it so. His mother started investigating the case file. I started going through saw people. That wasn't interviewed. I joined this mother. Search for justice or you recording us i am. Yeah someone knows something season six available now has a certain mystique but for those who work here and the intrigue israel. We're looking for experts from all backgrounds to bring our mission and your career to life visit. Fbi jobs dot gov forward slash radio wanda. What do those lessons mean to you in the work that you do now. I think you know part of part of what we're doing. I think both with the idc where i teach in my practices really eliminating those undervalued under examined ancestor worldviews. And you know. I think back really when i think about my grandmother. You know we didn't have running water in the in the where we grew up in where grandma gruff. My mom grew up on a satellite station. But that notion of caring the wellwater. Right where you're you're creating a preciousness through that that the act bringing the water from the earth carrying it across the land and utilizing it. I think it gives you a different perspective and i think that you know the closest associations that we have with The natural world come from Those acts those simple acts of being connected to mother. Earth and i think that is something that really really is vital. Right now. is we're experiencing climate change in. We're experiencing changes to our environment types. Think this is really really important. asset that we can sort of bringing to a more general public and to use the from field practically manifesting itself in the buildings that you helped design in the work that you do with your students to help create a. Yeah always you know get. The place is our first point. I mean besides the culture of course but the classes is really the first point of departure for us in when i think that that connection. Was you know a lot of our buildings are now. Starting to integrate swastha's equinox cosmology landmarks Direction analogy to sacred directions. Like there's so much so much layering that's happening within those buildings and through that it becomes an awareness. Not only for the architects of Who are working on the buildings but also for the people the users when they realized that these buildings are tied to the land. In a way right it begins to i think change perceptions of our relationship with nature. This film is being released at an incredibly sensitive time. And you were talking wanted to the histories and learn the way that histories are being framed and told and and discussed right now. We're talking not so long. After the discovery of the remains of some two hundred fifteen children at a former indian residential school in kamloops. How do you. How do you feel about the timing of this. Film's release in the conversations that have come out in the wake of that discovery wanda. I think it's interesting. Because so many best including myself have. My mother was Went residential school and so many of many of us are so closely tied to to that tragic Peace in canadian history. And so i think this the timing is really opportune because now people are starting to ask. You know what happened to that generation. You know when they're starting to make sense of that that perhaps what they're seeing within our communities you know the ills that are coming from That trauma that our communities experience. But i often also say that. It's really incredible to me that one generation later so my mom went to residential school And one generally john one generation leader. I'm designing indigenous centric schools for from k. To twelve or university spaces right. So it's there is a positive transformation happening right now. And i can't understate how important that is right. Now to bring indigenous people to the table and create more accuracy and inclusiveness and understanding and more accurate representation of who we are in the twenty first century. And what what a what. We aspire to tell the world about us. And i think that can only be done from the indigenous people who have been impacted by our histories. Douglas cardinal you attended residential school and there are questions are on what should happen with with those physical buildings. Those physical spaces could there are communities. Who would like see them demolished. Some would like to see them. Reclaim some would like to see them. Repurpose what do you. How do you think that should be approached well I remember when i was whissy elders and community of actually sat lake your community and and i remember with steiner and mike and all all leaders then they came and took over that residential school and and Ask teachers to leave and then put teachers in the facilities that were loving and carrying the children and just took over the school themselves and changed the whole program hugging a i symbol did was get on top of the roof and with a chainsaw the crucifixion reclaim it as one of their own facilities that they would change the whole concept of the old residential schools. That were so terrible to the children. And so with the people that took the initiative in getting rid of these residential school not the government and And i always inspired how. How really strong two people were. And no matter what they they went through all it did was make the people stronger and be more appreciative of their own culture and language and everything else and so i think that a people out to celebrate that they survived survived him and and they have even more to offer the register society because they have held onto their to their culture and their language and their roots in an a very powerful way and So i believe that Are indigenous people have a lot to offer the human family. Do you see as your role. I mean. there are many people who see you as an elder in in this community and as a teacher and somebody that they can learn from. What do you see as your role in this. You know we have this gift of creativity which makes us very powerful beings on this finding and we have to be responsible and how we used that gift. We need to use our creativity in a way to be able to solve the problems that we we have on this planet because we as human beings been very destructive to our mother the earth than we need all the creative energy we can get to be able to turn it around and be carrying loving not to each other but also to our marbles host our mother the earth. that's the opportunity we have. We've been well taught by elders and so we have a lot to contribute in that way. One of what about for you. You're in the film Introduced as the teacher and you have a next generation of indigenous students and architects and you talk about critical mass and this being a moment that that can be seized upon. What do you see as your role. When i started at the university about five or six years ago on. It's re. It was really important that we share that for me to share. My mother was a teacher. A cultural teacher in this in the classrooms for little ones in the city. That were a little bit. You know losing their culture in the city. And i think that's the role i've taken on that. How do we bring How do we make sure that that next generation has the stepping stones are what i call the lily pads to jump off school that the feel the cultures represented. They see how powerful sure can be. And how do we begin to Create a safe landing Place for those students. And what. I call what i what i share with. My students is that. I call them feel transformation ambassadors so through the power of place in design and you know culture based innovation this will be the generation that changes the discourse. You know we. Douglas hoping the gates he was the first one to open the gates for all of us. It's our job. The next generation to come and keep those gates open to set the stage for the people who come after us. That's how i see my role. There's a lot of optimism in. I mean it's easy for all of the obvious reasons to to feel the weight of of the moment. But there's a lot of optimism in what you just said. Yeah i think we have to optimistic. You know and i think architecture is optimistic in. I often say back when i was studying. My undergrad was native studies. And you know. I remember fist pumping in the air native studies. And you know doing the fight in a different way. And i feel like architecture. There's a beauty positiveness a it's about it's asset based its positive thinking it's hopeful it's futuristic because these buildings will stand for one hundred years and i think for me it's changed the discourse for me and i'm now supporting my community through Helping the world see the beauty of our culture through architecture. Douglas cardinal one of the final things you say in the film is there's hope whereas the hope for you absolutely one have to believe that because you know we have to create a better future for our children and you have to have hope that they will have a better future. We don't want the next generation to try to solve all the problems we've created. We've got to get going and solving some of the problems for the future of our children. I'm grateful to have the chance to speak with you both it's a beautiful film and your work Two point we'll stand for one hundred years and even longer out. Thank you very much for your time this morning. Thank you thank you thank you. Douglas cardinal candidates first indigenous architect. Juan dollar cost to the first first nations woman architect in canada. They are among seven indigenous. Architects featured in a new documentary is called from earth to sky was made by the toronto filmmaker. Ron chapman and the film is being released on national indigenous peoples day or you can stream at anytime after that a tv. Oh dot org for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

Douglas cardinal peter nygaard nygaard wanda da costa wanda pasta canada garin canadian museum of history arizona Bill cosby wanda frank lloyd wright Cbc cbc jeffrey university of texas north america Douglas Portia
When big money buys up homes to rent

Front Burner

22:36 min | 4 months ago

When big money buys up homes to rent

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey app. he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. Hi jamie push on. So on sunday night. I was scrolling through twitter and i see the story in the globe and mail. It totally caught my eye. It was about this. Toronto condo developer core development group and their plans to buy up a whole bunch of single family homes and turn them into rentals. They'd already raised two hundred and fifty million bucks to do this in mid sized ontario cities like hamilton berry. Kingston peterborough and their goal is to get a billion dollars worth of houses right across the country. The story caught my attention for a whole bunch of reasons. First of all. We've talked on the show before but how crazy hot real estate market is right now and how. It's putting home ownership out of reach for a lot of people so would this corporate player with really deep pockets make houses even more expensive. I was also curious about what kind of landlords they'd be. So would there. Rentals be affordable we've seen institutional investors get into the residential rentals game before with apartments here in canada houses in the us and it hasn't always worked out that well for ten minutes. I wasn't the only one with these kinds of questions. We heard a lot of that on social media as well especially after. I said on twitter that we'd be doing an episode on the subject shortly after we got an email from a public relations person asking if we wanted to speak to representatives from core development directly on the show. I thought great. Why not put her questions. Audiences concerns directly to them and hear what they had to say. We scheduled the interview for four thirty pm on tuesday afternoon. At four twenty nine we get this email saying an unexpected. Emergency came out and is executive vice. President would not becoming on the call by ten thirty that night. They'd cancelled altogether to be honest. I wasn't surprised. There's been a lot of backlash even conservative party. Leader erno tool tweeted quote. How our first time homebuyers supposed to compete with billionaire investors. So today leilani far has here. She's the former un special reporter in housing and current global director of the shift housing advocacy group. And she's seen what happens when big money gets into the housing rental game. highly lonnie. thank you so much for making the time today. Oh it's a pleasure to be here jamie. So i wonder if i start by asking you. What your reaction was when you heard that this development group plan to and i'm quoting from their website here. Pioneer the single family rental asset class in canada. I had a sinking feeling in my got I was pretty distressed But i have been looking at this kind of financial activity in the area of housing for some years. Now and i've i've i've seen this in the us or a version of this in the us and it doesn't bode well and so that was that sinking feeling And i'm hoping we can get into what you've seen in the us in just a few minutes before you know when they did cancel on our interview. They they did email. Also the long statement. And i won't read all of it but they did say that their goal is to provide quote stable secure long term rental properties for people who can't afford to buy but want more space than a condo and that they're creating new rental supply by renovating these houses and putting in another unit. And so what do you think about that. Yeah well i mean. That's that's their narrative. And i can see how it is that they believe in what they're doing But i think there is another narrative which is that first of all they have already been active and in the places. They've been active the rent levels that they've set have been higher than the average rent and so they might be affordable to someone but they're not meeting affordability rates but also i mean the question is was this needed who determined that this was needed. Who asked for this to happen. And what is this really about at the end of the day. And i think that what's at play here is that they see single family homes as we call them as under performing assets and by that i mean they know that by converting these homes into rentals and two rentals out of one right because that's what they're doing basement apartments which you mentioned rent. According to the globe they're going for sixteen hundred dollars a month right now and we looked into it found. That would be about fifty percent of the average president's annual income and then the rest of the home would also be a rental. That's right and so by doing this. By buying and converting it into a rental they can squeeze more prophets out of every square meter of that home. Then if it just stands as a single family home so you know what like. What's what's really at play here. Is profit making and its corporate profit making so you know. I'm not saying that They aren't creating rentals. they are But i think those rentals are being priced higher than average rents. And i think that at the end of the day this is about making money for a corporation And then there are bigger questions right like what happens when a real estate corp toronto. Based real estate corp. that has access to liquidity and can leverage money quite easily. What happens when they start competing in the home ownership market. Don't they immediately have an unfair advantage or an advantage that is going to make it even more difficult for you know the regular family. That's trying to get into the housing market cammie. Go back to what you mentioned at the beginning this issue that you have spent so much time looking into and this is a much bigger phenomenon at play. The financial allies ation housing. And talk to me about what that means. Yes sure since the global financial crisis back in two thousand eight we've seen a rapid and marked change in the housing landscape. Warehousing has become an uber profitable commodity and it's being treated as a commodity so i have a short definition of the financialisation of housing. This really easy to get your head around and it simply when housing is used as a place to park grow leverage or high tide capital. Now you might say well come on. This has been going on you know. Housing has been a commodity for longtime true. However what's new since the global financial crisis is the unprecedented amount of wealth money. That's being put into housing as an asset. What's new is the author. Mass purchasing of housing by institutional investors and institutional investors are pension funds insurance companies private equity firms. Huge huge amounts of money. Going in buying you know. Thousands of units at once and what's also new is the harnessing of technology to make that happen so literally artificial intelligence at all those tech firms making it possible to bundle mortgages to buy you know apartment buildings on mass etc. So we are in a new era of all of this and it's very scary. It's scary for tenants in particular because what the outcome of this is is there is a business model that's in place and the business model is very simple private equity or big capital big real estate firms purchase renovate an increase rents period at. That's the model and it is having dire consequences for tenants who can't whose incomes obviously are not going up at the same rate that rents are going up so it's resulting in people selfie victim because they know oh god. My rent has gone up. I can't afford this any longer or its resulting in evictions because of arrears and then people have nowhere to live. They can't continue to live in their community because everything is so expensive so then the question is okay. Well does what core development What they're proposing fit into this model absolutely. I mean look at the figures. A billion dollars. Four thousand units in its a prophet driven model. And you know. So i now. Are they putting this on the stock exchange. The way some of these big actors do in canada. We have a large number of real estate investment. Trusts which are really just a financial instrument owning apartments across the country. They actually put believe it or not. They put apartments on the stock market. They have shareholders and the shareholders are not individuals the shareholders our pension funds the shareholders our insurance companies etc even black rock which is another It's an investment management firm. They will own shares in these companies. So suddenly your apartment is really a tradable stock. Right so we. I don't know that that core development wants to go down that road and go public and all of that stuff But where is this leading and and and is this what we want our housing sector to look like in this country. Is it good for the country. Is it good for tenants. Those are the questions. I'm asking myself trying to explain to make sure your old that mom has to go away for while and he's asking why i'm rosemarie green and this is life jolt. It's a cbc podcast about women in the correctional system. You'll hear our struggles. They're denying human contact and our successes me at his crib. Yoda's mom he had his toys. It was amazing for everyone. Even the guards available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. I wonder if you could paint little bit more of a picture for me of how this has played out in the united states like just for a regular tenant family. Yes so we'll in the states after the global financial crisis. This is when it really emerged. So what happened was a lot of people were foreclosing on their mortgages because of predatory lending right so they couldn't make ends meet couldn't make their mortgage payments and the banks were foreclosing and what that meant was the banks had all this bad debt on their books. Write all these loans. They'd given that weren't being paid back. And they started to sell those loans to private equity firms who bought them on amass in particular a firm called blackstone. They really developed this model so they with like almost overnight went from owning no residential real estate to becoming one of the most prominent landlords in the us. So what they did was they. Bought forty thousand mortgages cheap so blackstone then took those homes did some renovations to them and put them on the rental market. Exactly what quarter. Element is is doing In this case they were they they were buying them cheap through the this bad debt. Arrangement with banks so homeowners suddenly became beleaguered tenants. Having to pay huge rants on a monthly basis and the modus operandi. I here is to constantly raise the rent. Because there are investors who need a good return on their investment and the way to ensure that is to constantly increase rans tendency fees other occupancy fees etc. So that's how it played out in the united states and it continues to play out that way. The pandemic has provided yet. Another opportunity for this to happen right. i understand the atlantic has has also done some really good reporting on this on sort of just living in in in some of these homes in the united states tenants have found themselves dealing with very far away corporate landlord Trying to get repairs or trying to get services This kind of stuff to absolutely and i mean who who do you okay. You're renting who do you want your landlord to be. Do you want your landlord. We someone you can call a warm body at the end of a text message or a a phone call. Who knows a little bit about you as attend and recognizes that things happen and they as a landlord have a responsibility to you or do you want your landlord to be a faceless nameless one eight hundred number lucky if you get someone at the other end of a phone call right. I mean these are simple regular questions. I also think what's happened. Is tenants have been extracted from the equation. They aren't part of the business model. They really aren't and there isn't an opportunity for tenants to participate in decisions that so greatly affect their lives with corporate landlords. And so that's one of the things that disturbs me. I mean there is a notion that governments have signed onto that housing is a human right and part of that human rate is ensuring that the people whose rights are at stake have the capacity the ability and the opportunity to participate in decisions that are going to affect their human rights and that i really feel that that has is quickly slipping away from from the housing landscape in canada and elsewhere. I wanna talk to you about what you think should be done here. But i i just want to quickly point out that these stories of tenants having such difficult times with their big corporately landlords the big rental companies here the companies buying up family homes in the us. They would say that. Actually you know quote professionalize the sector. They've made it better by centralizing in streamlining it that they can take advantage of economies of scale so You know i just. I just want to put that out there for for listeners but leilani this concept are buying up single family homes. It isn't something. We've actually seen very much in canada even though we've seen it With apartment buildings as we've discussed and so at this moment. What do you think needs to be done. Yeah well i've been looking to governments to have some kind of response. And i am concerned obviously with core development but let's face it they are operating legally within a legislative and programmatic system that allows them to do what they're doing and so that then for me requires a different question. Okay how did how did canada come to a place where where this kind of thing is perfectly legal and allowable and that then leads me to governments. And what our government's going to do about this. Do they not see this as problematic. I think a lot of governments have been pushing all and when governments. I'm using the plural. Because it's of course the federal government provincial territorial governments and even city government so i think most government's view the housing problem in canada's one about supply and a lack of supply and i think this model plays into that idea but in fact i Analysis is that. It's not just any old supply that is at issue in this country. It's that there's a lack of affordable and deeply affordable supply for people who are most in need those at the lower end of the income spectrum people living in poverty racialized communities so. I'm wondering if government isn't going to step in and say at some point. Okay wait a second like we need to get a handle on the needs in the country and make sure that any moves especially sizable moves. Like this are actually addressing. The real housing needs in the country. I'm not sure core developments move Know getting into the single family homes and turning them into rentals and charging above average. Rents sure that. That would pass the test. That i'm suggesting i think it was minister. Who sends office said that they're monitoring the situation. I really feel we're past monitoring i mean i feel like i've been monitoring the situation since at least twenty seventeen two thousand sixteen so monitoring we gotta go beyond that what about some action and what about intervening and saying. Hey wait a second. We're the government. We have human rights obligations. We have to make sure everyone has access to adequate affordable housing and we are going to step in and start regulating big capital regulating institutional investors in housing to make sure that we get from them. What we need as a country so that we can solve this housing crisis. I'd love to see that. I'm i'm waiting for that. All right. thank you so much for this. Thanks jamie it was a pleasure Okay so before we go today. Some news from northern ontario where covid nineteen outbreak is ripping through a remote first nation. As of yesterday there were two hundred and thirty two active in cashew on a population of about two thousand people. According to indigenous services minister mark miller children and adolescents. Make up a majority of those infections as vaccines are currently limited to those twelve years of age and older chief leo. Friday said the dramatic increase in cases related to longstanding issues with overcrowding in substandard housing conditions. And that three hundred new permanent homes are needed to meet. The community's needs the federal government has sent fifteen canadian rangers and fifteen nurses to help the community deal with the outbreak as well as tents and domes to temporarily those who don't have a safe place to isolate thus today jamie thanks so much for listening to front burner. We'll talk to you tomorrow for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

peter nygaard united states nygaard jamie push core development group hamilton berry canada Based real estate corp cbc Cbc leilani twitter bill cosby peterborough rosemarie green conservative party lonnie jeffrey Kingston
Roman Mars about the hidden wonders of a city

The Current

28:10 min | 3 months ago

Roman Mars about the hidden wonders of a city

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey epstein he far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that. I think our worlds as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. If you are a fan of podcasts this may well be one of those familiar. Sounds that brings a smile to your face. This is ninety. Nine percent invisible. Hey i can't find that on the radio. I'm roman mars. You'll talk to that station in the ten years since it launched in ninety nine percent. Invisible has become one of the most popular podcasts around. With more than four hundred seventy five million downloads host roman mars uncovers the surprising stories behind everyday objects from the stamps you see on sidewalks to those funny looking waving inflatable men outside used car lots. He and longtime producer. Kurt colsaid have bundled together. Many of those stories into a book called the ninety nine percent invisible city a field guide to the hidden world of everyday design. The current show smack. Galloway spoke to roman mars in january. Here's that conversation. I'm reaching you in the midst of a pandemic and you're in california and i know things are grim there. What is life like for you these days. We've kind of taken it seriously like in this household and in this region for quite some time so even though there's been various stages of of lockdown and and sort of relief It's always been kind of all locked down from me so so Things are really rough in southern california. Were hoping for the best here. Your dad died in november of covert. He did he. He He he's he lived in In ohio which was also overrun especially during that time period So this is real serious. It's affecting us Very gravely and i'm really hopeful that people Take care and do what's right so it gets over with as fast as possible. I'm really sorry for what you've been through And i know. I mean this is not what you talk about on the podcasts at all but i mean given what you've been through and you say you hope people take it seriously we're seeing vaccines are starting to roll out but there are way too many deaths on both sides of the border. What is your sense as to how those who are in charge are handling this virus right now. I think most of those in charge or not hanlin. Well at all i mean. It's a truly preventable crisis. It's a lot of behavioral can mitigate the effects in the spread It was not taken seriously. And it's you know for the most part I'm going to be eager for when our government transitions to people who believe in government and believe that government has a role in the public health of the nation. And i think that will only improve things this so personal for you Given what you've gone through but like many of us you're spending so much more time at home these days in lockdown. What is lockdown. Meant to you. I mean how. How is it practically. How's it changed your life. I mean i work a lot. So we'll it mainly affects work. I have the kids around. You know like so you have to sort of Be kind of a teacher and guide to them in a different way But you know a lot of the the the editing and writing of show and tending in meetings. Those are kind of the same. They're just remote and they they fill up more distant. I miss my staff It's been a surreal and odd. It seems like i'm kind of used to it. The double dose of things is is when it really sort of ways on me like so. We had wildfires in california in august and september. And when i was stuck inside it was bad. But was when i was stuck inside and couldn't open the windows because of air quality i that was when i was really loose-knit but you know things moved on from there in some ways. I mean the book like yours and your podcast is perfect for this time. Because they're both about seeing things with different is in some ways and i just wonder whether i mean i. It's your sense that you know. The pandemic is kind of unlocking a new way of seeing for some people because of of where we are and where we aren't. I mean obviously wasn't written for this moment mean. He was turned in right before. The the lockdown started here in the us of mid march but it is sort of this strange book of the moment because it is about recognizing the cool stories behind everyday things that are right outside your doorstep and it's a it's a field guide to those things and so this moment when we can't go too far flung cities and other countries and marvel at the cool things that they have their. You really can look at the everyday things right outside your door and And marvel at those instead outside your door or inside your door avenue in march after the first lockdown began you. You did an episode. That was recorded at home Where he went around your house and described what you saw Let's take a listen to some of that. I am starting in my bedroom. I'm sitting on a casper. Mattress is not an ad. We eat our own dog food and bug as business. Oh i have a casper mattress. But i digress. As i look around i see. I have five windows in this room. Now if. I were in england or france or ireland or scotland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. I would probably not want this many windows. Let's because back then the more windows you had the more tax you paid. This was all variable from place to place in overtime but the principal was that a window tax was good stand in for a progressive income tax. The bigger the house the more windows higher the tax. You all right. So there is the toilet There is an extremely common misconception that the toilet was invented. By a man named thomas crapper crapper was a sanitation engineer and entrepreneur in the uk in late nineteenth century. That held a few patents. And he's credited with improving indoor plumbing for toilets He was a good businessman and by all accounts he installed untold a lot of plumbing supplies with the name crapper and company while we here in the bathroom. Let's wash hands. There was a very good explainer soap. Recently in the new york times by various jaber so molecules look like little sperm with a head that loves water and a tale that hates water. So when you put soap and water on your hands these little. Folktales findings aren't water and they dig their tills into trying to get away. This breaks up bacteria and virus cell membranes and surrounds any debris with soap molecules and makes them easy to rinse away when more water and friction or applied for the sake of your own health and for everyone else's wash your hands regularly for at least twenty seconds. That is longer than you think so. Pick a song to keep you on task long before i had you in my dreams you came in kept in my imagination. Those things are never what they seem. Never have to worry. Because i know you are better than venus. The milo introduced drink better than the promise of a good one. Night thing better than a big book. Betty page jews even if it comes with a us subscription better than. Is that the first time that you saw on the podcast. Yeah but i. I was moved by this. Really remarkable episode reply all where they dissect it that sort of loss hit and so it was on my mind when i was recording. Are you surprised that it took you this long to to give a guided tour of your house. I mean it sounds like a normal episode in some ways of visible. I it's it's funny because So much of the origin of the show was inspired by The book at home by bill bryson which is essentially the that you know but More learned and better written And so eeo it. It did make sense. It just was like you know. The lockdown happened so much was happening in the world and now they're a bunch of people work on not not just me. It's really a show made by humans and you can feel it and if something's happening in the world we we try to reflect it and there was this moment where it just felt like the thing. We had slated for the next week even though it usually takes us you know six to eight weeks to make an episode was just inappropriate and i and i wanted to reflect the time and and give people kind of comfort and have a fun moment. In 'cause we were all kind of locked in our homes and and maybe we could enjoy that space and encourage people to stay in the may. Ask me something else. But giving people comfort a lot of asserts you know dealing with anxiety and stress in the midst of this and i had heard that people were listening to the sound of your voice to help them fall asleep during the pandemic. Is this tree here. I hear that a lot. I you know. I think it's true you know. The show has com town. I've always wanted the show to sound like it was a friend or a voice inside your head and i think that is comforting to some people mentioned some of the roots of this in this started a decade ago As a project of klw public radio and the american institute of architects in san francisco. What were you trying to do. I mean what was that. The elevator pitch for nine. I was working in the news department. Kale of you and The general manager matt martin. You know call me in the office with with this idea that the aa Wanted to kind of have a little drop into play during morning edition here in. Us states and it would be about a local building and Would i be instead of what what i would think of that. And immediately i wanted to expand it to the whole the broader concept of design. Like not just a cool building but you know a curb. Catis a sewage great. You know something like that and it evolved from from there. And that's what i mean. That's what the title means ninety nine percent invisible it. It's alludes to two things i actually. That came out at a meeting. Ice recalled of different types of designers. When i was a planning the show and there was like a landscape architect and a product designer a building engineer and i was like. What's unifying thing that you all do. Besides the word design. I didn't want the word design the title at all. For some reason. I was very against that and The sort of consensus was That wh- what they do when they do it right. It's it's ninety nine percent invisible. And i loved that idea it was really evocative to me. What's wrong what's wrong with the word. Design it just was. I just didn't want to be tied to it in this weird way. I found it i dunno uglier cumbersome i i like the word design just fine and i use it all the time We have a design bell in the office a week. Sometimes we get pitches. That are very far afield of you know. Maybe original purview and But we sort covered them anyway so when one is berry designing we ring that designed bell in the office but but besides that I just i kind of wanted it to be more poetic than the word design. You've talked about this being a mindset that these are your words allows you to go out armed with type of curiosity and questioning so that you notice these things and can support the good ones. Tell me more about that. What does that mean. It's pretty easy and in our brains are made his way on purpose to ignore the things that we see every day So that we notice the changes like the tiger. That's coming out you know. And so what. What i like about the sort of the project of the show over ten years is i know this is how it's worked on me this curiosity of the every day and paying attention to it and noticing that these things are Choices made by usually smart people to make our lives better is like a lovely way to navigate the world. because it's it's it's really easy to get caught up in the bad design of things that aren't working And ignore that ninety percent of things that Are working really well for you and making better and and also that there are stories behind those decisions and those stories are interesting and it just makes the world More delightful ami delight is one of my favorite words and delightful kind of perfect for this. Is it difficult though to spark that delight in something as banal as a sewer grate or a bench until you tell somebody. There's a reason why there's an arm in the middle of that bench so that somebody can't lie down for example. Yeah you know. I think in it can be hard. But that's just what we do like. That's the that's the i've staked out and at this point. I think it works like the people who are on board for the shower or onboard for it. It's pretty fun To have those moments of connection and to talk about a thing in a new cool way and make you You know sort of enjoy it or get angry about it just notice to scare and and and either of those things. I'm i'm looking for. Have you ever seen performance or work of art and wished you could sit down and talk to the person who made it to really to them. I'm helga davis. And i'm having those everyday conversations with extraordinary people bike visual artists. Nick cave actress and disability advocate merrily torkington and author jason reynolds in partnership with park avenue. Armory listened to helga the armory conversations. Wherever you get podcasts wanna play a little bit of one of my favorite episodes. This you talk about connections. This is such a great example of you kinda pulling together design and politics and culture. This is from episode one hundred twenty four of ninety nine percent invisible. It's called long box. I went to graduate school in athens. Georgia which is a great place to be from the ages of about eighteen to twenty five if you like going out to bars and listening to live music. Even though athens is a fairly small college town it's had a huge and important music scene for decades and the most famous band to come out of the athens seen undoubtedly was our. Em to be provocative. Right from the start. I'm going to say that. Rem's out of time is the most politically important album in the history of the united states. And this provocateur. Is reporter whitney jones. This isn't one of those. Oh it's a soundtrack to a generation or anything like that out of time made such a huge impact because of its packaging. The box out of time originally came in led to a bill being passed in congress and an actual concrete law. As i said. I have long supported the idea of motor-voter. I'm pleased to be able to keep the promise today that i made on this rock the vote card which still has a signature back in new hampshire shaking his hands after the bill. Signing we identified ourselves as rockville. Said you guys got this past and it was really one of the most surreal moments of my life roman mars. What exactly is that. I love that episode but for people who don't know what what is the connection between rem. I mean and your hometown of athens. Georgia bill clinton. At this time period cds were in their ascendancy and the packaging of cds was this Long cardboard box because you could fit two of them Upright in the old ben's where vinyl records used to go and so that was the the pakisi put a cd in a long box that more than doubled the sort of surface area of it. So it could stand upright flipping through the benz and rem was an environmental m amount. Environmentally-minded group. That did not like these cardboard wasteful boxes and so they made a deal that if you put the cd in a long box They designed these coupons to register to vote in in the rock. The vote campaign and Because of that that widespread They they would send in. They would send in support for this bill. They were overwhelmed by congress was and It led to the passing of the motor-voter bill and so It was a strange thing. Where morality and ethics of of the band hit this of design of the packaging and changed the law. And it is a really kind of fascinating story. What do you love about that story in terms of what it is that you're trying to do with the podcast. I love that sort of you. Know that that intersection of the mundane of and Something profound you know like that. There's a this this little thing that a decision made because of the shape of a ben to to to put A record in Led to the shape of the cd that needed to stand up right and then they had to deal with that. And you know the the the record companies just could not abide the fact that a cd would be released without a big cardboard piece of packaging and the way they dealt with it led to a law. It's that cascade of decisions that that have a story pint. each one of them that lead to something big. I mean that's just like our bread and butter. We love that stuff. Okay i want to ask some questions of things that these are things that you talk about but things that i have been musing about as well weird nerdy type. Things like stamps and sidewalks so in our neighborhood. There are stamps that say when the sidewalk was put in. And i sort of became obsessed with looking at those stamps because it tells you the date some of them are from two thousand and nineteen. One goes all the way back to nineteen sixty wiser as a piece of sidewalk from nineteen sixty. Tell me about what you've learned about the stamps that we see on sidewalks depending on the area there. They're standardize in different ways but often when a new construction is is done and the sidewalk has put up. The construction company in charge of that project puts in the sidewalk and then they then they stamp it with their can with you know with the kind of basically an ad for their construction company. And i love these things as well like. They're all over the east bay where i live and And you can sort of mark the date of the neighborhood through these construction projects you can even follow. There's one company called schnorr which Was concrete layer in the neighborhood. And you can follow these from the you know the very like kind of nineteen hundred to the thirties and forties and the mark on him says Schnorr and that says schnorr and sons and that says schnorr brothers and you can follow the the the the evolution of like this company called snore. You bring the sons into the business. Dad retires and the Brothers company and you can watch this over decades and i. it's it's this information layer about a local business. That is right there underneath our feet that you can read. Great example of paying attention Another example of that is The plaque always read the plaque is what you say. And these are you know. Historical markers these are plaques insides of buildings or on a bench in front of someone's home what what do you think people can learn by reading the plaque again. It's right there. There's like an information layer about the built world. That's sitting right there in front of you. And i think they're always worth reading even though they are absolutely incomplete in because they can't tell the whole story on a plaque but they just tell you something to get. You started and get you intrigued. And they're worth interrogating like you should always read the ply. You shouldn't always like believe everything on the black. You wonder whether the mean that takes even greater significance. After the summer that we've had with black lives matter protests and people paying it. Why is that statue there. And who is that statue of. And why is it in this neighborhood in two thousand nineteen or twenty one. Yeah yeah and and one of the things that's really important about historical markers in particular is that they're as much even maybe even more a reflection of the time that the plaque was erected rather than the time that they're depicting. You know like a lot of the you know. The civil war monuments in the american south. Or you know were erected in the twenties and thirties. As a really a tool of oppression even though the commemorating a time in the eighteen sixties. I was pleased to see notice in the book of our In toronto our beloved trash pandas That we love to hate or hate to love and the innovative so-called raccoon proof compost bins In the city of toronto somehow cooked up when you take a look at those bins and the raccoons. What's the bigger story there. It's really just a design story about our values and the war. We have with us in folks that that have thrived in our cities. You know that one was kind of fun more than you know. Because what i love about. Toronto's relationship with the raccoon is it. It's kind of fun love hate and the and and it's you know it's a nice cold war of escalation of arms race of these really really clever animals and all the things we have to do to make it so that ah latch is Still usable by by humans and can be unopened bowl by these Clever little creatures with creepy little hands and so and to me that that is is hilarious. It's their city. we live in it. You have a section. And i've been thinking about this as well talking about the nameless places in cities near the patch of grass maybe between highways or the little spots that it's hard to define what exactly they are but they're still part of the urban fabric. Do they offer a way to think about space differently. What should we be thinking about when we see. You know you're in the car and you're driving by and you see this little patch of green summer. I think giving it a name just gives you a way to like grab onto it as a concept and not think of it is just dead space that you ignore so that like that little triangle that's created by an on ramp and so into a highway this fella graham curl allen Named it a freeway eddie. And it's like poetic and of aug. And it makes you think about it as space and think about all the times. you've seen spaces like that and therefore kind of use it. There's a lot of debt space in cities that could be used in interesting ways and and it's kind of fun to engage without in your mind even if it's just you know just to engage with it or one of the ways people use it is to walk over it. You talk about desire paths for people who don't know what that phrase. What does that mean. So for example. If you imagine a parkin there's Walkways that are you know like sidewalks that have concrete and that are planned by the designer but if if they aren't efficiently laid out and you you know there's a ninety degree turn coming up that's the concrete pathway and you just want to get across Often people like you know. Walk across the grass and created a little diagonal cut through and And when somebody sees that piece of grass tramp down the you know they also trump down on it and his crates sort of dirt. Path and those desire paths are You know they're just kind of people voting with their feet as to how they wanna use space and i find them fascinating Because they are this intersection and a conversation about what public space like how it was designed for sis how it's used and It's worth paying attention to desire past because We could learn how to use spaces better. If we pay attention to the people that you do you worry about how cities are going to change. Because of this pandemic i mean we. Aren't there walking in those public spaces. Were staying home And people worry about where people are going to work where people are going to live. You know people whether they'll take feel comfortable and taking transit for example d. Do you worry about the future of cities. I do and i don't. I don't have a like existential worry about the future. Cities cities have always been through lots of changes. And i do think that cities will survive and people you know being together and creating culture together as like a fundamental need of ours You know around here. Even though i think we've taken the lockdown pretty seriously There's more people walking in my neighborhood than ever before you know like like they're out all the time they're just not gathering in bars and stuff. It'll be interesting to see what sticks in. I guess it kind of depends on if this is a part of a wave of pandemics. That's going to be in our future which some people predict or or not but what i found interesting about the moment was all the rapid changes that happened so quickly to cope in a city. Like all the plexiglas that went up almost instantly. Like i don't even know where you get a ten foot piece of plexiglass but it showed up in the corner store. You know like a fixed to the ceiling So quickly that. I sort of amazed by that and the tape on the floor that gives you a guidance As to where to be which. Actually i kind of enjoyed that. One and i kind of hope that one stays. Why don't like. Because you know. Like i find navigating public spaces can be kind of this anxiety inducing and knowing where to stand knowing if you're in the right line or whatever and there's a information layer like available to space on the floor. It's available to us to provide so much guidance. That is rarely used. And i i kind of found it cool and like you know like maybe it won't be you know i hope it's not dire and you need to stay six feet away from people but i do kinda hope that Like the floor is used to guide you through a single serpentine lines. You can efficiently. Get through a register like that would be pleasing to me. We've been forced to slow down. I mean part of it. Is you see those things and you see them in a different way. But you're also. The people aren't traveling as much and so hopefully they aren't And so you're spending time walking around your neighborhood or walking around a community and learning about the streets that you've been around for a long time. What happens when you're able to unlock that kind of curiosity and people do think i think it makes the world look a little bit better place. 'cause you recognize the fact that there are a lot of things that are working for you. Even when things in the world seem broken. I do a show for ten years where i've talked about how great you know. Roads and bridges and these municipal projects that we all get together and build the things that we can't build on her own and aren't they sort of marvelous and and and sometimes they're really beautiful to look at. But you know if. I'm in my car and i'm you know thwarted to where i want to get to. Because of construction. I can get impatient. And i get angry and i could be like wise. Why can't deal with this now. Whatever and i had to slow down and go. Hey you talk about how much you love these things. They have to be made some time. So just chill the l. Chill hell out. Take the moment of recognizing that the world is trying to be made better for you and And i think it just it resets my mind of a little bit to think about the care that goes into making the world I become you know. Much more optimistic person Through the production of this show just because of that just node seeing that you know people care. They're trying hard and they're making stuff in there making stuff for me. It's made me see my will differently. Which i love It's a real pleasure to talk to you. Roman thank you. Oh my. I really enjoyed it. Thanks so much. That was matt galloway. In conversation in january with roman mars host of the podcast ninety nine percent invisible for more. Cbc podcasts to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

schnorr peter nygaard jeffrey epstein nygaard Kurt colsaid hanlin athens california thomas crapper crapper Bill cosby helga davis merrily torkington jason reynolds united states jaber whitney jones Galloway Cbc
Carol Anderson on the Second Amendment and a racial reckoning

The Current

23:55 min | 4 months ago

Carol Anderson on the Second Amendment and a racial reckoning

"Around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey up he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think are worlds as seen. So far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal charges. Just a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. This next conversation deals with the disturbing subject of gun. Violence in two thousand sixteen philander casteel was pulled over. Just outside of minneapolis for a broken tail light. The police officer asked for his driver's license. Mr castille did with the national rifle association advise americans to do. He told the officer he had a firearm. The officer tells him not to pull it out seconds later. The officer shoots him. Repeatedly and fatally philander. Casteel story is part of the bloody history of the black experience with guns in the united states. That history is documented in carol. Anderson's new book. It's called the second race and guns. In a fatally unequal america. Carol anderson is the charles howard candler professor and chair of african american studies at emory university. And she this morning is in atlanta georgia. Carol good morning. good morning matt. How do you explain the action of the police officer shooting almost immediately. After hearing that. Mr castille firearm. I explain it in terms of the anti blackness that courses through american society american history anti-black is that fear of black people seeing black people as a threat. Sing black people as dangerous and so the response is to curtail to subjugate to kill. Mr castille had a legal firearm. He disclosed it and the nra made its reputation in many ways defending legal gun owners against the us government in its efforts to curtail gun ownership. They often cite the second amendment. What was the reaction of the nra to the killing of falente sto. Initially they went virtually silent. It took pressure from black. Nra members to pressure the the leadership to make a statement and that statement was rather milquetoast We believe that everyone regardless of race Should have access to you. Know have be the right to bear arms That wasn't enough because this is the same in. Ra that after the ruby ridge and after waco which were violent white responses to to federal officers They call federal law officials. Jackbooted government thugs. But for philander. Casteel it was. We believe everybody has the right to bear arms of. We have to wait until there's an investigation. I mean so it was really not the nra that protects whites right to bear on. Why that discrepancy. And why not a vigorous defence of mr castille right to bear arms again. It is that anti blackness that is in american society. It is the the the the sense that black people are a threat. That black people are dangerous and this emerges out of our history of slavery here in the us and and so we see in this kind of disparate way. Not just with the casteel. But it's where you see a twelve year old boy tamir rice a black child who's playing alone in a park in an open carry state and he has a toy gun and granted. The toy gun doesn't have the orange little tip on a desist. Hey i'm a toy. But he is gunned down within two seconds after police arrive and the police were like he was dangerous. He was a threat. He was a threat. But they didn't gunned down dylann roof. Who was the white young man who killed nine black people in during bible study and they didn't god down. Kyle rittenhouse in kenosha. Wisconsin a white teenager who gunned down three people killing two so the sense of threat is attached to blackness. Why did you want to write this book now it. I was intrigued. My my research is always been focused in on the fractured citizenship of african american looking at voting rights and issues beyond that we spoke with about on this program exactly exactly and so after the killing the landau casteel. It was this moment where journalists were asking after the nra's virtual silence will don't black people have second amendment rights and i went. Wow that's a great question. That is one of the rights that i have not in my work to date and so i went hunting and i ended up back in the seventeenth century and to bring that history all the way up to the twenty first. What was the original thought behind the second amendment. I mean that's the title of the book is called the second What was the original thought. Behind that second amendment as i explored it. So we've got two different pillars here. One pillar is our current reigning narrative that it is about the individual right to bear arms and that to have a militia to stop domestic tyranny or foreign invasion That's not what was going on really at the time at the time. What the militia was designed for was to put down slave revolts. And that is what was coursing through in the debates. That was very heavy in the debates that the slave owners believed that they would be left defenseless if the federal government control the militia. If they did not have state control of the militia Because of like you know you can't trust those folks. In pennsylvania and massachusetts if we have a slave uprising a we will be left defenceless that gets to that phrase of a well regulated militia which which is often cited When people talk about the second amendment tell me more about that and what you believe. The point of of the well regulated militia was that well regulated militia was designed as part of the slave control mechanism. It was designed to to put down. Massive slave revolts and to provide a level of security for white colonists and then white americans who were absolutely afraid that a black people would would seek retribution for all of the the the barbarities of slavery that have been rained down upon them. And yes oscarsson is in some ways you compare the second amendment to the three fifths clause. What is that just for. People who don't know explain what that is so the three fists clause is part of the bribe that the the the north made with the south to sign onto the us constitution. The south was afraid that it would be outvoted in congress where you had the number of representatives based on your population and they didn't have as large a population as say new york or pennsylvania or massachusetts and so what they wanted was to now count. There had slaved people as people not as as they had originally demanded when it came to taxation the the bargain that was cut was to count. The enslaved is three fifths of a human being for the purpose of representation in congress that added an additional eighteen representatives to the south in the us. Congress how afraid were White people in we're looking at seventeen hundreds of a of a revolution of black revolution. How how concerned people about that absolutely terrified. They were terrified. This is why you see an array of laws being a passed dealing with a denying access to weapons to the black population including free blacks. You also see the architecture of slave control coming up with slave patrols which were the smaller units designed to to monitor and to go into the slave cabins to to look for. Contraband like books. Like weapons like writing instruments And and then you have the militia who would which was designed to really be there to put down a mass of slavery bowl like had happened at seventeen thirty nine in stone south carolina with the stone no rebellion or. What's happening there. Oh that is when There was a massive slave revolt and Up to sixty people were killed and it worked the enslaved. Were trying to get to freedom in spanish florida because florida did not have slavery and so they were trying to get to florida and the alarm bells rang at in the midst of this revolt because the law said that every white man had to have a gun and it was on a sunday morning and on that sunday the men had their guns each arch and they took their gods and began to hunt down the the enslaved who were trying to get to florida as i said of about sixty people were killed. Twenty whites and forty african americans and the the response was just horrific violence rain down. Beheadings disembowelling The way to to send tear through the black population. This is what will happen to you. If you demand freedom they also pass laws saying that. If you caught somebody an enslaved person trying to get to florida you could scout them. Then they passed the seventeen forty negro act which defined african descended people as absolute slaves for those who are here and those not yet born and then it said the things that they could not do. They could not have literacy. They could not move around freely and they could not have access to guns. I told the court that i'm interest to my us. One small man and giant wheel cut. I do wish to say that official wrongfully imprisoned. right now. Uncover season seven dead wrong. Killed pepple available on. Cbc listen and wherever you get your podcasts post slavery you rate that the push to disarm black people has also been relentless and that that the concern around access to guns for african americans who were free was also a huge problem. Tell me about about what happened. Post slavery and and how guns were kept out of the hands of black americans post labor. You had The thing called the black coats. The black codes were instituted. By what i call these neo confederate governments and these were the members of the confederacy the groups that had attacked the united states in the in launched the civil war. An president andrew. Johnson gave them amnesty with that. They did a got control over their governments again. And pass these black codes and these black codes Just said one was about the control of black labor but it also said that it was about disarmament black people could not have gone gods and black people had the guns from the war and so you had the rise of these paramilitary groups the end these these militia groups and these domestic terrorist groups that went out working in league with these governments to disarm black people. It was a slaughter historian annette. Gordon reed causal slow motion genocide. What was happening in the south to black people and you had the black troops from the union as of occupied force trying to get in between these paramilitary groups in the free people. What would it have meant for more african americans to be able to get guns. I mean part of it is self defense as opposed but but beyond that what would it have meant if they were able to have access to the same rights when it came to the second amendment as white americans it would have meant and i think the best way to understand this is to go back to the eighteen. Fifty seven dread scott decision by the supreme court in that decision was about whether a slave person could become free by living on free soil by living in a non slave state and chief justice. Roger teini wrote in that decision. That black people have never been citizens. They worked citizens at the founding. They weren't citizens because they couldn't get passports. They weren't citizens because they couldn't carry the mail and they weren't sick. He said if they were citizens they would be able to move from state to state freely and they wouldn't be able to carry guns wherever they wit. The black man has no rights that a white man is bound to be stacked. That's how the supreme court was able to justify keeping guns out of the hands of of black americans despite the fact that the second amendment is in the constitution. Exactly exactly and you had another ruling in georgia that a a gun control law for white men was not Was unconstitutional because violated white. Men's second amendment rights but a similar law that banned free blacks from having access to guns was constitutional and so the sense of gun ownership as embodied in in citizenship was there and it was that systematic denial of that That was coursing through the jurisprudence. At the time. When i take it in nineteen sixty seven huey. Newton was the co founder of the black panther party for self defense here. He is speaking after a number of heavily armed. Black panthers entered the california state assembly. The people in this car and the people in the legislature has not been acting like human beings they put trumped up charges of conspiracy and felonies on everyone who went into exercise a constitutional right and said they had no right to bear arms and a public place. The california penal code section twelve twenty to twelve or twenty seven and also second amendment of the constitution guarantees the citizen right to bear arms on public property caroline jackson. What's going on there. Did the black. Panthers have a point about the legality of carrying weapons into the california simply. They had a point they really had a point in. And that is what they were carrying those arms in there for they. The black panther party for self defense had come into being as a response to the massive police brutality raining down on black folks it oakland california and their strategy as you can tell they knew the law their strategy was to open carry weapons and and and to keep their the legal distance away from police to monitor police as they were a resting black folk. They were policing. The police was the strategy. The police did not like that. And they ran to don mulford an assemblyman in the california legislature. And said you've got to help us. And so mulford was drafting legislation with the help of the nra that to to ban open carey and the panthers response was we have a right to open carry and because there was no accountability in the system for the violence raining down the black community from the police. And so you see in this moment. The legislature is more concerned with the panthers than they are with the police violence. I think i mean we're talking to you from canada. And i think there are a lot of canadians who find it difficult to understand how to many americans. How integral gun rights are to the american identity. What don't we understand. I mean you've hinted that this could tracing it all the way back to slavery and before but what don't we understand about the identity that part of american identity that that identity is really rooted in a sense of white fear white fear of black people white fear of the indigenous community of white fear of being under siege and that their guns were their way of providing safety insecurity from that fear from those populations And and that sense of of guns are my security against that threat. That racialized threat is what has short-circuited really short short-circuited our ability to have true gun safety laws in this nation. When you say when you say that this is not a pro gun book or anti-gun book. I mean what is it then it. This is a book about african americans rights as citizens rights as human beings. Black people's humanity if the anti blackness if with black skin as the threat as the default threat in american society it makes black life very precarious. So whether we're armed or whether we're unarmed we are the threat and this is why you see the killings of black folks who are unarmed. The killings of black folks like philander castille who have a legal weapon It just keeps happening in what we keep hearing is. I was afraid. I was threatened. They were dangerous. Does living in an open carry state where you can carry a gun on your hip or a rifle on your back. Does that give any added protection in twenty twenty one to black americans who have illegally owned gun. Do you think no it doesn't it. Infected heightens the fear. You know one of the things that happened. For instance in tulsa sub the in this recent commemoration hundred year commemoration of the tulsa race massacre was. That film was a black militia that wanted to march and there were all was all kinds of fear about these black people having guns openly carrying them in an open carry state. You don't have that kind of fear when you have white men with guns. How do you think the reckoning that has unfolded in the united states around race Sparked in large part by the murder of george floyd by police. How is that going to impact the use of deadly force against black americans by police whether they're carrying illegal legally owned gun or not I'm not seeing any kind of hesitancy On the police to back off from that sense of black as threat of. We're still getting black folks killed. Were still getting black votes. Tasers of who have their hands up as we saw with a child a seventeen year. Old in in ocean city maryland This past weekend. Who had his hands up in the police were surrounding him for for vaping The the there's there's no there's no real sense of accountability and there's no real sense of black humanity That is what we are wrestling with. And we're seeing the backlash as well to the uprisings to the protests about these racialized killings. Were seeing it in terms of legislatures after legislature's passing laws banning critical race theory Banning the sixteen nineteen project in the curriculum banning the the discussion about race and racism in the united states in our histories in our social studies courses. A way to say this never happened. This racism is not a part of american history. Before i let you go to final things one is mean in the wake of the pandemic but perhaps also in the wake of that backlash. You're seeing an increase in people. Buying guns for the first time and black americans in many ways lead that the ownership of guns buy blackmore's for the first time is up by something like fifty eight percent this year. What does that tell you. It's telling me what i what i've seen. Historically in the past that sense that there is no protection for black people in this society and they have to defend themselves. So what is the way out of this. Then is it more guns or is it. Fewer guns didn't coming from. I do i i do. And the way out of this because guns really are the conundrum here more. Gods don't make black people safe. Fewer guns don't make black people safe. What we have to really do is the hard work in the society to dismantle anti blackness That's the hard answer but that is the way we must go. And i know i mean. Historians are lows to predict the future. But knowing what you know having done you know the hard work in putting a book like this together do you think the country is ready. Your country and other countries are ready to do that. Hard work of addressing anti-black racism. No no we looked like we were almost ready But it's it's it's like star wars. The empire strikes back And the said the massive of voter suppression laws that are coursing through the states now. the blockage in the senate on a means to deal with laws targeted at black people to keep them from voting The laws coming through our state legislatures to basically whitewash american history and to criminalise the teaching of racism. Racism in american history of there is such an entrenched resistance to acknowledging how we got here That is going to take a lot more work. There is a real sweep to this book. And it's fascinating to talk to you about it. Carol thank you as always thank you so much carol anderson charles howard candler professor and chair of african american studies at emory university. Her new book is the second race and guns and fatally unequal america for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

Mr castille nra Casteel america peter nygaard nygaard philander casteel Carol anderson florida philander mr castille casteel tamir rice Kyle rittenhouse landau casteel oscarsson black panther party for self d us government charles howard Congress
Food writer Mark Bittman on building a more sustainable food system

The Current

25:24 min | 2 months ago

Food writer Mark Bittman on building a more sustainable food system

"In nineteen ninety five. A college student disappeared on a trip across the usa rabid. Portia missing right away. They went take it so his mother started investigating the case file. I started going through and saw people. That wasn't interviewed. I joined this mother. Search for justice or you recording us i am. Someone knows something season six available now. This is a cbc podcast. The expert economist and philosopher. Max rosen has an interesting way of summing up the state of the world. He says three things are true at the same time. The world is much better. The world is awful and the world can be much better and not. According to food writer. Mark pitman also applies to the food. We eat mark. Pitman's latest book is a history of global agriculture. It puts the system for making an eating food under the microscope and deals with wi- in fact the world can do much better and why. It's urgent that we do that. The book is called animal vegetable junk history of food from sustainable to suicidal. Mcelwain spoke with mark pitman earlier this year. Mark pitman good morning. great to be or matt. Thanks for having me. How did the food we eat go from sustainable to suicidal well. Food was the sustainable. When there were fewer people and we were really living off the land that was when we were foraging when we discovered when our kind discovered agriculture kind of spiral effect occurred whereby agriculture made it possible to feed more people. But we then needed to have more people. In order to meet our food needs and so populations grew and agricultural land grew so that was all sort of okay but then land became unfairly distributed and agriculture became just another way to make money and that after the industrial revolution that was compounded and even further compounded in the twentieth century. And then we're at this place where we are today where probably a third of the world is really suffering nutritionally. A third of the world is really doing just fine and another third is somewhere in the middle and we also have agricultural real environmental and other problems resulting from agriculture that affect everyone regardless of of their food situation. Which is the entire book. Which will unpack of course the conversation but go back to the word suicidal sustainable people understand. How is the food we eat and the food culture that we have right now suicidal. You know the sustainable part is kind of funny too. Because we don't wanna sustain the current situation we want to improve it but it's it's suicidal in that. Agriculture is either the first or second largest contributor to climate change so there is that and then we have this public crisis. Where in the states at least last year and this year covert will have killed around three hundred thousand people and chronic disease resulting. Pretty much from bad diet will have killed something like eight hundred thousand people so the covert thing is going to get better but the chronic diet thing i mean the chronic disease thing is not going to get better unless we do something about it but it's hard to label something a crisis when it's you know they used to call high blood pressure the silent killer and that's kind of how the standard american diet can be looked at. It doesn't kill people dramatically but it makes people sick and they die quietly in hospitals but they die prematurely and that's this is the first generation that's going to live less long on average than its parents did and again a lot of that is due to diet you look at agriculture through very specific lens in this book and i mean you look at it like an extractive. Industry like mining or fossil fuels. Why that approach to agriculture. Well it is an extractive industry. And i think the word industry is really important here. There's a there's a terrific book called every farm of factory that basically describes how have farms became factories and meet all the requirements all the definitions of the of the word factory and one thing factories are known for his is mining and using what we used to call natural resources finite resources and not only does agriculture use fossil fuel a variety of chemicals. And so on. It is using up soil at an on replenishable rate. It's using water at an unreplenished rate and it's also destroying rainforests and much of whatever virgin land remains on this earth. Anything that that can grow. Crops is currently being used for growing crops and then some that's the definition of extractive for taking things out of the earth and and we're not replenishing them when we think of it like that. I mean you say that society chooses what kind of farmers to support and has always chosen. What sort of farmers to support. Who gets left out in in those decisions well farmers for one thing or would be farmers. It's important to recognize that what gets grown in our countries. At least in north america is very much determined by policy and we can only eat what's grown so if it's determined that corn and soybeans wheat rice secondarily book cornyn soybeans primarily are the best crops to grow from a marketing prophet big ag big food perspective. Then that's what we're going to eat and the problem is that the foods made from those crops are not good for us. There's nothing wrong with corn and soy per se but those are the fundamental building blocks of what are now formerly called ultra processed foods. I i rather just call them junk foods and those are the foods that are making us sick and it's also the style of agriculture. That's robbing the land of nutrients and polluting the atmosphere and contributing to climate change. And and so on so the one word answer to who gets left out is eaters. And that's everybody when we take a look at the standardization of the american diet. You look at the role of corporations in helping to standardize what people eight and that goes well beyond the united states. give me an example of how that worked. I mean one company or one corporate interest that changed in many ways the diets of average people in the united states. Mcdonald's is obviously the easiest the easiest target here although you could talk about john deere and other equipment companies you could talk about dow and monsanto and other chemical companies you could talk about the challenger and pioneer and other other seed companies but the fast food thing is the easiest because mcdonalds was a great idea and it grew very quickly but a lot of its growth was aided by. It was the right time for it so shopping. Centers were subsidized by federal governments highways. Which obviously mcdonald's began and continues as a largely drive through. Enterprise highways were subsidized by the federal government. Later on the small business administration helped. Mcdonald's settle in inner cities ostensibly to to bring equal opportunity to african americans. And now it subsidized by not only the subsidies for many of its ingredients by the fact that it's able to hire people that incredibly low wages on a part time basis without benefits. And is that why you believe. I mean again. It's an easy target but when you connect all of those dots that it is the leading symbol of everything. That's gone wrong with food. They are an easy target and they're quite representative. But as i said you could take on any of those companies. I named before you could take on walmart. Which is north america's biggest grosser if the word grocer is is even appropriate. I store that size and also benefits from part time employees who are underpaid but who get effectively free healthcare by going to emergency rooms and being unable to pay for their healthcare get subsidized by food stamps. And those are direct. You know one of the real ironies is that something. Like seven or eight percent of walmart's grocery income is in the form of food stamps. So it benefits to ways it gets to underpay workers and then those workers and people like them who are getting food. Stamps come to walmart to spend that essentially federal money. So what do you mean when you say that the system is broken but it works perfectly for big food. It works perfectly for the people who run it because it's profitable so if you are if you are the people who determine what gets grown if you were the people who determine how it gets grown for the people who sell the seeds elva chemicals do the distribution do the processing sell the food and so on. It's working great. It also works pretty well for. Let's say half of the people who are dependent on it and for many of us we're able to buy healthy food the food we want and it is undeniably incredibly convenient. It's perfectly convenient. But that doesn't reduce the harm that it's doing and it doesn't negate the fact that for the other half of the population good food is very hard to come by and the food that those people are eating is damaging to their health as well as damaging to the general environment. How much choice to people have when it comes to the food that they have. I mean society has changed their households that have two working parents or single parents. People have become accustomed and used to convenience foods. How much choice to people have. When it comes to the choices they make in the food aid. It obviously varies from person to person. But if you're if you're busy and you don't have time to shop and you don't have time to cook and you're going to grab food on the run. You don't have a lot of choice. The i think the single most interesting statistic that that came to light in my research on animal vegetable junk is that sixty percent of the calories available. The available calories in retail food outlets today in north america are ultra processed foods. That's what's available. It's ultra processed food. That is the majority of what's available so it makes it hard to say. Well everybody has choice because the reality is if everybody wanted to eat. A largely unprocessed plant four diet. Starting tomorrow there isn't there. Aren't the calories available in that kind of diet for everyone to do that right now. Our lives are on our phones and with our phones full of livestream exercise classes midday work calls and nightly family video calls. There's no room for fraud calls thankfully. At and t. Makes customer security a priority helping block those pesky calls. It's not complicated. At and t. Active armor twenty four seven proactive network security and fraud call blocking to help stop threats at no extra charge compatible device slash service required visit. At and t. dot com slash act of armor for details around the world. More than eighty women have accused. Peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey up he far exceeds. Bill cosby exceeds. Anything that i think our worlds as seen so far a pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man he would have been in jail decades ago. He is hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts part of the also but what people are sold and you talk about the marketing of food particularly towards kids other examples of changing that marketing or defending the marketing towards kids. That have actually worked. Well there are there many but three that i'll single out. In the states there was a partial ban on advertising junk food to kids advertising junk food on television during cartoon hours child children's programming hours. That was kind of kneecapped by the reagan administration. Things are moving in the right direction until the reagan administration the to particularly interesting. Things are happening right now. One is that chile has the strictest and most strident food labelling laws and anti junk food marketing laws in the world. Right now and we're waiting frankly to see what the results of those are. But i think they'll be encouraging the second. Is that the uk just pass. A noah an advertising ban on junk food online and before nine o'clock at night on on television. It hasn't been put into effect but it has been passed so there's reason to think it will be put into effect now given you know the uk's kind of special relationship with both of our countries. I think that that's a really good sign. I think that will be keeping an eye on that. And hopefully we'll learn something and this is. This is in the boris johnson government. So it's it's an interesting development. What about in the in the production of food. I mean you talk about agroecology. What is that well. agroecology is a mash up. Word of that says. Let's do agriculture in in tune with ecological principles and ecological doesn't just mean environmentally sound. That means an understanding that humans are one family and that humans are very closely related other all other living species especially animals and agroecology is academically described as a kind of five step plan to move from an industrial agricultural system to a system of regional control of fairness of food sovereignty. If you will in between there are steps of reducing and then getting rid of chemical fertilizers and chemical pesticides treating labor's more fairly generating less carbon promoting bio diversity and and polly cropping protecting the soil. And so on. What did they do in brazil and belo horizonte but what they did was they. They organized around a very strong workers movement. That was that was demanding. Fair food for everybody affordable nutritious food for everybody and that that did happen in bella horizonte. Which is i think the sixth largest city in brazil but grew to a national movement to the point where nationally there was land reform that gave more land to peasants warmer peasants than than had been given away in the entire history of brazil. Up until that point that that supported restaurants that were feeding people on a sliding scale hundreds of thousands of people a day. That subsidized organic agriculture. That was then being sold locally at farm stands and provided locally food systems and more and then it was reversed by the boston. our government. right and it'll it'll probably be reinstituted if lulu becomes president again. i just wonder when that gets reversed. I mean how what it tells you. How fickle something like this is because people might say that you can have those ideas but you need to. There's big business. There's a lot of money in this that you have to reform something even larger than food like you have to reform capitalism to try and change a system. Well this is. This is why food is an interesting lens with which to look at society because as we discussed many aspects of this in the last fifteen twenty minutes there there are. There's almost nothing you can talk about. That isn't food related. So if you want to address climate change you have to address the food system. If you want to address labor issues you have to address the food system. If you want to address racism you have to address at least land reform and the food system want to address public health. That's food system issue. It's not that only food is contributing to these things. Food contributes to all of them and as important in all of them but at the end of the day yes. The system needs reform. Science fiction writer named kim stanley robinson. Says something like we all know that on the thousand years we're not going to be living under capitalism. So why don't we start dismantling tomorrow. That's an interesting approach but again it implies or it says we don't know exactly what the future holds. We just know that things need to be better than they are right now and we need to move in the direction of making them better. How is your own thinking on. This changed over the years. Well i've been doing. I go back a bit and and you know that. I started writing recipes. And i wrote for an i still do and i wrote for many many years about the joys of food. The wonders of cooking travel restaurants fabulous ingredients and so on. But after doing that. And i'm a slow learner after doing that. For twenty years or so it. It just became clear to me that there was more to it. There's a backstory and the backstory is. Where does all this fabulous food. Come from and when you look at the the other ends of this where it comes from and what it does as opposed to what fun. It is to eat it. You see much bigger much bigger story and that was sort. Sorta gradual realization for me that started twenty years ago or so maybe a little longer but five or six or seven years into that process the links between overproduction and over consumption of meat contribution agriculture's contribution to climate change and the food systems contribution to public health. All became pretty clear to me. And i started writing about that and as happens when you start writing about something you learn more about it and if it's a good subject you stay with it and that's what i've done. Does that. change your your enjoyment because you love food and you and you still are creating recipes. you're still publishing things on your website and the blog That that will inspire people does thinking about all of the dots. Change your enjoyment of what you're eating. I mean i've always had some guilt about being a relatively privileged person. But you know there's a human condition and a social condition and you can't exactly give up on trying to enjoy your life because you might feel bad about some of the things that that make it enjoyable or you might feel about bad about the way other. People are forced to live their lives. There's a there's a balancing act. And i'm neurotic so it's a hard question. It's a whole other show to discuss my feelings about these things but the short answer is i do love to cook and i do love to eat. And that hasn't changed much. He live on a farm. I do my partner runs a nonprofit. That's on a farm and does organizes regional agriculture in the hudson valley. So i'm really lucky. In that regard. I get to live on a farm. I learn a lot from that. I get great ingredients. That are grown within one hundred yards of where i live and i don't have to do much work for that. So it's it's really great super position. What have you learned in that again knowing what you know. Well i've learned a lot about animals. Not that i not that. I can raise them but i sort of understand more about their patterns and what it takes to raise them in a in a loving and kind and and beneficial way. So there's that you know. I picked the brains of the vegetable farmers all the time but really. I'm still a terrible gardener. So i guess i haven't learned all that much. I don't know i've learned that. Agriculture is really hard work. I guess i knew that. But now i see it on a daily basis. Here's the thing let's do i have. I have a minute. Yeah let's assume that let's assume that agriculture is difficult and that we have to subsidize it. We being the federal our tax dollars. We have to subsidize it because it's just too hard for us to feed hundreds of millions of people or for hundreds of millions of people to be fed without some kind of government intervention right now. We have government intervention on the side of two things primarily making money that is the government intervention enables big food to make money and producing commodity crops without particularly caring about their impact if we had as the goals of government intervention sustaining the land treating the land with respect and producing affordable nutritious food for everybody and chose to subsidize those things. I know the word. Subsidy is a bad word now but but this is. This is the right way to look at things. I think if we chose to subsidize a form of agriculture that protected the land and put eaters needs. I we could make that happen as your sense that we have enough time to do that. I mean there's real urgency to this book and it feels like you. You were talking about how you've changed but it feels like much of what you've done is built to this book. Much of what. I've done has built this book but you know every remember saying this to my kids when they were when they were young every generation believes they are witnessing the end of the world. That doesn't mean that we're wrong in believing that we're in this thing the end of the world but everybody's so far has been wrong. There have been terrible things and the twentieth century so more mass death incidents than any other century before that are we going to see hundreds of millions of people die as a as a result of climate change as a result of of ineffective antibiotics which is part of the part of the upshot of industrial agriculture. As a result of any number of things. It's possible it's nothing is guaranteed. I think there's a sense of urgency. I don't. I'm not in the camp. That feels panicked. What's one thing. Aside from reading the book that individuals can do like tomorrow to try to create that better system that even talking about you know. I have to say two things because one is that many people can change their diets. And that's an important. That's an important step. Not only for their own health but but for that of others but but the second is to to get involved and that primarily means on a local level to look at how your city or your municipality or your town whatever is procuring food to look at how. Your children are being fed in school what they're being taught in school. I mean if i had to stop there. I could those but but it is that we need. It's it's not just taking care of yourself. It's getting involved in the community and politics socially because collectively collective action is the really the only way to fix this mark pitman. It's great to talk to you as always thank you very much as always for me too. Thanks matt matt. Galloway spoke with mark. Pitman in may and in that conversation mark pitman mentioned the death toll from cova nineteen in the united states was just over. Three hundred thousand. It now stands at over six hundred thousand for more. Cbc podcasts to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

Mark pitman mark pitman Max rosen Mcelwain walmart north america united states Mcdonald Portia Pitman reagan administration Peter nygaard nygaard cbc brazil small business administration john deere monsanto mcdonalds
Have the Liberals met the climate change moment?

Front Burner

26:07 min | 3 months ago

Have the Liberals met the climate change moment?

"Around the world. More than eighty women accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey epstein he far exceeds bill cosby. He exceeds anything that i think. Our worlds as seen so far pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were a poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. Hi i'm david wessel when i looked at my window toronto this afternoon. The sky was incredibly hazy. And when i went outside it just sort of felt like the air was sitting. Army really really happy. The hazel at forest fire smoke from northwestern ontario and as far away as british columbia. It was a visceral reminder. The climate change is not some far off problem. It's here and it feels like we've been getting a lot of those reminders. Lately for six years catherine mckenna was a key player in the liberals response to climate change as environment minister she helped implement a national carbon tax. She then moved on to become minister of infrastructure and recently announced her retirement from politics. We'll canada has just committed to reduce its carbon emissions by forty to forty five percent below. Two thousand five levels by twenty. Thirty many environmentalists. Say that the federal government is not acting quickly or substantially enough on this issue and is too beholden to the oil and gas industry today. My conversation with catherine mckenna about whether her ministry and the trudeau government met this crucial moment in the fight against climate. Change mr mckenna. Thank you very much for making the time inscribed to join so. I wonder if we could start today with With some of the latest news so in canada we saw a record breaking heat wave at west recently that the researchers say would not have impossible without human caused climate change and a town the burned to the ground ongoing wildfires happening earlier than expected outside of canada of course more heat waves but also the amazon now has started to admit more co two than it absorbs. We're seeing quote once in a century type floods in europe. And you know i recently. I recently had had a child. He's about fourteen months now. And i have to say i struggled. I struggled a bit right with the idea of bringing a life into the world knowing what the science is saying here. And i know that you have Children as well. And i wonder how. How do you take in all of this news as a parent Well it's hard. Sometimes i think we have a disconnect. We don't really understand that. The science is the science and we just need ambitious climate action. And i am you know is is much for the future for our kids We often talk about timelines. We talked about twenty thirty targets for twenty fifty. Like i'm hoping i'm still around twenty fifty but my kids will be having kids potentially than end. Were really right now. We're at a point where we need to get our act together We in canada. We have an ambitious climate plan. There's still more work to do. We need the whole world to be putting a price on pollution getting off call making investments in reducing emissions and infrastructure. Whole range of things But we don't have time and I i really do think about this. Both as a mom Where i just look at my kids. And i think you know what future do i want for them but also in my role in my role is yasser politician. But it's also someone who's developed an expertise on climate action. And so i think you know. How can i be most useful like there was some very practical things we need to do. The whole planet nets needs to get off coal like now when as far as fast as possible. Twenty thirty for for developed countries are twenty forty for china at twenty fifty for the rest of the world so these are kind of moonshot spider practical things we actually have to do. And so i look at. How could i make a difference Of course in canada but also pollution doesn't know any borders so we really need to be driving the ambition internationally to okay so so i think today then i'd like to spend some time talking about the legacy of your government when it comes to fighting climate considering where we are right now. And so. According to the most up-to-date data available between nine hundred ninety and two thousand nineteen under the conservatives and now under under your liberal government. We have seen canada's greenhouse gas emissions. Go up twenty one percent while they've gone down for other g seven countries like germany the uk. And so you know. I i understand your point that we need to get moving now but why hasn't canada been able to do the same up until now while so i mean we've taken a whole range of measures. So there was a decade of complete inaction where we're going in the absolute wrong direction and so we brought in price on pollution. We're phasing out. Coal by twenty thirty which is an advance of many other countries including germany including the us at were eighty three eighty percent. Clean electricity We are We have a clean fuel standard. We have a whole range of regulatory measures and then on top of that. We're making historic investments in infrastructure. But it takes time. You can look at our projections because what we do. We have to continuously put out our projections in a transparent way. And you will see that we are driving down it just when you're phasing out coal by twenty thirty. It's not happening tomorrow when you make an investment in a major public transit project doesn't happen tomorrow so if only these investments have been made or this action had been taken under the under a previous government and i'm not trying to point fingers because i would say You know different. Governments have not driven climate action. I it's a challenging candidate because we're federation so you know. Unfortunately you saw the fight on the price on pollution. The provinces were dead set against now. Luckily we wanted the supreme court by that makes it trickier. because albertans scotch wants. Emissions are going up extremely significantly and per capita. They're much higher than in other places on. But you've seen in good news ambitious action and the provincial level by bbc by quebec ontario when they phased out coal under other mcginty government. That was the largest reduction of emissions in canada's history. But you know it does take time all take time to put into effect oil and gas along with transportation or two of the biggest sources of emissions in this country and according to the international institute for sustainable development candidates spent about two billion bucks on fuel subsidies last year alone including supporting newfoundland's offshore oil industry for example and the institute says that agencies like expert development canada provide on average thirteen billion dollars a year on domestic and international fossil fuel production and exploration. And so why does this. Government spend so much money on oil and gas when we know how much it contributes to the country's greenhouse gas emissions. Well the number one it is a transition. I mean we still are. We are not Completely electrified and have solutions across the board. But i do think there's a I do think that we need to really think hard about the transition to cleaner future. One the economy's going in that direction. So it's a huge vulnerability to our economy to be overly reliant on fossil fuels that we have to get off the world is moving to get off of but also we have a moral obligation so look. I think that that is something that there's work to be done on. But you look. I mean we are once again a federation and so we have one province while a couple robinson scotch on and alberda. His emissions are going up You continue to push against good climate policy. There's now You know looks like an inquiry into a folks that are pushing for climate action in alberta a billion dollars with spanta pipeline That it was quite clear that if president biden was elected it wasn't going to go ahead and that money could have been used for any other investments. So i think we need to take a rational approach. And the way i look at it and put it outside feeling aspect or if you're a business it's in transition and you don't have a plan for a very different future. You will go out of business. And that's when we talk about stranded assets like this is just about proper planning. But it's planning for jobs and workers like how are we helping workers in jobs. If we're making bats that are just not gonna come to fruition. So i think there is certainly work and conversations that need to be had and we need to focus on. How do we support all canadians. Because i certainly believe if you're working in the energy in the oil and gas sector you deserve a good job that your community deserves to have opportunities but we need to look at where the future's going i mean i know it's overused but it's where the puck's going. Yeah and so. We should be focused on that. I i wanna come back to that gesture transition for workers and governments plan for it. You know i've heard you talk about other provinces qu- quite a bit so far. How much responsibility do you think the federal government has here though. Oh we have huge responsibility. I mean the reality is though. There are areas of federal and provincial jurisdiction. That's why we ended up at the supreme court with the price of pollution but look on the transition piece which i don't even actually really like the language. I don't think that that's great language to be using but if you just say support for workers and communities so they have good jobs and can succeed. We've done a fair bit in the context of coal so we created. I think the world's first just transition taskforce and you had hassan yussef so a labor leader with a with a panel. They went to communities where we were literally telling. People aren't gonna have a job where phasing out coal and they would go to town halls. And there'd be like six hundred people there and they would be angry or upset or worried which are completely reasonable reactions and they had conversations and i think what what the reflections on that was that that actually have to listen to people and and people actually valued that they couldn't believe that the federal government that panel would actually come to their community and hear about what they're concerned about and how could support them. Because i actually think most people understand that the climate is changing and most people want to take serious action. You just to stay on this topic for a moment of the oil and gas. Subsidies like a lot of this money is coming from the federal government and and the international monetary fund estimates that elimination of of fossil fuel subsidies would reduce co two emissions by twenty eight percent. And i do. I do wonder here if part of the problem is that this government as as critics have said is too cozy with the oil industry. So for example martin lukacs from the breach recently reported that during the pandemic committee was created that included high ranking liberal government officials and heavy hitters in the oil and gas industry and there were frequent meetings to figure out ways for the industry to say active and viable this. This is a lot of money here that these companies have been receiving. So i think first of all because i think we talk in the abstract like. What are we talking about as possible possible subsidies. I think this is a really important conversation that canadians need to have. But there's a fossil fuel subsidies range from the communities on on diesel and it's really expensive because You know the the cost of living is expensive. There said they get subsidies so that that life is affordable that can be rural remote communities. Cleantech that if you could produce your whether it's oil and gas or manufacturing in a cleaner way that we're making investments to do that. I think that is a good conversation around whether we should be supporting You know the these companies to reduce the remission significantly. I think that's a good conversation But it's not i in some ways often. What is count as a fossil subsidy. I know some organizations count. If you don't have a provincial sales tax. Like i'm not entirely sure. I think you've gotta get into the weeds of us. I don't disagree with the sense that you've got to create the right incentives and not the wrong. What's do you really think. Though that the of this money is going to initiatives that would either be considered necessary by tax payers. Important by tax payers or initiatives that that would fight climate change. What it imperial oil gasol. Yeah if i could just give you example about imperial oil claimed one hundred twenty million dollars through the weights sub subsidy program this year and issued three hundred twenty million in dividends. According to that's unacceptable. So this is catherine mckenna speaking. Look we had programs through kovic. So we're now bringing those into a fossil fuel subsidy discussion. I mean those were programs that were open to any company So i in a way. I guess you could say those are fossils subsidies because they're going to these companies But it was really so we can keep people in jobs now. We should particular company have received them. I mean i think we will see And i think that you know when people are paying large dividends and they're getting money I don't know that is an issue. And i think that that's something that You know canadians would not have a lot of tolerance or personally. I have a lot of tolerance for what would you like to see these subsidies big time curtailed or eliminated altogether. We'll as i say like you. Can't you actually have to go line by line and see what exactly we're talking about. The federal are obviously federal subsidies. Som- are probably things that canadians would say are useful some would say no And then there are a lot of provincial. Subsidies different provinces have incentives in place. I would say that it is extremely to look at the incentives how we're reducing emissions. How were driving to cleaner future on because you could say. I don't want to be repetitive. But i do think this is a conversation canadians. Need to think about if you have for example you know. A smaller willing gas company take it in alberta and they have a way to upgrade so they can significantly reduce emissions when they produce oil and gas is that something we wanna do. It would reduce emissions by then. Some people would say well. That's not a sector. We should be investing in at all. And as i say like these are real conversations. Climate policy is like real life. It actually you have to not have it in the abstract. Think folks off inhabited abstract. They don't think about people they also don't think about science climate. I mean that probably were politicians. But it's on us to really unpack this. I guess this has won't one more time Just as you as you know former environment minister current infrastructure minister as somebody. Who's sort of leaving politics. Do you feel like your government could have done more here on the issue of subsidies We'll off we definitely as i said. I think we've had a review. I think that we've removed a number of subsidies. Is there more to do. I think so for sure But to smart. Broadly unclear at lake. We have worked extremely hard. Like i knew life isn't about how hard you worked by looking across the board. Climate is actually it is. It's just like a very functional thing. Where are your emissions coming from. How do you reduce them In the most again ideally efficient. Way how do you consider folks livelihood and jobs and you know our economy. You gotta you gotta look at a lot of different boxes. That's not an excuse I think we've actually done a lot. We had clan and a target. Now we have a plan that's going to exceed the target but of course we need to do more and the world is shifting fast. So i think there's huge opportunities and huge risk of being locked behind. I if we don't around the world more than eighty women have accused peter nygaard of crimes ranging from rape to sex trafficking. If far exceeds jeffrey epstein he far exceeds bill cosby seeds. Anything that i think our world as seen so far pattern of predatory behavior spanning half a century nygaard denies it all but now he faces criminal. Charges were poor man. He would have been jailed decades ago. He is hid in plain sight. Evil by design available now on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. I wanna come back to. This idea of adjusts transition. I that you were talking about earlier. You know for these oil and gas workers Who who are understandably like worried about what their future might hold and just also speaking of your climate plan I i have read it and there. There are not a lot of details about what that just transition would actually look like. What would you say to critics uniform. For example that represents twelve thousand oil and gas workers who who feel like this government hasn't done enough to ensure that there will be a just transition for people you know the countries that are serious about having a transition plan for workers are trying to figure out how to do it because it's not that easy right you can't just say okay. We're going to take one job in the oil and gas actor and suddenly you're going to be making the same amount of money in a unionized position in the green economy. Life doesn't actually work like that. So i think there's a lot more work that needs to be done to understand how best to do it. This is something. I grapple with the lot. Kansas be told you knock job right like that. You're kind of collateral damage. And then you know what happens. You know what they say. They say people in cities who can go you know and and go the starbucks lattice are like they don't care about us and that's not a good situation it really isn't because these are real people with real jobs and let's all be clear. We all benefit from coal. We all benefit from oil and gas. In fact we're still winning but that that doesn't mean we don't have to move forward and doesn't mean but it also doesn't mean that you can have empathy. I think empathy and climate is extremely important empathy for young people who are honestly that they have dep- depression related to climate change empathy for indigenous peoples. Who are worried about their lands about their traditional medicines. The thawing permafrost. An empathy for workers who are in the oil and gas sector. But i guess just all ask one more time. What what would you say to critics. Say like Government would have seen this coming along time ago and should have done way more earlier here to make sure that they're like very real plans in in in place. And i guess sort of on top of that i would say you know. During this pandemic a lot of people who care about climate issues looked at the resources at government marshaled and they are questioning today. Why hasn't more been done like that with the climate emergency like talking green new deal type stuff here. Like massive massive massive investments in energy efficient housing guaranteed jobs to anyone. Good jobs union jobs to anyone who wants one in these sectors like. Why aren't we applying what we did in the pandemic to the climate crisis. So i think that that's what we need to do. But i think look. I think the pandemic though is a useful guide because what happened and i talked about this what happened in the pandemic. We had a very clear goal. We needed to get out of it. We need to support people and we need to get a vaccine marshaled. The resources from the public sector the private sector and look we were able to. I think you know we're not at the end of this. We're able to get out of the pandemic. i totally agree. I think we need to think like that when it comes to the climate crisis because that is the biggest challenge that we all canada every single country needs to wake up every day. Have the clear goal which is to go. Well believed below two degrees striving for one point five really listening to science and scientists. I mean now you can just look at window. Because i'm looking here at hayes downtown toronto from forest fires and crew. I'm also hear it's brutal and it's actually an air quality issues. It's actually a health issue right now but but also just everyone working together and i think that that is something that in canada. It is a challenge with the provinces. It is very important. That provinces come on side provinces municipalities of federal government. the business sector business sector has to take responsibility now. A lot of companies are talking about net zero by twenty fifty okay. Let's your plan right. Like i've had to plan and we actually have to publish hit all. We have to publish emissions every year and how we're tracking on her plan so that everyone needs to be part of this canadians needs to be part of it and the whole world needs to be part of it and so you know people say well. You're leaving politics like we need every country actually to do at canada's doing you know i think now probably i can be more useful Actually working with other countries for example the whole world off call because we don't get off coal doesn't matter all these other measures were doing. Everyone needs to get off coal. But i wonder just as as a final question on on that know that you are leaving politics but planned to say dedicated to the fight against climate change. Do you worry that. You're giving the impression that more substantive work can be done from outside government than within it. And i guess frankly de feel that more substantive work can be done from outside government than within it so that was really surprising question. When people said that because canada's one country like we have climate plan after a decade of nothing going the wrong way. We have climate plan. We have met regulatory measures. We have to grind away. We have to continue moving forward on. There's more work to be done for sure. But the rest of the world hostage to this like if china doesn't get off coal and make the transition india indonesia where i live for three years if we all don't work together it doesn't work like that blue doesn't know any border so my focus. I believe in the future. I will always be pushing candidate. I will be calling people out. Don't worry if. I don't think we're taking ambitious action or were backtracking on and i will continue to work with indigenous peoples in canada. It's extremely important to me. But i think the whole world needs to act. And i believe through my you know the opportunities i've been given internationally through cop twenty one but also created the minister on climate action with china in the uk. The powering pascall alliance. We also worked very hard to add to get countries to do follow. Candidates protect thirty percent of our nature. Like i need to. I think clairol pushing that internationally. So every other country does list and also support developing countries who need investments and need support to actually make the transition. I mean some who will be underwater. If we don't say well below two degrees. I'm so look there's a lot of work to go round It's not just in politics by politics is extremely important but globally. We need a lot more work to okay. catherine mckenna. Thank you very much. They scrape all right so before we go today. Some news as of late. Tuesday british columbia has declared a state of emergency as fires. There continue to grow. The declaration will allow the to speed up mass evacuations and to secure accommodation for people. If needed as of yesterday. There were more than two thousand eight hundred properties under evacuation order province wide and more than ten thousand properties under alerts. More than three thousand square. Kilometers of land have been burned by nbc. So far this season three times the ten year average for this time of year. I'm jamie porcelain. Thanks so much for listening to front burner and we'll talk to you tomorrow for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

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