28 Burst results for "nissim"

"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

04:58 min | 1 d ago

"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

"That said, the Iron Dome debate in the House was particularly ugly. And I think Jews, many Jews across America felt like an unwillingness to support Israel's missile defense. Signaled a viewing of Jewish lives as expendable. Like Jewish lives mattering less. So while it was a vote about Israel, those lines were really blurred for a lot of people. And unfortunately, we're still fighting for Iron Dome funding. The house phone is done. Thank goodness it passed. But it's held up in the Senate now and we're nearing the yearend where there's a government shutdown looming. And this funding hasn't gone through in the Senate. So for everyone who wants to know, what can I do? One thing that you could do is go to AGC dot org slash fund, Iron Dome. And you can send in 30 seconds a quick note to your senator saying please pass on your indulgence support. I'm thrilled that you mentioned that. I'm a big believer that there are so many ways of being Jewish. I've written about this. I've talked about this on the podcast. I mean, yes, I'm so glad that you brought that up. That the maccabees were one kind of they had one particular kind of way of practicing Judaism, but it really was about the diversity within our tradition. Melanie, I'm curious if you have any thoughts on just how to use, again, that complicated Hanukkah story. As a tool for advocacy. I love what Julie said. And I think that the idea of peoplehood and the complexity of peoplehood is so important and I agree that this is an opportunity for us to utilize the hanuka story to help people understand that. One of the challenges we have is that people don't understand the Jewish community. They don't understand the notion of peoplehood. When we say we are a nation, we are a people that we were a people without a land. That does not make a lot of sense to most people who don't really understand much about Jews. Therefore, they will wrongly think that anti semitism is a merely a religious bigotry and anti religious bigotry. When we know that anti semitism sometimes it is about the religion, whether it's, you know, the sort of classic Christ killer kinds of tropes about Jews, but that are fundamental sense of peoplehood and identity is often what is being attacked. And that they don't understand that our connection of to Israel for many of us, again, I don't speak for all of us. But for many of us, it is absolutely endemic and intrinsic to our sense of Judaism and jewishness and people hood. And so for many they think, well, if I'm criticizing Israel, I have no problem with Jews practicing Judaism. I just think Israel shouldn't exist. Or I think as well as the worst place on earth. They don't understand the connection for us because it is part of our peoplehood, and they don't understand how that feels. When we hear that. The battlefronts keep coming. The aggressors keep challenging us, but zealots that we are, we will persist. Can I sit one more thing really quickly? Please. Because it strikes me that we are coming at this with a sort of a nuanced understanding of what the story is. But.

Israel Senate Iron Dome Melanie America House Julie
"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

04:20 min | 1 d ago

"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

"And their teams to try and make sure that we are part of the awareness raising from the very local level all the way up through the state level onward to members of Congress and beyond. And we understand that. So as Julie mentioned, we're seeing the awareness being raised because AJC and many other organizations, but certainly AJC are working hard to make sure that our elected officials and civic leaders at every level really understand what's happening. What we know is that much of the inaction is simply because they're not paying attention. And they're not aware of what's happening. It's not necessarily nefarious. So it is our job to make sure they are aware. It's their job too. Of course, but we are there to help make sure that they understand the reality of the problem. They understand the complexity of the problem. They hear our ability to describe the many sources of anti semitism. We're not blaming any one particular corner of the population for anti semitism. We're saying, this is a problem that takes many forms. It's complicated, and you need to understand it. And that if you do understand it, you will also understand how it connects and becomes almost a harbinger of other ills that exist within our communities and society and other forms of hate. So what we're doing in order to help make those changes is we are out there presenting our survey data and our agency resources and tools across the country, both at the very local level. So to city councils, to mayors and their staffs, to state legislators, to various civic groups, to community groups, to Jewish groups, even around the country so that more and more people are aware of the problem are aware of some of these alarming statistics and are talking about it. And then we're able to say, we have some important tools as Julie mentioned the IHRA working definition of anti semitism, which we believe is the gold standard of definitions of anti semitism is something we have seen with our encouragement and advocacy mayors, city councils, state governments, different bodies, municipal bodies, adopting this definition and saying, we understand that this definition will help us define and identify and understand anti semitism more fully. So I want to ask you this, Melanie. I mean, it's not apathy on the part of these mayors, right?.

Julie Congress IHRA Melanie
"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

04:51 min | 1 d ago

"nissim" Discussed on People of the Pod

"And really just trying to have fun. There has been a lot of David digs in our House, which is probably not a wise choice on my part because my son really does want a puppy for Hanukkah. So it just exacerbates that. But you do, you raise a good point. There is so much joy in the Jewish tradition. And Hanukkah is one of those moments, one of those times of the year when we really should play up the joy. Holly not to put you on the spot, but you are tasked with leading AJC's efforts to combat anti semitism, and you are Christian. Growing up, celebrating Christmas, what was your understanding of Hanukkah? Was it Christmas for the Jews? Or did you understand it as much more than that? And at what point did you realize this is actually a festival that marks some of the earliest efforts by Jews to defend the freedom to worship? So my best friend growing up was Jewish. So I may have had a slightly greater understanding of Hanukkah than other non Jewish American children. But I do think I saw it as a Jewish Christmas. And I remember being envious when I was little, that my friend got presents for 8 days and I only got presents for one. And I actually asked my parents about more days for presents. But now I know more about the history of the holiday, even how it celebrated in the United States. Both Christmas and Hanukkah became increasingly commercialized in the United States, especially in the 20th century with lights on our homes and decorations. And I know many Jews who also have lights on their homes, decorations that you see the elf on the shelf has become bench on the bench. And a lot of this is for children for children to celebrate these holidays together. But now, you know, removed from those younger years and today in the field of combating anti semitism professionally, panic it takes on new significance. It really wasn't until much later in my life in the last ten years that I really learned what Hanukkah meant about the rededication of the temple, the Mac of the Jews were being controlled Jerusalem. And I think about what the late rabbi lord Jonathan sucks said about Hanukkah. When he noted that the maccabees victory was actually short lived and within the century Rome took over..

AJC Holly David United States rabbi lord Jonathan sucks Jerusalem Rome
"nissim" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

05:19 min | Last month

"nissim" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

"The time you leave friends you meet new friends and sometimes it's nice to have somebody that's been the same things you've been through to communicate with us so it helps connect like minded lighthearted kids 'cause what is as we have parents fill out the form. What are your kids likes. What are they not lake. And we try to match by age groups and interests and so far with our beta testers. It's been phenomenal. They've all really liked it. Um we're wanting me more people sign up the milky milky dot com and it also helps build resilience in gifts because a deployed and they write to somebody else that has apparent deployed. They can talk about their emotions. Not necessarily face to face which some kids that that's difficult for. Sometimes it's easier to write it down and it helps a lot. I know it's helped my son with writing in like write doesn't like to read. But this made him interested it kind of that interested in writing his handwriting. Nissim food fight doing this. Because he is ready to be all chart and then he started doing this in one the other kid be able to read his writing was important to me. One to present a good image to educate. Who's writing. do you wanna be young. Some sloppy kit off the street and a just has kind of grown from their their particular story of something. You didn't expect to happen from the launch of the product. I wasn't expecting my kids to be excited about it as we as adults are excited about it because it's our product in. We're hoping for that excitement but to see might kids so excited hague aga- check the mail today like not something you'd expect a nine year old six year old. Say but they do. They go wait every day. That your check the mail on Their back and it's just. It's awesome. What i can see. That is almost this ability to like. Would you set articulate the emotion being able to share that with another kid that they don't understand they've never met probably right because these are just online connections as these are people that are familiar in their life. Will it could be. But in your case you're actually putting two random people together to have a conversation with and there's just kind of this opportunity to reveal with child is but then also here who the other child is and i mean that empathy. There that you can do. Especially if the dad's reply to moms employed that something is not a lot of kids. Give themselves permission to like. Let their guard down enough to say that..

Nissim
California Recall Effort Fails: Newsom to Remain in Office

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

California Recall Effort Fails: Newsom to Remain in Office

"Gavin. Newsom survived the recall. Election in california survived slash decimated. The recall election california early estimates wednesday morning had the margin. That'll keep nissim in office by over twenty percent exit. Poll numbers from edison research had some interesting nuggets more than four in ten. Democrats called corona virus their top issue compared to one in five republicans. Republicans were three times as likely as democrats to call the economy. Their top

Nissim Newsom California Edison Research Gavin Nuggets Corona
"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:11 min | 6 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

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"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Wow you talk about enlightening and impact will conversation. I think i just had it would be. I mean she dropped the mic and she deserves every single on fire emoji. You know that one can send him. I mean true. I think the biggest thing for me is when she said that although she was scottish board and although you know there was a king in that country her king is king david no matter if there was a king or queen ever in scotland the queen and her history as queen esta. And i feel like with all these identity politics and all these these race conversations anti-semitism and everything else says flying right now as that. It's important for the jewish people to realize is that the horizontal arguments have everything to do with. What's going on down here this first. That and i'm not saying we don't have to be in the world very much so we're supposed to be in the well we're supposed to be elevating the will but that's the thing is elevating it. We're supposed to bring down that vertical relationship from up above down to this earth and that's our genius dislike fish if you take fish out of water and you look at the fish. The fish will choke it would die. It would look as if what's the purpose. What is the purpose of this fish. But if you put that fish inside a water then you'll see it's genius any joop when we step outside of bringing down our vertical relationship to this world and elevating this world. We're put here to do then. We don't show up. Jeez and i feel like being connected to our kings or queens worth the ultimate help the world in a major way more than what we know what that said. I love to leave you guys with the song that makes me feel some type of way you know. After i had that conversation. So the appropriate song i feel like for this conversation is none other than bhave song. My rendition of.

king david scotland queens
"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

37:57 min | 6 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Else forever you will. You'll be silenced. You know you'll be cancelled as you said you'll be unless you're the you that you you you know that you know that you are so i think the twenty twenty was very big for a lot of people. Yeah i really agree. You know there was a point actually right in the beginning of the pandemic. When i sort of came to that realization of i think people are really going to route deeply into themselves during this period of time and when eventually the time comes to emerge back into society people are going to have to be prepared to face goes they used to know in their tryst essence because a lot of people were expressing nostalgia at the beginning of the pandemic and start as a source of comfort. You know you go back to the records used to listen to you. Were a kid or the tv shows movies. Whatever so that you can feel some sense of comfort and in such a distressing periods and you know unknown period of time. And i think what happened in that was that people really traced at three line in their lives and try to figure truly where they're so comes from and who they really are and the fact that we've been so un-socialist but we've been so separated from all the sensory stimuli that we're used to all the time that there's been no distraction. There's been no outside influence from the people that were accustomed to spending time with. And i do think that it makes sense that we're having all of these incredibly complicated conversations about identity and having all of these tribal clashes because i think people have really clinging on to however they identify as the be all end all for their survival right because without our stories and who we are. There's really at the moment. There's there's nothing else to go on. I mean so right. It's very true. And you know something else about what you said about anti-semitism you know since i have that. That side also have the black side. I've always said that. I cannot speak for every black person when it comes to race related questions right because i grew up in seattle. Seattle is was very very. It's a tree hugging very gray. I don't see color colorblind. Which is quite crazy because everything is going on like seattle and portland. Where you you're more than likely to have more. African american say that they're not really experiencing racism outside systemic racism. That's already something different but like real deal racism or that that's the actual problem in their life. If there's two places in america where you will not be talking about it right. We'll be in seattle and portland and they're like going flipping out going crazy all over. It's rather interesting to see. But i can't speak for person who grew up in new york where everything is already segregated by neighborhoods and boroughs and different things like that are who grew up in atlanta. Georgia my wife. Who's from louisiana. She has a different experience than i had growing up in seattle. Not to say that. There's not issues everywhere but i can't speak on behalf of everybody for good friend of mine who was Was actually i. Call him a friend. He's like an uncle to me now. He grew up during the jim crow era. He watched his father killed by the ku klux klan. He has a completely different experience. He's got a different heightened heightened sense of awareness and smells out racism far more than i can who never had that experience right so i'm obviously going to have a different different approach. Do you feel like perhaps maybe the jews that are in america who are not experiencing a blatant anti-semitism as you say that made may be things systemic and things have been in curbing that way. I'm gonna be honest like especially in the entertainment industry for instance. You're starting to see more even black privilege in the fight to push out the jewish influence. Even more you know in the wake of everything that's been going on. I guess it's probably happening every industry but you starting to see things be pushed a certain way and you know obviously the olym- group and a lot of them coming out with anti-semitism Part of the campaign. Do you feel like the jews. And americans just because they haven't experienced it and on that they're not able to have the adequate response to such thing. Yeah i feel as though i again just as you feel like. You can't speak for all African american people. I also feel like. I can't speak for all jews and i can. I can say that. My experience in america from a jewish perspective over the past seven years has been quite one of impulsive syndrome. Really and i don't feel like i connects to american jury tall. It's not my experience to feel like i'm in the. It's it's interesting. Because i think a lot of american jews maybe under the false impression that they're in some kind of secure majority here and there are no you know. American jews are nowhere near a majority of the population in this country. And even in places where they're highly concentrated they're still no majority so. I think that there is a lot of complexities with american identity at large and i think a lot of jewish americans would identify themselves as american amend maybe even democrat before they identify themselves jewish. If they happen to be left-leaning. I think that this comes down to you. The the story of how many americans many american jews came to america on where they they were asked on entry whether they wanted to sort of fit into 'em religious or racial categorisations and that a law of jews define themselves racially as as white or white functioning and therefore they have assumed a law of the quote unquote white guilt. There is festering existing right now as a result of conversations around systemic racism. Right i give when i hear this stuff also to like we look at what we did and now that i'm hearing coming from like jews mouth you know. You're part of the founding. Fathers that i think it was Maybe around two percent. It could even be less than two percent of even the white people that are there in america are descendants of slave owners right. You know you start to look at white guilt and it becomes something completely different than even furthermore when you start to hear you saying you know look how unfortunate it is that you know what we've done to these people and i. It really does bother me a lot. When i hear these type of things but i want to ask you so you when you described london i wanna. I hope i'm going to quote you right. You said it was a eyebrow raising place to be jewish right and anti-semitism is very palpable. Like we're talking about and when you got to allay. Did you really feel a a big change in a big shift in that. Yeah i felt like had made. Ali are when i came to la. Which is a gay and kind of speaks to the the question that you just asked me about. This full sensitive living through some kind of golden medina in america is particularly in areas like los angeles. Because you'll drive through west. Hollywood and beverly hills and you see all of these really palatial synagogues with big hebrew writing outside it's very showy and everything is on display in those minora's and the local cvs. And i seen anything like you have never seen anything like this because first of all. I grew up in glasgow in scotland. Where there's a population of a few thousand jews we had six synagogues one reform and five orthodox and by the time. I left glasgow. Only two of them. I think were still functioning and we didn't have. We didn't have a meet daily. We had to get our meat delivered from manchester in london and we had one to kosher delis. Sorry but the point. Being that i lived in a very minority environment and i lived in a tiny jewish neighborhood. All glasgow but we were no putting our judaism on display. I was always taught to wear my mcginn divvied underneath my shirt i remember. I had a hard rock. Jerusalem t-shirt from an israel tra- when i was a kid and my dad wouldn't let me wear it. I two time it was very much. You can be pro in your home. And it's fine you carrier judaism with you always but just don't go looking for trouble when you're out in the street. London isn't to that extent. Because obviously there. There is a much larger jewish population in london. There are lots of very visibly jewish areas in london. However at the time that i was i was living in london from two thousand seven till two thousand fourteen and during the last period of that time was when you know there was conflict in gaza and the movement was really building steam. And i remember even going. I was living in the east end of london where interestingly enough was you know the first kind of jewish immigrants to the uk. Many of them lived in east end of london. And i remember going to my local branch of a huge supermarket chain in the uk cold tesco's and all of the kosher products had been removed from the isles because of the boycott movement tesco as named such after the the wife of the man who founded tesco whose name was test a cohen. So it was you know seh. Jewish is a historically jewish supermarket. Chain and the thing. That's even more mind-blowing By this is that the kosher for that they were removing from the aisles was not from israel. It was made in kanter somewhere in the south of england so wasn't even successfully. Just one of the first instances. I really saw the grind jeff. Ho- honestly stupid. The movement is because it's not even in with regards to what it wants to target a can't even get that right. There is nothing about boycotting fit products that are made in kent this going to help the palestinians right right. So it's clear to me that it's an anti semitic movement that was one of this draws that broke the camel's back that was like one of the final moments of i really feel like i have to. I hear you know in terms of eyebrow raising because the eight fell. I mean felt sinister. I completely understand and it seems like everything sort of like the way it starts out with boycott israel. This and then people's true feelings ended up coming out and you start to see that. It's anybody that identifies with openly. Jewish are have have any type of love support for israel where the state of israel. or whether. It's you know it's the people you know. I just feel like everything is so divided right now in the world is becoming so divided is a horrible feeling because you may have friends and family. You know you're mentioning earlier that you know friends starting to drop out and drop off of your. You know your friendship list. It's it's almost like the biggest blessing. Because there's that clarity air you know. I never forget. I was somewhere was hearing. Someone speak and they were talking about i i unfortunately i forgot who the rabbi was But he was speaking about the the blessing of anti-semitism. No because sometimes when everything is in this area of great and it's not so clear right like the The villain of making elliot. La you know where it's a different world for you. You understand what i'm saying like. Yeah it's very much so can make it easier for a person to relax and and sometimes we're relax relax too much. And we forget what mission his forget. What purposes we forget what you know what we're supposed to be doing while we're in this world and unfortunately many of us have to have a wakeup call wonder for us to realize hold on. Wait wait wait. You know what i am different. And there's some special about me and this is not even just. This is something that is very very true for the jewish people. But it's true for every individual sometimes. It's only fill those hardships and going through things that are less desired. You know that really help us to remind ourselves who we really are and what we're our cape capabilities are so i think it's it's a huge time and as much as it's hard on. Everybody is really like a blessing in disguise right so yeah and the point that you made feeling a bit too comfortable honestly you know without speaking out of turn. That's kind of the way. I feel about a law of american jews as it's the assimilation as being in a way too successful because the the knowledge of who we are where we come from why we have a country and why we need that country seems to have become you know even remotely a priority to impart between generations. And i think that's why we such a ferocious rise in anti zionism among especially progressive leaning jewish people in america because they've sent her themselves in the story of the jewish diaspora. And i mean. I think if you were to ask. Many anti-zionist in america do you know about the last jeez of yemen who were exiled last year. They would know about that and they wouldn't realize that if it weren't for israel an alley opera then the the number of jews from the middle east to north africa who managed to escape oppressive anti semitic regimes many of them. We would never we wouldn't know about and we wouldn't have heard about right. But i think they are ignorant to that because they've lost they've assimilated to too much into a non jewish world and i say that as somebody who who balances the importance of my jewish identity with with what i feel to be important to me as being office secular community. I've always been proudly am involved in the non-jewish worlds. But i never abdicate from my jewish identity in order to do so because i knew where that leads. I know where that's lead us historically and also. It's not my business to do that because i am a pro. Do right favorite beautiful thing. So i'm gonna ask much of your energy These days is bent fighting the good fight on social media. You know what it is today. Everybody's like fighting these trollers right and people get on the end. Just trolling tonight. Question for you is like. Do you ever stop. This is not worth god. Yeah i actually. I have to be honest with you. The amount of engagement that i do is very limited now i. I'm pretty much a you know. I liked my bags off and i leave like i just i just. I put whatever i want to go. Why there and if someone is asking me a genuine thought-provoking interesting question on looks willing to engage in. Have a discussion been great. I'm all for that. But trolls i just. I just blocked an and move on because i've seen it too many times. Even i mean controls can be people with elevated massive platforms with tens of thousands of followers. But i were where these people's hearts or like they're all lie and they just won't be hateful and spiteful they don't they wanted to humanize me. They want to create a scenario in which i advocate for my for. That's their endgame. So there's new there's new conversing with that person there's no dialogue and i think that's one of the biggest tragedies of social media is that it's supposed to be this democratic information highway where we're all supposed to be able to say things and share ideas and thoughts and what have you but what actually done is created this horrific divided into tribes are echo chambers. Or whatever you wanna call it. And there is no dialogue happening between those. Those chambers is just you know i was tweeting something the other day about the most damaging tactic that is employed right now on the internet is a bunch of trolls calling someone racist with any accountability without any rationale without any evidence and the m the disproportion between what they don't have to do in order to make that claim and then the consequences that result on the person being labeled as racist. It's just wrote. It's insane but this has become a part of online. Dialup is just acceptable to people. And it's completely absurd and it's gross. It's truly grows. It is for sure i tell you what. It's a waste of time. I i i'll tell you what i just had to ask you that because i feel the same way like people write things and some people are very genuine in their dislike of me but other people are not most people not even the ones that are genuine for sure you're not gonna convince them because evinced off or whatever and then when it comes to like trollers are even people that are very. Let's deal with the sincere people even right Trollers everybody knows that. It's not real but for people that are even sincere about it sometimes. It's sort of like nobody came to have themselves convinced otherwise. Generally when you start arguing somebody is almost like how much are you really looking for. Truth in the matter are are how much of it is you. You really want to get your point like in other words. We're having this conversation and we're going back and forth about what. We both may believe wholeheartedly. However i i really didn't even hear what you just said to be because you said one thing and that brought up amazing point that i want to touch you know you argue that you you just went for you know ninety seconds but in the first thirty seconds you said something and i've had my answer prepared since the first thirty seconds of which you just almost feels like you know it's so unhealthy the dialogue itself because we're not even getting anywhere. So do you ever feel like when you're having disputes are in the past. They have more disputes. Because you said now you just dropping bombs on them so that's all good the ever feel like you're getting somewhere within the you feel like you've actually been able to change people's mind and open them up to Maybe your wave thinking. yeah. I have actually quite a law. I have a pretty good track record of that mazing and it's really it's hard work and it doesn't it some people. Can they wanna formula for how to make that happen. And there is no formula but it is. It's the people you can kind of. Tell the people who are leaning one way. But they're kind of still on the fence. They have enough humility to admit they don't know the full picture of information and you offer them some information they've never heard before and they have not preparedness to change their perspective according to some new information so there are times when it happens sometimes. It's happened in public forums. So in the comment section of my instagram or on twitter. Most of the time it happens in direct messages behind the public space. This is the tragedy of social media. People feel comfortable to ask questions on social media. They don't they don't want to admit a lack of knowledge of the time it will be someone who has you know slid into my as they say and questions are says. How can you advocate for this. How can you be zionist then. I asked simple questions of or. Did you know that this is what zionism means that. It's just plainly. A by a human human rights for jewish people basically who have been in exile for three thousand years and then and then you get into with them in a calm manner where they don't feel as though they're being watched by limitless might of people while they're trying to learn about something so there are occasions when it has gleaned results and people have changed their perspective however that takes a certain kind of engagement that takes a certain type of person and one of the reasons why i started. Advocating is because i realized that i was in a really unique position i was firmly embedded in the progressive world in the arts space. I was a really respect to journalists. And i was followed by an in inner circle with all of these you know really quote unquote cool bands and artists and musicians and people who had been used to hearing a lot of civil rights. Speak about many different communities them the black and brown communities. Are you know. Queer communities are all manner of communities. But i knew that those people never really heard anything by jewish advocacy and that it was in my experience of existing in a lot of other spaces. Queer spaces feminist spaces my experience that jews were being pushed out of those spaces unless they rescinded their zionism on which i was never a prepared today and because i was seeing this happen more and more i felt will while i'm still ryan tear. Educate people on this is a buyer and white so stop the we're being excluded And being excluded really is being excluded from that conversation of you know we are also minorities and we're also mistreated and it's one of those things where Goes back to you said earlier this whole entire idea. I have a friend shutout out to see my boy. And and i. I have to quaint him with this phrase. I haven't heard of anyone else right. But he said to me a long time ago. We're having this discussion. And we were talking about jews identifying themselves as white right and you and i just talked about the detrimental effects of that and we're not talking about even just ashkenazis jewelry. We're just talking about okay. Identify as white. You know that really becomes a big question now here in america. Whatever what everything that's going on. He said like this if jews were white. Why didn't hitler just say everybody. We're all white. Why didn't he say just like you know we're all white. We should get along and same thing with the sar and everybody else. Nobody said were white. So it's okay. So i think that when these conversations come up. It's not a really about skin color. Because the jewish people indigenous people many of many different colors many different background even more so after being exiled in being in so many different countries that the color of the skin absolutely means nothing in terms of jew. But then when you look at it and you say now that you know we can't bring our distress in an hour conversation about anti-semitism to the table. When the lgbt community can complain the black community could plan the brown community. Everybody can complain except for us were thrown on the on the other side. When do you really wanna compare history. You know what i'm saying like. Let's be honest. i'm a beyond saying that as a black man. I love being black. Obviously there was a a horrendous. History which african americans Definitely went through but like come on. We going all the way back to egypt. Let's go back four thousand years. And i think that it's an unfair set of rules when it comes to that. Do you think that it's because we're just really bad at pr. Do you think it's really not wanna like what's why we can have that conversation. You know it's funny. You say that. Because i've made that joke so times that the jewish community particularly as regards our friends in israel are really really bad. Pr like just shockingly bad at pr. you know. I appreciate what you say about counting three hundred four hundred years versus three thousand years. Then we get into this game which people talk about the oppression olympics and this is a really unfair horrendous way to view the world as you know who's depressed and who's the most victimized i feel like the focus is wrong you know and when you when you talk about pr. I think the pr around depression in victim. Who does amazing. And it's kind of. It's like become sort of sexy in a way and then activism and advocacy olov. It comes from a place of victimhood and thereby vengeance. I think a lot of people are avenging. Their victim hoods and i don't necessarily buy into their thing that schooling to i understand why people are angry. Why people are hurting. I never am seek to see the world from an inexperienced. The i haven't lived through because you know. There are many forms of prejudice that i inherently don't understand because i don't experience them but when it comes to pr. I think something. The jewish people are struggling when what we're coming up against the alot of the philosophy in the theory around identity politics now has been bill through the non-jewish worlds in a way that actually doesn't encapsulate awesome tall and does no it away in which the jewish faith in the jewish people can't fit into. We don't fit into critical race theory. Because you point to the jews are tripe we're an indigenous people. We come in many different colors and size is and we've we've come from all different parts of the world and we don't fit into binary of of black person versus white person to in my in my view. I think a lot of people who are afraid to have this conversation of just especially white functioning. Jews have press the panic button. Or maybe even not consciously realize they've done that and said i'm fully accepted white girl when something that i've been saying a lot recently is why would you choose white. Ill over jewish pray. You know this is your heritage assist who you are. You're jewish person and you may have light skin but you're not part of the history of the white man in america. That's not your history. Your history is that the jewish people. You know my my kings and queens are you know are david and solomon and i. I'm a. I'm a scottish person and great. I totally accept that. I grew up in a country where henry was once king. But he wasn't my king. I don't quite share history. And i've always enjoyed the geology of as i said before existing in a a secular culture in a country that has granted my family a lot of wonderful things a place that was safe haven. For my great-grandfather to escape from the russians are too and and build a new life by it's not ultimately where my roots come from. You know exa- listen. I'm gonna tell you right now. If you sent that to me as a what's message i send you like ten rows of fire emojis. Okay that's lava which you just said it's lava and the realist thing and you know what i'm thinking about it like you know. I've been asked in a lot of different groups like about the discussion of you know. Well you know if you black then. Then you'll just be a rapper. You'll be some something in the entertainment. I play basketball. You play football. Whatever and that's all you really think you can do. We need to do this innocent. That are jewish. Show you just be a lawyer are doctor or you know whatever whatever whatever and i say like this is back in but i think that there's a god who created many different types of people and some people are talented. He gave certain gifts to certain nations. I would say Not every single person is good at you know a basketball because the color of the skin but if you saying that the general population of african americans either have a great love or desire for the game of basketball or football. Some type of sport are being involved in in the arts in their form. What's wrong with celebrating. That and being happy about that right so when we talk about the conversation we're bringing it back in the conversation about anti-semitism versus you know The race conversation. Or you know like we said the lgbt communities. Whatever they are at this series question comes in is like okay. If there's a problem it's sort of like how do we really spend the story to match what's really going on inside the jewish world. We may not be able to talk about a victimhood. because just by the pure nature of a jew. We don't fall into that. That's not something that that we do. Everything is about going out from egypt. We don't sit around and talk about how how to make it in this mitts ryan. No we're going out. The whole thing is to get out from egypt. That's the conversation for us to have is talk about resilience. I've been asked many times. What can the african american community take from the jewish community. Is this everything that's going on right now. In america from the censoring. The cancelling the pressure and everything else. The what i call right now you know with all this and that is these. There's a lot of experiments going on right now. with kovic and everything else unfortunately the jewish world has lived and had to experience that for years under you know hateful regimes and different things like that and being able to come out and be as resilient and have the effect on culture from everything from entertainment commerce the way that we have as a people today. That's a story to be able to tell you know what i'm saying taking victimhood and turn it into victory and i feel like that. Is the story that everybody wants to talk about big. You used to have a line. He's to say you know. I went from ashy to classy. And that is the jewish story being able to bring that to the conversation. I think is a little bit more a little bit more fitting. Yeah i completely agree with you. I think the problem that we have as jews. We've always had. Is that when we glow about our accomplishments to march people begin to resent us. We are in this constant source of push. Pull between you know the anti see. My is obsessed with us is either obsessed with how successful we are are obsessed with disgusting. We are and we're always called between these two these two things. Anti semitism is such a different form of prejudice for people to try and get their heads around. And i think a lot of the time. It's very difficult because it is so deeply rooted in these conspiracy. Theories and these fantasies are really enjoyable. Actually for the anti see might to engage in on lows them to project all of their own responsibilities are onto jews. Because it's the juice fall but what you say about feeling proud of our accomplishments and about how our focus on coming of meats ryon no sitting in a and thinking about how badly we were done by you. Know pass off has always been my favorite festival. And i love how you know. We spend a sater night talking about the bitterness of our tears and our people and and samantha build and we representation of it but at the end of the day where leaning or drinking four cups of wine were having a good time. Were eating like kings and queens and it's a joyous event where we're singing at the same time as you know. We always have that joke that every jewish festival essentially is know they try to close. They didn't manage. Let's see and that's what we do and is always a celebration and ajoy perseverance. For joy through real struggle in hard times and not being our entire history in the resilience of the jewish people is absolutely staggering. When you were talking there you reminded me of that. Incredible story of the freedom writers in the nineteen nineties. I think it was a school in long beach in california. Where teacher at a poorly funded high school that was majority african american students. Who were all you know. Were they incarceration. Rate was atrocious. Barely any kid graduated from this high school and she introduced was she was a white lady who introduced holocaust education to her english literature. Class i think and was teaching them and frank's diary a men. Some other literature from the holocaust took them on a field trip to the to whichever holocaust museum was nearby in long beach and essentially empower words. These african american students with the story of survivors from the holocaust. And how this bridged. The jewish commune say on the african american community. Together as you know. It's not the same story. And it's not the same oppression. It was something deeply inspiring and empowering about anne frank's story for these kids and they wind up flying one of the remaining survivors over from europe to visit this class of high schoolers because they become so so inspired by the story starts to get really good grades because they were motivated to stay in school and gradu- way i think at the time it was quite famous story and they made a move a hollywood movie i of a an. It's beaten sort of this beautiful example of cultures being able to be inspired by one another to spy their difference. It amazing. that's amazing. I have one last question. And i think it's appropriate for you because you are a professional observer of culture but as someone who has rung the alarm on anti-semitism and a host of other social issues. How long do you think that we should be right now about anti-semitism or not to scare anyone but i think we should be alarmed. I think now is the time for organizing. I'm not in the business of fighting anti semitism which might seem really strange to you. Is the thing for me his online. A m i really am not in the business of fighting antisemites or antisemitism because i know from my education that anti semitism will never die. It is the the oldest hatred in the world to because it's institutionalized and really what i would say in answer to. Your question is that we should be alarmed but we should also take this moment to empower our own empower our own community and learn and educate ourselves on ourselves with the knowledge of our story. Our people are one nation to exist to protect us and really go back to our roots and really find out. Why is that. We have to star advocating for ourselves in the spaces that that we deserve to be in. Because we've become such a part of that. I think i also add for younger. Jewish people who feel as though they don't have the right to speak up for themselves in especially their progressive circles because those are circles that exist because of as many other people but also because of jewish people who helped to create those circles and for just as much of the reasons that they exist because they've acquired justice and they require protection and these have become incredible secular spaces ball. It's a real stain on the existence of those spaces that they can accommodate jewish pride and jewish advocacy. So i do think we need to be very concerned by. I also think that we need to look at it as positively as we can and to not lay our fear. Override our desire to come together and do something about it. That is amazing. The amazing ebro. I really appreciate you coming on the show and we somehow in some way. We'll continue this conversation. Maybe when i stopped through la. But i really appreciate your time. Really do i would love that. I appreciate you asking me and have really enjoyed chatting. Ut you today.

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"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

"I i want to thank you so much for joining me here on the deal in a long time coming. you know. you're on the frontier of people that we wanted to have on the show. So i really do appreciate you being here. Thank you very much smy pleasure to be here and thank you sir. Thank you. I wanted to reach. Do i have to. And i feel like you know my own form of like affirmative action to i gotta get enough people who speak proper english as well as people who speak messed up english.

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on Unorthodox

"This is the scene black..

Connect to 5D Gaia And Infinite Source With Dakota Earth Cloud Walker

Merkaba Chakras

04:11 min | 9 months ago

Connect to 5D Gaia And Infinite Source With Dakota Earth Cloud Walker

"Well can to a nether. Podcast episode of merck kaba charlie russia's i'm your host von goats and today we dive into the healing nature of connecting to five guy or earth through the shamanic meditation and rituals with doug coda earth cloud walker. Now dakota been a teacher for over twenty five years and she brings a wealth of experience in how we all can connect to our planet and each other through shamanism so with that the coda welcomed makovich. Thank you so much for having me here. I really appreciate it and love talking about this stuff so at least you. I love metaphysics too. Yeah it's good stuff and there's so many different ways to come into metaphysics and high alums of consciousness and so many different experiences. You never really get bored so Yeah i love to okay so before we get into this wonderful discussion about the modalities that you bring forth to connect to five the guy and the higher consciousness within the universe. Let's begin with. How did you get into this work in the first place. Now well i would say that the work found me and really when i look back on my life i feel like i have been living the shamanic life ever since i was a kid. Even my parents would comment about that. That it was just that was always my natural way of being was to be more of that chamonix nature so for me. When i got into the work it was Really just kind of an extenuation of what i always knew and felt and then i just found a way to carve it out into my life. I started in my early twenties teaching spiritual studies and things like that and really diving into the world. Native american spirituality and celtic drew injury and just kind of finding my own path but then at the same time. I'm always been the one that you know. I feel very passionate about something. I want to bring it into my work and so became very easy dovetail to make that right right and you know just just for people to understand about shamanism. Shamanism is just kind of generic term. Because there's a lot of shamans all over the world. I'm laos and their shamanism house as well as well as all over the world. Mongolia china south native american The celtics have Their own as well and basically shamanism is just basically a spiritual approach to your connection to that subco- energy field of universal consciousness. Everybody s it. It's just kind of coming into that mysticism about reality and that's really what it is It is connected to any kind of religions there's no buddy to chew etc so In terms of a spiritual approach. It's very very very much. And we have a lot of shaman nissim type outlook in buddhism because buddha again is a spiritual approach that is not unreligious you reality and to connect to that christ consciousness within you and everyone else which is source so right. We're talking the same language years. Yeah yeah there's a lot of misconceptions about shamanism because they feel like it's it's primarily native american or that it's a religion you know. Some people feel very dark energy and really. It's it's it's very very light and it's more like a container that contains the soul of the person who is deciding to walk that path. In whatever capacity that you show up in

Doug Coda Makovich Merck Dakota Walker Russia Laos Mongolia Celtics China
Sudakshina Bhattacharjee, content marketer, on expanding your career options

Journalism.co.uk podcast

07:00 min | 10 months ago

Sudakshina Bhattacharjee, content marketer, on expanding your career options

"Welcomed journalism. Dakota uk podcast. What's the working situation like for you at the moment. Thank you jacob. Gatty here so i'm constantly. I'm a content marketer and i been self employed since september of last year and working from home working with a couple of kinds b. to b. kinds made in the. It effect and engineering metro effect is at the moment someday of technical writing for these companies. And it's been interesting very busy. Busy is the optimum word like at the moment how is how is work been throughout covert. What has been all right actually for me personally. I was working till may In a content marketer inviting and then made furloughed as of may until august and then made redundant september. But then i thought no this was. I saw way. The market's governing projects of more available as opposed to long-term jobs contracts and we will working from home. We have been in and out of lockdown for so long. So it's been like okay now. I can get used to working from home. I don't mind it at half. I'm not too fast. For having extent job. I could brave it. Go south employed start my own business and taking that i had some times already contacts in the industry. Anyway who happy to hire me. Which helped they took. I spread the word on link chain. They're like yeah he had stupid. Let's get on been busy since he hasn't stopped. It'd be more busy than i have. Been awhile loss. Roster lots for us to dig in as we continue this conversation about the ever diversifying skill set of digital journalists and and and general digital writers Let's let's be honest. You're kind of an interesting example here. Qena you're qualified. Journalists turned commercial right of some eighteen years. Tell me what. Why did you make that decision to switch say. Didn't come obvious to me. It didn't come easy and not to come quickly either. So i wanted to be a journalist. I wanted to work with the papers and the tv actually When i graduate. 'cause i graduated new media media to specifically digital journalist And i was very to go in in the mainstream media but but my university professors they were all. They warned us all that. The industry's changing jobs in mainstream media. Aunt that freely available at even if they are the conditions aren't that great And probably not even permanent or in a long term situation and digital in the meantime the internet is exploding expanding and we were a skills are writing skills are being hired to work for websites and blogs and things like seo was a new thing that was coming the kospi suspect in two thousand five indeed. When i graduated. Then i i'll just did. Beggar picked up day jobs. I was councilman. No connections i worked in a bank for a while and things in the meantime freelancing decide biting for certain websites writing articles here there not really picking up on anything food time. John nissim. ben. I'd want to do something with this. Become really passionate about meeting loved writing at the infrastructure teaching. I taught journalism and catholic colleges for seven years. Most of my students have not gone into a wet can mainstream media but indicated that more technical side of things brave and some of them have gone on to become content marketers and following my footsteps instead of nineteen four immediate for the public at nah. You're basically writing for businesses than that specific target audiences but you do have your similar skill. Set amvest dotted doing that. Foam night twenty thirteen. I went into content marketing full time. Because i saw that perks pay was good a and i get to use my skill set to do what i wanted to do. And i and also create a nice things that blogs and videos in podcasts and things do all those things but it's just a commercial twist does not for the public interest Okay so let's what i really want you to do for me. Qena is blow open. This term content marketing and really demystify. Where where where. Where can we stop. Search content marketing recent phenomenon. It's recent it's a discipline and it's branched out from digital. Marketing is similar to news making in lot of ways. It's just that the purpose is different so in news when we constructing both construct so under constructing creating a piece of content or creating a piece of news we are constructing something we ought telling a story and we are trying to sell this story to people the away deferred with news which find to tell a story to make people aware of some incident on something that's factual that's really happened. And it's in the public interest them to know what the news piece is about but in the piece of content. What we're doing is we are informing people and not just consult people at large but take your audience. But we're trying to tell the look you have a problem. His product or a solution. Seth is that can meet. That problem. solved that problem for you. And why did you try out. Why didn't you consider it. You know. I mean not forcing them to buy the product. We're not being fails the tool. We're just telling the consider the i'd sing problems. Pain points because marketing types paint points. And then they could. Oh this is interesting. Then they are hooked than they want to know more about it maybe be video. Maybe info graphic. Maybe another block post. You know maybe a white paper be people. Don't want to be advertised at. Don't wanna story they want to be. They want to be engaged. And when you do that you've engaged them. You got the interest when you've caught the interest you can then okay. You're not interested in. Why don't you consider talking to my colleagues in sales and they will then take you through and you pass it to the sales team you take on yourself. If you think that you can sell it it depends on the product rating service but The angle in content marketing is purely commercial. That's something that you've got to bury.

Qena Gatty John Nissim Dakota Jacob UK BEN Seth
"nissim" Discussed on TAKE THE PLUNGE with Pavin Orpiana

TAKE THE PLUNGE with Pavin Orpiana

05:12 min | 10 months ago

"nissim" Discussed on TAKE THE PLUNGE with Pavin Orpiana

"By nine monkey. Believe other nissim it'd be going guerrilla showing some melinda the young Gustav williams looking happy casino. Happiness summoning say nike up. At the moment we full placed relationship moon as per so unhappy complete. Here and completeness begin. Competes able. i can be lynn nina. So never left. I i know you ability. I don all standard being.

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Podcast Critic and Creator Wil Williams Shares Her Origin Story

Inside Podcasting

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Podcast Critic and Creator Wil Williams Shares Her Origin Story

"Hello and welcome to a bonus episode of inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft. I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. A few weeks ago I posted a post show episode in which my podcast friend, Ariel Nissim flat, and I discussed my interview with podcast critic and Creator. Will Williams during that episode, I revealed that due to technical mishap will and I actually recorded twice the interview with will, that I, shared with you a few weeks ago was our second recording. Today's episode is the first eleven or so minutes of our original discussion which I was able to salvage despite the technical mishap. So today, I'm releasing it for all of us here I. Hope you enjoy it. Will Williams. Welcome to the show I am so happy to have you with me today. I have been. Thank you for having Oh. Absolutely. I. Have Been Intrigued by you ever since I came across your posts on twitter you're one of the first people I came across where I don't remember what you were saying, but it was surely opinionated and. Could. It could have even been. You know a useful rant. I'm not really sure but I immediately knew this is someone that I want to pay attention to this is someone that I wanNA follow. So. For me to get a chance to just dive into who you really are because of course, at this point I have had the chance to meet you in person and we have had. Interactions they're still so much. I don't know and I have a lot of questions. So I read somewhere that you started listening to. Night. Vale and Lime Town that that might have been your first introduction to podcast. Is that right? So that was my first introduction to fiction podcasts by I was one of those people where I was listening to podcasts in a more general sense before I pods were even a thing I was downloading them on my desktop computers and listening whenever I could back in those early days of I tunes but Lime Town and Night Vale were definitely my biggest introductions to fiction, which then launched me into writing. So when you're listening to the other podcast prior to that, what happened that was different when you listen to night villain lime town that led you to feel like Oh maybe I wanNA play a role in this. In Twenty twelve, twenty thirteen. There were a bunch of fiction podcast being made and because I guess I kind of raised myself on traditional nonfiction podcasting things like radio lab and grammar girl and writing excuses when fiction podcast starting to make stir I was unfortunately in the camp where I thought that they were going to be good that they would be kind of. Poorly, produced or poorly written or kind of tacky. So I just didn't latch onto them, which is so embarrassing to see now. When I listened to night neil well, that's fascinating to me because of course. so closely to the genre. Yeah. When I heard Night Vale, it was kind of more of the same kind of thought of it as the exception to the rule, and I think part of that is because I was so set on this idea that you know all fiction podcasts kind of sounded like basically like a prairie home companion in my head that's what I was comparing it to and I liked that night failed did something so different in. So weird I mean this was again like. Twelve thirteen twenty thirteen, and back then lgbt representation, which is something that I think a lot of people fiction space take a little bit for granted now, not that we couldn't still be better, but we really had so little of that in an accessible fiction format and the main relationship in that podcast is between two men and later would go on to have trans characters and it felt really revolutionary to me and growing up in Arizona and specifically being in Phoenix for most of my life I. Latched onto. The weird desert setting usually the desserts here are basically exactly as bizarre feel feel feels like a documentary sometimes. I thought of it. Yeah. As like the exception to the rule I liked it but I didn't think it would be into more efficient podcasts but when lime town came around and my friend introduced me to it. I mean, it sounded incredible and I was working in my college radio station. At the time I had tried my hand out a little bit of production. So I knew how much went into it and it just sounded so good. They loved the writing and I've always been one four character study is and that's basically what town is like there is the mystery to it, but it's mostly vignettes of these fascinating characters and he just fell in love and then from there I just kind of dove headfirst into all the fiction I could find, and now here I am. So, you were at college at the time right were you what were you studying? Did you have parallel paths going like I'm interested in radio and I'm working at the college radio station but I- majoring in something completely different. Something completely different. I. My Undergrad degree is in English education. I was very bent on being teacher. I just worked at the college radio station for fun basically, and then you Kinda fell in love with and the more I fell in love with audio the more I fell in love with working at the station. And then I did my semester of student teaching. I graduated I worked as a substitute teacher for two months. End then hated it never been You hate it why? I loved teaching proper is loved being with the students but honestly I think that I was. I got way too emotionally involved in all of my students and to to this day. I still think back on students during that semester student teaching and wonder if they're okay

Lime Town Night Vale Williams Ariel Nissim Sky Pillsbury Twitter Vale Arizona Neil Phoenix
Justin Maxon on Leading & Thriving as a 3rd-Generation Business Owner

Dose of Leadership

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Justin Maxon on Leading & Thriving as a 3rd-Generation Business Owner

"Well Justin thanks for coming on the show. Welcome to dose of Leadership Hey. Thanks for. Having me on. I love talking to young executives. Particularly in senior leadership roles I can relate to that I. Mean I think when I was about your age and your thirties that correct that's correct. Yes, outside of the Marine Corps I was. Getting a lot of accountability responsibility, but in the business world I was given a tremendous amount of my thirties in them, so I can relate so Was it? You ended up at NCRI and got to the senior position as such a young age. So the company in Sierra, national catastrophe restoration actually started. In nineteen seventy two, so we're going on forty nine years old and the founders of the company are actually my grandmother grandfather Oh cool so I was born into this. If you will plead in Sierra, blue in kind of a came along grew up in the company, so no one in the in the INS and outs of restoration and knowing the INS and outs of. Being being a leader is something that was groomed to do from from day one. Love, those stories and you know that the family owned businesses gives. The following rations, a tremendous opportunity that being said it certainly presents itself. What's unique challenges as I I? Can Imagine what what are some of the challenges that you faced again? Being being young as you are, and a family owned business right I mean there's some challenges there. Absolutely double jeopardy. They're. So being being a family member and being a young executive absolutely has its challenges I on the on the young executive portion. Of the big things, not only four with employees with our clients I think is that the the stereotype and specifically in our industry respiration reconstruction stereotype that. Equals experience. The what I've tried to do is really a kind of break that barrier and make sure that individuals employees and our clients understand that you know really knowledge. In your in your particular craft and in your industry, and your profession is what equals experience. I love that answer in. You're right. I think that I've I've trying to think of a couple of times I've coast couple of individuals who were in that consume spot that you were right and. One of the pitfalls that I've seen. In my experiences with the family owned businesses and someone that's young is the the inherent cynicism that you get from your team members right, and when you, when you feed off of that inherent cynicism, which is GONNA be there regardless of not no matter how good you know, no matter what type of leader you could be the best leader since. Gandhi or whoever? You're you're going to be faced with that. kind of inherent cynicism right. Yes, absolutely so. Yep being being a family member has even own set of challenges yet, but I think especially being third generation I think the statistic for third generation is as soon as their generation takes over. That's when the company takes a dive. So no pressure, no pressure meaning. No pressure compressor, so you know so big focus for me. has been the go against the odds. Yell? Don't be a part of that statistic and but to do it in the right way also not just to. Try to approve its the continue on the legacy. If you will the company but then also build on the exceptional Nissim that know the exceptional. Base that we've had over the last forty nine years, so that's that's really kind of a drive for me. In the reason that I wanted to get into this reason I'm still in it today. Yeah, love that answer and you can. I can tell from you know part of the solution to kind of. Challenge that you've been again that you've been faced with nothing you can do about is to. Approach it with that humble teachable spirit that I'm hearing from you right, and to appreciate in the awareness of the uniqueness of. The family business and what I also hurting your answer was you completely understand that you're standing on some pretty significant shoulders, and you better not screw this up right which I love that that's yeah. I love that kind of That humility I. Guess you know what I mean. That's what I heard from your answer. What do you think when you alive? Yeah I appreciate I present that if you could make a phone call into a few family members later and with the no. That would be fantastic. I mean you know every day? Within its no matter, the size of family business they're they're presents its own challenges you know it's unique in in our industry with the rest racing industry like I said with the age stereotype so. Every day is a new challenge. in all I can do is ask that Each for ways in each our clients continue to trust. What we're building in I continue to you know what I continue to bring to the company and what I'll continue to bring. Over the life of the entity in the legacy that in Sierra breaks so

Sierra Executive Justin Marine Corps Gandhi
Sean O'Beirne

Published...Or Not

09:53 min | 1 year ago

Sean O'Beirne

"Short stories are the perfect way to address a range of issues in an immediate and succinct. Way Sean Ben has done just that in his collection entitled a couple of things before the end so sean welcome to three. Ci thanks very much for having me. Now what sort of did you have in mind? It's a bit ominous sort of title. Yea Well I wouldn't be the person I mean just about everybody's GonNa soonest ought to be thinking about what the next ten twenty thirty forty s log and if you begin to read even in the mainstream press you'll start to get warnings that if the sky gets full of more particles that make the earth hotter and hotter parts of the Middle? Part of the Earth are going to become more or less uninhabitable this century and serious water and food shortages will come along with that. I mean this is nothing else but what anyone who gets anyway. Nissim Sci. He's starting to tell us Now then the question would come. Kenneth fiction serve that what can fiction do Without saying the same thing over and over but what what to do with that was really interesting to me was what would the people I grew up with. I love And also people who weren't exactly like the people I grew up with. How are we all going to be with this? What he's going to happen to to quite the people I really know once serious privation serious shortages dot to happen all around us. There's one story at the end Bunka which goes into that. We'll come to that one but there are other sorts of ends in mind here. The gained the a period in your life The end of communication is another one. That comes up. So let's delve into some of these stories and hopefully it won't be all that ominous Because there are some fascinating things here you did. The first story is called scouts. Were you ever a boy scout? I have to go ahead and say that I was a boy scout. I was a boy scout in the nineteen seventies I was very. I was particularly bad at sports which were an Australian boy his special problem but one thing I could find do with me was put me in cub scouts. And that work that worked I was especially bad at what we in. The nineteen seventies was called foot clinic Stood there disconsolate. A very small boy. Seven or eight years old in the middle of big muddy oval. And all I wanted was people might remember this. You GotTa be game at the end but for me it really was standing around in an hour on a on a baddeck not understanding really what to do with the football. I remember years ago. Michael Looney telling the story that when he was boy out in the country he was sort of Eilly united and confused by football. What you were supposed to do when the ball came down to woods him he picked it up. Held it to his chest and ran through the goals. Naturally as as one would. But it's a right of passage in some ways you know learning the not earning the badges miss but at what point do you sort of. What will does it come to an end? If we want to talk about ending but you transition the development there what was I suppose one of the things that got some pythons about being a scout? I mean they certainly some comedy as well but what was what was maybe saddle. Poignant upbeat about being a scout in the seventies wars you were participating in the system in. You didn't exactly think about lock these you'll participating in a system that was actually dying all around you which was the old British USTRALIAN loyalty. Oh British Astrid Unite. The revolt was valuable. Said they weren't sort of nineteen seventy seven nine hundred seventy eight nine hundred seventy nine a NI- uniform saluting the flag And trying to be sort of good junior soldier. Boys in a Y. Or at the very least the kind of good boy that you would have. That Biden Powell know if people remember Lord Biden Powell the founder of the Scouting Movement. But if you go back and look at scouting for boys it's the idea of kind of purposeful cleanliness in a little boy. That's also always turning into the effort to sort of locate and destroy aliens. But Tom and I don't mean I don't mean from outer space I mean the ones we leave this a militarist element. This is it. So it's it's playing soldier but it's also got an idea of self theirself idea of self control in it. There's a list of things that are good boy does that a scout does a scout prepared but a scout is also sort of honest in a tainted in some ways and I don't mean to mock all of that hopefully the thing about that stories. It's not all pissing from a high on the scouting movement. It's getting to something. Which was that? There was something in that I mean. I know we feel like this a lot now. But there's something in that old idea of self control. Which is such a daily on fashionable idea. Now the scouting movement held onto a part of it. But of course to us. It just looks ridiculous that you would wear your little uniform and your little hat and salute a flag on a Tuesday night. It's not so much ridiculous. One eventually which happens in the story eventually grows out of it yes and reevaluate says you grow older so it has its purpose in its place but as you say a lot of traditions a dying as well and they've got a reinvent. I mean the notion of a boy's group alone today. Isis audience changed another thing. That's changed the royals. You've got him on August news lead. There is an incompetent. Monarchist Focus Group pretty early in the and that comes out of the Scout Story too. Which is it goes to the whole idea of the Shia strangeness of trying to make an England down the bottom of Asia which we really did try and do. I went to London for the first time. Not that long gone about ten years ago. I had that thing that many many strengths must have had. Which is the shock of recognition that once you get through cock fosters on that train and start to going to London accord. It looks exactly like Hawthorne it looks. Exactly like Moldovan down to the last and you begin to understand why that you had before that we that that the F. It was really just to make these places again. The idea of Kemba well below Laos below. Papua we really tried for that and again I think one of the things. That's hopefully interesting about growing up. In the seventies I think the seventies there was a was a real transition time where that old idea that we could somehow Cape together an England down here began to break up and wash away and so and then then I mean then I think plenty of people listening to this would know this. But in a way the bill for that wasn't paid until the nineteen ninety s in the nineteen nineties. We had that exuberant Tom where we thought well. No no money in this and we'll just be Australian. It's all we can let England going by the nineteen ninety by the Howard years. You had the understanding that it was actually going to be something that we felt a lot more Sarah about a lot more angry about and we're going to punish somebody else but we still had politicians bringing back knighthoods and such luck. And that's you that's interesting but that was what was interesting about the Abbot Attempt. In about the time of that story about the top of that royal story where it really much to light now and even people that you wouldn't expect or the I thought the idea of Sir Prince Phillip and the first strategy night. All that's right it will be Prince Philip. Did you give Edinburgh that? The whole country in two thousand fifteen couldn't take that But just as Australia was reinventing itself oil or imagining its identity. Which is a growing sort of evolution. The monarchy is sort of caught in the same bind. Harry and Meghan done Mike it into the story necessarily only slightly but they trying to establish their own identity in a new ish. Can you hold on to the monarchy? This is where I think I mean. I think this is still true. This little against what I just said but I still think it's a strain schizophrenia. What you would think of is the oldest. Dr Steele holds a lot. Hold on a lot for monarchy and foreign idea of England that still does persist in one of the places it does possess these in those people in that royal family in the Queen and to some extent. Now I mean we tried Diana but now much more and William and Kate but the thing that Tom the thing about that he says it's just getting hotter and hotter for any family any group of individuals to actually be able to carry off what you need to do to be a barely successful enough royalty in the face of the sheer amount of virulent attention that the entertainment system is GonNa WanNa put on you. It's it's pretty much going to be impossible to be monarchy in the next fifty but also the the monarchy speaks to a tradition that goes back centuries which hasn't necessarily evolved and changed with the Moore's that go on today which is it's appeal. Which is the thing we desperately hope for that. You could point to any one group of things and say you want change will you? You'll stay the same. You promised The problem is is that as you say with them. What Harry and Megan is it. They couldn't take the deal that will often because the deal starts to get so strange which is listen. You'll be a representative of what is good in a sense. He's more self control. This idea that we're after over and over again but at the same time will pretty much persecute and you will be at you all the time. You'll open your door in the morning and hundreds of us where we tried to watch you and I I can't understand. I don't get a sense of whether this is to their credit or not. They just refuse that. Were like this is so awful. This is more or less like a kind of strange it privileged. But it's also a persecution and can leave. Just leave

Scouting Movement England TOM Sir Prince Phillip Harry Football Sean Ben London Monarchist Focus Group Biden Powell Asia Edinburgh Michael Looney Representative Laos Lord Biden Kemba Papua
Optionality & Why You Should Follow Rule Two Instead of Paying Down Debt

You Need a Budget

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Optionality & Why You Should Follow Rule Two Instead of Paying Down Debt

"Today. I WanNa talk about something that I mentioned in Discussion that I had with our debt. bootcamp group on facebook and That is the idea of not paying down debt for a little while all in order to shore up your rule to true expenses Just as a little bit of a refresher for those of you. That probably don't need it anyway but a true expense is Something that is one of your larger less frequent expenses. That probably in the past would have blindsided. You may not appropriately so but it did nonetheless so oh Christmas. Though it comes every year the same time blindside even optional. Vacations tend to blindside people car repairs. Obviously more of a true blinds nightside although I'm not familiar with a car that is indestructible. That cyber truck looks at but we'll see so the idea of have pain off. Debt is obviously amazing. And you want to get to that as fast as you sustainably can but you do not want to pay off debt and sacrifice a funding rule to expenses appropriately. So if you are planning on giving gifts for Christmas you want to be setting aside money for that. If view are planning on driving your car you WanNa be setting aside money for car repairs if you are planning on living in a house. That's pretty old and maybe we'll need repairs. You should plan on setting money aside for those. Here's why and maybe it'll be a short podcast because this is a salient and short point when you're sitting side cash for a true expense events such as car repairs you'll keep setting aside. Let's say one hundred bucks a month. You're not paying down a hundred dollars a debt. You're setting the money side that means interest is accruing on the debt of course but it means that you're maintaining an option and. I'll probably talk about optionality next week as well because it's a larger idea And optionality is something that I've been really geeking out on since I read anything from Nissim Talib so the which I think I've mentioned in several times before on this podcast but when you set aside the money for car repairs you have not spent the money on car repairs. You've just set the money aside so at any point you have. The option of pain for car tires blew out or paying down debt at any point. When you pay down the debt you do not have the option any longer then when the car tire blows out. What are you left with your hands forced and a lot of times. It's forced to the credit card. So the the reason we opt for rule to instead of just aggressive aggressive pay down debt is because we want to maintain optionality. We want to maintain flexibility ability. We want you to not pay down debt and then fall back into it. Get out fall back in Alpha back in it's demoralizing. We want you to sustainably get out and and then stay out. An adequately funding rule to expenses will allow you to stay out of debt. Now once they're funded once it's appropriate once you're finding the level is at a spot where you think this is reasonable. Christmas will cost this much and we have. It saved our vacation. I wouldn't go on fancy vacations if are in a lot of debt but all things are saved for the need to be saved needs are covered once be a little more picky about those but those are covered to then. Then you say okay now extra all extra any extra make the extra happen dig around sprint. Get intense and start throwing that towards the debt. This will allow you to stay out of further dead while digging out at a very rapid pace. Now you've been paying interest on your debt for a long time so don't all of a sudden become really really picky about paying a little more interest as you short your rule to expenses nonetheless. Pretend to be a different person. Here the interest is the interest. It is what it is. It's a little bit of a cost in order for you to maintain that option and options aren't free three unless you're a rent seeker but options aren't free so it's totally appropriate to not pay the debt pay a little bit of interest which is essentially the cost of your option mm-hmm

Facebook Nissim Talib
"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

"All right. A very unique man Nissim Talib. I think I'm pronouncing that right. Has some compelling ideas on the, the subject of measuring risk talent is in a middle aged man of Greek background from a prominent family in Lebanon, and he's he was educated here in the United States. He's an author scholar, mathematics, professor philosopher senior Wall Street, trader and head fund manager and he's an expert on mathematical science. Pretty smart guy sounds like. Yeah. That's quite a mouthful. And, and saying that description really hardly begins to describe him. Talent is is a formidable thinker. And when he speaks he draws large crowds, as you can imagine his most famous books are the hidden role of chance fooled by randomness. And the black swan the impact of the highly improbable. Now, you will not need to run out and buy these books and read them cover to cover although you could let me tell you what he has to say, because it has profound meeting for you, and me and really profound impact on the ideas of the everyday investor. He says that we all place too much weight on the odds that past events will repeat when unrepeatable chance is a better explanation. Do you -ssume that the markets will continue to always go up that any downturns temporary that Bo? Markets continue forever. Or you do not, even think about the risks. Either way. Danger lies ahead. Talib argues that the markets do not factor in risks that are not measurable, and that most of the really big events in our world are rare unpredictable and not measurable. These events when they happen usually have a very significant downward impact on the investment markets. You probably remember what happened on nine eleven of two thousand one. Totally unpredictable. But this is one of the very big reasons why we spent so much time encouraging you to get off of that train and shift the risk to someone else shift the.

Nissim Talib fund manager Lebanon United States Bo professor
Nissan CEO sees no big downside to FCA-Renault merger

Biz 1190 Overnight featuring Bloomberg Radio

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Nissan CEO sees no big downside to FCA-Renault merger

"Renewed. One of the big corporate stories, Nissan CEO says he's interested. To learn more about the proposed merger between new and fit cries that when the French automaker briefs it's Japanese partners today chief Asia correspondent Stephen Engle joins us from Tokyo. Steve, good to see. So the Nissim says that could be -tunities but it's this is just another headache for the company, which is roiling from from the gome saga. Yeah. There's a number of ways you can look at it. First of all, I might just say the alliance has put out a statement. That's of course, I'm talking about the Renault Nissan Mitsubishi alliance. We had open and transparent discussions on this proposal. Keep in mind, of course, this proposed merger is a separate entity from the current alliance be Renault and Fiat Chrysler merging. And for he wrote the psychology the CEO of Nissan. Yeah, it's another headache. But it could be a good opportunity for him. And if he plays his cards, well, he could come out with what he wants keep in mind. He is rebuffed the overtures of Renault to merge. He wants a more equitable partnership within the alliance and a merger doesn't accomplish that four Nissan. That's what we're hearing. Now this new challenge comes at a time, of course when there's a great disruption. Because of electric occasion and automobile sales are declining around the world. So psychologists on as you see, here, he has lots and lots of decisions to make. The one good thing could be though this new merger could give very needed distraction, and that could buy psycho Assan some time to get his ship. In order get those sales turned around there and get a new plan in place in the post gone era. Stocks are down. What about thirteen percent so far, this year, you look at the options that the Nissen boss has besides being given a lot more pressure. What else does he really have to play with? Yeah. I mean again it's, it's, it's you can look at both sides of this. I mean he's been seeking a more equitable partnership keep in mind Nissan owns what fifteen percent of Renault, but no voting rights and Renault owns forty three percent of Nissan with voting rights. The French government owns fifteen percent of Renault with double voting rights. Now this new entity would give Nissan in that entity. More of a say seven and a half percent stake with one board seat and voting rights. However, you flip that around and look at what the new entities car sales would be they would be what eight and a half plus million vehicles, a year that would dwarf Nissan on its own five million five point six million in two thousand eighteen and declining and profitability, declining one great strength of Nissan and the current alliance is that they had the key markets of the US and China, they had better profit. They had better sales. Now, this new entity comes in all of a sudden Renault do they have the upper hand it's a question to be asked. Steven great catching up. Thank you very much for those insights, Stephen Engle alive out of

Nissan Renault Nissim Stephen Engle CEO Tokyo Steve French Government Steven Fiat Chrysler United States Mitsubishi China Fifteen Percent Forty Three Percent Thirteen Percent
Renault FCA merger set to reshape global car industry

FT News

11:12 min | 2 years ago

Renault FCA merger set to reshape global car industry

"Fair Chrysler, automobiles, has unveiled a proposed thirty point six billion euro, al-sham measure with Renault that would we shape, the global automative industry, David Atlee discusses, how the jail came about and how it will affect Renos prepares tired with Nissan with Irish masugi and Peter Campbell. Rush tennis about the two men who engineered the deal when did the talk start. And how did the deal come together? Okay. If tickets step back and just imagine that in the last three or four years in the car industry, all the major players were talking to each other. Part of this thesis, was driven by the former CEO, the late CEO of Fiat Chrysler automobiles Sergio Marconi passed away last July, but had written this manifesto called confessions of capital junkie, where he called for consolidation for a number of reasons in the car industry, and he was, in many ways, the chief, confidant of John Elkin who runs the nearly family empire through an investment vehicle called Exor, which is the dominant shareholder and Fiat Chrysler. And so with Mark Janas death Elkin really steps into this role that normally would have been played by any number of special executives brought in by the family over the years to help exercise their interests. But Elkin really stepped into this role and then began taking charge and making a series of moves one. Those moves was to begin conversations with Renault about various things those conversations really took off, when John Dominic scenarist was brought in January to become the Renault chairman, and stabilize the company, which had been going through tumultuous period after the arrest of Carlos gone in Tokyo in November, the meetings between scenario and Alcon took place throughout the spring in Paris, and Turin at their various homes, and then in the last few weeks, what began as talks about cooperation in a broader partnership really shifted into something else, which was a full merger did call us gone have any role in trying to put together such a merger when he was headed. It's run into San Peter and the rest of the team who's been covering the gun fall out reported in March that Nissan had looked at FCA in the past three years in something that was pushed by Goan. It's not clear to what extent he actually wanted to do that. But at the time he was very much more focused on. Combining rhino with Nissan when it became clear that, that deal was not possible to scenario who had replaced gun, the conversations with Elkin really took off, and in centered Elkin found someone who is more mild mannered, who's more classically European traditional very smooth and diplomatic not an ego maniac, not a big character. Which is typically, what defines many of the big auto chief executives Goan would certainly be seen someone who was imperious character. And so in Senator, there was someone who is much easier to deal with. And I think that probably played a major role because Elkins manners is very sort of genteel in European if you want a risk Socratic, and so that dynamic probably helped make this happen. So you could actually save the absence of gone to some extent, maybe even absent Marconi made this deal easier to engineer. So where does that lead us what are the terms on? What will be the balance of power between each side, so it's a fifty fifty stock deal. So the shareholders in Chrysler wife. Fifty percent stake in a new company, which will be a Dutch registered company and Reynaud shareholders will have fifty percent that essentially means that everyone's shareholdings in the two existing companies will be cut in half. So extra will become the most dominant shareholder with about a fifteen percent stake, the French state, and Japan's Nissan which have fifteen percent of Renault. They will have seven and a half percent in the new company and there will be others who have smaller state, but that's largely the three dominant shareholders. That's why John Elkin will become the non executive chairman of the company and at least for the time being is believed that scenario will become the chief executive. But we'll see how that shakes out of the coming years theme what will is still mean for the industry, and can we expect further consolidation. Yeah. I think the message is yes, but the trick is, it's very hard. The industry is beset with big egos with national pride with unions with manufacturing jobs and the core. Thesis behind this is shutting down factories and firing people. So that is a really hard thing to. Swallow layer that in with the fact that you getting some kind of scale through consolidation layer that in with governments that will want to say to try to protect their jobs. And so you have a very difficult dynamic now concurrently to these talks with Reynaud Fiat was talking to pizzo of France. And obviously those talks have fallen apart hoettges looking stilted at the altar a bit. So the question is, what do they do next and Nissan, which at the moment, just looks like a basket case is also left with some questions to ponder upon for the future. But all the major car companies are watching this with great interest at the moment, so he can we then tune to what do we think. With the cost savings, be and will this mean job losses, the Irish alluded to? So the terms set out yesterday were quite clear in the deal. They envisage being able to do this merger without any plump closures now that may sound ambitious, but remember a few years ago, PSA, Persia took over opo and said they would have a turnaround program and integration program, evolve, no plunk closures and brutally. They haven't closed any plants, so. Oh, it's certainly possible to do that. FCA talked about possible cost savings of around five billion euros from combining various things such as purchasing an RND with Renna. But what they're most likely it's do is to avoid additional cost. One of the reasons comic is trying to tie up is because so many of them have such massive investment costs in future technology, think about something like electric vehicles, something like driverless, technology, and Sergia, Makia, knees, onset to or this was, it's much better for comic is to pool resources and spend this money together, rather than old, Joop locating their investment. And so what this does mean is that FCA and Reynaud, if they come together, we'll only have to spend one load of money on developing electric vehicles, rather than say, two now Renos already the European leader in electric vehicles as the biggest selling electric model in Europe and fit Kryza is generally regarded as a lag Auden electric technology and say, we'll hopefully be able to take in some of Renos electric technology. So they'll be looking for cost savings in various areas such as that. And how much will this merger weaken Nissen's bizarre? Mission within the alliance with Renault currently the way that the alliance is set up is that Reynaud Misawa each have equal representation on the alliance operating board says two seats for Japan. That's Nissim officially in two seats for froms. That's the Reynaud CEO and the Reynaud champion his John, Giannis Sonat, and what this will undoubtedly mean. We don't know what this will mean for the aligns board but is almost certainly going to mean that FCA has a seat at that table. It means that Nissan's influence in overall terms will decrease across the alliance, but actually, the view is that Nissan may perceive parts of this deal is incredibly positive for them, one of the conditions the FCC set during these talks with Renna was the any plans to merge renaissance should be shelved for the time being in order to let Nissen and to some extent, Renos wealth focus on they call business because Nissan's core businesses. Not in great shape seeing a huge slide in it sales in the US as saying fools in China. It's really struggling in some of its logo operations and a lot. Of the phone out of the Costco, no arrest and the questions over the future of the alliance and all the shenanigans about would they merge? Would they not merge has been distracting missiles, management, and frankly, Renos management, as well from the day-to-day operations of the business? So the hope is that by putting that issue to bed for the time being it will allow listen to focus on that day today or perations and not sexy is one thing that's been put in that to try and win over Nishantha supporting this deal in short, then that could be benefits finish San in this new alliance with key be so the long term, what if CA is open to doing is having a full on merger with miss sandwich would create by a very long way the world's largest car company with around fifteen million sales, and that would give them huge scale and therefore numerous potential to invest in a lot of the new future technology a much greater resilience in a very cyclical bumpy industry to be able to weather the storms now. That's more long term in the short term suddenly what Nissim would hope is that it just takes the potential of emerge Reynaud off the table. It lets them focus on the business. Which is something they need to do in order to be able to remain competitive in the future turning to another very important stakeholder in this how have investors responded? What has their view been safe, all say, if you look at the Shatt prices the shaft prices of FCA anniversary both rose incredibly strongly yesterday on Monday when the deal was announced, both rose more than ten percent, investors. See this broadly as positive, but there are lots of questions over the Deel. There were lots of questions over whether call makers need to have global scale, which this will give the companies or whether it's better to focus on getting scale instead of half an individual regions like someone like Persia has done with the OPEL deal because what this won't give Reynaud or FCA is much greater scale in any given regions. They have a bit of overlap in Europe, the market, share, at the end of this deal will be about sixteen percent in Europe. So it increases this state bat. But in terms of that Sharon other markets, there wasn't a great deal of overlap, so they won't be the biggest player in major global markets. They operate in. And so there's a. Question about whether they really need regional scale, or whether they need global scale, lots of other questions around merges, and particularly auto mergers that cross borders in general around company, coaches, we've seen a lot of mergers, in the past the famous one is diamond Chrysler go on for a few years, and then just collapsed because they don't work. That's almost never because of industrial issues political issues. It's almost always because of deeply ingrained, cultural issues, car companies are very cultural animals often rooted in the country, that, that headquartered in and say trying to put together a company that has not just a talion in US culture from fat Chrysler, but French culture from rhino, and ultimately, possibly Japanese culture from Nissen as quite a melting pot. If you're trying to put it all together, so there are two questions over this deal. You've mentioned some, but do you see any particular hurdles, is it the cultural is it the regulation is the politics that could prevent this top, the biggest one of the moment is whether Reynaud agrees to it. So while Reynolds, Chavan, John Donnie Senate has. Been in talks with Alcon for a long time over this and in recent weeks about the merger and FCA has put this proposal to Reynaud Renos still has to agree to it. The French state her fifteen percent of Reynaud behalf double voting rights. Still have to agree to it. Nissan, even though they don't have a blocking vote on this still need to agree. You have the Italian government saying that it wants to protect talion jobs. The French government won't to protect French jobs is going to be very political. We still don't know what the locations of this deal are for the specifics of Renos relationship with Nissen, particularly if it'll affect some of their past contracts together. And so there are a lot of things that could potentially derailed the deal. So it's not a slam dunk by any measure, but the language of FCA and the fact that they're leaders of work closely with Renos leaders over the last few weeks to nail this down. Does at least suggest that there is goodwill on both sides, and both of them it is in their interest to do this deal to make it work.

Nissan FCA John Elkin Renault Reynaud Nissen Reynaud Fiat Reynaud Renos Reynaud Ceo Alcon Chrysler Reynaud Misawa Sergio Marconi Persia Europe Fiat Chrysler
"nissim" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

The 2 Robbies

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

"He'll stay why it's a magnificent nissim football did if you can get fifty percent going to capacity is is better than most. They love him to the point where they sing his name aimo than any other player. You can tell you look the community looked at that global so important is shown that can keep team up is basically put the ball in my cashways cool. Give me a chance to compete with what he said and that's what was brilliantly phrase. That's what he wants to give him. He's not asking the billions. Give him some money so we can improve the team and so they're not fighting mela gatien what other clubs to you think that he might think you know. I'm i'm not gonna turn this contract down. I am tennis contracts and i would go to witch clubs the whether it's now whether it's maybe in six months or when something goes wrong which ones of the top six because i think like you said you cuss united is a massive club so anything underneath that he's not bothered so manchester united any india any moment of time in the future where that might that might have no for me not for me i don i just don't feel the fits for him and much night also football club if you need para hands with two years to give them time to whatever likely in the bridge tottenham porch yes if i needed to be just i need something she'll say from. Do i know we'll play good football and keep keep things going. Rougher benches can be money showed chelsea went in. I was an interim guy on the police. Even go back to chelsea would no i think that's done funds didn't didn't mean to take to him did he because he's got a manchester city which isn't going to happen so there isn't there's not many places primarily khalil spe know what abbott evitable certainly deserves more than what he's getting from my casualty in <hes> we'll have to see how long goes so my friend twenty eighteen in twenty nine season. Please download that you will be showing up a podcast review the show let us know what you think so and one of the tonci gracie's ever he's manchester city that finished top of the table and make it about tie wins and with the f._a. Cup still to comb it could be a first domestic treble the path and these men the council f._a. Cup party after next weekend's big fixture for now. Thanks for listening. I'm he's must oh together through. The two roby's good not me honest goodbye good night..

manchester football chelsea roby tottenham porch abbott tennis khalil spe gracie india fifty percent six months two years
"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

"All right. A very unique man Nissim Talib. I think I'm pronouncing that right has some compelling ideas on the the subject of measuring risk talent is in a middle aged man of Greek background from a prominent family in Lebanon, and he said he was indicated here in the United States. He's an author scholar mathematics, professor philosopher senior, Wall Street trader and head fund manager, and he's an expert on mathematical science. Pretty smart guy. Sounds like. Yeah. That that's quite a mouthful and saying that description really hardly begins to describe him talent is is a formidable thinker, and when he speaks he draws large crowds as you can imagine his most famous books are the hidden role of chance fooled by randomness. And the black swan the impact of the highly improbable. Now, you will not need to run out and buy these books and read them cover to cover. Although you could let me tell you what he has to say because it has profound meeting for you, and me and really profound impact on the ideas of the everyday investor. He says that we all place too much weight on the odds that past events will repeat when unrepeatable chance is a better explanation. Do you -ssume that the markets will continue to always go up that any downturns are temporary? That bull markets continue forever. Or you do not even think about the risks either way. Danger. Lies ahead Talib argues that the markets do not factor in risks that are not measurable and that most of the really big events in our world are rare unpredictable and not measurable these events when the happen usually have a very significant downward impact on the investment markets. You probably remember what happened on nine eleven of two thousand one. Totally unpredictable. But this is one of the very big reasons why we spent so much time encouraging you to get off of that train and shift the risk to someone else shift the risk to.

Nissim Talib fund manager Lebanon United States professor
"nissim" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"That's good. Kiss right now paint a Bill nine ten and then so much more this kissing. Fully just. I don't know what to say. Justice. You don't do this. This have to me. Nissim piece. Jeez. See? Hey, if you want to but the on it goes I want. Want.

"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on KTOK

"Let's talk for a minute about risk that four letter word risk from this perspective. How can we really know the risk? We take in investments. How can we measure the risk as we talk about it? Let me give you a phone number in case you want to call and find out more about this topic, please call eight seven seven five four eight safe. That's eight seven seven five four eight seven two three three. All right. A very unique man Nissim Talib. I think I'm pronouncing that right has some compelling ideas on the subject of measuring risk. Talib is a middle aged man of Greek background from a prominent family in Lebanon, and he's he was here in the United States. He's an author scholar mathematics, professor philosopher senior, Wall Street trader and head fund manager, and he's an expert on mathematical science. Pretty smart guy. Sounds like. Yeah. That's quite a mouthful and saying that description really hardly begins to describe him. Taliban is a formidable thinker, and when he speaks he draws large crowds as you can imagine his most famous books are the hidden role of chance. Fooled by randomness. And the black swan the impact of the highly improbable. Now, you will not need to run out and buy these books and read them cover to cover. Although you could let me tell you what he has to say because it has profound meeting for you, and me and really profound impact on the ideas of the everyday investor. He says that we all placed too much weight on the odds that past events will repeat when unrepeatable chance is a better explanation. Do you -ssume that the markets will continue to always go up that any downturns are temporary? That bull markets continue forever. Or you do not even think about the risks either way. Danger. Lies ahead Talib argues that the markets do not factor in risks that are not measurable and that most of the really big events in our world are rare unpredictable and not measurable. These events when they happen usually have a very significant downward impact on the investment markets. You probably remember what happened on nine eleven of two thousand one. Totally unpredictable. But this is one of the big reasons why we spend so much time encouraging you to get off of that train and shift the risk to someone else shift the risk to.

Nissim Talib Taliban United States fund manager Lebanon professor
"nissim" Discussed on Advantage Over Podcast

Advantage Over Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on Advantage Over Podcast

"So I've been really pleased over the last couple of weeks, speak Nissim break people around the Rabih referee community, and today's interview will be with Andy brace who you may have seen out and about on the world would be six nations stage over the last couple of weekends running the line and a couple of games uncertainty as he ups his preparation and hopefully prospects for rugby World Cup in Japan later this year, but before we get to that interview with Andrew I'm just want to touch on a few things that's happened since then, obviously we have seen the start of the Guinness six nations of twenty nineteen we've seen the the first batch first couple of weekends with northern hemisphere referees taking the center stage and then last weekend the weekend before the coming weekend the southern hemisphere referees takeover as. Announced pre before Christmas think it was the all the the top fourteen refs in the wilder be list. I'm have a game at least with Nick berry picking up to I'm so a chance for them all to really stake. I'm claim ahead of selection from Alan Lund later on said, six nations already kicked off. Oh, going pretty well from refereeing perspective. Amazon the things can be let's see what happens over the next couple of weeks. We've had the super rugby tournament kickoff for twenty nineteen. I'm Linden Bri announced them a different approach there. I think since we lost on the podcast, they using new pod system. I'm where groups of referees will work much more closely together on kind of rotate refereed a art referee.

Linden Bri Rabih Alan Lund Nick berry rugby Japan Andy Amazon Andrew
"nissim" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:35 min | 3 years ago

"nissim" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Uh yes it's time for robes random request and this is a part of the Eurovision showcase where my husband rob gets what's the two hats out we got little bits of paper and both of them and one has countries on it all the way from door all the way to Ukraine and then recalled the years from nineteen fifty six to two thousand eighteen in the other hands. Let's start. We're GONNA do the year I this week. Serve Raw pick your year gig okay. He's picked two thousand three. Oh right now. That contest was in the <music> Sukamto in relaxed presenters were nothing and who wanted to appreciate with by one high. Now's WHO's who thinks third with his group brainstorm thousand Eurovision Song contest with the Song my star awesome tactic and the country has picked as Croatia. Yes are the Croatian and treats the two thousand and three Eurovision Song contest. It was decided through their national snow selection show Dora and the winner was Claudia Beni with this. I'm Nissim Toy Yeah V._M.. Nissim troyer. I'm not yours anymore. Yes the Croatian Shitsu thousands free Eurasians some contests now it was performed.

Nissim troyer Eurovision Sukamto Croatia Claudia Beni rob Ukraine Dora
Australian Firehawk Raptors Intentionally Spread Wildfires

Curiosity Daily

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Australian Firehawk Raptors Intentionally Spread Wildfires

"Who could use a little more self control fire hawk raptors, the birds that said fires on purpose. I'm talking about Brown, falcons, black kites and whistling kites. And guess where you can find them the same place where you can find fire tornadoes Australia shadow to our friends. Don't under this one's for. You. Luke, Robin, acey usually goes down anytime a fire. Sparks in the plains forest these so-called fire hawk raptors will gather to snag a burning branch or stick. Then the flip a new. One area where the fire hasn't spread yet and drop their payload. Of course, there is a reason for this. They're looking for food before one of these fires is set hundreds of birds will gather around and then as they watch the world burn from there. Literally bird's eye view, they'll start to collectively gorge themselves on the small rodents and reptiles that flee the inferno the Nissim some rare obscure phenomenon either for decades there have been reports of fire hawks stealing burning sticks from human cooking. Fires or other pieces of smoldering vegetation and get this. The three stages of fire control are one and understanding of its behavior to inability to control it and three inability to start it. These birds have mastered stages one and two of fire control chimpanzees. They've only gotten a stage. One forget planet of the apes. Maybe it's time to start worrying about planet of the fire. Raptors

Raptors Falcons Brown Sparks Luke Australia Robin
'The Flash' star Grant Gustin hits back at body shamers saying he looks too thin in leaked photos

Jason and Alexis

06:57 min | 3 years ago

'The Flash' star Grant Gustin hits back at body shamers saying he looks too thin in leaked photos

"But. I saw this yesterday right before I left for the cat video festival and. I, I'm a big fan of grant Guston who is the flash on WBZ's the flash, oh yeah and before that he was in glee, that's really when I started liking him well I guess even if you're not a fan of comic book shows, or superhero. Shows or you don't even know who grant Guston is I think you'll find the story fascinating because I. Guess I was unaware. Of this until, I read his long. Instagram, post. I guess there is a photo leaked Of new costume that he will be wearing as the. Flash, in the new season season five of this show and I think this is another, example kind of like the toxic fan base of, Star Wars going after rose the actress that played Alexa I can't remember her name Tommy head and I feel, I feel. Very bad because Kelly Kelli Kelli TRAN Horrible things into, her horrible death threats into the director of last Jedi Ryan Johnson anyway toxic fan base this is another example of toxic fan base and it's it's gone too. Far it's just ridiculous so this photo leaked of grant in this costume a prototype I should say of this, new costume and fans freaked. Out non only they will they didn't, like the costume but then they were also body shaming grant Guston Horribly. Body shaming him and. The opposite of what you usually here I mean some you know when I I. Would imagine that when you hear body shaming you think. Of fat shaming you think oh we'll body shaming. All they're talking about a. Person being overweight well it happens. On the other side too and let me read you this statement this. Post from grant he. Writes so here's the thing about this BS, photo leak it's a cool suit that's a terrible photo that I was unaware was being taken. Much less being posted some things need work and they will be worked on we'll get there as. Far as the, body shaming that's what pisses me off not even just for my sake I've had twenty plus years, of kids and, adults telling near. My parents I was too thin I've had, my own journey of accepting it. But there's a. Double standard where it seems to be okay to talk about. A dude's body I do my best to stay in shape and add as much. Sizes I can throughout our, seasons I'm naturally thin and my appetite is greatly Affected by stress. Stress is, something, that ebbs, and flows, for me throughout flash season thus gaining weight is, a challenge for me I, didn't cast, a, slim actor as the. Flash I went to an audition for. A, role I never dreamed I'd actually book, but here I am fi seasons later on happy with my. Body and, who I am and other kids who are built. Like me and thinner. Than me should be able to feel the same way not only that but they. Should be able to feel like they could be a. Superhero on TV or film or whatever it may. Be some day I love. The suit that has been designed. For me and I think whenever one season in its entirety you will. Love it two things. Have been adjusted since at leak was shot, and more things will continue to be adjusted until it feels right and then he went to. Post a video and he looks totally kind of beaten and he just barely says anything other than. F- to the, person that leaked that photo Any kind of ended the. Video but he just if you look at. His face I don't know if it's still up. Let me click on his little head here. No it's just the it's just, the statement but he just looked worn down cool and if your brain that fast all, the time wouldn't you have a high metabolism and be thin I was thinking the same thing people not everyone is gonna look, like Thor yes the flash I mean he's a thing of the track stars in your college and your. High school I think of. My friend David Lang who was literally like our thinnest, by finished friend because he was a track star, you too great body. I I don't I look and I was really not schooled but I think midway through the run of our show I. Made I made a comment about not not that stereotypical eat a bagel but I, made a comment similar to that and I got a really thoughtful Email from a woman Actually. No, I think. He was, from a gentleman who really kinda schooled me in a really nice way about. How as a thin person, he's like you don't like body shaming in the other direction Jason and I I feel that. Way as an overly. Skinny, person and. I thought wow I never because because when, you look at it through your own perspective I would do anything, I'm meat from for me I win anything to be thinner but, I never thought of what it would feel, like to be overly thin and have people go oh Eat a cranberry eat a bagel or, something How awful that must be And to hear grant. I really liked this guy I've always been a fan of his and that kind of broke my heart, when I read that yesterday but also kind of a good for him We're here is because, there are a lot of people for sure Nissim, being EMMY Rossum she is the of shameless. Which by the way. If you're a fan should be watching. Showcase it's fantastic and season, eight is now available, on net flicks? She posted on, her Instagram and I was, like what is this, and she, says wanna know what I way, and then it's like all right I got gotta, click on this see what's going on and. In her Instagram stories here's a picture. Of herself at, the gym it's a selfie in the mirror there and she says the next thing in, the in the story, is a picture of her, with, these, words, on, top of it, three, best friends, since kindergarten Dr kindness empathy Jewish and proud daughter one happy marriage and she kind. Of goes on for all of, the things that she is accomplished. Being directing three episodes of television finished her screenplay an animal rescuer and she says this great message because you. Are much more, than a number? And kind of the same thing she just saying you know what all of these things add up Who, who I am? Not the size of my thighs Really good message yeah for the same reason that grant Same thing for all the kids out there and I feel this way being an openly gay guy in, media, for all the kids. Out there that feel like oh. Look at my body I could never be the flash I. Can't, even pretend to. Be the flash or for EMI I I love that I love it because you never. Know who you're affecting in a positive and negative way you never know who's hearing your. Who seeing your light and I. And I love it both? Examples, of

Instagram Guston David Lang Jason Mathison Saint John Facebook Cornhole Minneapolis Kelly Kelli Kelli Tran ALI Don Mclean Tommy Head Brown Thomas Alexa Charlie Director Donna Ryan Johnson Emmy Rossum Nissim