38 Burst results for "north america"

Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:46 sec | 27 min ago

Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

"Coma propelled money update Now, If your house hunting you need to move quickly, recent data showed that 42% of homeless teens nationwide. Gone off market in two weeks or less, Redfin said. 71% of homes listed in the Seattle area, We're off the market and 14 days or fewer while in both Omaha, Nebraska, and Lexington, Kentucky, 67% of listed homes were gone within two weeks. Other markets where homes sold particularly quickly included Indianapolis, Portland, Oklahoma City and Sacramento. A lot of couples apparently decided during the pandemic, that marriage might be the way to go. Citing data for the holiday season. Jewelry retailer Signature, said preliminary same store sales for the bridal category in North America grew by double digits. Same story at K and Sales driving the gains engagement rings. That's your money. Now. How about that? We have money news on coma with 20 and 50 passed every hour and on the way Garth Brooks with friends in high places, we'll talk more about that next. You've.

Coma Garth Brooks Redfin North America Omaha Seattle Lexington Indianapolis Nebraska Oklahoma City Kentucky Sacramento Portland
Innovative Designs for Cold Weather Tiny Living in Canada with Daniel Ott

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

06:24 min | 4 d ago

Innovative Designs for Cold Weather Tiny Living in Canada with Daniel Ott

"Dan. Ought welcome to the show. You i've actually. I was just curious. What is the upside down method. Oh the upside down methods so that is our what we call our signature method. And that's how we help. Our clients prepare their mindsets to be able to not only survived but thrived living tiny and then go through the design process and the mental preparation of education before actually building building is only a small part of our method because we believe the mental preparedness and the impact on yourself in the world around you on both ends of the build are far more important method methodist five steps and we minimize or simplify. We educate we design build and then impact and so impact is like a move in well. It's it's more than that. It's it's it's impact to yourself. And i like to say well it impacts your finances because you can live so much more cost effectively but you also impact. Just you're all the whole tally. The world out there today is to live so quick and so everything on top who itself over and right in rapid succession but we live in a tiny home. One great example is it only takes you an hour to do a really deep clean so you end up with all his extra time on your hand you this extra money on your hand that impacts your lifestyle yourself because you can spend that it also helps you to impact the world around you. So we say don't want impact the world around you. You're just going to by default because they're using less materials and less energy to run your house but it also gives you the opportunity with this extra time money to impact your local community by you know helping out with the local food bank or volunteering at the library or something that impact. You're up nice what What's so difficult about the ontario building codes For for china home specifically but also in general in general everything. So i have. I also have design company and i've been designing regular houses for years and even there. We run into problems where because everything with the internet has gone so global when we do our designs we get people to save stuff on print pinterest and other such things like that and we look through what their designs are and we would see spiral. Staircases and cable railings. I mean those are two things that have been huge throughout the rest of the world. Those are two things illegal and antero. You can't have horizontal members in a railing because you might climate and fall over. You can't have spiral staircases through more than ninety degrees and the rules. Just keep coming at you and it seems seems ridiculous but when we get into tiny home specifically some of the things that really impact us are are. That was the only place. North america has minimum room sizes and sealing so a ceiling height for livable space. Must be a minimum of six eleven. So difficult under the loft very well. Yeah or it means doable. But your loft becomes very small however your loft must also have six eleven so now to be classified as living space or bedroom. That's living space. You need to have sex with eleven so now we can't live in our loss so there's always i in my career. I've gone through finding ways around the rules to to use them to work within them. But kind of like on the very edges. So i like to say we can design a storage sloth. And if you happen to store a mattress and a spare body up there at your time that's And then simply other. Things are the minimum room sizes. So you mentioned you found just by talk by seeing a video on the nest and that is interior smallest legal house and it's two hundred and thirty square feet. I cannot build a house smaller than that. Be legal. maybe to twenty. I can get away with because the bathroom doesn't have size only has a ceiling but the main living has to be. It's actually in meters because that's out canada's but it's thirteen point five square meters which gives me an outside wall dimension of ten by twenty and that it has to be the combination space of cooking eating living and sleeping and then i have a bathroom on side of it and so that's how we get the two hundred twenty or two hundred and thirty square feet so i like to say to people. Oh there's one more thing it's illegal living on -tario in anything that has wheel. So i like to say to people everything you've seen on the internet about tiny homes would never pass the code on -tario but we can still design houses within the code in it's more of There's a lot of lobbyists out there. Who say hey. I'm all for tiny homes. We have to change the rules. And do you know how long it takes to get the government to change rules decade decades. It's ridiculous so i i'd rather say hey. We have the rules. I'm an expert on figuring out how to work with in them the most of our ability and then you know like i said connor dwelling on the outer edges of those rules. And then what you have to do though is bend your mind of that idea a little bit in your mind of what you think. A tiny is and we can make it work right so down like building people what they might have in their head as the picture of a tiny home. Which is you know a little house on. A trailer must not be legal in ontario. I'm sure that doesn't stop people from doing it though. No we bill goes to

Antero DAN Ontario China North America Canada Connor
Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:35 min | 53 min ago

Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"Calm the Bloomberg business APP and and Bloomberg Quick Take. This is a Bloomberg business Flash. We have rallies underway in Tokyo, Sydney and soul. Yesterday. It was kind of a mixed session. We had the China data that helped to drive the Hong Kong market and many of the mainland markets higher Rest of a pack region was a little on the back foot. But that's definitely a different situation in today's session right now in Tokyo, the Nikkei of about 1.4% In the Hong Kong looks like the futures for the hang sang showing a gain of about 8/10 of 1%. Right now, the market cash market will open at the bottom of the hour in Seoul. The cost be better by 1.2% in Sydney ASX 200 ahead by about 1.2%. So if you go inside the market right now, Using the W E I function on the Bloomberg Terminal to Tokyo. We're seeing a recovery in information tech. This group was weak yesterday, many firms that specialize in providing Semiconductors and various hardware to while away were on the defensive yesterday. That was after the Reuters reports, saying the U. S. Is planning to revoke the company's licenses. To be able to work with while wait. You look at the many futures contracts now for the American market, the Dow, the S and P and the NASDAQ 100 each contract hire anywhere from between the 4/10 of 1% to 1 half Of 1% and the U. S. 10 Year Treasury trading for the first time since Friday. The yield of 1.10% that is market action. Let's get to Global news next and then Baxter from the Bloomberg 9 16 Museum in San Francisco. Eddie all right, Douglas Hong Kong has reported 107 new Scolded 19 cases most since December 19th you setting a target of vaccinating 70% of the blocks population by this summer. France, meanwhile, says it will meet its one million vaccination target for January. The UK is set to step up its mass vaccination program this week is shutting its borders to anyone who hasn't tested negative, says it aims to start easing lockdowns by early March, Singapore plans to vaccinate over 10,000 maritime workers by the end of the month. U S Defense secretary says there is no indication of any internal threats with the national Guard that are at the Capitol to protect the Biden Harris inauguration. The White House says no papers have been drawn for Donald Trump to pardon himself. Trump's appointed director of the Census Bureau, has resigned Midst accusation he manipulated data on undocumented citizens and China says it's already decided to sanction some U. S officials over involvement in issues with Taiwan in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter, Jules. Thank you so much. And let's get to George Boars, head of research at K two Asset Management on the line from Melbourne. Just wanna pick up what it was talking about there with China, saying it's already decided to sanction some U. S officials over their involvement in Taiwan issues and this coming as we're about to see the handover from the trump to the body in the administration, I guess talk us through the risks that we have here still on the geo political front as we expect this new presidency to get underway. Yeah, So that's why managers we expect attention to continue their well underway under a pardon administration wants assuming as endlessly conditioning else out there, there's going to be more accommodative attention if that makes any sense. That means North America reached out to see your pain to UK, Japan. Remember that loosely based squad you know, India, Japan, US an Australian navy, So they seem to be probably living more coordinated, but the tensions Here for the medium to long term and that's just a condition of economic power base and you have mainland China. Hong Kong is one economic center to buy future earnings in the decade ahead. This is Japan and South Asia. If that makes any sense, so we're anticipating ongoing tensions, a recalibration of those tensions that so much you know the real. That's his fighting, but turned evidence that Present and they're just going to have a recalibration. That's ongoing because of what's at stake that again. We have portal exposures to mainland China and sent My medics and I said Shindo international, which always seem like knocking and Puma, and we had the composure to knock in North America, so we don't see that still is logical for us because the domestic demand of my man China needs to improve in the decade ahead. The domestic demand office in North America. So we we do think it's logical to have those earnings growing, even though they creating those tensions within it, and within tried and the other things that come with ongoing tensions to continue. But the bullish Cole's that you're talking there about some of these major Chinese players is kind of, I guess something that we're seeing broadly. In fact, I think when we look at buy recommendations on the seaside 300 on the Bloomberg something like 86%, now of the 5600 stocks in that index, where you I guess avoiding in in some of these emerging markets you were talking before about What we could see in terms of potential dollar impact, too. Yes. So where would like a top up is emerging markets that will benefit from a sustained US dollar weakness, which is yet to be proven, But that's the base case. So obviously South Asia increasing exposure so, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, See they're the sort of place you'd like to think about. And then I would say, develop market. I just obviously Japan. So we say that differentiation and we still think it's logical. So your age, your son can have that mainland China Hong Kong exposure could be from financial services in the PBOC and the authority to doing the right stimulus program thing. Capital market reform. But then as I hedge obviously Japan but separately again to reiterate it's you know, career You know Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam by sort of plays that are still logical thinking hedging within that agent portfolio. We're talking, of course about the economy. Trying to get back on track. You're talking here about regional travel hubs is something that is going to be part of that broad, broader opening story. That's certainly what's going to help propel a number of these economies here in Asia. What people missing here? Yeah, they're not missing too much. Just think of calendar 21 as the domestic demand internal travel help around the world and just think of calendar 22 as more regional center travel bubbles..

Bloomberg China Japan Tokyo Hong Kong North America South Asia San Francisco Taiwan Ed Baxter United States Donald Trump UK China Hong Kong Douglas Hong Kong Seoul Indonesia Reuters Asia
Can we build 15-minute cities where we live?

The Big Story

03:34 min | 4 d ago

Can we build 15-minute cities where we live?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Alex zekovic is a staff columnist and the architecture critic at the global mail. Hello alex hey jordan. Why don't we start. I was gonna say with a simple definition. But but maybe it's not that simple. But what is the fifteen minutes city. Where does the concept come from. And what does it describe. So the idea is actually an old idea It goes back at least fifty years in the world of city planning and really it hearkens back to previous models of cities built before the car and the basic idea. Is that everything you need for. Daily living is within walking distance of your home so the idea is not a new one. The rhetoric or the phrase of fifteen minutes city was popularized by the mayor of paris. Over the last few years. I need. I'll go Because she is interested in pursuing the fifteen minutes city returning peres into as much as possible. A fifteen minute city so. This is kind of a familiar idea. That has fresh relevance today. How do you define it for analysis purposes. When you're looking to see whether a certain city or neighborhood would qualify so there are a bunch of different definitions of the term and the one that paris uses actually includes workplaces or generally tries to include workplaces with other things. If you include workplaces this becomes a little bit trickier because trying to find to link up. Everyone's home and everyone's workplace in a large city is very complex. The more familiar and lord sort of less controversial definition is that you have the necessities of daily living within walking distance of home for the article. I did for the global mail with some colleagues a little while ago. We used a measurement called amenity density developed by statistics canada and see 'em each see and that defines it as having a grocery store a pharmacy and a public transit stop within one kilometer and having a daycare a primary school and a library within one and a half kilometers. And then there's a larger circle for health facility and larger circle for places of employment. So you know the least the most straightforward way is to say you know. Pick up a prescription go shopping. Be able to catch a bus or train. You should be able to do all of this things within roughly a ten minute walk of where you are. Why is that set up so desirable. I'm sorry if that sounds like an obvious question but just you know what does it impact. Well yeah i mean it is. It sounds really straightforward. Because when we think of our cultural ideas of what a city is or how people should live. I mean you. Think of sesame street It seems easy but the fact is that most people in north america don't have that at all. I mean the large majority of people in canada as is also true in the united states live in what planners will call car oriented suburbs or car-oriented places. If you have that then you know you. Effectively are limited to being able to survive comfortably to having a car. If you don't have a car to available to do those basic things you know your life becomes much more complex you effectively become a second class citizen and this is obviously -cations for youth and teenagers. It has obvious implications for anyone with disabilities And and there's a strong overlap of course between people with disabilities and seniors but You know this is a very large in growing issue for many canadians. Many north americans. Who are egypt in places where they need to have cars and may not always be able to

Jordan Heath Rawlings Alex Zekovic Alex Hey Jordan Paris Canada North America United States Egypt
Fresh update on "north america" discussed on News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:42 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "north america" discussed on News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

"Michigan National Guard troops and state police coming face to face with more than 100 protesters. And counter protesters, some carrying weapons 21 states have now called up the Gardas well is here in D. C, where they're rehearsing for all possibilities, including armed groups that might plant bomb ABC is Martha Raddatz. Meanwhile, a scare this morning at capital No. This'll was he overhead warning playing at the Capitol, telling everyone to take shelter and to stay away from Windows President elect Biden's inaugural escort was on site for an inauguration rehearsal, and they were moved under the Senate carriage entrance. He turned out it was a fire at a homeless encampment under an overpass, and there were some popping or explosion noises. There was no threat to the capital like stone. ABC NEWS Washington Come on news time to 20 time Worker fell. Insurance BUSINESS Update from Jim Chess Co. If your house I mean, you need to move quickly. Recent data showed that 42% of homeless teens nationwide had gone off market in two weeks or less, Redfin said. 71% of homes listed in the Seattle area, We're off the market in 14 days or fewer while in both Omaha, Nebraska, and Lexington, Kentucky, 67% of listed homes were gone within two weeks. Other markets where homes sold particularly quickly included. Indianapolis, Portland, Oklahoma City and Sacramento. Ah lot of couples apparently decided during the pandemic, that marriage might be the way to go. Citing data for the holiday season. Jewelry retailer Signature, said preliminary same store sales for the bridal category in North America grew by double digits, Same story at K and sales driving the gains engagement rings. Meanwhile, at the Grand Canyon, one of the world's most popular proposal spots, enquiries about proposal packages and bookings over the second half of 2020 doubled from a year earlier. That's your money now. Money News or 20 and 50 past the hour. We have a coma Traffic update straight ahead. Come on radio news, stay connected. Stay informed and check back 234 times a day for the news that affects you, plus traffic and weather every 10 minutes on the force, the Northwest news station. This is called News, Kendall's 30 Minute pop ride. This should be fun. Okay, Ballot on who's ready to work? Here we go. Don't forget to breathe. Good idea. Get out home Motivation. We are climbing through this chorus. Let's get it anytime you want it bump up that intensity. Give it all you have..

Money News Martha Raddatz ABC Michigan National Guard Senate Jim Chess Co Gardas Redfin Biden North America President Trump Grand Canyon D. C Seattle Omaha Lexington Indianapolis Nebraska
Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:27 min | 5 d ago

Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

"Today with us. Our guest is dorman basell. Who is the chief data officer for the state of north dakota so high doormen and thanks for joining us today. Kathleen ron thank you for the opportunity. Either to hang out with you guys for a little bit. Yeah we'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as the chief data officer for the state of north dakota. Sure sure well. Good morning everyone So my my background is You know went to college. Got a degree in computer science mathematics and then when often like everyone else When i lived in saint louis you. It was kind of a requirement. You had to work for mcdonnell. Douglas which is now boeing corporation. So did that for it. But but then after a while Got got involved in consulting and worked my way up through the Consulting ranked says developer and they as a project manager is the data architect the solution architect and then finally got into a position of driving business intelligence and analytics for a couple of large international consulting firms where ran their north america. Big data and the i practice And the great ride. A thoroughly enjoyed all of the things we did. I think we added a lot of value to Our customers which was private industry And had great teams Had a strong onshore team strong offshore kimes and delivered a lot of value. But i think two years ago Over two years ago. When i applied for this position as the chief data officer At first i really didn't want position Didn't like the idea of state government state government has has a bad connotation Of kind of a nine to five job And a people people who just weren't really motivated to To move the world change the world and my boss who i interviewed my off. Now the cio. Sean reilly Who i interviewed with his his final comment to me was well. I can't pay what you make today. But are you wanna paycheck or do want to change the world. And i had never thought about life that way. Never tried to change the world and So i decided to take on this opportunity This was the first chief data officer position for the state of north dakota so there were a lot of unknowns Certainly certainly my presence Was a bit chaotic for the organization. Because i came in with a completely different agenda and completely different way of looking at the world through the eyes of the pillars that are assigned a line to me which application development and automation. And the second pillar is data analytics data science artificial intelligence and had some very different opinions about those things. And how we might move those forward So as i became involved with this role i became an. I had made an assumption that every state had a chief data officer come to find out there are only twenty seven of us out of fifty states So it's it's an interesting It's an interesting mix of of individuals who are chief data officers and getting to know them is. It has been a really amazing opportunity because they have such a very backgrounds and they bring such such different perspectives to cheap date officer role I like to joke and tell people that the last thing i focus on data which is obviously not true but but my real focus is really around cultural change within the city physician and what that means in the context of not not necessarily data. Because i have to executives are on my team who Are just are just brilliant at running the operations and managing the two pillars within my organization.

North Dakota Dorman Basell Kathleen Ron Boeing Corporation Kimes Sean Reilly Saint Louis Mcdonnell Douglas North America
Minter Dial talks about his new book "You Lead: How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader

Sam Talks Technology

09:48 min | Last week

Minter Dial talks about his new book "You Lead: How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader

"My first guest of the year and i'm so excited because he's also very good friend of mine is meant to dial into how i i a sam. How are you happy new year and my friend. Now minter is a successful author. Filmography speaker podcast. And he's also multi-linguistic. I've practiced that word several times. Because it's not easy for me to say minter. We're here today because you've got a fantastic. New book came out only yesterday. What's it called. What's it about name of the book. Thank you for having me on. Science is called you lead. How being yourself makes you a better leader. And it did. Indeed launched yesterday around the world except for north america which takes three more weeks Gotta do things differently and the books about leadership so the issue at some level is just another book on leadership but said the central premise is about leadership. Starting with how you lead yourself at home with your friends family and at work. 'cause real leadership has to start with leading yourself being ceo of your life. Why did you write this booklet. Where was the inspiration. What's trophies who write this so there's a little bit of a long answer on that one time. So just indulge me a second. I began writing this book in two thousand and fourteen and the premise was. It was going to be the book that i write. i like. We all say we have a book with us. This was going to be that book and such the thesis really was a wanted to talk about my life's learnings up until the age of fifty and naturally those learnings had to be both at work and out of work and so i. I started writing this book. I went off to croatia and thirty thousand words. And then all of a sudden bang big piece of news drops and i had to put the book aside and if you can imagine. I had that specific type of process where i went into the book. Big thing happens as in someone dies or her major event. And i keep on having to put the book. Aside in the interim i've done three other books and a documentary film and finally having heart official empathy out of the way. I said i got this went in. And i got the publisher. We got moving on. Its on on this leadership principle. And then i had it in my manuscript sam on the seventh of march seventh amounts twenty twenty twenty twenty which basically was a week before we all went down into lock dumb and god another big event because that was a pretty big event and they are. My gosh is not going to happen again. But fortunately i had. The team was on fellow. I got a chance to laron some pieces. That made it even more pertinent yet. Do i feel that. The concept of leadership needed to be dramatically addressed before the pandemic. And i'm delighted to feel that sort of satisfaction that the pandemic has revealed even more the need for new type of leadership in the future. And that's why. I wrote the book so you talk about a new type of leadership. What is this new type of leadership leading so unbalanced the real difference between any other type of leadership where we're also talking about performance and getting people everyone motivated. The real design here is to think about leadership being you and your personal and professional life so absolutely taking away. The wall between what usually is just where you have to go to work. You're a strictly professional here. I really am opening up the komo no to the idea of bringing your whole personality to work now. The challenge is just finding about how much of you do. You want to bring to work to provide that authentic sense of self and yet retain the privacy that is absolutely normal the intimate highly confidential elements of you that you don't need to have and the and the challenges inevitably is finding that cursor along the scale that allows you to be you yet. Keep some secret garden that we all have private more on the basis that we are now working from home here on a zoom cool with you. I can see part of your study going. Glimpse into your personal life just through this small portal view. The are half which of course if we were in an office together. I would never know that i would never know that. Was your talk box meat. And i'd never was on new shelf so all of those things that little snippets. Is that why you think we have to not be more authentic imelda to you. Personal public personas. Let's say that's the pandemic's version and there's another bigger piece to that. Which is that. Finally people are taking stock of mental health and generally whether it's in the army as or in business there's an element of bravado to the leadership. Suck it up. let's go get it. All done and fire up the team and yet seventy percent of employees systematically score themselves being disengaged from work so were now in a situation where when you see me in my home you might hear my kids. The cat might pop up on the desk. There's also behind the screen behind the mosque. Some realities that this pandemic has changed whether or not you have a personal issue with regards to someone being sick or dying. There's just a an overall menez that's out here and whereas before we Happens at home. Keep it at home. That's died on that selfish shit happening at work. actually now. my work is at home. I can't extract myself from that whether it's my tuck box or my surroundings but more importantly my personal wellbeing and whereas before we talk about efficiencies and effectiveness by can actually see my bed from where. I'm speaking the way you sleep absolutely has an impact on your productivity. So why aren't we at work creating environments where people sleep better for example having naps. Why is it that we just have to have the google pods. Just a few of those illuminated type of companies allowing for that whereas we should actually be training people where you're learning for development departments aren't just about how do you do a pl better. How do you make a product more efficient. But how do you sleep better because that energy that you gain. That's off the ball. I like to say. I use the in sports. We say on the ball where you're at work but off. The ball counts dramatically in any sport. How you play off the ball. And i think of time away from work as off the ball and that counts absolutely how you are as a person how you show up the energy you have and that sense of discretionary energy that you bring to work and that becomes a competitive advantage. I read the book why we sleep last summer. Brilliant book and change my productivity. I was dots. Bravado person up early three hour sleep for i sleep in i can do. I've been doing that since my army days. It's easy pa. And of course i then read the book about why we sleep in the house you need and then i read the book about kadian rhythms and wire naps quite useful in when we all pick women up. He has changed the way i work. Is that what you're describing that sort of productivity the borders one hundred percent and the funny thing is sam i got on the sleep. Bandwagon serendipitous lee. When i was investi i went to university in the states and i came across a course the fluffy of sleep and i was sitting literature and the sky called rose kind was on loan from stanford and he was doing a year and as part of his situation at yale he had to teach a course in so he brought this. He'd been studying. With the god of all gods of sleepy research the time build event and so brought this course and i got lucky enough to sign up for it and all of a sudden i took four courses all around sleep back in the eighties. And just expose me to my. Gosh we tell ourselves a bunch of nonsense with this sort of bravado stop for or just the thoughts we have for example sam and i'm going to guess that most people listening don't know this but you know how many dreams you haven't tonight. I don't but i'm guessing that's one or two though you wanted to. You remember generally speaking your sleep cycles. Lost one and a half hours on average lots of averages in this and then your dream period is about often especially at the beginning of the night and the that's called the rim sleep and here's a funny thing. Do you think that your dreams happen in real time or an accelerated time. Never thought about it before. Winter is my honest answer so the bringing it down to the granular level. The forty five minutes of your dream. The issue is how you recall it. So it's like a haze you recall it. And generally what people do kaleidoscope the way they recall their dreams whereas their dreams actually happened mechanically in real time. That's to say if you imagine you're walking down a whole your brain sending but it's cut off at the neck messages to the rest of your body to walk down a hole so as long as it takes you to walk down the hall. That's how long it happens anyway. There's so many wonderful things you can learn about the importance of dreaming porton sleep and so i like to bring it into the the professional space because i think it's just another elements of our personalized that is useful when we're in the working environment.

Minter Laron SAM Croatia North America Imelda Army Google PA Stanford
Chester Martin (Mi'kmaq

The Storyteller

05:24 min | Last week

Chester Martin (Mi'kmaq

"My friends to the storyteller where you'll find first nations people from across native north america who are following jesus christ without reservation on. Today's program will hear more from chester martin of the mid mon nation in new brunswick canada chester was trapped by hatred towards his father. And it's not something that he could break free of on his own but there were so easy to find bulls ana reserve. I went to people that that welfare unemployment checks oleg pension checks army checks people. Dead meat homebrew on the reserve. You know the more. I drank sicker. I go out and vote a year later. I remember getting. Dt's at my uncle's place. I can hear the baby crying on the other own buzzer. dt's later. Start here and voices. And i started listening to his voice. And i always told me that was no good to. They'll never become muscle. Just kill yourself. And it went on and on and on. And i walked up the road and i jumped in front of occur. I figured that's the only way to go. it hurt. Everything saw anger everything that carried hateful ono sober up so nice fellow. Ono's drink and everything was hateful and me and you know going in trouble going to fight and win. I'll go beat up and just look at the current miss me when i jumped in front of it. Got the back end of her and it knocked me off to who started running what's hidden and what and got away from the cops jerash emp. Looking for me i guess. Who would you think would self drink. And then i didn't. And i kept drinking finally one day and got the again and i got in trouble real bad trouble. I in place now destroyed it. That caught sent to mental institution and camels browser to see a insane. Are something a center for six weeks before three sony. Twenty twenty one years old twenty one and a half and so told me a drink a little bit too much of it you can easily on on my drinking and i went back to the court soul me that Just looked at me. Said you're charged drop. But he said you gotta impair turkey against. You'll never been looking for you. So they charged me twenty two hundred and fifty dollars and he asked me if he can put me on probation for six months to go to a and he told me you've been in here in and out for years last three years and getting in trouble i said would you go. I said i looked at him and said yeah. I would go and i didn't know what it was at that time so my mother so glad that jail. How mental institution auditing care. And he was that time you always already sold before five years that he stopped drinking. I think it's twenty years upbringing anyway. And he said just go to. Generally that i didn't want to go jalen weren't is took. The alcoholics anonymous eater. Daddy was six months for raising a or go to jail and i took the go to. Alcoholics may join the program. I used to go to a first three months. I used to take a couple of pints of beer. And i said you know we're on hurt me then i go to a tonight. Come home drink all night. Then they go to a. Because i was scared my they might catch me so one night. I heard this guy story. You went on totally story. Talked about being in the army talked to both overseas and all that and couldn't identify with him. But i can and he said let go and let god take over and the first thing that popped into my mind was pearl hill and jack mci and he said you know go up. Saved his life seeing made them no man. Okay let's go home. And that night i went home and afraid as good. Can you remove alcohol. And i don't know what happened that time. We just feel that it came over me that i didn't want to drink no more. I stopped drinking and to my wife. I knew all my life.

Chester Martin Ana Reserve Oleg New Brunswick Chester ONO North America Canada Sony Jalen Turkey Pearl Hill Jack Mci Army
The uncertain future of North Americas ash trees, and organizing robot swarms

Science Magazine Podcast

05:24 min | Last week

The uncertain future of North Americas ash trees, and organizing robot swarms

"Now. We have freelance journalist. Gabriel popkin we're going to talk about the fate of the. Us's ash trees now that restrictions on the movement of ash trees would and living trees What's been a tree. Quarantine has been lifted by the federal government. High gabriel. sarah one thing. I want to mention right away. Is these bumper stickers. Okay bear with me here. They say don't move firewood and they mystified me for years when i would see them on pickup trucks or other places but they're a sign of quarantine don't move firewood. Campaign began as a response to an insect called the emerald ash borer emerald ash borer is not the first insect or disease has ever appeared in the us that made attack a tree. And you may not want to move around. So i can't say for sure that there was never a. Don't move firewood campaign before. At any rate the emerald ash borer appeared in two thousand. Two is proven to be very devastating. It kills almost every ashtray on the north american continent that has ever encountered and while it can fly from tree to tree. One of the main ways that it gets moved around is through firewood through in other words tree. that's already dead and has been cut up but it still contains the insect you easily. Imagine someone putting a load of wood in their truck moving tens hundreds of miles and suddenly the emerald ash borer shows up starts. Killing trees starts reproducing and causing huge mayhem. The emerald ash borer is an invasive. Pest it was. I noticed in two thousand and two. What kind of damage has this bug done well. It's been called the most damaging for insect to ever raking north america. That's saying something because a lot of insects have showed up over the years ever since people started crossing oceans and a lot of damage has been done so to be. The most damaging is pretty huge. I don't think anyone's like tallied up. Exactly how many trees. The emerald ash borer has killed. But you know we're certainly. I think well into the hundreds of millions at this point i think the other thing that's important notice. That ash trees are really important trees in a lot of different ecosystems. They grow in wetlands along rivers streams. They grow in savannah's they grow on mountains in forest. So it's not like you're losing a tree in cut a one environment. All arrest are k. I think almost anywhere. I go that has trees at all. Can see dead ashtrays evidence of this insect. So if you look at the map of where emerald ash borer is it's pretty much a red blob that covers the eastern half of the us into the midwest. How does such a tiny bug. because they're really small. How does it take down such a big tree. Basically what happens is the adult beetles flies around in his green in this where you get. The name rolled asked for it finds the tree than it lays eggs on the bark and those eggs hatch the larvae that burrow into the tree and sort of start eating the layer of the tree. That's under the bar. You think of this big tree as being like all a living thing but actually the interior of the tree. The would is not living. The living stuff all happen sort of right below the bar in this layer called cambian and so once the larvae eat sort of a ring around tambien layer that pretty much cuts off everything above that layer from the roots. The roots are where the tree gets water nutrients. That's pretty much it for the tree. Now you might say well. Does this tree the ring survive in the answer is yes. You'll see the main trunk fall and then a few years later you'll see that it puts out new sprouts so in a sense the tree is still alive. But it's certainly not the big ecologically important tree that we think of now. I mentioned these bumper stickers. Don't move firewood. And that was part of a very large effort. Basically quarantine areas of the country and keep the ash borer from moving around. But it looks like we won't be having that quarantine anymore. What's happening to the quarantine was created by the us department of agriculture in specifically agency. We'll just have a fix. It's an acronym for along name. Part of its job is to protect plant health and so when it became clear that the emerald asked for was here was killing trees. It got kicked to eighth apis pretty quickly established quarantine that was intended to stop the ask for from moving from infested zone to the infested zone but the problem is asked for flies. It's very hard to detect people. Do move it around through firewood and other also selling live trees a tried to stop this. I think they did a good job for the most part. The movement of live ash trees went to almost zero. But you know it didn't do the job. Atheists has said that other experts have said that the ask for continued spreading every year you know enforcing quarantine costs money and it doesn't really have a whole lot of money to throw at this. So eventually they decided that it wasn't worth the money they were spending on a quarantine that money could be redirected towards other things. That certainly aren't going to keep the emerald ash borer from spreading but may enable the ashtray itself to have a viable

Gabriel Popkin High Gabriel United States Federal Government Sarah North America Savannah Us Department Of Agriculture Midwest
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | Last week

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
Massachusetts Rep To Propose ‘Official State Dinosaur’

WBZ Afternoon News

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

Massachusetts Rep To Propose ‘Official State Dinosaur’

"Other states already have one. Don't not a drive thru at the ski area, but Dinosaur official state dinosaur One Massachusetts politician wants to bring one here Granted, it hasn't quite captured the same attention as the runoff elections in Georgia. But base taters from hither and yon are keeping an eye on which of these dinosaurs. They would like to see names the official state dinosaur, a battle that pits Oh Dokka Saurus, the first dinosaur to be named and described by a woman against the Yankees, Saurus tend to be The earliest dinosaur discovered in all of North America State. Rep. Jack Foley says he'll sponsor whichever one gets the nod at the State House next week. I will file this bill to settle once and for all which Dino will be our dino, a whimsical exercise and helping young people learn about the legislative process, but also for adults who need a little reprieve from the nightly news.

Dokka Saurus Rep. Jack Foley Massachusetts Georgia Yankees State House North America Dino
New Years Eve Festivities

Extraterrestrial

04:40 min | 2 weeks ago

New Years Eve Festivities

"Happy new year listeners. We made it as finally less than twenty four hours left in the year. Twenty twenty if you're just joining us. Welcome i'm alistair myrddin. And this is superstitions a spotify original from podcast in this podcast we use short stories to explore the ways in which human beings interact with luck and fate in each episode. We peel back the layers of mystery surrounding peculiar rituals totems and practices. Today's episode is a very special one. C. you may not believe in santa claus leprechauns or the easter bunny. But new year's eve is the one holiday where everyone becomes a little superstitious because the future is uncertain and new year's eve is when we take a moment out of our lives to face that uncertainty head on according to cultures around the world. What you do on new year's eve will determine the trajectory of the next three hundred and sixty five days for good and ill. So maybe don't relax on this. Last day of twenty twenty after ruled a whole new year is at stake coming up. We'll see some practices from people around the globe and hope none of them drop the bowl. Time never stops it. Never waits never stand still for anyone throughout human history. We've given it to name a face a persona. Even cronos carla banged goon. Bang rune the knowns father time all these deeds he's only there to moscow truth. That time is the one thing that will remain forever out of human control when our story starts time is running out all over the world. It was already january. First in the area known as ut. C plus fourteen the earliest time zone senator earth but in the western hemisphere it was still december thirty first and all manner of hustling and bustling was afoot in. London beleaguered playwrights. Emily jordan would receive a parcel from her irish mother containing a single sprig of mistletoe. And a note saying. Please put this under your pillow when you go to sleep tonight. Emily knew what this charm was supposed to mean. It was a way to ensure a single woman found romance in the new year in atlanta georgia griffin. The hair murphy was also rushing out for some last-minute groceries. He found himself laying. Low the business partner darius who insisted they have collard greens and black-eyed peas. Dinner who was griffin to deny a southern tradition. Farther north america's central hub for new year's new york city was teeming with activity there. Ruth oltman gathered dozens and dozens of confetti poppers and blowers of various sizes. She was once told that noisemakers with scare off evil spirits and in her haunted brooklyn apartment complex. She wouldn't take any chances at the same time in midtown manhattan. A man named thatcher refused to loan out any money to his friends. He saw on a logistical online. That it was bad luck too low. Now money new year's eve it lonely guarantee they'll keep coming back to you for the rest of the year. Each of these individuals was engaged in different superstitious ritual. They followed wildly different rules. That had originated in different parts of the globe yet. They all had the same purpose to ensure good fortune of one form or another in the coming year. What none of these people realized indeed. What very few people understand is that it wasn't just their personal luck on the line. For new year's eve is special. It's a gateway in time a moments when all humanity takes a deep breath then walks hand in hand into the future and it's in moments like these that anything can happen

Alistair Myrddin Bang Rune Emily Jordan Griffin Ruth Oltman Carla Moscow Darius Emily Murphy Atlanta London Georgia North America New York City Thatcher Brooklyn Manhattan
Omni Hotels Accepted Millions In PPP Funds But Didn't Pay Workers

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Omni Hotels Accepted Millions In PPP Funds But Didn't Pay Workers

"A lot of hotels closed their doors in the spring. And some still haven't reopened. These hotels were able to keep their workers on the payroll because of funding from the federal paycheck protection program. But one national chain omni hotels and resorts is under fire for laying off than and workers. They use the funds for other purposes bill driscoll of member station w. esa in pittsburgh reports one. Leadoff worker is killed. Sia moronta a health club attendant at the omni. Providence in rhode island. She's worked there twenty one years more onta. A single mother with children applied for unemployment and food stamps. Then she heard what she thought was good news. I well struggling to provide for my family. I learned that they only have received some ppp money great. At least you know. They're going to help us. Can't buy when it comes to basic needs. The ppp is the paycheck protection program. The half trillion dollar initiative was part of the huge pandemic relief. Package congress passed in march. The p p offered loans. That are forgivable if employers you sixty percent of the money for payroll related expenses. Ep was designed as an alternative to unemployment at least for the eight weeks of payroll benefits. It supplied the omni. Providence applied for a two point six million dollar loan and said it would be chained some two hundred fifty jobs. Balloon was approved in april but eight months later with unemployment benefits run out and health coverage long-gone meranti and the other laid off are still waiting right now. We are in december and we having here anything about using that money to help. James employees moronta belongs to the service workers union unite here with three hundred thousand members. In north america using government data unite. Here says omni. Hotels received a total of seventy six million dollars. P p p loans about a third of that went to hotels where the union represents workers. Carlos outta maiyo is unite. Here's executive vice president boston. I've spoken to hundreds of workers to work at the army. Parker house at not of them have received a single dime of this money and looking at this winter a lot of them could really use it. So where did the money go in a statement. The omni chain based in dallas said it didn't use the funds to pay workers because the hotels were closed or operating at low volumes. Ppp rules allow a business to use the funds for payroll even if it were closed but the omni chose not to instead the chain promised to repay the loans with interest at least the part of the loans that are not forgiven but these loans carry a below market interest rate of just one percent which angers demayo it's disgusting companies. Wanna try to use this as a way to get a low interest loan from the federal government. Critics say repaying the loans beside the point. Lisa gilbert is executive vice president of watchdog group public citizen. Thank you think about other businesses. That maybe didn't get money because he did either to small businesses over struggling or another company that might if you actually pay their workers as for these workers. Many feel betrayed again. You'll see moronta only call family. They always say that. We are finally so where the family treatment when it comes to the employees the unite here union has asked the small business administration which administers the ppp and the us department of treasury to scrutinize the omni loans. Whether they are forgiven remains undetermined even as congress approves a new round of pandemic relief

Bill Driscoll Omni Sia Moronta Onta Providence Moronta Service Workers Union Carlos Outta Maiyo ESA PPP Omni Chain Rhode Island Pittsburgh Demayo Congress Lisa Gilbert North America Watchdog Group Public Citizen
Most reliable used cars

Clark Howard Show

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Most reliable used cars

"So i've had an obsession forever about why buying a used vehicle is so much better for your wallet than buying new. There are a lot of people who love new vehicle smell. They want that new vehicle and if it works for you financially. That's fine but for most people buying used is gonna be a much better choice but there are people like a vehicle that feels new. And that's why to me. The compromise has been historically a three model year old vehicle. So right now it'd would be twenty eighteen because the twenty one or what out on dealer lots now so when you buy a vehicle. That's three years old. As a general back of the envelope rule it will have lost roughly a third of its value some models substantially more than that others a little less but generally about a third of the value has been wiped out in those first three years even though the life of the vehicle is so today with vehicles running quarter million miles Not at all unusual. That's like normal now where it used to be hundred thousand miles pretty much. The expected reliable life span of a vehicle but vehicles vary a lot and quality and consumer reports has put out a recommended list of bike category. The most reliable vehicles you can buy depending on size. And i want to start with the most popular part of the vehicle market and these are the most reliable three-year-old suv's based on consumer reports deep dive research and again. These are all twenty eight teens. The honda cr v. honda hr v. The hyundai kona alexis annex the mazda. Five and the toyota highlander. So if you're interested in an suv. Those particular ones are the most reliable. Now when we talk about Cars mid size and large cars the most reliable eighteens the mazda six toyota avalon toyota. Camry accurate t. Lx and infiniti q fifty so people don't buy a lot of cars anymore they specially don't buy small cars. But i'll tell you the ones that are the most reliable small cars the chevy bolt. The honda fit the mazda three the toyota corolla and the toyota prius and the toyota prius c in addition the toyota prius prime. Could there be enough. Prius is on there and the volkswagen beetle so The only american owned company that made the list was chevy bolt but most of these other vehicles are actually manufactured in north america. Even if they're owned by quote unquote foreign automakers that a vehicle. That's very reliable. Starting you're looking at a vehicle that's very reliable is key but not enough. You want to do to other things you want to check the van to see if the vehicle has been in any major accident and it's time of ownership that the van research would show and then the other thing is a condition to purchase. You want to have that vehicle. Checked out by a mechanic of your choosing. I have a more thorough guide to how to pick a used vehicle and what steps you should go through on a used vehicle buying guide at clark dot com.

Toyota Mazda Honda Prius Highlander Kona Hyundai Infiniti Avalon Corolla Beetle Volkswagen North America
What are the most reliable used cars?

Clark Howard Show

03:53 min | 3 weeks ago

What are the most reliable used cars?

"So i've had an obsession forever about why buying a used vehicle is so much better for your wallet than buying new. There are a lot of people who love new vehicle smell. They want that new vehicle and if it works for you financially. That's fine but for most people buying used is gonna be a much better choice but there are people like a vehicle that feels new. And that's why to me. The compromise has been historically a three model year old vehicle. So right now it'd would be twenty eighteen because the twenty one or what out on dealer lots now so when you buy a vehicle. That's three years old. As a general back of the envelope rule it will have lost roughly a third of its value some models substantially more than that others a little less but generally about a third of the value has been wiped out in those first three years even though the life of the vehicle is so today with vehicles running quarter million miles Not at all unusual. That's like normal now where it used to be hundred thousand miles pretty much. The expected reliable life span of a vehicle but vehicles vary a lot and quality and consumer reports has put out a recommended list of bike category. The most reliable vehicles you can buy depending on size. And i want to start with the most popular part of the vehicle market and these are the most reliable three-year-old suv's based on consumer reports deep dive research and again. These are all twenty eight teens. The honda cr v. honda hr v. The hyundai kona alexis annex the mazda. Five and the toyota highlander. So if you're interested in an suv. Those particular ones are the most reliable. Now when we talk about Cars mid size and large cars the most reliable eighteens the mazda six toyota avalon toyota. Camry accurate t. Lx and infiniti q fifty so people don't buy a lot of cars anymore they specially don't buy small cars. But i'll tell you the ones that are the most reliable small cars the chevy bolt. The honda fit the mazda three the toyota corolla and the toyota prius and the toyota prius c in addition the toyota prius prime. Could there be enough. Prius is on there and the volkswagen beetle so The only american owned company that made the list was chevy bolt but most of these other vehicles are actually manufactured in north america. Even if they're owned by quote unquote foreign automakers that a vehicle. That's very reliable. Starting you're looking at a vehicle that's very reliable is key but not enough. You want to do to other things you want to check the van to see if the vehicle has been in any major accident and it's time of ownership that the van research would show and then the other thing is a condition to purchase. You want to have that vehicle. Checked out by a mechanic of your choosing. I

Toyota Mazda Honda Prius Highlander Kona Hyundai Infiniti Avalon Corolla Beetle Volkswagen North America
A Deep Dive on the Cashew Family

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:45 min | 3 weeks ago

A Deep Dive on the Cashew Family

"So roughly speaking. How many taxonomic units within this family. We're going say species. We'll go a species here but how big is and a car. Dac eight hundred species somewhere around there. We're constantly and finding new species surround eight hundred contender about eight two or three or four genera- it depends on who you ask for aforementioned reasons and is there like a center diversity for the group or the kind of globally spread. Yeah so malaysia Southeast asia senator diversity for sure. But they're really found on most. I mean most landmasses have heard. Ac temper plants are. They're tropical answer mostly tropical but certainly very diverse in temperate zones as well. They're not a new zealand and not in extreme southern tip of south america Extreme northern places. They're not typically although when john and i were doing the trick for the floor of north america someone reported finding of poison ivy in very northern part of canada. And we just no way. We didn't believe in sure enough photo of it. In this specimen basically there is a hot spring in somehow some probably averred carried it seed of poison ivy from southern canada and it happened to land on this. Very warm spot. It doesn't get as cold and it's there while so yeah that's remarkable and at least with this you can say with some certainty. It wasn't human involvement. i don't know too. Many people planting poison ivy seeds. But a lotta really cool bio geographic questions you can answer or ask their potentially ensure there's endless answers to or hypotheses. You could come up with but you mentioned in the beginning that you started very broad. And that's still a lot of species to contend with. What were some of the broader questions. You were just trying to ask a lot of just. How do these generous sort out. Roughly how many species can we throw in them. Those sorts of things. Yeah so i was interested in looking at the certain classification evolution across the whole family and looking at the trends and the different policies that have evolved within the family chemistry often the family of really trying to get a basic handle basic understanding of what are some of the sort of units within the family whether those genera were there larger groups of general things that things that we call serb families or through a claims within the family evolutionary units within the family. So he did some sequence analysis in a lot of different logical characters To do that and got kind of an interview picture of the evolution of the family. It was large reflective of what we what people have thought for for a number of of decades in century. In fact about how the family is kind of organized internally but there were some big surprises in that two things that had been treated as separate families bhai som- had been put into the family of by others. Were certainly found to be within the carnousie. So i'm not nice nicely reassuring us in abilities of people before us to assess the investigation of the family using traditional techniques and then from there was able sorta kinda pony on on some of the general that we are particularly interested in and do some more kind of detailed apologetic analyses of of some of the clays within the families of this evolutionary unions within the camera. Yeah hearing it that way. It makes sense why. You'd want to start broadly and then start taking about tinkering with the smaller units of this. But it's always really exciting to me when you read these big genetic treatments of groups and you're like wow yeah. They were pretty spot on a century or more ago. And that's to me really cool when you see this sort of morphological species concept in the genetic

Canada Southeast Asia Malaysia South America North America New Zealand Bhai Som John
Nike's New High

MarketFoolery

02:10 min | Last month

Nike's New High

"A new all time high. Yeah well i mean we. We've been saying it all year regarding strong businesses in trying times like these ceo. John donahoe even even reiterated on the call when he said and i quote these times when strong brands get stronger and certainly nike is one of those strong brands. Going into this. i mean we. We knew that it was going to be able to pivot and deal with with the situation better than most. And then it's proving out to be the case as you noted strong strong really funny to performance across the board revenues of eleven point. Two billion dollars. It was up seven percent on a currency neutral basis nike direct sales. This was really impressive. Nike direct sales were four point. Three billion dollars. That was up thirty percent. But if you do a little math and you can see. Direct was actually almost forty percent of the company's business. So listen we talk about these companies that are taking more ownership of the brain in the experience and nike is doing that. And it's really benefiting in nike digital sales up eighty percent on a currency neutral basis. That's now three straight quarters of approximately eighty percent or better digital growth china as you mentioned was the real star of a quarter the they working on a little bit of an accelerated time line there and recovering from covid nineteen of course and and so i think that management is is learning a lot from what they've done in china and they're able to bring that over to north america and into the digital sphere north america flat not terribly impressive but really given the situation that that's actually pretty good. They've got inventories. And check gross margin. Compressed a little bit just due to basic costs regarding the pandemic and in some higher promotional activity. But when you look at this quarter in total just another just another stellar really quarter from from what i consider a stellar business. I think you're right about north america. I mean just the fact that it's basically flat. It's like that's fine and i think part of it is because of what we just saw out of china even when you factor in.

Nike John Donahoe North America China
Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:36 sec | Last month

Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

"A massive part shortage that's causing production slowdowns and factories in China, Europe and North America. Suppliers of semiconductor parts diverted their sales to consumer products earlier in the Corona virus. Pandemic is auto sales dried up. Now the car business is bouncing back and there aren't enough semiconductor parts to go around. Volkswagen says The shortage will effect production at Chinese, North American and European plants during the first quarter of 2021. It impacts models under the Volkswagen, Volkswagen commercial vehicles, Skoda seat and two limited extents. Audi brands. Keith Peters

Volkswagen North America Europe China Skoda Audi Keith Peters
Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

Dan Proft

00:36 sec | Last month

Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

"Volkswagen facing a massive parts shortage that's causing production slowdowns and factories in China, Europe and North America. Suppliers of semiconductor parts diverted their sales to consumer products earlier in the Corona virus. Pandemic is auto sales dried up. Now the car business is bouncing back and there aren't enough semiconductor parts to go around. Volkswagen says The shortage will effect production at Chinese, North American and European plants during the first quarter of 2021. It impacts models under the Volkswagen Volkswagen commercial vehicles, Skoda's seat and two limited extents. Audi brands.

Volkswagen North America Europe China Skoda Audi
Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

WBBM Evening News

00:30 sec | Last month

Volkswagen facing 'massive' shortage of electronic parts

"14 days. Volkswagen says it's facing a massive part shortage that's causing production slowdown, said factories in China, Europe and North America. Suppliers of semiconductor parts diverted their sales to consumer products earlier in the Corona virus pandemic as auto sales dried up. But now the car business is bouncing back and there aren't enough semiconductor parts to go around. Volkswagen says the shortage will affect production at Chinese, North American and European plants beginning in the first quarter

Volkswagen North America Europe China
Brittens Ceremony of Carols

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:36 min | Last month

Brittens Ceremony of Carols

"The recent. Tom hanks movie greyhound. The captain of destroyer leads a convoy across the u boat infested north atlantic during world war. Two not say that the trip from the us to britain in nineteen forty two was dangerous is not only an understatement of epic proportion it offers the context for the extraordinary composition of benjamin britten's ceremony of carols britten was arguably the most important british composer of the twentieth century. After three years in north america. He found himself in the middle of the atlantic aboard a swedish cargo vessel trying to return to his native england instead of panicking midst. The harrowing circumstances were too dangerous crossing. He wrote two. Choral works the him to saint cecilia and the ceremony of carols and as the name suggests the ceremony of carols consists of ten carols frame by the chant. Hodie a christie's not to est- today christ is born both the beginning and the end the carol employed day from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries and are sung in middle and early modern english as well as in latin one. Care all deo gratias. Thanks be to god. Sung a combination of middle english. And latin tells the story of genesis three while the texas primarily about the fall the carols musical energy and emphasis is on thankfulness specifically thankfulness to god for providing a savior who sets things right. The most beloved carol in the work is this little bay. And despite the sentimental sounding title of this carol the tax describes the all out battle that this babe of bethlehem wages against satan himself the tax was written by robert southwell catholic priest who was hanged drawn and quartered by queen elizabeth. The first. here's how it goes this little babes as old as come to rifle. Satan's fold all hell doth add his presence quake though he himself for cold do shake for in his week. Unarmored wise the gates of hell he will surprise. Jeff's version of new york's classical music station w. Q x are caused this little babe his favorite christmas carol in south wales words and britain's music's spurgeon the battle between good and evil is one by quote a baby born in obscure poverty and it's depicted quote not by a huge orchestra and massive voices but by harp in a choir of children will britain the man who pulled all of this off musically could hardly be described as an orthodox christian definitely not a devout one his personal life including his sexual proclivities where the source of numerous controversies during his life even after his death still he was at least if this work composed during a potentially deadly voyage any proof so christ haunted man. Believe it or not in this. Britain's not unusual see so much of the west great art is inspired by christian themes in fact it's impossible to imagine the west cultural heritage without christianity and though much of our greatest art was created by people of unquestionable. Fates johann sebastian. Bach others were produced by people whose faith is unknown known to be non-existent the power that these works hold to move us is at route the power of the story that makes the work possible. The story that explains where human creativity like fully evident in the amazing talent of benjamin britten comes from in the first place and in this case to use virgins words. The story of god sneak attack on the forces of evil. Something will soon celebrate

Carols Britten Benjamin Britten Britain Saint Cecilia Tom Hanks Robert Southwell North Atlantic Carol Christie North America Atlantic England Bethlehem Queen Elizabeth Satan Spurgeon Texas South Wales United States
"north america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

02:22 min | 5 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Chompers

"I've landed hundreds of years back in time on an island in what's called the Caribbean Ocean I, see a man getting off this ship it seems really excited. Oh, it turns out. He's been ceiling for ten weeks all the way from Europe. But there's something wrong. This man seems to think he's arrived in a country called India. But Dude India's and totally the opposite direction. Time machine who is this guy? Find out after you switch, you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth. Rush the molars in the back to. So, who is this man? Columbus. Columbus was an Italian explorer who really wanted to reach India and when he arrived in the Caribbean, he thought he'd found the west coast of India. So called the islands, the West indies. He also called the people who were living there. The Indians. It was all a big mistake but still for decades and decades and decades people from Europe kept calling the people from North America. The Indians. switcher rushing to the bottom of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth. Okay. Let's travel through time again. I've landed farther back in time Columbus hasn't even been born yet. I'm not on an island anymore, but I'm still in North America. People are making clothes, building buildings, farming food hang out with their families. Huntington traveling trading things with each other. You know just doing all the stuff that people do. Time machine who are these people? Native. Americans. Rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth, but don't brush too hard. Native Americans were the first people to live in North America and they've lived there for a long long long long long time. Native Americans were there before Europeans like the Vikings Columbus or the British arrived and set up homes. Native Americans have been here since before Canada the US and Mexico even existed and native Americans are still here today..

India North America Columbus Europe West indies Caribbean Huntington Vikings Indians. Canada Mexico US
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

08:19 min | 7 months ago

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Crops gardening, so you sprinkle little ladybugs. Of ladybugs, Garden. Just regurgitated the. Eat them other. Than ladybugs. Dot Com. Lady are also good luck just so we all are aware okay I recently learned that lady books are beetles which. Is Obvious, but. We never think of them that way. Their own distinct Beatles, gross ladybugs or What's up with that people go as ladybugs for Halloween. Nobody fucking goes. I'M GOING TO GO IS A. Beetle. Sting but Spring Beatles back bitches. Miss GonNa beat all the others in the. She's unstoppable. All right what what's the? Trying. Yeah That's all the counts kids. If you're listening at home, trying that's matters. If you dare! It doesn't matter because you drive. That's that's how business works. Just try your hardest. today's episode is about the birds of North America and today's Trivia is about birds, specifically chickens and the age old mostly metaphor question, which came first the chicken or the egg. Usually, we don't really know the answer to that, but science has solved it very clearly. You guys went with Allison Chicken and. Egg. But I think the answer is going to be some bullshit thing about neither just knowing you matt totally. because. This is a subject. The metaphorical question, he's going to give us some bullshit which came for? Dancer is alien. Hear me shaking my head. The Correct answer is the egg. Jen gets it right. And her explanation was perfectly. Exactly correct I`ma genius, sh- MacArthur genius you. Get the. You. Can't graduate. My God awesome right? So what? What is the actual explanation of evolution? Is The answer every animal? Every distinct species comes from another species, and this is sort of evolution is not like. Here's a you know. Here's a jungle fowl, and then boop, and appears like it's a it's a slow gradual scale and scientists don't know exactly when domesticated chickens evolved from red jungle, fowl, wild birds that lived in the jungle, but they estimate about eight thousand years ago. There is no. No definitive egg that's like this was a jungle fowl, and this was a chicken, but on the sliding scale of Aleutian. There is an arbitrary point at which we say now it's a chicken, and it has to do with the viability of interbreeding the species whatever, but the definite answer is at some point in history, a jungle fowl laid an egg, and out came a slightly different creature that we now call a chicken. Thus the egg came first evolutionary speaking. It added met that. Me Selecting. Chicken was a good goose. Is Your clock right there what you punch out now. You got. Just Punch out. I For In Sleep, you've got you gotTA. Deal with all that time. I'm out and I'm thinking. Really considering how many hours I spent awake, I don't have them. Before. We get to our interview. We should a clip of birds of North America just in case our audience. Trader Joe's. I never he wouldn't do that to us I'm saying I'm queuing up. A clip of show that which is give provides context to our loyal audience. Why would I miss? LEAD THEM YOU'RE! Yeah also you watch out because one day Genara going to get you back and you know why because to can plant. Girl! You don't need to drop your back. You need to literally smashed against the wall. Just smash it. So good, it's so good I give you. Permission smashed that Mike. I can't. Silence here at all right here is. Here's a small clip from the trailer for birds of North America starring Jason Work. It's not going to. Little Snip. What's coming up on this episode of innocent traitor jazz. Honestly do you walk in the store I think I usually cows. That episode of teaches starts with birds. That you know it did it did it did? All right, let's hear the railroad. Give Hope. All Right? Here's a real. When I was fourteen I spotted a Peregrine Falcon Window. Silly Bronx. I never looked back. I don't understand how everyone can't love. I'm Jason Ward this this birds of North, America. I'm talking no look at that bird. That's cool. You go hang out with your Falcon. Burning Sounds Love Wyatt Senec. He's fucking awesome. I was dancing. Oh Man I mean look. It makes more sense when you see the video where they're chasing chasing birds around central, but you get you get a sense of the enthusiasm here it's it's such a great. Out Well. We have the host with us now, so everybody please welcome. Jason Ward Jason is the community relations and outreach coordinator for the national, Audubon Society, as well as the host of birds of North, America welcome Jason. For having me, we are so excited so I think we just need to ask like to kick off. How did you get into birding? We're talking about how you think about it as your GRANDPA's pastime, but like you know you're down, you didn't cities. So how did this get started for you? Yes, so first of all we're not. We're taking that old stereotype and we're just kind like turning it on upside down on his head. burning is going to be new is going to be sexy is going to be cool. In. Five ten years hopefully hopefully sooner rather than later. We're going to flip the script on burning. Is Thought of as. that. For for me, personally I I was always one of those kids who was always obsessed with animals ever since a young age and dinosaurs started out being my favorite. Initially, I think everyone pretty much goes through that dinosaur phase, and that progressed to anything and everything that can walk swim fly crawl in really matter to me. Birds being my favorite, the front runners for multiple reasons one. They're super closely related to dinosaurs. So may argue rightfully so that they are modern day dinosaurs. Addition to that they have the ability suggested leave, and that was something that I admired and what I mean by that is they had the ability to look at their immediate surroundings. Decide you know. This isn't really suitable for me. I need greener pastures in. They can pick up fly in fine, a better environment to live in, and that is something that growing up in the Bronx in the projects, essentially that I always admired that Kinda live vicariously through bird's as I grew up. That's like. I'm. Also.

North America America Allison Chicken Beatles Jason Ward Jason Jason Ward TA MacArthur Jen Jason Work matt Trader Joe Wyatt Senec Genara Mike Audubon Society outreach coordinator
"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

08:44 min | 9 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

"WanNa get a better understanding of how we got here to this many infections? I know that you spoke to a worker about her experience cargill and we're not using her real name because she's worried that speaking out might affect her job security We're using the name Rachel instead. It's so to go into work every day. Wondering am I gonNA contract this virus and when I contract. This virus died from it and what's going to happen to my family if I die. How are they going to be financially secure? How they're gonNA miss me on. What's going to happen if my family gets it. When did she start hearing concerns about covert at this plan? Well between Rachel's account and also having talked to other people now in the plant We know that there was a lot of anxiety even before there was a confirmed case on April six. You know probably a lot of workplaces so there was anxiety like there was everywhere. Merch twenty the company starts saying that it's going to increase safety measures. Increased sanitation putting plastic sheets in common areas like locker rooms in the lunch room. But and Jamie. This is really key. Going forward workers were still working elbow to elbow shoulder to shoulder in the production. Lines and production had not been slow to give them any more space. There's also the concern of like. Are the tables being cleaned between people moving? Are the walls being clean down? Because people touch the walls people touch everything and yes. They tried to limit touch points. But it just did not work that. Despite workers having started to raise concerns was becoming very clear that the anxiety level about Cova nineteen and what a petri dish a meat plants like cargill or any of the other ones might be and then of course we have the first case that was diagnosed on on April sixth and that sort of ratchets up the discomfort concern in that plan. And so what happened after this? First case is I well between April sixth and April thirteenth. The number of cases at cargill proliferates from one thirty eight a real harbinger of things to come. It was a real sign. And that's when you started getting the media spotlight turn to this outbreak. The union says there are dozens of confirmed cases at the plant. Cargo says it's added more safety measures like temperature checks hand sanitizing so the company cuts hours to one shift at this point to prevent the spread while that only gets people inside the plant. Even more freaked out. You know they're trying to figure out how cutting the shift is in any way creating more space between workers. It's it's doing. The opposite concern was after all was said and done. We were so piled up because we were so short staffed. They moved everybody to one table causing them to all be shoulder to shoulder and also transferring people from one spot to another and not cleaning between people being transferred and so some of them are calling in sick because they're scared. Some of them are calling in sick because they're actually sick and then this is key. Some people are coming to work with symptoms for two reasons one because they need the money they need the job to feed their family and to because we have heard the accounts of a number of people who are being told that it's okay to come in with certain symptoms or if someone in their household has tested positive. What we don't know is how widespread that kind of message was Was it in a you know a couple mistakes made here or there was it a protocol we don't actually know and I can guarantee you. It is going to be one of the key points that will drive any kind of investigation or reviews and as you mentioned before during this time the shift was cut. That would just mean that people were working for less time during the day but this production line that you describe which is just packed with people cutting down the meet. That hasn't changed at all right. And this is when the Union start saying you have to shut this down. You have to shut this down. Our people are going to start getting sick. I think as soon as that email went out everybody. That fear was finally like really there. Everybody was so frustrated. Everybody was asking a million and one questions like. Why aren't we closed yet? Winter we closing. What's going on? The company takes that as sort of an unofficial call for an illegal work stoppage and then relations start breaking down between the company and the Union and all of a sudden that does really bad things for communications. Because you have the company communicating with workers who some of them by the way There are language barriers with to begin with you. Also have the union communicating with workers. And then you have public health authorities through their daily briefing and through the news media Communicating with workers. And they just don't know what to do. They're they're really confused about what to do. Many of them and I know this is something. Rachel talked about this breakdown in Communication. Nobody was able to get through to. Hr or production support which is a different version of HR at cargill. Nobody was able to get through even barely to the front desk. There were so many phone calls coming in. They were very understaffed. Another thing I want to ask you about is that we talked before about how there are foreign workers. Vulnerable workers in these plants and I know. The company and provincial officials have also talked about the living conditions of many of the workers and how this have contributed to the outbreak as it grew. And can you talk to me a little bit about that right so After it was sort of confirmed publicly that there was an outbreak at cargill. There was obviously a lot of questions of the chief medical officer. Dr Dena hinshaw. How could this happen? What was being done and she answered a question. That basically turned into a little bit of a controversy really because she you started talking about how Some of the ways that some of these workers live had contributed to the spread and that is like carpooling to work. Not just looking at the plant itself but looking at how do people get back and forth to work thinking about households and there's households where people simply don't have the space to self isolate if they're a case or if they're close contact and needing to provide supports to those people you know multi family households you know. I think she was just trying to explain why it might have spread. What the exterior factors are biting really came across many of the folks at cargill who work in cargo as having blamed the workers. And you have to remember that. These people are feeling Quite a stigma to begin with You know they're going into the grocery store and people are afraid of them sometimes. They're being asked to not come into places particularly visible minorities who who work at cargill were. Were feeling that because they were the most easily identifiable as cargo workers Cesar Callous. Has He's been hearing a lot from his community about this. He's Filipino Calgarians and a volunteer with Philippines. Emergency Response Taskforce Filipinos. Have a coach or called Bayani Hon which is being heroes to each other and so we see that a lot many Filipinos are volunteering to give care packages. So that's my appeal to leadership is let's let's unite let's collaborate. Let's not divide because finger-pointing health so there was a real concern that they were. You know being blamed for this. I think that didn't start out as as a an intention to blame but it was. Certainly it was certainly felt that way by the by the community and You know they`re. They're anxious upset to begin with so that didn't help Certainly at least an unintended consequences must be so difficult. All these people who are trying to make ends meet or trying to put food on the table for their families and are having to make these sort of risk assessments. Just sounds.

cargill Union Rachel cargill proliferates Philippines Bayani Hon Cova Cargo Jamie Dr Dena hinshaw medical officer Cesar Callous
"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

"Wrong. Workers Return to the cargo meat. Plant this week after. It became the site of not just candidates but the largest single corona virus outbreak in North America. Which is really saying something because there have been some huge outbreaks in the. Us meat packing plants as well over. Fifteen hundred cases have been linked to the cargill plant with nine hundred and forty nine employees testing positive. There have also been two deaths a few weeks ago. A woman named hip boy passed away from the virus. She had worked at cargill for over twenty years. Why at this hour earlier this week? Her husband Nanu win who also works at the plant and Contract Cova. Nineteen as well talked about her through an interpreter so basically that was no seem times. He didn't see that was coming. It was chem so fast and I love. She was a wonderful wife. She swallowed me. She never with me and then late Wednesday afternoon. A second death connected to the plant are Mondo Sega. The father of a worker who was visiting his family from the Philippines. The Union representing the employees is calling all levels of government to shut down production at cargo. Which is responsible for almost forty percent of be processing in Canada today. What led to this outbreak? And what's the risk of opening this facility? Backup again. Caroline done is with me. She's the C- national correspondent in Calgary and just a note to say caroline and I spoke before our mandis death was made public. This is.

cargill Caroline North America Mondo Calgary Nanu Philippines Canada
"north america" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

Celeb News Ride Home

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

"I'm in the middle of recording. Today's episode so we have to get into it. I mean literally you should have seen me. I stopped everything. I like through my laptop on the ground. I was like we got to put this in today's show. The people need to know that Harry a Meghan are leaving in England. That's right. Harry and Meghan are officially stepping back from the royal duties and they're gonNA start splitting their time between England Gland and North America which a lot of people are guessing means Canada. Because they did you spend six weeks on Vancouver island over Christmas and also weirdly weirdly while we're on that topic David foster the music producer like set them up with the House that they stayed in. Because he's like the King of Canada or something and he way hey in age joint. INSTAGRAM statement on the verified account at Sussex Royal Hairy Megan wrote quote we have chosen to make transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution. We intend to step back as senior members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent while continuing to fully support her. Majesty the Queen and quote okay. I liked it. They're going to be financially independent. I mean the the biggest problem with the royals is obviously the tax payers pay for their lives which is like. It's cool that they're going to say no to that like they're gonNA make their own money game which like Duh like. Why don't they all do that anyway? They also wrote in the very long instagram post quote. We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America continuing to honor our duty to the Queen and quote so yeah they just said North America. They didn't specifically say Canada. Which means I hope they they might also come to la which were making his from? I think it'd be so cool to like run into Megan markle in La like at the studio city farmers market. I'd be like hey girl. Do you miss this weather while you were over across the pond. Isn't this weather so much better than England. My God it's actually. You may dream to like talk to Megan markle about whether while like feeling for a good tomato you know. Isn't that like a good. That's a good. That's a good goal for me to have in life. Also I'm just GONNA put this out there when they say they're going to you know be financially independent. I desperately hope that means Megan's GonNa go back into acting like maybe.

Megan markle royals North America Meghan Canada Sussex Royal Hairy Megan England INSTAGRAM La Harry Royal Family England Gland Vancouver island David foster United Kingdom producer
"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Thanks for listening is a really strange scene. On Capitol Hill. This morning there were essentially back to back. Press Conferences says from House Democratic leadership and the first one was we are impeaching the president who is just devilishly corrupt and boundlessly lawless and represents a threat to the very foundation of self government. It was first part the second was also we were going to vote on impasse. The number one thing. That president wants the House Democratic Congress to do which is the revised version of NAFTA. Uh the two press conferences were whiplash inducing in many respects. We'll get into that. But on the substance there are two things to think about one. Is that this new agreement is he's not that different from the original North American Free Trade Agreement among the US Mexico and Cannon Fac the text of the new agreement started off with Nafta and made some changes at the margins which is why many call it Nafta two point Oh and second of all the version that Donald trump his administration negotiated and the version. That's going to be voted on by the House. Else has some significant concessions to the concerns of Democrats including enforceability the provision particularly Labor provisions requirements. Around how much of the car needs to be made. In North America to avoid tariffs increased access to Canadian dairy market for American farmers. And a big win for progressive forces. Were lobbying on this taking out exclusivity for big Pharma on a certain class of drugs. which would have raised consumer prices for everyone? So there are legitimately things Democrats can say. They won MM concessions on that. made the deal better but the broader question to my mind is can you imagine Republicans and Hillary Clinton Administration Impeaching Hillary Clinton and also at the on the same day senator saying they're going to vote for big trade deal that Hillary Clinton negotiated. Does this make sense to do with this moment substantively politically. We're going to debate that question next. You.

Hillary Clinton Administration NAFTA Hillary Clinton president House Democratic Congress Cannon Fac North America Donald trump senator US Mexico
"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

10:01 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Attorney. General William Bar has shown himself time and time again to be zealous. Partisan utterly willing to compromise the perception of independence and integrity the Department of Justice on behalf of President Donald Trump and today. He gave a really in many respects shocking interview to justice correspondent Pete Williams. We're GONNA play that but before four playing part of that interview. It's really important. I think to reestablish the facts of what happened in two thousand sixteen. That year was a weird election. In many ways might recall one of the weirdest aspects of that election was that there were active. FBI investigations involving both of the major party candidates right there was one into into Hillary. Clinton you remember that about her use of private e mail and whether that use of emails contained classified information and the that broke the law at the same time There was a counterintelligence investigation into the campaign of Donald Trump and it's contact with Russians connected to officials in the government a government that we knew who back there in two thousand sixteen was actively attacking me election on trump's behalf. Now that is a sticky situation for the F. B.. I think it's fair to say and there's very very real danger under those circumstances that you have the FBI essentially going rogue and using its investigative powers to essentially put a thumb on the scale of the election for one candidate and that did happen to one of the two candidates. Hillary Clinton it happened when then. FBI Director James Comey Tell me define all justice department guidelines just freelanced and went out and criticized Hillary Clinton's handling of classified information while at the same time saying that quote no reasonable prosecutor Underwood anti-clinton over emails. But then most consequentially. It happened again a second time when Komi announce the FBI was reopening investigation. Asian Hillary Clinton's emails eleven days before the election and action that multiple people whose job it is to look at the data say was decisive in tipping the election from Hillary the Clinton Donald Trump now the same time during that campaign. There is also the counterintelligence investigation into the campaign. Don Trump people associated with that campaign the the existence of which did not leak in fact the one time that it kind of surfaced in the press there was reporting on it was this infamous New York Times investigating instigating Donald Trump Comma. FBI No clear link to Russia spoke to reporters that article. We don't know who they are. Gave trump a clean bill of health in the midst of the election even though we were later to find out for for instance his son Don. You're actively welcomed help from the Russians tied to the Putin government in defeating Hillary Clinton. Okay so that's what happened in two thousand sixteen today attorney generally embarrassed selling story that literally the reverse happened. I think probably from civil liberty standpoint. The greatest danger to our free system is that the incumbent I've been government. Use the apparatus of the state principally the law enforcement agencies in the intelligence agencies both to spy on political opponents but also to use them in a way that could affect the outcome of the election. As far as I'm aware this is the first time in history that this has been done to a presidential attention campaign the use of these counterintelligence techniques against a presidential campaign there has to be some basis before we use these very potent powers in our core first amendment activity and here. I felt. This was very flimsy. There's a curl of appoint here you in the abstract bars. Correct if President Obama had ordered the FBI to open an investigation and then use the existence of that investigation to tip the scales. Hillary Clinton Clinton that would be wildly wrong and dangerous and a threat to democracy. But we know that is not what happened. Thanks to the newly released inspector. General's report the white. The House had no idea the investigation was going on be the found no political bias against Donald Trump. The Russia probe see we do. The whole thing didn't leak because it didn't leak because because we were there watching it now. Attorney General is doing the Donald Trump thing which is no puppet no puppet. You're the puppet to try to get his way out of the situation. And this is the man Dan Right now who holds in his hands investigative power over American citizens. Everyone of you watching. It is chilling joining me now in the profound implications of all this this Adam serve our staff writer for the Atlantic wrote about this in his piece today the Russia hoax a hoax and Michelle Goldberg New York Times columnist and MSNBC political analysts. I there is a kind of crazy making quality to watching someone in bars position. Take up the kind of trump TV. Donald trump no puppet. You're the puppet line of light up his down the reverse of what is true is true. And he says he's every bit as much of a liar and a propagandist as Donald Trump. He just does it in this kind of software ethic bureaucratic voice choice instead of Donald Trump's ranting showman voice but it doesn't change utter insanity of much of what he's saying the other thing that is quite like Donald Trump is that in that clip clip. You just played he was actually describing something very much akin to what Donald Trump has tried to do in Ukraine. What piece for right? And so what. So what he's done this before. It's always kind of accused your enemies of whatever you're doing so that so that people out there say oh well that's both sides are saying the same thing who can tell and after the crazy making point I mean so much of our dystopia. Fiction is not really about gulags. It's not really about torture. It's about the deranged denial of truth. Right it's not just we're well right. It's also Fahrenheit to one and all the sort of Russian literature communism right. It's all about kind of what happens to a person's psyche under the bombardment of lies allies and it. It's kind of psychic tax. That's being exacted on the American people who have to Wade through the midst truth and propaganda and of their purported leaders to figure out what's going on and that's that's exactly what the title of your column was about today. Yeah I mean it's really extraordinary to hear Bill Bar Explain why Congress is impeaching Donald Trump even using those action rock Obama. But look I mean the point of this the point join of the the Russia hoax narrative which is completely disproven by the report which showed there was no political motive for the beginning of the investigation into Donald. Trump is to exhaust people. Were trying to figure out what the truth is. It's to make them throw up their hands and say well. I can't figure it out everybody's yelling. I don't know what's happening so it's probably not not that important. Yeah I WANNA be clear her like I don't trust necessarily unfaithful like the FBI to be with the power they have. They have tremendous power. I I think the report is an important review like there should be some accountability for that. But now you've got the situation in which he he must have known. The report wouldn't produce the outcome you want. And so now he has his handpicked guy running his own investigation despite the fact that statutorily. It's to the judge. This is what he says about the timing about this. S. about the the the or at least about John Durham investigation and how he can sort of go. Further the idea take a lesson. Durham is not limited to the FDR. He can talk to other agencies He can compel people to testify so someone like someone like Durham can compel testimony. He can talk to a whole range of people private parties fallen governments and so forth. And I think that is the point at which a decision has to be made about motivations. So he's going to supplant the report with his report which says it's GonNa come out in the summer of twenty twenty so the idea and he's he's he's already kind of telegraphed what he expects the findings of this report to be we know from the way bard described the mullahs report before we actually got to see the Miller. report art that he is completely unbound by Ebi. Reliance on the on the factual record. So he's basically telling us kind of rubbing our faces in the fact that he's going to put out this political hit job exonerating not just exonerating donald trump but kind of this political hit job on the basis of the investigation into Donald Trump suggesting that this political hitch up suggesting that the Russia hoax is somehow real thing just in time for the twenty two thousand election and you've written a lot about how trump and bar and other share the similar attitude towards due process civil liberties in protections depending on who is being protected and who is being prosecuted. Yeah yeah well. It's really rather extraordinary after bar said last week that communities who criticized law enforcement can't count on their protection. Is those sworn officers of the law. Aw enforcers who if they don't get their protection money. They can't do their jobs but obviously bar in the president himself criticize as law enforcement all the time and don't expect to be denied its protection and at the core of that is really a belief that bar and trump have that some American citizens have the full rights of being American citizens and other Americans simply do not and that is the both the core of trump is in the core of bars legal theory of running the the Justice Department which is a tragic irony given the origin of the Justice Department in the aftermath of the civil war which was to protect those new Americans who had recently been emancipated. It's a disgrace grace. It's it it was created to stop the clan from exercising terrorism over those Newly enfranchised Americans wanted to her Express their democratic and First Amendment rights the First Amendment that Mr Bar was talking about that interview Adam Server and Michelle Goldberg. Thank you both. Thank you also happening today day. President trump hosts Russian Foreign Minister.

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Clinton FBI Don Trump Russia William Bar president President Obama New York Times attorney Department of Justice Michelle Goldberg Pete Williams Attorney. Adam Server Dan Right Durham
"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Evening from New York. I'm Chris Hayes. We now know the charges. The House Democrats plan to bring against the president of the United States this morning speaker. Nancy Pelosi and six House Committee chairs presented to articles of impeachment today. Not Merican people today in service to our duty to the constitution and to our country. The House Committee on the judiciary is introducing introducing two articles of impeachment charging the President of the United States Donald J trump with committing high crimes and misdemeanors. The first article is four abuse of power. It is an impeachable offense for the president to exercise the powers of his is public office to obtain improper personal benefit while ignoring or injuring the national interest when he was caught caught when the house investigated and opened an impeachment inquiry president trump engaged in unprecedented categorical and indiscriminate defiance of the impeachment inquiry this gives rise to the second article of impeachment for obstruction of Congress. The actual articles of impeachment are long just nine pages of text and they lay out in very clear terms that the president abused power of his office and they did everything in his power to cover it up quote. Oh using the powers of his high office president. Trump's solicited the interference of a foreign government Ukraine in the twenty twenty United States presidential election and did so through a scheme game or course of conduct that included soliciting the government Ukraine to publicly announce investigations that would benefit his reelection harm. You election prospects of a political opponent and influence the two thousand twenty United States presidential election to his advantage articles. Also explain how trump exerted pressure on the Ukrainian president by withholding both three hundred ninety one million dollars military assistance and a White House meeting. That would show US support for Ukraine as it remains under literal attack from Russia articles. move onto the next charge the cover of quote without lawful cause were excuse. President trump directed executive branch agencies offices and officials not to comply with those subpoenas in the history of the republic. No president has ever ordered the complete defines of an impeachment inquiry or sought to obstruct impede so comprehensively the ability of the House of Representatives to investigate high crimes and misdemeanors they conclude with a recommendation. President trump by conduct has demonstrated that he will remain a the threat to the constitution if allowed to remain in office and has acted in a manner grossly incompatible self governance and the rule of law president trump thus warrants impeachment and trial wild removed from office and disqualification to hold enjoy any office of honor trustor Prophet on the United States. Now those charges articulate the president's fundamental mental misdoings in this matter he solicited interference from a foreign country when he got caught he tried to cover it up. He's stonewalled Congress unconstitutionally notably. There are only two articles impeachment now. We saw testimony judiciary committee's hearing last week. Invoking the concepts and words of bribery and extortion. Which I believe are both fair and accurate characterizations is the presence conduct? Those words are not applied to trump in these articles. They're more general in some ways less legalistic which is simply. The president abused his power. He's the listener foreign country to interfere in our elections and then he tried to cover it up and what trump is specifically charged with now sets the standard. If these are past the committee in the House the trial the charges will frame the narrative and ultimately any votes in the Senate. Judiciary Committee will begin discussing the articles tomorrow night once they are passed out of committee which everyone expects accent. Pass out of the house which is also expected and when the trial gets to the Senate those will be the two charges. He is very likely to be tried. On the allow interestingly enough left minimal wiggle room on the facts establishing say beyond a reasonable doubt quid pro quo extortion bribery. All of which I think are obviously obviously there and appropriate but they are more difficult cases to make on the facts and the question of whether he abused his power as foreign interference which was clear from the moment moment. The White House released the notes presents now infamous phone call until I twenty fifth with Ukrainian President Zelinski. I would like you to do as a favor. Though because our country's been through locked Ukraine knows a lot about it. I would like you to find out what happened with this whole Ukraine situation. They say crowd strike. I guess you have one of your wealthy people. The server they they say Ukraine has it the other thing. There's a lot of talk about Biden's son that Biden. Stop the prosecution. A lot of people WANNA find out about that so whenever you can do with the attorney general would be great. Eight Biden winner a bragging. They stopped the prosecution. So if you can look into it sounds horrible to me. The stakes are very high for whether this is acceptable behavior in an idea. The Senate does not convict him on the obstruction charge for instance and basically says he's fine dude nor a congressional subpoena full stop to order all agencies of government not to comply may essentially end up vacating their enforceability in the future. The narrow articles makes the stakes as clear as possible. The Senate will likely police is what the president any president is going to be permitted to do or not do going forward joining me. Now is one of the members of the House Judiciary Committee which drafted these articles of impeachment against the President and will vote on them this week. Democratic Congressman Jamie Raskin of Maryland Congressman. There's reporting today that indicates that there was the consideration of a third article impeachment for obstruction of justice pertaining to the president's actions particularly as included in the report. Is that true. And did you favor such articles. Well I.

president President United States Ukraine House Committee Trump Senate House Judiciary Committee House Democrats Judiciary Committee Congress House of Representatives White House Nancy Pelosi bribery extortion Chris Hayes New York
"north america" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"The RV industry is Dean choral the I guess I can say he's suzy right right very enthusiastic and really genuinely nice guy who happens to be the on camera spokesman for leisure travel vans now over the past few years Dean has become the most popular RV salesman in North America as by virtue of his on camera walk around video tours of his company's RV's those are videos have been watched I ready for this more than check this morning they've been watched more than thirty one million times in the channel that Dean is on From Lisa travel vans has over one hundred thirty six thousand subscribers thus he has become the best known. RV salesman all of North America but he's also become a full-fledged celebrity in his own right he is also a terrific guy I've gotten to know pretty well over the years as we've encountered him and various RV shows and we even visit him up at his factory up there in Manitoba last week at the California he's show in Fontana have we got him to come into the leisure travel vans display a little bit earlier before the crowds got there because once the crowds were there and they spotted dean we'd never get any time with him so he came in about fifty minutes early and we got him to sit down for an interview about how this all began and what it's like being a celebrity RV salesman while we're sitting in a brand new leisure travel then and this is the first time I think I've ever seen dean it down at an RV show but we had to come early because once it starts you go thank you for spending time with no problem thank you for having me so we wanNA know is about Dean tell us about the in cargo how did you get into this business and how did you become this guru of doing our video tour yeah you know kind of a funny thing you know I started selling our visa retail lot back in the ninety things and you know the factory reps would come in I thought they were pretty cool they didn't have to set up the show they goodbye drinks for the guys after the show and I should be an RV rap that's the way more on and then be careful for what you wish for because then you get it and then you know the the video thing just came out of necessity you know we are coming out of that Recession Oh eight Oh nine uh-huh half the RV dealers in the US went bankrupt GE cut off all the flooring plan money we had just come out with the new unity model and we didn't how we were going to sell it so Ryan our General Manager Brian Elias Generation Ship Company he said Hey we're going to do a youtube video and I said okay it's just how long ago this was in two thousand nine so he says into a youtube video and that's how we're going to sell the the unity's because nobody can see him dealers have no foreign plan they can't floor him and I said okay well yeah sure whatever and then he says in you're going to do the video can I said Oh no I'm not you know we had built the very first unity MVP for Al Iota which is one of the founders of Jayco he actually came to us with that and he says you know I'm retired now listen to me but so we built it and you know turn to be fabulous and built the can we shot the video in January at minus twenty two in Winkler Manitoba now we should tell everybody that you live in winkler do yet we're yet ready the factory Lincoln Manitoba we've been there it's pretty cool though it's very called they're nice small town in the wintertime it's a little bit about winkler when he was a great community minute community we've been building there since nineteen sixty five saint family ownership great people I wouldn't want to work for anybody else they fired me five or six times now but I just keep coming back to work so how big is Your first video you said you sat it in January January up what was that like for you you've never done video governor no it was awful I remember we shot the video the the the slider was going on it was screaming because it was so called time like a cat got caught in a alternator you know one of those noises and you can see me do a double take was that and we edited the video it with a Hitachi camera we edited it we watched it I went to the bathroom and threw up and said well nobody will ever watch that thing you know that's how it went and you've done how many videos now oh I don't even know now I mean product videos I guess there's gotTa be a hundred at least on the now we use that hundreds and important number here because we should proudly point out that you are one of the the few Youtube Stars that have read just over one hundred thousand subscribers and that is phenomenal for what is essentially a a corporate webs Gotcha like she was so excited she follows lots of youtubers you know on Herron Nails and whatever it is and she was very ecstatic and I'm like yeah okay whatever right I mean there's such long videos I cannot believe I mean there are thirty minutes long sitcoms on TV or shorter right because they have commercials we don't have any kind of see this is the funny running joke on the six one thing is that in the video I I say I'm six feet tall then I go into sorry I'm six two right we kind of have some fun with it how much time do you spend preparing for one of those videos do you really WanNa know after factory so I'm a factory rep so I work at the factory and then I travel to shows or to my my dealer network so and you Washington California Oregon forgot that one Arizona so that's kind of my territory and Have you realized that you are a celebrity I know it's just it's just amazing I mean I know I've watched a lot of your videos and learned a lot and they're fun fun you know you the company they were too happy some people in the company like you know because we were very private our customers happy are dealers happy I mean and those three could be interchangeable in any direction they do not care about market share they do not they've never come to me and said Hey your market.

Dean salesman North America thirty minutes fifty minutes six feet
"north america" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Welcome to kids myths and mysteries. I'm your host chrome today. North America's lost World Sir Arthur CONAN doyle had most of the description correct for a lost world. He was just on the wrong continent. If you read the loss world by conon doyle you you know about the dinosaurs primitive tribes at fought and the jungles. We're all consuming of course there was the expedition Professor Challenger reporter in a big game game. Hunter Doyle came up with all this at a time when explorer Percy Fawcett works flooring the Amazon searching for the lost city of Z but what if I told you that there is a place where a tribe of primitive Indians fought and at least one dinosaur roamed along with a prehistoric bear dog doug a location not touched by the last great ice age a place with high cliffs a river that no one has ever navigated fully early and a waterfall twice the height of Niagara Falls but this so-called loss world is in North America aside from the jungle goal nearly everything in doyle's loss world exists or exists today. That's right today. The dinosaur was the woolly mammoth than the bear dog was Sua. The mammoth was present in this hidden place as the Romans were building the coliseum bone soup both the mammoth and the Wahiawa are present in the valley to this day two tribes occupied the valley the Naja were violent and rumored to be cannibalistic they lived high up upon the plateaus and in caves the DNA were resided near the river and were finally driven out by the constant Naja raiding parties between tweet nine hundred ninety five and nineteen fifty-six more than one hundred miners and explorers either vanished or their bodies were discovered minus their heads today the DNA live outside the valley and the Naja simply vanished the valley referred to as Deadman's Bali or headless valley is the the Hani Hani was early on considered a shortcut to the Alaska gold rush of the Yukon in one thousand nine hundred five that McCloy brothers ventured up the nominee in search of gold and apparently found it when they didn't show up before winter set in a third younger brother went in search search and this spring and found their bodies tied upside down and trees missing their hits over the next fifty years numerous individuals entered the valley some looking for gold that was rumored to have been found by the McCloy brothers other simply to explore some never seen again and others were found by their camp or cabin dead and missing their heads. Many Tales of law cities and civilizations are slow. Lee consumed by the miss of time time not so the new hockey as recently as nineteen seventy four one of the last prospectors to seek out the McCloy gold was still making trips down on the Noni the DNA native to the Hani Bali reluctant to enter the valley and share tales the Vanish Naja the woolly mammoth and the Wahiawa today as few as nine hundred tourists a year take a trip up to Virginia falls few if any venture beyond the false even with the guide the cliffs of the South Hani Tower over three thousand feet above the river. If you're interested in watching a documentary on this last prospect suspect that would be Albert fatally and triple the Hani simply Google is name Albert Sally S. A. L. L. E. The result will direct you to documentary made about nineteen sixty eight and the aerial views of the honey country are are inspiring. North America's loss world was produced here at night owl sound studio and brought to you by Al Creek press at Al Creek Dot Com check it out and the Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library be sure to listen to tales of ghost towns at the old West every Tuesday and Thursday and myths and mysteries every Monday Wednesday understand Friday. I'm crumb. Thanks for listening.

Arthur CONAN doyle Hani Hani North America Naja Hani Bali South Hani Tower Rogue Valley Metaphysical Libr headless valley Wahiawa McCloy Al Creek Dot Com Percy Fawcett Niagara Falls Google Professor Challenger Al Creek Albert Alaska Amazon Deadman
"north america" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Aerial America

"The bagley icefield gets the largest non polar icefield north american. The beckley is essentially a giant bathtub of solid ice. It's one hundred twenty miles long six miles wide and in some places a half a mile thick a giant bathtub of solid ice. It's one hundred twenty miles long six miles wide and in some places a half a mile thick ice fields are created at high elevations. Were it's too cold to rain but as snowfall accumulates over time it gets compacted under new layers of snow and gradually turns to solid ice ice that will eventually be the source of glaciers. It can be hard to see from above by the ice in this giant bowl is actually flowing out into valleys between the surrounding mountains as glaciers. Uh the bagley is a giant in the world of ice so it's not surprising that the glaciers at spawns giants to in one of them is the largest and longest glacier in the world the bearing at its mouth this one glacier is ten miles miles wide every year it releases six and a half trillion gallons of water into the gulf of alaska. There are few natural environments as forbidding to humans as the treacherous surface of giant glaciers flying across the bearing is the only way to peer down into the thousands of deep and shifting crevasses make up this glacier just one of these could easily swallow low people

longest glacier bagley beckley alaska trillion gallons
"north america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gin and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear welcome back. It's time for chopper's your morning and night do brushing chef station on top of your mouth on one side and brush all the way to molars in the back in its history week and tonight. We're exploring his street three of north america. Let's jump in our pretend time machine and travel back in time. Wow where are we gettysburg. Pennsylvania united states eighteen sixty three. Oh cool. I see a tall man he's wearing a suit with a long coat and tall hat and he pulls some paper out of the hat what he's about to give a speech to a bunch of people so time machine who is this man abraham lincoln switcher brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth breath. Abraham lincoln was the sixteenth president of the united states. He was the president during the american civil war a war that divided fighted people from the south and people from the north abraham lincoln once gave a speech where he said that all people were equal and the american people should live in united nation that speech still inspires the american people today and abraham lincoln is remembered as one of the greatest u._s. presidents and one who kept his papers and and his hat pretty practical switch rushing to the bottom of your mouth. Don't forget your front teeth. Okay time to time mm travel again time she where are we now. It is twenty years later in chicago illinois. Whoa i'm standing in front of massive. Ten story building might sound small to you but back in the day this this was huge. It was the tallest building people that ever seen so time machine. What do i spy the home insurance building. I'll tell you more after you switch your rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth your tongue brush tale the home insurance building in chicago was the world's first skyscraper and the person who designed it major william lebaron jenney was named the father of the skyscraper he used a steel frame to support the walls of the building and the enormous weight of it it and at that time houses and buildings were mostly that of would the home insurance building was one of the first buildings be made using steel <music> dipper chompers tonight. You've done a great job brushing until next time. Chompers is production of gimblett. Media chompers is brought to you buy good night's the number one night time underwear delivering protection where children needed the most grownups back to school is just around the corner new schools new new friends new classes when your kid there's one thing that can get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups at good nights to your back to school list because 'cause nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great school days begin with good nights.

Abraham lincoln Chompers chicago north america united states william lebaron jenney Pennsylvania illinois united nation forty percent twenty years
"north america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gin and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear good morning. It's nine per chompers. Chompers your twice-daily tooth brushing show establishing on the top of your mouth. Pick a side ambush little circles all the way around each to three. It's history today. We're exploring the history of north america so let's jump into our pretend time machine. I've landed hundreds of years back in time on an island in what's called the caribbean ocean. I see a man getting off of his ship. It seems really really excited. Oh it turns out. He's been ceiling for ten weeks all the way from europe but there's something wrong. This man seems to think arrived in a country called india but dude india's and totally the opposite direction time machine. Who is this guy find out after you switch you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth rush the molars in the back too so who is this man columbus columbus was an italian explorer who really wanted to reach india and when he arrived in the caribbean he thought he'd found the west coast india so we called the islands the west indies he also called the people who were living there the indians it was all a big mistake but still oh for decades and decades and decades people from europe kept calling the people from north america the indians switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth okay. Let's travel through time again. I've landed farther back in time. Columbus hasn't even been born yet. I'm not on an island anymore but i'm still in north america. People are making close building buildings farming food hang out with their families out hunting traveling trading things with each other. You know just doing all the stuff that people people do time machine who are these people native americans <music> into the other side of the bottom of your mouth but don't brush to heart. Native americans were the first people to live in north america and they've lived there for a long long long long long time native americans were there before europeans. The vikings columbus or the british arrived instead of pulse. Native americans have been here since before canada the u._s. And mexico even existed and native americans are still here today. <music> that's for choppers but come back tonight and until then dan chompers production of gimblett media chompers brought to you by good night's the number one night time underwear delivering protection where children needed the most grownups back to school is is just around the corner new schools new friends new classes when you're a kid. There's one thing that can get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups <unk> abc good nights to your back to school list because nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great school days begin with good nights.

dan chompers north america columbus columbus india europe vikings west indies mexico forty percent ten weeks
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

15:40 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Her. Her. How is it internet being used to attract a younger and more diverse crowd? You know, a lot of people look back in the good old days and they say that was such a simpler time. I would much rather live during that time I disagree. I think that's nonsense, I would much rather live to in today's world where we have yes to stow, many things I can speak to someone across the country, or even across the globe, just by setting tweet out. I think that the rise of the internet in especi-, especially social media has helped a lot when it comes to just seeing familiar faces out there. I think that that's one of the most unique parts about all of this. For example, there aren't I don't know if anyone ear knew this, but aren't a lot of black burgers out there just gonna shock there. They're using social media. I can see that there are indeed other Blackbird is out there in states like California or Illinois, or Arizona, and I can start a network with them. And we can become friends, and we can kinda just. Share things that are familiar to us in, in grow, this relationship in grow friendship, in hopefully, reach out to other people who look like we do as well in kind of start a movement, essentially. So I think that being today's world with the rise of the internet and social media is one of the biggest parts about all of this thousand fucking perfect answer. I'm. Over jason. You said that this is Pokemon go. But for real birds. My question there is when I find a bird, can I capture it in a small ball, and then fight other birds you can with it. Definitely do that. Thanks so much for that addition, met that was really. If you if you find a European Starling house barrel. Please captured in a Pok. Mon ball of basketball. Baseball doesn't matter. Capture it as you can do whatever you want with it. You heard here guys. All right. Police pursued. Yeah. So what are some of the best online resources for birding Jason I know I saw something in one of your videos about, like bird list serves like where burgers going online. All right. I don't like this serves. Okay. Okay. List serves to they utilize Email as, as a what they considered to be efficient method of getting information out. So this is the thing if I'm burning in a certain location. Let's say east of this of a city and another bird, who's west of the city. See something really rare in common. I'm gonna find out through Email hours later, I'd much rather find out on Twitter, the moment it happens. So we're starting to move away from list serves in more towards more quicker fishing, methods of communication. So I'm starting to see Twitter accounts pop-up whose sole focus is just to tweet out bird sightings in a certain city. So we're starting to see stuff like that was started seed. Burgers, join a message groups like what's app or group me and they're able to communicate with each? Other much quicker and get information out is well, I think that hide on the frontier of a big boom when it comes to abs- being created specifically for burgers to get information out to one another. That was talking earlier about an app that tracks the migratory patterns of birds based on people's photos of them in different states. So I don't know. There's probably some cool stuff out there that what I think I think I may be mistaken, but I think it was called Ebert or birds. Yeah. And it was like I have Hiebert on my fault. Take the picture, you have is that it was created by a university. Maybe Cornell now. Yes, it is out. Great. I is it? Good. Is this is, is this good science happening in crowd source? I think so. Yes, but I think that so this is what the app is first of all, I think cornell's e bird is the biggest current app out there. The most important as well. In the reason I say that is because it allows you to input data into a global database and Ebert will keep track of all of your data for you. It will compare and contrast it with other people's data at live in the next town over the next state or the next country over you are able to see where birds are at any given point in time anywhere cross the world. And it keeps a one of my favorite features. That keeps a ranking list for you as well. So you can see where you stack up with burgers that are in the same city as you in the same state or in the same country as well. So I love. The competitive aspect of it saw Mabel to see where I rank a currently with everyone. So we've left to hear how this YouTube series came to fruition. Yes. So all right. Of had his Twitter following for some time now. And as I mentioned, consistency is key in part of the reason. Consistency is key is because you never know who's watching so last year March of twenty eighteen the editorial director of topic, which is visual storytelling platform, they reached out to me and said, hey love, which doing hair. Would you like to brainstorm a little bit in work together in the future? So I was like, okay sure let's do it stains information next thing you know, we're on a conference call. And we're just tossing out ideas I came up with this really cool video series that we would record maybe two or three episodes, just showing burning in fresh new light that turned into them. Hiring a director film crew and us going, the central park, two months later in filming the pilot episodes for of North America. So. No kind of media, training know kind of rehearsing or anything. I was just pushed onto this platform this decided to host in the very first scene of episode one, I am walking through this place called sheet meadow in central park, and anyone who's ever been. There knows its place where everyone goes to just chilling. Hang out. They listen to music, a throw frisbees around. They just they chilly sunbathe and they walk a hundred feet out in this field. We'll have these big giant cameras at the edge of the field. And we just need you to turn around and walk back toward us in delivered his monologue. And I'm had okay. But everyone else is going to be looking at me, and they're gonna hear me. So it was it was something that I just had to internally struggle within get over lesson as as performers. I would like to just say that you soared. The first I had to say my favorite part, I wrote this down because I thought it was so adorable is you said something like you know, when you see a bird, you get so excited, there's in this, like you wanna have a party. But you gotta keep the party inside. Side. It's so thank you. So this is how this happens. I'm used to birding, right. So those scenes where the cameras following me around in looking for birds and I don't have to say anything. Those are natural for me 'cause I can do that all day long. But there are certain moments where we are seeing certain birds in hearing certain birds in director, who doesn't amazing job. That's why he gets paid the big bucks. He says, hey tell us how you're feeling right now. When just was like word salad that just came out of me now. It's still going to start using it. I'm keeping my party inside right now. But I'm bailing. Yeah. It's so good. My, my sister tease me about it. She thought it was the most funniest thing that he's ever heard. Also, I love that you refer to peregrine falcons as a sky lambere Guineas. That's what they are. That's where they will be formerly known as moving forward. Skyline Borghini now can start incorporating car puns, and this really opens doors for me. I have a totally different question. Do you have any bird tattoos? I just got one. Yeah. So this is my very first hat to ever actually. Oh, it took about four and a half hours and pretty large one. It's a paragon falcon. Of course, skyline Guinea, this guy Lamborghini. And it's just sitting on my upper show up, upper arm, and, yeah, it costs a lot of money. Did you filmed it, you filled it? That's also okay if you're open to it, I would love for you to join our discord server and drop a photo of your new sky lambere Guinea. Gotcha. No problem. Okay, I'm so excited. Another mother unrelated question. What are I'm just reading something about, like the, you know, about some of the crazy extinct birds that were in this country is that true? You can you tell us about. Like, what are some of the craziest extinct birds that used to be in the US in the US? So we have. All All right. right. So let's start with passenger pigeon right passenger pigeon, which, by the way, pigeon's are really cool birds, a lot of people just think of pigeon than just discount them and just toss into the side and say whatever, pigeon suck hitches are amazing. They are the only birds out there who are able to milk like substance for their chicks. It's called pigeon. Milk comes from their wrote can feed their babies that kind of milky substance. So anyway, passenger pigeons used to be so plentiful in new in North America that older settlers from back in the day, they used to see like what they described as a river of birds that would fly over their heads in darkened the sky sometimes, and we shot and killed them all so that happened. And then there's the myth of the existence of the ivory billed woodpecker as well. That is a bird of the southeastern United States. It was. The largest woodpecker that we had here in the United States. In the reason why it's such a subject of controversy. These days is because there are people out there who claim that they are still seeing this bird around. It's been extinct for over one hundred years, there's no way that they're seeing this bird anymore, but that doesn't stop these ivory. Billed truth IRS from claiming that there's this seeing the bird, man. There's a big online truth or community. I was actually passed a business card at a recent bird convention from someone out there, who said, hey, man, you wanna see a real bird, come talk to us, and he passed the car that I looked at it, and I just laughed because I thought he was kidding. And he's no, man. I'm serious. I have recordings and get out of here their truth for everything in their trolls for everything. So I was just curious like in the YouTube comments on your series or you're getting some crazy responses. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean it's inevitable. All right. So in one of the first videos, we did a kind of like a mini episode tutorial on how to use Benach years. This was shot may of last year since that point in time, I have been introduced to this, what we think of as a luxury brand of Benach, yours who've decided to gift me with a pair of their spiff -i really expensive Benach years, that I would never been able to afford, otherwise. So now I. Those everywhere that I go and the old binoculars I had were Nikon's and during that mini episode on teaching people, how to use Benach goes on holding my Nikon's, and as one person in the YouTube section who just commented to word, Nikon suck. People who are claiming that we're misidentifying some of the birds in, in the videos. And then you have the group of people who decided that they wanted to have these stupid things to say in one of our most recent videos, we did a video with Molly atoms of the feminist bird club. And of course, that brought up all of the trolls talking about why there needs to be feminist bird club in first place in this one guy was like a well, since he so inclusive. I shop at his bird, walk with make America great again, hat Ourika. Yeah. It's, it's really good that my brother and I may have someone who I'm so close with, like my brother who are Mabel to share these stories with, because my brother is so chill. So mild-mannered so agreeable with he's the good guy out of the bunch, and I'm still have a little Bronx in me. So when people say stuff like that, I'm lucky, I have. To really fight back the urge to comment in say y'all go. Let's do it comments like so it's difficult to stay you know, Jason your past this level. Now, you'll have to resort to that kind of stuff. I think the way you deal with, there could be affected, though, like taking into blows immediately. They would down either nor it or fight them. Nothing. Love that. That's your attitude. But Jason don't crow there. Going to be a waste of your time. Just like me. Just have a quick question for you. My daughter is six and she is recently like obsessed with birds in the neighborhood in the yard. And my question for you is like, what sort of kid-friendly gear apps projects, should we be equipping her with because she's, she's all aboard the bird train here. Yes. There's actually a lot of really cool things that you can use to kind of, cultivate that obsession from the app perspective. There's Audubon birds also raptor. ID is well, both of those free apps. Then you have ones that cost little bit of money like Sibley volume to that one is about twenty bucks those apps. Take you inside the world of these birds is shows you their range, maps, it actually plays different songs in 'cause back for you, so you can learn them, the raptor app, actually shows you video of the different hawks in falcons flying around you. You can get a better idea of how they look when their in flight, all of those apps, I know I dove into them when I first started to bird, and I can see kids diving into them in loving listening to the different sounds at these birds make as well. In addition to that, there are young or youth birding groups that exist in different parts of the country. What city D living we're based in New York, but in the suburbs. So yeah, yeah, I'm pretty sure there's a New York young burgers club. I just did an episode with the Ohio young burgers club in there of really cool group of younger burgers, who are trying to ushering, the next generation of burgers, they exist from eighteen years old all the way down to about eleven years old. And then they have younger kids are even younger than that. They're kind of a grooming. I guess you can say is so that they become his in finally, this sense of community as they get older as well..

Burgers jason YouTube United States Twitter North America Cornell Ebert Mabel falcons director Nikon New York especi Baseball basketball Benach Ohio Arizona
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Smoking, hot social media strategies, followers, and turn your Twitter account into being told this episode his own joining like with birds. Likes and shares from looking at birds. Not once the point in this really earn watchers edition of tumor. All's one podcast and now here are Joan merge or ways in hand, and never in the moist. I was in good. Mergen daniela. Everybody. I'm Jen I'm.

Twitter Jen I Joan
"north america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Preexisting cultures would have been just fine without European intervention and all the the disease and degradation that had brought along with it. So if this myth of empty North America is indeed false. What do we know about it? Like, what are the facts? Oh, sure. I mean prior to any Europeans showing up on North American land. There were one hundred and twelve million people already living somewhere on the continent. And, you know, lower estimates do range to as little as eight million people from that one hundred twelve million. So there is a range because it's not known the exact number of people. There's no census. There's no any way of telling how many different peoples you, can you can tell them any different. Well, at least close to however, many different cultures essentially exist just from finding things, but knowing the exact number of people is very very difficult. Right. Right, right. The one thing we do know is that there were millions of people. Yes. And they weren't all just sorta strolling around. So as many as one hundred twelve million people in fourteen ninety two but by sixteen fifty that population already plummeted to less than six million the people living at the height of pre European history. Had extensive trade networks, they have rich cultural lives, they had cities they had internal and external warfare conflicts cooperation all the things that Europe was doing and they had dense urban areas, which is something that may surprise a lot of people listening, right? And normally when you think of pre-run populations, we think of people living, a perhaps nomadic existence in some areas of the continent, we think of complex cave dwellings perhaps. But we don't we don't think of. A a London. You know, we don't think of Berlin at least. Yeah. An early version of that with structures and highly organized society existing within these structures. So we would like to introduce you to one of the largest known pre European cities in the on the continent at the time a place called Cahokia so in its prime about four centuries before our boy Colombo stumbled onto the western hemisphere walked away, and then decided to come back and dig a little deeper Cahokia was a prosperous pre American city with a population very similar to London. Archaeological data showed that agricultural settlements. First appeared in the area around four hundred eighty and then in ten fifty you had a boom population boom at coke, which became a major political and cultural center with the population booming into the tens of thousands. Yeah. And you know when When you. you think about something like this. It's hard to imagine that it could exist anywhere near current civilization. Right. Oh that must be out in the middle of nowhere somewhere. Right. Because we would know all about that. We would people in the United States would travel there to explore the the remains or something right? Sure. But no if it was located very close to present day, Saint Louis. Yeah. It's about eight miles out of Saint Louis. It's located in southern Illinois. This was by all measures that we can find the largest North American city north of Mexico at the time. It had been built by a group of people known as the mississippians. These were native people who occupied a large swath of the present day southeastern US from the Mississippi River to the shores of the Atlantic. This city go Kia was sophisticated. It was Cozma politics. But today, it's his. History is virtually unknown not to just most of the current US residents. But even to people who live in the area present day residents of Illinois, Illinois, Ziems illinois's, Enes. I hope that's not Illinois. Oh, not worth it. Just throw us in the trash. It's this is one of those stories that was bypassed in favor of that dominant narrative that we see reinforced in literature, we see reinforced in. In cinema. Yeah. Right. And it's the idea that the people who lived here before Europeans ever arrived were somehow less learned which is clearly not the case. And there's a guy named Thomas. Emerson a professor of anthropology at the university of Illinois who had an interesting, quote a lot of the world..

United States Illinois Saint Louis London North America university of Illinois Europe coke professor of anthropology Berlin Colombo Thomas Emerson Mexico Mississippi River Atlantic Ziems illinois Enes four centuries
"north america" Discussed on One Two Review

One Two Review

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"north america" Discussed on One Two Review

"Right manage that was the biggest birthday party of ever seen. I've never I never had that many friends growing up is that what part of like, hats and the cake, and they have not given us any ice cream that was messed up. No. And they had their except us got cake and ice cream. Yeah. No. I mean, and it was. The she wasn't brat. She was a brat. No. You said it, right? I she was a. I I can't say, but I know I know what you're Fisher, man. She was a mean mean girl, and I hated her and she ruined this movie for me. Anyway, you guys ready? I am. I am. I want to give it to points. But the film I saw is one point film to one point. I think just rating the film that I saw I have to give at one point. But yet much like you, Alex. I wish I could give it to points because I think under there there is a good movie. We just didn't get to see it. So one point officially. Yeah. I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna go slightly different way. Just because I agree that the movie I saw was a one point movie, but I'm gonna see it again. Which is the marks of a good movie. I'm giving it to points. Right. I wish they'd give it to. But I only gave it one that is four points for she has a sixteen screen burners. Definitely go idea. So each week. I went to review we have a different way of keeping score. And this week is no different this week because it's wintertime, we decided to give you the top twenty best sledding spots in the US a well, actually North America's a of Canadian rates in there. Let's just jump in here. Sorry. Like, I'm in LA. Currently there are no sledding spots. So I to kind of maybe get something that I might be able to make use of right now. At the time the time, we're is that. Okay. Yes. Right. So hypothetically speaking if someone died at your party the. In whatever manner. Whether it be falling off, a railing or or whatever having a heart attack. Anyway, you have a body. How how do I just dispose of a body twenty top ways to get rid of a body? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Cool, man. I like the storm. Let me get a pen can go for pathetically speaking. All right, cool. Hypothetically speaking, you got a dead body in your house. I would say number one called the police companies Tomo happen easy, and they'll get rid of that body. So for my one point called police say, no. Yeah. Go ahead. No. Because for me if I'm just off the top of my head I've seen some movies. So I TV I'm gonna go maybe breaking bad style. Dissolve it in tub for one point, and then maybe Hannibal Lecter style and feed feed the body to guests that come over. True to does seem efficient. I only have to give one point. I'm going to say what do you do with the body? You bury it. Okay. Great. Thanks, guys. Yes. Oh, get get through there. Sleep. He's shown that sleepers wear shoes are twice as productive in.

Alex Fisher LA US Hannibal Lecter North America