36 Burst results for "ninety six percent"

Why a 4th COVID-19 wave may look different than previous surges

the NewsWorthy

01:16 min | Last week

Why a 4th COVID-19 wave may look different than previous surges

"Possible the us could be on the cusp of another covid. Nineteen surge new. Corona virus infections are on the rise again all across the us over the past week. An average of about sixty three thousand americans a day have been diagnosed with covid nineteen. That's a seventeen percent increase from the week before. The biggest bikes are happening in michigan and new york possibly because of new strains like the one i found in the uk remember. Scientists say that one is more contagious and possibly more deadly too but they say the vaccines should work against it. The good news is even if this is the start of a fourth wave. It's likely it'll be a lot less deadly than the previous ones. And that's because seventy. Three percent of american seniors have now gotten at least one dose of a covid nineteen vaccine a lot of people with underlying health conditions have also been vaccinated before the rest of the population. Of course younger people are not totally immune to this virus either as abc news reports. This is the first time since the pandemic was declared that most new hospitalizations are younger adults. But on the flip side there's been a ninety six percent drop in covid nineteen cases in nursing homes since the vaccine rollout started in december health officials. Say what we can take from. These new trends is vaccines work and everyone even young people should be signing up to get an appointment as soon as they

United States Michigan New York UK Abc News
Fresh update on "ninety six percent" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:37 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ninety six percent" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The coronavirus vaccine made by china and distributed around. The world isn't all that effective that admission from china's top disease control official. Who says the government is considering mixing vaccines to give them a boost. Beijing has yet to approve any foreign vaccines for use in china and has tried to sow doubt about the effectiveness of western vaccines in the us manufacturing problems or causing shortages of the johnson and johnson vaccine the c. d. c. Says this week. J. and j. will distribute eighty six percent fewer doses across the country. New york state will see an eighty percent week over week. Drop the johnson and johnson supply while new jersey officials expect a ninety six percent decline with jay. J. clearly have had some challenges. Our objective is four point seven million people by the end of june. So there's going to be a couple of months there for you to allow you to do that. Governor murphy defends the state's upcoming eligibility expansion by saying not everyone qualifies will immediately come forward to get their shots. Report our skin with fox five in new york another nail biter for nasa as it prepares for a test flight when masses. Perseverance rover landed on mars earlier. This year it brought with it a drone not unlike the one you play with at home. It's about the size of a tissue box. They call it ingenuity and they hope it can fly. In the martian atmosphere it would set mars exploration far ahead for either robotic missions manned missions because you can get to location so much astor by air than you could on the ground. Traveling by rover is relatively slow. This away that you could actually move a longer distance masses eric. I hanson directs their mars program. Today they'll try the first up and down flight and if all goes well both the drone and rover might send back pictures. Fox's evan brown. I'm pam talks..

Today Eighty Percent New York J. Ninety Six Percent Johnson This Year End Of June First Both Seven Million People Beijing This Week Eighty Six Percent Evan Brown Hanson China Governor
Inside Novavax Lab Amid Race To Develop COVID Vaccine

NBC Nightly News

03:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Inside Novavax Lab Amid Race To Develop COVID Vaccine

"Mellon nbc. News exclusive inside a company developing another covid vaccine. It hopes will be a global game changer with more on that katie beck developing vaccines is an uphill race. One that novak. Ceo stanley erc has been running for decades. How close to the finish line do you consider yourself to be at this point But we are close. Maryland-based has been developing. That seems for more than thirty years but has never had one approved and on the market now a possible victory on the horizon as the company mass produces tens of millions of doses of its covid nineteen vaccine confident. It will be authorized for use in the united states. Do believe your product is better than the other ones out there. Are they do all work. And i think everybody should take whatever action that they should offered them promising. Early test results secured novak's a one point six billion dollar contract from operation warp speed to produce one hundred million doses for the us but pre pandemic nova vaccine was sinking suffering setbacks after several failed phase. Three trials we had to to lay off people that it hurts. Everybody's morale when you do that on the verge of collapse in december of two thousand nineteen at times company's stock trading at a dollar. If you've been around it as long as i have you seen a lot of experiments fail but you also see people figure out why and then fiction. The company's recent data from phase three trials of its covid nineteen vaccine show ninety six percent efficacy and against the uk variant eighty. Six percent checks in news was the first crew allowed into this biotech lab in college station. Texas where vaccine production is bustling focus on make as much as to be here at the texas facility. Eighty thousand square feet transform to produce covid vaccine as quickly as possible now. They've added three hundred employees and are making millions of doses inside those bio reactors every month novak's paired with the biotech arm of fuji film to use this space taps by the federal government years ago as an emergency vaccine site in case of a pandemic novak's already fulfilling vaccine with canada and australia and in talks with europe facing critical shortages. Back in maryland nova vaccine is transforming space to fill out this but this year the company grow from one hundred employees to eight hundred. And it's worth fifteen billion dollars. Still there success relies on fda authorization expected to be sought in may the failed experiments that we learned from you know Show if you can learn from them and had the wherewithal you can win erc experience. It's still too early for a victory lap. That will come when novak shots go into arms katie beck. Nbc

Katie Beck Novak Ceo Stanley Erc Mellon NBC Maryland United States Fuji UK Texas Federal Government Australia Canada Europe FDA
CDC encouraged by vaccination study

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

CDC encouraged by vaccination study

"The CDC says it has encouraging news about the nation's vaccination program it's studied twelve and a half million people who got their first dose of either the flies or maternal vaccine over a two month period about nine in ten also received the second dose ninety six percent of people who got both goals as did so within the recommended time frame CDC cheaper show Lenski calls the results incredibly reassuring the study did not look at why some people did not receive both doses overall the CDC says about twenty one percent of the population of gotten at least one dose roughly eleven percent have completed their vaccination Sager mag ani Washington

CDC Lenski Sager Mag Ani Washington
At-Home COVID Tests Could Become the Norm for Americans

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | Last month

At-Home COVID Tests Could Become the Norm for Americans

"From wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business. Wars daily on this thursday february eighteenth when it comes to cove it. Here's one thing we know for sure. Widespread testing is vital to slowing down the pandemic so vital in fact that report from the university of colorado released last november found that testing seventy five percent of the city's population. Every three days would reduce infections by eighty eight percent just from people knowing whether or not they're spreading the virus but we can't know better if we can't get tested and depending on a litany of factors like where you live and what time of year it is getting in person test can be at least an inconvenience if not almost impossible. Wait times at test. Sites can be hours long in some places. Some testing locations require a referral from a doctor and is getting a test really worth asking a potentially sick person to show up at a physical location especially if they have to use public transportation to get there. Well no it's not says the us government that's why the white house just signed contracts with six new companies that are producing at home test at home. Tests are already available to some degree in the us but president biden wants to make sure they're really available. Americans will have access to sixty million At home kobe tests by this summer if all goes to plan australian diagnostic company. Aloom just signed a multimillion dollar deal with the us to build a production center for at home tests in the us. There's is a rapid antigen tests that connects to wait for your smartphone. Of course it is twenty twenty one after all business insider detailed how it works. The user connects device to their phone and swabs. Their nose puts the swab into a container of fluid. Then drops the fluid with the sample on it onto the device connected to the phone and then they wait but not for long test can detect covert in a nasal sample and around fifteen minutes. The whole thing sounds like it should be expensive but the test is set to cost thirty dollars and be available over the counter at retail outlets like cvs early clinical studies though small indicate that looms test is ninety six percent accurate when compared to the standard pcr tests. Those pcr tests can take days to deliver results. Meanwhile the ad home test from abbott will be the cheapest option at twenty five bucks. But you'll need a prescription to get it. Which could slow distribution users. Take the test in front of a train teleworkers. Through a video app the test was found to be around ninety. Two percent accurate for positive cases and one hundred percent accurate for negative cases reports business insider even though accuracy rates can be high for at home tests. There's still a chance of user error to that end. Alums smartphone device. Notifies you if there's not enough of a mucus. Sampled attest and avid is hoping that its teleworkers can coach users through proper swabbing technique but there are tests on the market that even with the best intentions can't account for user error the at home test by pixel labcorp which runs for a hundred dollars unless covered by insurance gives. Test takers clear. Instructions on how to swab. But it can't be sure users are doing it right and that opens up the possibility of a false negative result which could spread the virus instead of preventing spread. Now take a guess as to which. Us mega corporation has just made an at home test available for its shoppers

University Of Colorado President Biden David Brown United States Us Government White House CVS Abbott Labcorp
A highlight from S6 E3 - What is VA Solid Start?

Courage to Fight Again

30:48 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from S6 E3 - What is VA Solid Start?

"Welcome to we serve now. What were we seek to answer. The questions. veterans and their families are already asking that stays question is about a relatively new. Va program called va solid. Start and on today's show. We'll be answering all your questions about this program. What is it. who's it four. What's the goal of the program who's eligible and perhaps most importantly the actions that you need to take to not only take advantage of this program but also to take advantage of ball. The va benefits that you've earned through your military service. And i thought who better to answer this question than the person who came up with the program. So some of you may have heard of dr paul lawrence who is the head of the veterans benefits administration. Well his second. Command is a lady by the name of margarita devlin and she is an absolute well of knowledge. Not just from the. Va solid start program. But about so much more as well hello. My name is aaron perkins. I'm a. Us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Father to two amazing kiddos on the author of resolve a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through the journey of rediscovering purpose. Meaning and passion in your life after you've left the military and if you hadn't guessed on the host of this podcast and when we come back my special guest will be here so sit back. Relax and enjoy my conversation with margarita. Devlin who am i. Why am i still here. How can i uncover who. I was meant to be during my own transition from the. Us army the wounds of war especially those not visible continued to plague my through the pain of job loss of ptsd diagnosis at crippling anxiety by finally discovered the reason. I'm here on the earth. And i knew i couldn't keep it to myself so i wrote a book. Simply titled result. Resolved is a book that has one apologetically faith-based a step by step guide designed for maximum effectiveness in the context of a small group of other veterans resolve provides veterans everywhere with the tool to help you step into your new life a life full hope purpose and vision for the future to pick up your copy of resolve head over to courage to fight again dot com. That's courage to fight again dot com. Well i am here with margarita. Devlin and i just want to take a minute to thank you margarita for being here on the show. This is going to be so so great. I'm super excited about it. But i want to take a minute just to kind of introduce you. And i don't want to steal your thunder because i'm going to give you a chance to introduce yourself as well but margarita devlin. She is the principal secretary for benefits in the department of veterans affairs. She's held that position since may of two thousand eighteen. Now that title in itself obviously a mouthful right. But i will let you. Margarita explained what your role is and all of that and kind of dive into a little bit more for listeners. Basically she second in command at veterans benefits administration so veterans benefits administration. Va that's your va. Va home loan disability compensation of oak rehab life insurance transition assistance and speaking of transition assistance marguerita has a lot of different advancements in military to civilian transition and also suicide prevention to include. What we're talking about today and that is the. Va solid start program so margarita. It is so good to have you. I just want you to want you to take a few minutes and introduce yourself but is so great to have you here. Welcome to we served now. What inky so much. It's really my pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me to be on this podcast And i guess what. I areas like to tell people as i've been in the va for twenty five years It's my passion to serve veterans in in various different roles throughout my career. i'm also mom of inactivity serving marine And also the mom of a college student Dad was a navy veteran brother served in the army so Military family close very close to my heart this mission so really happy to be here and talk about the solid start program haas of also weived definitely excited to have you and again on this show. We do our best to answer the questions that veterans and their family members are already asking and one of those questions is what is the. Va solid start programming. And that's question. Maybe we can just lead off with that. What is the. Va solid start program. Absolutely i'm happy to just dive right into that. so solid. The solid start program is really part of the military to civilian transition journey. That really looks at the fact. That transition does not end when you get the d. to fourteen at the end of your military service in fact those of you who have served you know this right. That's really when everything starts to actually happen and no amount of preparation With the military can really prepare you for what what your situation is gonna be like after we heard this from veterans so this program really seeks to connect with veterans in that first year after separation starting at about three months and then we follow up beginning six months in a year and it really is an opportunity for us to start out with. How is it going for you. How's your transition going. How're you doing what's going on in your life. What are you worrying about. And really letting the veteran drive the conversation about what he or she needs the moment how it's going and then our agents are very well trained to pick up on those cues from that conversation and provide that veteran with specific resources in guidance on how to continue their transition in the most successful manner. Possible that is that is huge. I remember. I remember when i got out at the end of two thousand fourteen. It was a kind of a drinking from the fire hose. Except i didn't even know what i was supposed to be drinking. You know it's like hey here's a bunch of benefits you might be eligible for good luck and so it's funny so we started this podcast in the summer of two thousand eighteen and it wasn't until i started this podcast and started doing some research that i learned about more benefits. I could've taken advantage of when i first got out. You know four years prior and so the fact that this this solid start program is tackling that specific issue. I think is great. So what what. Problems specifically is the program trying to solve will it is really a suicide prevention initiative and it came from the fact that we heard from veterans. That sort of felt like all the services and support sorta stopped When they separated from the military and because it was like drinking from a fire hose. They really didn't know where to go to do And who to connect to and it was really difficult for. Va to connect with veterans who were not engaging with our with our systems already so we entered into this agreement with department of defense and homeland. Security is coastguard is under homeland security to get data feet of all the military members when they were separating so that we can start those phone calls so that we can call everybody and by the way we do call everybody that we have information for that includes regardless of character discharge We will call these veterans and we will make sure that they get connected to services and resources that are that are specific to their needs so again suicide prevention. We recognize that. There is a a real. There's a reality about transition stress Which is very different than what you might think about with clinical rate with post traumatic stress disorder. Which is a clinical diagnoses Comes with its own required treatment in the mental health arena. But this is just It's stress around. All the life changes that happened with transition. And what you said you know sometimes they. You're hearing so much about so many benefits while you're in the process of separating that when you get out you might not realize that you didn't take advantage of all of them right right. That is so true. That is so true. So so the the tap program transition assistance program or the army's version i think is a cap or something. It is this part of that is essential that the tap program still exist. How does it factor into all that. They're they're connected. They're two separate things but connectors so the transition. Assistance program does still exist Dod really owns and operates. Don on any of the military services of course puts their own branding on their part of the program via has an entire day where we come in and we teach about. Va benefits was really great. We were able to get it to a full day. Always didn't always look like that but even in that full day where we teach it's really It's a classroom experience right so you're Before covid you were in a room with twenty twenty five other service members and as much as we try to make it engaging and make sure that the servicemember can tie all the benefits to their own personal situation using interactive workbook. All of those things. It still was a classroom experience. A not individual not one on one We do still have benefit visor. Available for one on one support with and they. They advertise that during the class. Now when we went into the code environment we go to virtual So we we are still pretty much in the virtual environment. We've we've started working on getting a little bit more in person presence with tap classes but of course as you can imagine Safety is the number one concern And so we think about this way. Transition assistance program is about teaching. You what you might need to know and getting you prepared in the right mindset for transition. Solid start is like okay. Now we're gonna talk to you after this happened after you got out of the military to see. How are you doing ended. All that stuff makes sense. What questions do you still have. And it's one on one so rather than having to listen to what everybody has to listen to if you already have a job and that's not your concern or you're already in college and using your education benefits that's not your concern but maybe you need to get into a medical appointment. You don't know how to navigate. That will work with you on justice. If that's what you need is maybe you have issues with your children. You need some some other resources. We have access to information about state department of veterans affairs benefits that can sometimes filling gaps were. Va can't Provide a service to really is personalized the comments we hear from veterans. I know you've been seeking feedback from veterans. As well is that they're surprised that va's calling and they're so thankful for it because they were maybe not sure who to call her how to ask about a particular benefit so it's been really interesting seeing the positive reaction from our veteran community. Absolutely and you know. I think that you know this is my opinion. You based on my own experience and the experience of know friends and other veterans who gone through the transition systems program. There are getting ready to get that to you to fourteen right. So all of those briefings. I shouldn't say all but a lot of those briefings are at least in the transitioning servicemembers. Mind it's it's a check the block it's like all right. Let me just get through this thing. So i can go home. Take off this uniform for the final time and get on with my life so the fact that you're contacting them throughout that first year i think they're going to be a whole lot more receptive to hearing. What the benefits are. Because it's not like you're not keeping them from you know from going home you know. You're not you're not saying. Hey you have to be here. This is your place of duty right now. So you mentioned covid nineteen and a lot of things have gone. virtual has there been any other impacts to the program. I know the program still pretty new but have there been any other impacts of the program as a result of the pandemic like are you behind or ahead or anything like that. A solid start actually was in a great position to react effectively to the covid nineteen situation. All of our agents were telework ready and all of our equipment works from telework standpoint. So they haven't skipped a beat they are not behind. They are on target When we first created the program we weren't sure what kind of response we were gonna get so when we created the program We we have to have a performance measure right so we said well. How many people do we really going to answer. The phone won't va calls. You know think about yourself right if your cell phone rings and you don't recognize the number what's the chance you're gonna answer it. Probably not your let it. Go to voicemail right. And if that person's important deli new message so we kinda thought we might get that sort of a reaction so we kinda started. Set the bar low. We said fifteen percent our goal was fifteen one. Five fifteen percent of veterans we reached out to we would be able to actually engage with. They would answer the phone and engage with our with our representatives. It's been just phenomenal. The actual result actually have your with me the december twenty twenty report since we began the program. We have reached over. Eighty seven thousand veterans and the fiscal year. Twenty twenty today fifty seven point. Five percent have responded and engaged. Yeah i know it's it's been just an incredible Response and we also prioritize veterans. Who we know from the information from dod if a veteran had mental health appointment In that last year of service before they left the military prioritize them and we also know that for that population. We need to make sure we get them connected into. Va healthcare and with that sub population. The percents even higher seventy three point. Six percent have responded to our agents and our end have engaged with them on the phone. Wow that is really really great. How surprised were you at the at the numbers when he finally saw them. In the beginning. I was very surprised. And then you know we had a town hall with are Representatives the ones who are actually making the call and it was really interesting. Many of them are veterans themselves. Some of them are you were military spouses. And some of them even used to work in the tap program and and they're so passionate about their work and they're always submitting new ideas about how to improve the program here in the anecdotes That they shared with me about what some of these veterans were telling them and how grateful they were for this phone call. One thing we do is we did put it on the caller. Id so in most with most cellular services You you'll it'll save veterans affairs on your phone so you kind of notes the. Va calling so kind of helps to increase the the response rate but yeah. It's it's been an amazing response for veteran for so happy that this program is reaching them in making impact. Yeah definitely that's great. That's great so. Va solid start. It's for those who are basically brand new to the civilian world right so for those of us like myself and a lot of our listeners who are not newly separated what resources are available for us for helping us understand available that that we can take advantage of so a couple things you're right. Solid start is for those that are recently separated so for veterans of any era. Were here for you as well. And you know i always. I'm always very sensitive to that that you know if you Or vietnam era veteran. We care about you. We want you to call us if you if you never got connected to your benefits. Please call us and we will walk you through. There's a main toll free number which is one eight hundred eight two seven one thousand and that is our main call centre. Those agents are trained across the entire portfolio benefits as well and they will help you identify. What eligibilities you might have In the benefit side and they can even connect you to healthcare If you if you haven't signed up for your healthcare so they can. They can kind of connect you regardless of when you got out of the military And if you are a veteran that just got out in the last year and you haven't gotten your solid start call. I say the information we get from dod his last information we had about the servicemember. Sometimes people change their phone number They changed their email address. We do try and reach out by email First before we make that first phone call so call us. And if you're in that last in the first year after separation just asked to be transferred to the solid start program very cool very cool and you just taught me something with this eight hundred numbers at eight hundred eighty two seven one thousand right cracked. Okay so i could you know after we finish this conversation i could off here. I could call that number and find out the benefits that i'm eligible for. Maybe i'm not taking advantage of. Yes and really. What what they're gonna do is they're going to ask you some questions. What type of benefit are you thinking about. you know. and because we haven't education call center so if you said hey. I'm really wondering if i'm if i'm eligible for the gi bill. They'll transferred to gi bill experts. Right if you say well. i'm really kind of thinking. What kind of employment types of benefits or what about disability benefits So you know they'll help you with those benefits. It's a little bit different than solid. Start in that There are more got react to what you're needing in the moment whereas are solid start agents are trained to sort of prompt And get information out of the veteran to help navigate the whole suite of benefits they might be entitled to and i also wanna say your state department of veterans affairs. They have offices in in different states. We have regional offices. One day hopefully will be able to meet in person again. But in addition there's the veterans service organizations in. They're out there to help. There's a lot of resources but yes feel free to call us. Anybody listening to podcasts. Give us a call one. Eight hundred eighty two seven one thousand and we'll try and get you connected to your benefits above love it and so speaking of benefits and this is it's kind of a curiosity question. I guess what is the most overlooked benefit that veterans typically. Don't take advantage. There's a couple and we actually make it a point to focus on these in the beginning They're time sensitive so one thing for example is life insurance benefits. There is a time limit on when you can convert your service group. Life insurance to veteran group life insurance. And if you don't do in that timeline you kind of miss the opportunity It's about a year and a half out from from when you leave the military so We tell them always about life insurance and that's always kind of a tricky thing right. Nobody ever wants to think about end of life. Especially you know you. A young twenty five year old veteran and twenty six year old. And they're thinking while life insurance okay. You know if they're single and they don't have a a spouse children they might not be thinking about it so we want to make sure they understand the value of having that life insurance policy and so that they make an informed decision potentially to take advantage of it another one is dental care the eligibility for dental care which is time limited in a lot of veterans miss out on that because they don't fully understand it so there's a couple of the ones that we know are are critical sensitive And honestly we've heard some some of our veterans who say they didn't file for disability benefits. Because they didn't feel like they should take that benefit away from another veteran so we do spend some time explaining that they don't take benefit from another veteran. It's a it's a mandatory benefit. Were any veteran. Who's eligible for the benefit and it also opens up the door for healthcare. And you know if you're young and strong now but but you know that you had injuries orthopedic injuries for example. But you're okay and you can kind of deal with the pain right now. Well one day you're going to need healthcare it might worsen You know this is. This is not a handout. It is an investment in that veteran. Making sure that they can stay strong and half the care that they need to to For the rest of their life if needed sure sure so that is some really really great information. But it's not every day that i get to to the principal. Deputy undersecretary for benefits at the veterans benefits administration or being translated. Second command right. So i have a couple of questions that they're they're along the lines of transition but not solid start specific right sure all right so one thing that i'm incredibly passionate about is helping veterans rediscovery since of purpose and meaning after the military and so finding that sense of purpose in that sense of meaning after military service is. It's really the single most challenging part of a chat challenging part of the transition and so one question. I wanted to ask you is how does the. Va help with this aspect of post military life. It's interesting that you bring that up because our research also validates that is one of the biggest challenges. In fact we did. We just started last year. A post-separation study of veterans. Who went through the top programme while they were in uniform to kind of see the retrospective look right. Because it's one thing we can really high marks in the classroom right there. The ninety six percent are highly satisfied with our tap class. But what we wanna do is wait to your veteran in the naski. Look back on and say okay now. How well prepared did you feel you were and we also bounce that against data to see are they employed you know are they using our benefits and we ask them for information about how they're doing so in that study we found the open comments that we got from veterans were very much around that loss of sense of camaraderie. That loss of sort of feeling that you're part of a community unit cohesion that you had the military you don't have that in communities today And just that that loss of sense of purpose and mission so we're just now starting to lean in to explore how the can help with that. We can't solve the problem ourselves right because we're not going to be that sense of community for them but we can connect them and we've been engaging with a lot of organizations nonprofits and via so organizations that provide that connectivity that sense of community in that sense of mission And we're starting those conversations to say. How do we infuse that into the solid. Start program so that we can start connecting veterans in a different way to give them that sense of community. they're looking for. It's really going to involve have to involve a partnership model via. Can't do this alone. Sure sure on love the fact that that the va is realizing this and is like you said leaning into that so now this is a this next question for you is potentially a touchy question. But i don't need to tell you that. A lot of veterans are like. I don't like the va about experience for those veterans who have had that experience or they're just like man. I've heard so many bad things. I don't even wanna try it you know. It's probably not worth the hassle. What what would you say to them if they were if they were asking like. Okay what should i do. Should i do anything. What would you say to them right now. A couple of things first of all. I wanna say avenues. Cells and good news typically unfortunately does not get the same kind of traction. There are so many good news stories out there. And if you look for them you'll see them. I would say comback triumphs again. It's not the same. va that. It was a few years ago. We have come such a long way in the healthcare system with the hospitals in the end the outpatient clinics in our regional offices are outreach is is so much different and we understand better how to improve the experience for our veterans. So i would say it's been a couple of years maybe had a bad experience comeback to us get another chance and if your experience is not absolutely stellar fabulous edit. It doesn't make you turn around your opinion of va. Reach out to us. And i would say in the healthcare system. We have Advocates in every medical center. Go talk to the patient advocate. Tell them about your experience. Let us change something. If there's something specific that's not quite right. Sitting in our via regional office asked to speak to the leadership team. We have lead dan so hard on getting feedback from veterans and making changes across the entire enterprise. It's it's just not the same. Please try again in comeback. That's what i would say. Sure sure so of just just anecdotally right so my family. And i we live in alabama and so my closest a regional center is in birmingham. And so you know i. I've been there a lot over the past few years. And when i compare the service and the facilities and everything like that to a to a more local hospital more local medical facility. It is night and day difference. I mean bring. Va clinic is just top of the line. So it it is really an and again. I know everyone is different but it even from. When i used to go to the va we lived in texas to go into the va. Here it is. There's so many positive changes that have been made in at so honestly i'm really really happy with with the facilities and the care receive and everything like that so glad to hear that. Yeah absolutely absolutely so what's a big takeaway here right. So what does something. All veterans and newly separated veterans or. Otherwise what should they really remember from our conversation. Today i would say remember that. Va is here for you We probably have a benefit or a service that you might not have been aware of And we wanna be there. We want to be partners in your military civilian transition. We want to be partners in your life and help you with any issues that you might have. We're not the answer for everything But we also have connections with community resources and just reach out to us if if you need anything don't try and go it alone and again if if you had a bad experience in the past comeback to us i promise you it should be a much better experience now and like i said if there's anything you encounter that that you have an issue with let us know we're here to be part of it. I mean my personal story. My brother who is an army veteran wouldn't go to the. Va for the longest time. I finally got him to go and he's been so thrilled he was. He calls me up and he's like says they're offering me services that i didn't even ask for. They're they're doing this. They're doing that. And i said yes. That's what we call wraparound services when you come into a va. We are not just looking at the problem that you presented with. We're gonna ask you how else we can help you. And he's been so impressed with that. He wishes he would start in the. Va system a long time ago. It really is We've really made some great advances. So please come see as awesome awesome so here on the show. We like to give our listeners. Some practical next step. So when this podcast finishes playing what should they. Do you know the context of our conversation today. What should they do because today's question is. Hey what's the. Va solid start program. And obviously you've answered that more than we could ever imagine and in so having you on the show has been just absolutely outstanding but what should their next steps be right after listening to this podcast. I would say if you're curious about the benefits and services we offer You might try to going to our website. Www dot va dot gov easy to remember And when you go to. Va dot gov. You'll see sort of things grouped into logical sort of life domain issue. So you'll be able to kind of navigating see. Wow you know what is what does the. Va half for me. And then you can actually apply for many of our programs online. Some of them Were still working on getting online. But you get the application online so that would be one thing and then if you just don't wanna talk to somebody some full more comfortable calling on the phone and talking to somebody call that number i gave earlier one eight hundred eight two seven. One thousand You know we're here for you. Take that step. Check us out If you're already enrolled in one of our programs you know good on you but there might be something else that he don't know about so check us out. Sure well margarita. Devlin this has been so so rate again. You have answered the question. What is the a solid star program. Frankly answered a whole lot more questions as well. So thank you so so so much for coming on serve now. What really enjoyed having him my pleasure and thank you for what you're doing to. It's really important work. I hope you've enjoyed my conversation with margarita devlin. So what are your questions recorded voice memo on your phone and send it to podcast at courage to fight again dot com or joined the post nine eleven veterans and families facebook group. And post your question there. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question we can ask ourselves is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus. Christ we'll i'll see you right back here. Two weeks from day and the nixed veteran question. We'll be asking is this. How do i use my post nine. Eleven gi bill. Well until next time. Thanks for listening. We serve now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Veterans Benefits Administrati Margarita Devlin Department Of Veterans Affairs Devlin Dr Paul Lawrence Aaron Perkins Us Army Margarita Marguerita Department Of Defense And Home Traumatic Stress Disorder Army Ptsd Navy
TV audience for President Biden inauguration larger than Trump

TIME's Top Stories

01:53 min | 2 months ago

TV audience for President Biden inauguration larger than Trump

"Nothing illustrates the political passions of a television networks audience. Quite like ratings. For a presidential inauguration the six point fifty three million people who watched president joe biden take the oath of office and deliver his inaugural address on. Msnbc wednesday was a whopping three hundred. Thirty eight percent bigger than its audience for donald. Trump's swearing in four years ago. The nielsen company. Said on the flipside fox news channel's audience of two point. Seventy four million for biden on wednesday represented a nearly seventy seven percent drop from its viewership for trump in two thousand seventeen nielsen said a preliminary nielsen estimates shows biden's inaugural viewership on the top six networks. Beat trump by four percent. nielsen said. It doesn't have a complete estimate for inaugural viewing because it's still counting people who watched on other networks or outside their homes. Cnn with ten million viewers easily beat abc. Cbs nbc msnbc and fox. During biden's big moment nielsen said that's one hundred ninety six percent more than watched trump for years ago. Cnn which has been on a hot streak in the rating since biden's victory also topped all the others for its coverage of the prime time inaugural celebration msnbc. Meanwhile said it recorded the highest daytime ratings of the networks nearly twenty five year history on wednesday abc had seven point. Sixty six million viewers for the oath-taking up ten percent from twenty seventeen. Nbc had six point. Eighty nine million down twelve percent and cbs had six point. Zero seven million down thirteen percent nielsen said.

Biden Nielsen Msnbc Nielsen Company Joe Biden Fox News Channel Donald Trump CNN ABC NBC CBS FOX
US troops drawdown from Afghanistan

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:50 min | 4 months ago

US troops drawdown from Afghanistan

"Donald trump has done more for peace than the nobel peace prize winner who dropped an s ton of bombs in his time as president. Barack obama did so has trump has dropped a lot of bombs to. There's no doubt about it but not any new places and he's removing troops from afghanistan. According to fox news the draw down is under way after almost twenty years bases are being closed and troops are heading home. General mark milley chairman of the joint chiefs of staff suggested that just two large bases and several satellite ones will remain for the twenty five hundred soldiers. Who stay so. They're still going to be a couple thousand troops on the ground there but on the ground. The situation is getting worse. The taliban is launching more attacks and taking more ground and thousands have fled their homes for those people. A peace deal seems a long way off and many are losing faith that it will succeed. The rise in violence is thought to be a tactic by the taliban to gain leverage in negotiations secretary of state. Mike pompeo said that it puts the peace deal at risk adding quote. I made clear to them that the violence levels can't continue all these negotiations go on won't work and so we've asked all of them stand back and indeed stand-down unquote. The afghan army has been trained at the same thing. That trump said to the proud right standby and stand down. I think or stand-down standby say. The afghan army has been trained by the us to fight in its place and conduct ground missions and ninety six percent of air missions themselves. But it's not thought that it can stand up to the taliban alone even after the draw down the. Us will continue air support funding and training all in accordance with the deal they made with the taliban and about sixty five hundred other. Nato troops remain but for america. This country's longest war is winding down

General Mark Milley Afghan Army Taliban Donald Trump Mike Pompeo Joint Chiefs Of Staff Fox News Barack Obama Afghanistan America Nato
Lawmaker quits GOP over bid to overturn Biden's win

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

07:49 min | 4 months ago

Lawmaker quits GOP over bid to overturn Biden's win

"The political world has a new independent tonight because earlier. Today republican congressman. Paul mitchell of michigan decided to leave his republican party over trump's efforts to cast doubt on the election. It became clear to me that i could no longer be associated with the republican party. That leadership does not stand up and say the process. The election is over. It's over today. I voted for donald trump. i supported the administration policies. Ninety five ninety six percent of the time the last two terms. I've active in the national state party but this party has to stand up for democracy. I for our constitution. I am not clinical considerations. that's a candidate. Not simply for raw political power. And that's what feels going on. And i've had enough back with us tonight. Robert gibbs former obama campaign senior adviser former white house press secretary under one president obama and steve schmidt longtime political strategist who led the mccain campaign. Who has since left the republican party and among the founders of the lincoln project which set out to defeat trump and trumpism and steve. That's why i'm going to start with you What have they unleashed. I've got a poll to show you fox news poll. Seventy seven percent of trump voters. Feel that the election was stolen from their guy. Then this weekend at a maga- rally in washington a chance starts up. Destroy the gop. What have they uncorked here. How will anyone fix this. And is a guy like mitch mcconnell ready for the consequences. Well let me just say brian. That several years ago a book came out and it was name j winning and he posited that april eighteen sixty five one of the most important historical monse in history. And i think when we look back november. Twenty twenty is going to be such a monte it's a before and after monte hinge in our history and it was the month where faith and belief in american democracy was deliberately premeditatively intentionally poisoned by donald trump by his supporters including many elected republicans in culminating with one hundred twenty six members of congress in eighteen attorney general's signing in a meekest brief. Now it's important to understand that signing got a meek brief was not illegal lack the junk lawsuits. It was preposterous. It was a political statement. It was a repudiation of be bedrock of the american system the idea that a government of the people by the people for the people. The people are sovereign. The people decide who our leaders are in their in tampa to maintain empower defeated in common president over the clear in legitimate. Victor is something that will do to american democracy. What the exxon valdez. Day to alaskan waters deepwater horizon did gulf waters it poisons that fundamental faith and belief which the system can't survive without and then lastly resolved in washington dc. We saw right wing extremist violence with these proud boys. And just because they weren't wearing brown or black doesn't mean that they're not the same people that you saw at nineteen thirty five or nineteen. Twenty seven in italy or in germany is a fascistic organisation. Trying to impose violence political will on the country. We're in a lot of trouble as country after this month of november. And we're going to be fighting this fight for generation and this is the month where american politics relying on one side a pro democracy coalition and on the other side we have an autocratic coalition within that autocratic coalition for example in the house. You have a conservative leader liz. Cheney and you have an autocratic leader kevin mccarthy in the same way that the kansas nebraska wrote the whig party in eighteen fifty four and led to the emergence of a new party. The republican party. I suspect that what we've seen play out over these last weeks with these members signing onto this in time we'll break the republican party into its conservative faction faction but either way we have one institution politically in. This country stands for the ideals of american democracy. And that's the democratic party. You'll political party in the world while you've given us a lot about their can sure on your assessment of april eighteen sixty five the book by jay winnick which i love to and his on my bookshelf. Hey robert think of the senators as i like to call them in the witness protection program. The lamar's the blunts especially the portman. Monds they insist on being upstanding republicans all of them to a man have taken a dive for this president and have sold out their seats and votes. When it's come down to it. How are they going to react. When perhaps as the ultimate extension of trumpism these chance startup about destroying the gop. They didn't make that bargain. They just went along. With a a president occult. They were scared of getting tweeted out. Who doesn't understand that They didn't go along with destroying the party. that got them to the dance will. They didn't brian. But i think they cut a deal essentially with trump and bought something they may not be able to now return Because this is going to land on them. How are they going to sit across from a president. That a seventy seven percent of their own party believes is illegitimate and try to govern the country. It has to start brian with not just a recognition of what happened today at the electoral college. But why and how it happened because of an honest free and fair election fifty some court cases which heard wild accusations about fraud that never got proven and election that delivered a president elected vice president-elect and if they don't begin to explain that to their own voters that this wasn't just a happenstance on a calendar for the electoral college but in fact a result of an election that was had in this country been. They too are going to be able to govern the the idea that this is just making joe biden less and less of a legitimate president and that they own or quite frankly aren't going to feel the effects of this on them. I think you're beginning to see it whether it's chance that you saw in washington whether it's the questions that the senators that are up for re election in georgia are getting they go to these rallies. They pitch their candidacy for a vote. And then somebody says what. Are you doing to protect democracy for the presidential campaign and if they don't start to let the air out of that balloon in a real way. Nobody's gonna come vote for them and january because nobody's going to have confidence in the system even their own base.

Republican Party National State Party Donald Trump Lincoln Project Trumpism Paul Mitchell Steve Schmidt Barack Obama Robert Gibbs Mitch Mcconnell Brian Fox News Jay Winnick Michigan White House Monds Mccain
Chicken in a Petri Dish: Singapore First to Allow Lab-Grown Meat Sales

Business Wars Daily

03:30 min | 4 months ago

Chicken in a Petri Dish: Singapore First to Allow Lab-Grown Meat Sales

"It may look like chicken and tastes like chicken. But that doesn't mean it's actually chicken. Take eat just for example. The company cell cultured chicken also known as lab grown meat just got approval to be sold in singapore. It's the first time a country is given regulatory approval to sell lab grown meat other companies are working on lab grown beef poultry pork and seafood. What is lab grown meat. You ask good question. Well for starters. It is grown on a farm technologists. Take a sample of muscle tissue from an animal. Then they typically put the cells into a liquid or gelatinous substance housed in a bio reactor one of those sci-fi movie containers that grow organisms. Most of the lab created meet. Looks like ground beef or small nuggets. No one's growing sirloin steaks in a lab just yet scientific american reports that one cow tissue sample can yield enough meat to make eighty thousand quarter pounders without slaughtering a single cow. Singapore's approval may lead to a quote revolution. In-kind kind clean meet one analysis in the guardian claimed. And that's a big part of its appeal. Livestock production is routinely plagued with stories of inhumane treatment of animals. A university of oxford study says the lab grown meat would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by ninety six percent and use just one percent of the land currently used for commercial livestock production would also slash water use and contamination. By bacterial waste. Electricity use would likely be higher to create meet in a lab however while the singapore approval may seem like a sign of things to come the. Us is not anywhere close to approving lab grown meat but would be manufacturers like just eat and competitor mosa meet got one step closer last year the department of agriculture and the food and drug administration formed an agreement to regulate the sector jointly that regulatory framework shows that the us takes innovation seriously and may help us manufacturers attract more funding box. Report says aside from overseeing safety the joint regulators will also decide issues like whether manufacturers will be able to simply label their product. Meet without disclosing. The grown in a lab part mostly is planning to seek its initial regulatory approval in europe first food dye reports beyond regulatory concerns cost is another barrier to mass production several years ago when mosa meet unveiled its hamburger patties. They cost roughly three hundred thousand dollars. Each costs have come down as techniques for growing the meat have improved now just eat says it can bring in its products at roughly the price of premium chickens nbc reports and investors smell opportunity. Mosa landed another fifty five million dollars in september and eat just which also makes plant based egg products is valued at a whopping two billion dollars while more than half of the population is the concept of lab grown products for in ten. Call them scary and say they won't be putting them in the meal rotation anytime soon. According to dive alleviating those concerns will require manufacturers to devote more time to educating the public about their products but even with the promise lab created need for the environment and animal welfare and eating consumers may not by

Singapore Nuggets University Of Oxford Department Of Agriculture Food And Drug Administration Mosa United States Europe NBC
Zconomy: How Gen Z Will Change the Future of Business with Jason Dorsey

Entrepreneur on FIRE

29:22 min | 4 months ago

Zconomy: How Gen Z Will Change the Future of Business with Jason Dorsey

"Jason. Save up to fire nation and share. Something interesting about yourself that most people don't know sure what's up. Fire nation thrilled to be here with you. Huge fan fire nation. Everything about something that most people don't know about me is. I wrote my first book when i was eighteen years old and it was so successful. I ended up sleeping on the floor of a garage apartment with five thousand books that i had printed thinking somebody was going to buy them instead. They were furniture. So a bed of books means you're not selling as many books as you want to fire nation but guess what jason's grown he's matured and right. Now he's rocking z. Konami which is all about generation z. And how gen z is going to change the future of business. So i kind of want to start a few steps back jason. Because i'm just curious like how does one get into studying generations wide. Did that interest you. And why did you get into it. Yeah share well that. I book that i wrote when i was eighteen at ended up not selling it first and then becoming a real big bestseller and i started speaking all around the world and i ended up on sixty minutes and i was on. That show is all about millennials. And i'd written a bunch of books and started a company and everything was going great but after that show i started speaking all these corporate executives who are now our primary clients but i was speaking all these exact and he would say such terrible things about millennials and i am a millennial pretty fended lazier titled your pants or fall off. You live with your mom and all this stuff. And i'm like well. No actually. I have my own house in our own office building in my parents worked for me and my pants are on very snugly. Thank you very much. And so so after that i remembered Clear as day. I was in this boardroom. Big public company and the ceo had said Some things about millennial employees. That i just i didn't fully believe and i'd spoken about half a million millennials at that time and so i asked him because i didn't know any better. Now i serve on lots of corporate boards. You know one of the couples on sold for eleven billion dollars. I live in this world now. But back then i didn't i didn't i didn't know and it was really a set up for success so i asked him i said is there any way i can see your data about millennials because you say the turnovers hiring. They're not as engaged and on and on i. I love to understand better. So i can conceptualize it and maybe help also for so. There are a lecture or whatever so they sent the data to me. And the data didn't match with the ceo had just said in the boardroom which basically never happened. Ceo's don't go off the cuff in front of their boards prickly a private publicly-held company like that. So i asked my wife who has a phd. I said denise you know this is. The strangest thing was just in this room with this pretty famous. Ceo they said all these things with great conviction then. I looked at the data and the data doesn't match what they just said. I said what do you think we should do. And she looked at me and she says we start a research for. She's up because if they don't even know their own data if we can help them to understand their data make better decisions and we can really great copy and help lots of peoplesoft. Lots of challenges and so. That's how we got into this thirteen years ago. We founded the center for generational kinetics. We lead research all around the world for many of the biggest brands in the world. And all about separating generational myth from truth through data so leaders can make great decisions whether you're a startup or venture capital or your bootstrapping yet or you're in a big public company getting accurate data and being able to make decisions based on that increases the likelihood of success de risk strategies. That you're looking at drives innovation and so forth and we found that generations in particular or one area where there was just so much myth and so much misinformation and if we gave people great information that it could take action and that was incredibly exciting. We've had seven hundred clients since then which is pretty wild and done studies all around the world and just love it absolutely it now. Your ceo is just flat out wrong when it came to millennials and you had the data to back it up. Did you ever go back to him. And just be like joe burrow. Check us out. you're wrong in also my pants. They're pretty snug. Check them out. I know that was a quiet. But i really do credit him and i if it wasn't such a negative story i would say what company is because it's really big famous company but But no but. I do believe that he something that we saw frequently. Which is the idea that generations older generations. Think of millennials through the lens of their kids or their grandkids and so that that becomes a proxy for the whole generation. And in fact when we wrote the economy book new book. What we found is the same thing was happening again and there was all this misinformation and it just wasn't true and that's why we spent less two years right in the book is because we've got to clear this up because when people have the wrong impression about an entire generation it leads to so many problems for everybody. Everybody loses so no. I never never corrected him on it. But i do give him credit for sparking the idea. I'm glad that you do give them credit for sparking that idea because sometimes fire nation. Is those things you just like you know. I'm not just quite sure about that. Let me look into it. They can really uncover some great opportunities in one thing. That i think is a huge problem in this world in general and especially when you're talking about generations is just regurgitation. You'll hear one person on one talk. Show say one thing. And then you'll regurgitate it. And then somebody else regurgitates regurgitation and like seven layers down. You're like how'd you hear that. They're like oh. I don't really know like somebody just mentioned it and like now you're speaking it like it's the truth and it's just regurgitation of what you know is something that has no data to back it up. So what most people get wrong jason when it comes to generations break that down for us shared. There's a few things that jump out. The first is this belief. Generations are a box or stereotype and that is absolutely not true. We're generational researchers. This is what we do more than sixty five generational studies and what we see is generations are not a box but what they really are powerful clues and as long as we used them as clues and only clues to dry faster connection trust and influence in create all kinds of positive outcomes. We don't wanna put people in boxes. We wanna use this as clues. So we can figure out how to better lead market sell collaborate innovate and so forth. And when you sort of at that level people seem to really embrace it because it just gives them another lens to better connect. So i think the first is people think. Generations are boxes or stereotypes. And they're not in fact. Our clues are driven by math. We look for what's called predictability by scenario so that's the first thing that people i think it wrong. The second is this idea that generations are the same around the world. Now one of the things that we've uncovered repeatedly in our work. We publish all this on our website. Is that generations vary by geography so for example in the us will see differences between urban and rural within the same generation. And that i work a lot outside the us and we'll see differences. Has we travel around the world and that's important because if you're a global company or frankly a global brand fire nation is you want to make sure that you really representing each of the different geographies. And what makes them different now. One cool thing that we've uncovered and we talk a lot about this bunches. Economy is the most consistent generation the world. now that doesn't mean exactly the same but the most similar generation the world is now gen z. Gnc's about twenty three twenty four years old. The oldest and the reason the most similar is because of cheap mobile technology so if you live in different countries around the world you might even get your phone for free as long as you use it for payment. Think about it started using a text. Payer sort of like a mobile credit card in different parts of the world and because we've driven the cost of a mobile down solo basically two zero in many places now. All the sudden young people around the world are having access to entertainment news information dating banking on and on and on and as a result of that. We're seeing a lot more similarities. As i travel all around the world the younger you get but interestingly the older you get even to gen xer baby boomers from a different planet as you travel around the world. So that's something people get wrong. And then the last thing that i think people get wrong. And is they have to deal with a bunch. Is people confuse life. Stage or age with generation. So for example jen's is now twenty four but when we do studies and ask people how do you think the average millennial is they'll say twenty five as if we didn't keep getting older you never talking about millennials for fifteen years. Say there they're now forty. I think that's a board it because you stay in the saying generation but you pass through different life stages and frequently people confuse the two and it's very important to understand the difference because if you're trying to market or employer build a business that targets different groups generations gives you all these clues but we got to distinguish between the generation which travels up right at ages up baby boomers for teenagers versus life. Stage for example high school or college which are still pretty similar ages as they have been for the last four years and so knowing. The difference helps you to understand that. Yes really interesting. How people always confuse age with generations. And how that all goes. I mean you know. I was just talking to a friend the other day literally. He's in his late thirties. I'm in my late thirties. And he's just going off and riffing about jenner. How millennials or just entitled and all this stuff and it looks like you know where millennials. He's like oh no. I'm definitely not a millennial mike. Well we're we're like the oldest millennials millennials. And he's like well. I need to look at that. And so it was funny. He came back. We know there's actually a lot of great things about millennials and he's now like listing off all the good things because he now is identifying himself as a millennial so it's really interesting fire nation and yes. We do get older. That is what happens to all generations and all human beings foreshore. And we're gonna die something. I'm pretty excited about as soon as we get back from our break which is about how generational work is actually going to solve challenges for both entrepreneurs that's you fire nation and companies as well as soon as we get back think is the best platform to create market and sell your own online courses in. We speak from personal experience. We've been hosting our online courses within kick since two thousand seventeen with dinkic we can deliver content to our students in a simple user friendly way that allows them to learn and take action fast plus our students are always raving about how easy it is to follow the flow of the contents. Thanks to think theme and templates. So if you're ready to create an online course to help you reach a wider audience build revenue in make a bigger impact than think. If is the perfect partner to have by your side to prove it. Think if it has an exclusive for you fire nation. Their five day course challenge. Here's what one of their recent students had to say about. This challenge helped me gain the confidence and clarity. I needed as well as a perspective required to compile my specialized knowledge into marketable contents that others will be willing to pay for sign up for this free challenge today at think dot com slash fire. That's t h. I n k. I f i. C dot com slash buyer looking for business. Coach was helped thousands of entrepreneurs just like you to increase profitability by an average of one hundred percent per year all for less money than would cost a higher a fulltime at minimum wage employee fire nation meets clay. Clark klay has been coaching businesses. Like yours since two thousand six yep even through the great recession and he does it for less money than would cost a hire a full time minimum wage employees at a time when inc magazine reports that by default ninety six percent of businesses will fail within ten years claes helping businesses like yours to grow on average by one hundred and four percent annually. Houses even possible clayton only takes on one hundred and sixty clients so he personally designed your business plan. Plus cleese team helps you execute that plan with access to graphic designers. Google certified search engine optimize web developers online added managers videography workflow masters in accounting coaches visits thrive time show dot com slash fire to see thousands of video testimonials from real people. Just like you. Who plays helped over the years. That's right do your research view. Thousands not hundreds of proven documented in archives videos. Testimonies from real people just like you. At thrive time show dot com slash. Fire thrive time show dot com slash. Fire then schedule your free consultation with klay himself to see how he and his team can help. You thrive so jason. We are back. And as i kind of teased before the break. I wanna get into. How generational work console challenges for fire nation. That's for us entrepreneurs but companies as well. Sure that with us. Sure one of the things. That also is not obvious as i'm venture partner at a venture capital firm and serve on lots of start up boards. It's an extremely passionate about and what we're seeing much of the opportunity being created today has a generational trend or thesis. It's the adoption of new technology new solutions or bringing a different way to look at old problems and when that happens that's where both change and frustration and challenge and frankly companies go out of business but it's also wear new opportunities are created so i'm speaking with entrepreneurs and working with entrepreneurs were trying to look at what are millennials and particularly gen z. Doing right now that you might want to be able to build a business around or leverage as their pine power influence increases so for the first time what we're seeing is technology trends are rippling from the youngest to the oldest and that's a huge shift. It used to be from the oldest more affluent down to the youngest. But now we're seeing younger. People are actually driving tech adoption up to the older but the key as an entrepreneur mississippi that we coach entrepreneurs about is being able to sort of step out of your generation and look at it through the lens of another generation. it's what we call generational contexts. One of the best ways to do that is actually bring members of that generation into the conversation. I can't tell you how many times i'm speaking at places. And they're asking me all these questions about millennials or gen z and. I'm like well. Why don't we invite some of them to the conversation. Let's talk to them. Uh let's actually talk with them. See what they say. Say get and so. I think when you look at bringing generational diversity into the workplace into innovation. You can solve all kinds of interesting challenges. I'll give example right now. What we're seeing is the gen z and even younger millennials. I talk about both of these in this economy book. They want a different on boarding experience. Obviously we're in this time of covert and all these changes but even before that what we saw is that the youngest generation wants to be on once on boarding to be by text message. Which sounds i know a little bit wild but there are companies. Do all of their on boarding through text message so you get semes- before you Short for your first day in alaska you just give you a simple example. This is in the book from coming called on border. When you they'll send a text message and it'll say what's your favorite snack three o'clock when your energy starts to go down. Do you have a favorite sports team are causing all this sort of stuff and the is when you show up for your first day. Or they'll even now senator gift baskets to your house. They'll have all your favorite snacks ready for you on your show up because they already know because you put in your text message or the. Have your favorite sports team. Or they'll find the best place that you wanna go eat or have that food delivered so they're engaging you by text message in a process that generally used to be in person and frankly pretty terrible at most companies. There's another company that worked in with again. This is generational trend. They figured out how to pay all employees fifty percent of their wages every day at no cost. They're called instant and what they did. Is they basically said you get a text message or message on your phone after your shift. And it says hey. Would you like half your money today. Yes or no. If you click s you get your money. Will all the sudden now you have. An entire generation is growing so fast that thinks they should always be able to get half their paycheck. Every day will imagine how that changes so many other things and all the sudden other generations. What do they say well. This text messaging on boarding thing is pretty cool. You mean i can get paid every day. That's pretty awesome. I think i want that. To and all the sudden the generational trends creates huge businesses. And those are the types of things were seeing you know so much. Innovation is driven by other generations. This is the key they don't even think it's new or different when we interview them. They think you've always been able to do on boarding by text message because they never got on onboard before there was text messaging or if they've only worked at a place that gave them the ability to get paid every day. That's how they think everybody gets paid. And you know older generations. So i work with the frequently. Get defensive and they're like you know. The young generations are trying to change everything. And i'm like no. They're not this is just all they've ever known they don't know any differently. Change to them is actually doing what you're proposing and it's not about one being right or wrong. It's going we can. We can leverage us. We can adopt this and all the sudden on boardings better retention is higher engagement is higher in these types of things and you see it on the marketing side for those fire nation members who are really growing their businesses and they're more than sales marketing. Same exact deal and the idea is just recognizing this you're creating so much opportunity. We see this particularly with social media. We see this with podcast such as yours that this is a great way to engage younger generations who then index for talking about these things and driving awareness in referrals and excitement fire nation. So many things to take away here. One of my favorite things jayson broke down was specifically tech trends are rippling from the youngest. To the oldest. Like think about that shift. Think about that change. How the ripples actually going from the youngest to the oldest now which is a complete flip from how it used to be back in the day and one thing. I wanna really dial in on just because i'm personally curious and i think fire nation is to is this the up and coming generation now. Let's talk about generation z. Like who is generation z. And what do we need to know about them. Yeah absolutely so gen z. The key thing is that they're already twenty three or twenty four years old. So that's a good starting point and what we uncovered in our research and we publish. This is economy. Book is at gen. Z is the key thing we got all these research firms around the world to change their birth years. Gen z does not remember nine eleven and that is a huge deal because it's the biggest event for the millennial generation we call generation defining moment. But jesse doesn't remember it at all. They learned about it in school or heard about it from a parent or they watched the video on youtube. But it's not something they experienced and they're now twenty three twenty four years old so a huge event of the generation before they don't remember in fact they're they're covid nineteen is essentially their defining moment. This pandemic is the generation defining moment that they're gonna take with them and we talk about this a lot. So one thing is they. Don't remember kievan of a previous generation and the other is there. Cuban is happening right now. But what i think you're entrepreneurs will find super interesting is that we've been doing this. Study for the last five years called state of gen z and. It's our big study released every year. And what we've uncovered and we've seen it for five years in a row now is gen. Z is more practical or frugal with their money than previous generations. And this is shocking and when we dig into it what we find out is that gen z came of age around the great recession. And what do i mean by that. Their speakers are experts. Like you talked about earlier. This regurgitation people running around saying oh gen z struggled during the great recession in the workforce they were twelve and were not working right but instead what they did is. They saw their parents struggle. They heard their parents struggle. They know people lost their houses. They saw millennials drowning in student loan. Debt having back home a mom and dad and you put all that together and what you see is. They're very conservative or practical with their money. As a result they're driving double digit growth at stores. They like couponing they wanna know. They got a good deal. They want things to be a bargain. They want them to last a long time really have utility and what we see. The example. i'd like to give is a gen zero sixteen years old. We'll have a birthday party. They'll get fifty dollars. They're all excited it away. And then they'll go to their mom or their dad and say hey. Can i have fifty dollars. Wanna go buy something. Mom or dad will say but you just got fifty dollars. And they'll say oh. No that's my money your money. It's overseeing that so if you're trying to market to them you've got to understand their practicality with money we also see the gen z when we do values based research. What we find is for the last four years Their top concern was climate change. Or would they would call climate crisis in their own words. And so that's been the top that they've been looking for brand alignment and for entrepreneurs to get behind and so forth however in the last six months we are new study. Social justice has leapfrog. Climate changes their top issue. And it's significantly more now so all the sudden as you see the generation respond to events around them. You can sort of see how they're shaped so if you wanna make sure in line with their values you gotta know what their values are going. Even deeper on the employment side is people look to hire them. Gen z no is looking for stability. This one's this one's tougher for entrepreneurs. So i want to explain it. They're looking for stability in an employer. What do i mean by that. Gen z saw these layoffs. I heard the layoff. Seen millennials struggle and as a result they're looking for an employer that they view as stable. So it's interesting because they tend to automatically defined stability by being a big company. So they'll say. I want to work for a big company will say why and they well because they're stable and the truth is you and i both know that. Just because you're big company does not at all mean that you're stable and just because you're a small business doesn't mean that you're not stable so it's important that you message to them. We also found in our research is gen. Z is very much interested in benefits which is shocking given their age in fact two years ago. Twelve percent of gen z was already saving for retirement. Wow and yeah. That's crazy right and many of them already have an emergency savings account. These are eighteen year olds. That are taking up their phones showing us emergency savings accounts and it. Just it's such a different generation. I think the key here. Mrs so important for all the marketers who are listening our nation is at gen. Z is not millennials. Two point oh they are not millennials. Just more extreme. That's total bunk. People say that it is not true. Jesse is a completely different generation raised by different set of parents who has come of age only knowing social media it has always existed for them. That's why they trusted so much at the same time. They're more diverse than any previous generation. Different set of values different purchasing pathways. And now the key is they over index on influence because of how they use digital media and already twenty four years old fastest growing generation in the workforce today on a percentage basis. And they're gonna be the most important consumers to get right over the next ten to fifteen years. One thing that i assume and please correct me if i'm wrong. Because it's just an assumption but generation x. And millennials like this is like. I'm speaking of my generation's here that i cut kind of overlap. Both pretty closely. It's we came to like being seventeen eighteen years old and it came to money in debt. Just kind of close our eyes and kind of believed the rhetoric of. Hey you just have to go to college and it's going to be expensive and you're going to get college dad and that's okay and you're just going to be a paid off at some point in the future and now like millennials and gen xers just hammered with this dead. They can't payoff ten twenty even sometimes thirty years later because it was just brutal with the mountains of debt that people kind of blindly get into it. Seems from what you're saying. Generations not gonna kind of take that same approach in just blindly. Sign away their lives to this debt of secondary education in colleges and universities in the such. Is that true. Wow that is such an insightful. I mean you you are super pro do so yes. That is actually true What's interesting is when we studied student. Loan debt with millennials in particular. That's what we call an economic anchor. So what it's causing. It's actually causing millennials. Now this is wild to delay marriage kids and buying a home because of student loan debt and that has massive ramifications on all parts of the economy to everything from financial services whether or not. You're buying life insurance. You know the the homebuilding recovery like on and on we could keep going to income households. There's just there's so many things that are impact even ultimately the ability to take care of your parents later on so what we saw. Was that large student loans at delayed major life commitments which we which is what's happened as a result And by the way gen z will tell you they're not sure that if spending a whole bunch of money and college actually pays off his it remains to be seen right now for millennials. We were told. I'm a millennial. We were told getting the best college at an. Just get debt. And will all be worth it and then for a lot of it wasn't on the flipside. Gen z in our new. Study in this in this economy book because it's important to understand how thing about education gen z is trying to graduate from college with as little as possible ice which is super cold. They're also saying that they're looking. They're very interested in the employability of their career. So so if they go and they pursue a certain path. Am i going to be able to get a job in that path. Now by the way kobe. Nineteen has been a massive massive. You know challenge for that because there are people that were three or four years into college university you know. Maybe they're going to study retail merchandising. Well aren't hiring never hired for that role again or they studied. You know oil and gas and those aren't hiring whatever it is so all the sudden people who already had you know pretty heavy commitment are now realizing that that path isn't there for them but we are single. Gen z particularly during this experience. Right now is they're saying. Hey i want to make sure. I'm getting value for my education and raven seeing well if it's going to be online only i'd rather go to a community college or state school or somewhere else. Get some credits. And then i'll figure out. If i want to go back into the future maybe take a year off and then come back and so forth so there definitely much more conservative with debt when it comes to college university and by the way the other people who are more conservative are their parents boomers had to cosign on all those millennial loans just. That's my mom about it right. And that as a result for many millennials it was tough for them to pay it off on the flipside. Gen-x is going well. I don't know if it's worth it gen x. Gen z kids. You will not end up. Like those millennials so the that's also being weighed into the conversation now is college university worth it and then you add the layer of kobe. Nineteen is it worth it if it's nontraditional experience and you know i don't know the answer to that but it is something we're observing and now this is where it gets really interesting. So the oldest members of gen z. Those that are about eighteen to twenty four. They're bearing the brunt of this. Pandemic what i mean by that is in our latest study. That group was most likely more than any other generation to lose their job. Have a decrease in pay or have a shift in responsibilities meaning. They had to assume a job that they didn't sign up for where it gets interesting though is younger so my daughter is nine years old. Her name is russia Sushi is in fourth grade right now. She heard this is in the book in third grade. Her last end of the year project. Which i didn't know anything about Was she went and built a presentation. She built all and google sides. She built it all in spanish. She had animation. She presented it. She recorded it and then she uploaded to classroom and she thought that was completely normal. She's nine and then of course. You saw one of my powerpoint slides. He's not very good. So i say that because the younger members of gen z. This is the real twist here. They might end up turning this pandemic into a positive. Because they're going to learn a whole different way to learn to collaborate they're going to get the benefit of the older part of the generation struggling. So they can learn from them. All of this stuff largely will be resolved in terms. Of least what normal looks like in the future and so they're gonna get the benefit of all of that the closer you are to those transition years of eighteen to twenty four the worse is but the further away the more benefit could end up being you so it's pretty interesting that within the same generation you can have two very different experiences and by the way this is what happened. To millennials millennials like me who crashed into the great recession and then the millennials who came afterwards who benefited from a very robust economy. So even within the same generation you can see pretty significant differences. I mean fire nation. I really hope you're enjoying this contest. Much as i am. Because i'm seeing the application to the real world and that's so important because we're entrepreneurs in the real world. We own businesses and companies in the real world in this stuff makes a massive impact so jason of everything that you shared today. What's the one key takeaway that you really wanna make. Sure fire nation gets from all of this awesome stuff above generational impact and the generational studies. That you've done and then share how we can even learn more about it through you and any call to action. You might have for fire. Nation is time to share. Yeah absolutely so the number. One thing that i would share. You know as an entrepreneur myself now for twenty four years is i would do. It's called a generational snapshot and what that means is you create essentially a pie chart representing the different generations. Either of your customers or of your employees or team members or ideally of both. Because what you'll often find is that there's more generations and you suspect it and it will help you to shape your messaging your leadership in your marketing to better fit them and going a bit further if you don't see enough of the next generation coming in particular on the customer side that's definitely a yellow flag that you need to pay attention and make sure that your dappling for the next generation because they will be the ones that drive growth. So that's the best easiest how to that will cost you zero dollars that a promise will make you money. Which are the type of things i'm all about. And if you want a whole bunch more in terms of how to actually recruit and retain motivate and so forth across generations or market and sell. You can definitely check out the new book. It's called economy. How gen z will change the future business and what to do about it. We do talk about all four generations and just packed with how to in case studies and all kinds of cool stuff and we'll put together a special promo for fire nation. New it be on my website. Which is jason dorsey. Dot com slash. Fire you'll be able to get all of that. They're including three free video courses. Because i am a passionate entrepreneur. Have been for a long time. And anything i can do to help them. Nation will fire nation. You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with and you've been hanging out with j. d. n. j. l. d. So keep up the heat and head over to your fire dot com type jason in the search bar. The page will pop up with everything that we've been talking about today. But of course jason. Dorsey dot com slash. Fire is gonna get you to that gray page with all that awesome content. And i just wanna jason. Thank you for sharing your truth. Knowledge value with fire nation. Today

Jason Joe Burrow Clark Klay Inc Magazine Lazier Peoplesoft GNC Denise
Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

TIME's Top Stories

07:22 min | 4 months ago

Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

"Hawaii is riding out the covid. Nineteen storm but geographic isolation isn't the blessing it may seem by a. hundred algata when hawaii's corona virus infections were rising in late august. Honolulu mayor kirk caldwell visited doctors in the covid. Nineteen ward of the queen's medical center the state's largest hospital. I could see it in their faces and in their eyes caldwell says the concern and fear. They had that by the following week. If things didn't change they were not going to be able to care for people that they were going to have to put them intense outside. It was a crisis that leaders in the fiftieth state hoped they would never face between march and may when a stay at home order was in place. Hawaii was averaging only a couple of new cases every day but as some restrictions were lifted in june resulting in a patchwork of state and local rules. The numbers soon began inching up by late. July hawaii was metaphorically ablaze with the bulk of cases centered on oahu. Home to two thirds of the state's population. The island lost one hundred and nineteen. New cases underlie thirtieth by mid august. It was averaging over two hundred today four days after his hospital. Visit with more than three hundred and fifty people hospitalized for covid nineteen symptoms on his island issued a second lockdown order with the blessing of hawaii governor. David ige our hospital administrators had informed us. If we didn't do something that they would become overwhelmed says he gay three months later. It seems hawaii's response may have worked as a new deadly wave of coronavirus infections sweeps across the us. Hawaii is one of the only states in the country experiencing relative reprieve. It reported one hundred and thirteen new cases on november twenty third according to data from johns hopkins university slightly more than its weekly average of one hundred six daily new cases. Only vermont reported fewer cases that day hawaii the fortieth most populous state has a low case. Count even when adjusted for population as of november twenty third. It has a weekly average of seven cases per one hundred thousand residents the lowest in the country by comparison. The highest per capita figure is belong to north dakota at one sixty and wyoming at one fifty four infection levels in hawaii have stayed relatively steady since mid-september while nearly every other state has experienced an increase it remains to be seen whether a slight uptick in recent days could be the start of a new upward trend however how has a wii so far avoided another major covid nineteen surge. The clearest reason is apparent on any world map geography. It's so obvious yet. It plays such a big role says thomas lee. An assistant professor of epidemiology at the university of hawaii at manoa and co chair of the hawaii pandemic applied modeling workgroup. He also served as the lead outbreak. Modular and forecaster for the hawaii emergency management agency this spring for hawaii. The pacific ocean has helped serve as the world's biggest moat travelers arriving there by plane. Essentially the only means of reaching the state with cruise lines. Shuttered have since march required to self quarantine for two weeks though since mid-october visitors can avoid isolation if they test negative within seventy two hours of arrival while the rules may have kept visitors from seating new infection clusters. They have also devastated. Hawaii's tourism sector which accounts for nearly a quarter of its economic activity. Some hawaiian leaders. Still don't think they're doing enough to prevent infections part of a broader split among hawaiians over whether and how to welcome visitors back during a pandemic derek kawakami mayor of quite county says new infections on his islands are related to the reopening of travel from the continental us. He's proposed a requirement that travelers get tested a second time after arriving. This virus requires layer upon layer of intervention and mitigating measures. Kawakami says we have to be able to respond quickly and boldly because it can spread like wildfire kawais. Recent uptick is tiny in relative terms on november twentieth. It reported six cases. Its second highest one day count so far but kawakami has good reason to be worried koci home to around. Seventy two thousand people has just nine. Icu beds and fourteen ventilators. Isolated and with limited healthcare capacity and uncontrolled. Outbreak could quickly spell disaster. The holy grail is prevention. So that is what we put our blood sweat and tears into here on kobe. Kawakami says we're almost always on the red line. A similar imperative applies across the entire state of one point. Four million people with nowhere to turn of hawaii's healthcare system is overwhelmed leaders. There have little choice but to be proactive. In preventing covid nineteen outbreaks. We are geographically remote and so our healthcare system is really vulnerable says catherine purple an associate professor of health policy and management at the university of hawaii minoa there really is a strong motivating factor to try to keep those numbers under control. Hawaii's isolation then is a double edged sword. Thousands of miles of ocean are a good tool to stop travelers from seating new corona virus clusters but if infection spin out of control anyway. Assistance could be a long time coming. We have been from the very beginning focused on the science and public health recommendations because we are twenty five hundred miles away from any help. Says the governor. We learned a long time ago. That we have to be self reliant and that we have to act as a community epidemiologists say it's difficult to attribute hawaii's relative covid nineteen success to any one factor isolation included for one thing cold weather which is forcing many americans indoors where the virus can spread. More easily is unheard of in most of hawaii. Honolulu's thanksgiving day forecast is eighty two and sunny. Other government measures may also have played a part unused hotel rooms and a wa who have been repurpose to isolate nineteen patients and restrictions on inter island. Travel have prevented. Local spread mask wearing has helped as well on kauai and a who mask. Mandates were instituted in april while an august survey found that ninety. Six percent of hawaiians are masking up. Unlike for many americans. Wearing masks to prevent illness isn't an entirely foreign concept for hawaiians public health experts. Say that's likely due to the states relative proximity to asia where facial coverings tend to be more prevalent. Many hawaii residents. Who commented for this article also cited the state's heritage and cultural values as a reason for high adherence to public health mandates. We have a culture here that comes from the first people's the native hawaiians called ball says the term juliana means responsibility and it does the people here in hawaii still leaders in hawaii have come under pressure over cove nineteen restrictions caldwell says people sometimes drive down his street to yell outside his house either at him or his wife and daughter. Some people certainly have reason to be upset. Travel restrictions have ravaged the state's tourism dependent economy hawaii's overall unemployment rate was more than fourteen percent in october according to the us department of labor the worst in the country for the second month in a row called bo says he understands people's frustrations but needs to prioritize. Public health. people are impacted. Their businesses are impacted. their life dreams are impacted. He says. I get why they're upset. But i also believe that in order to protect health and safety which is always the most important thing that comes first. And i think it's tied directly to the economy to after months of travel restrictions. Guy says the state's pretrial testing program finally bringing in visitors and helping hawaiians get back to work while keeping cova level stable still. Despite hawaii's current low case counts it remains to be seen if the state's leaders can revive tourism based economy while at the same time staving off a devastating rise in cases which would likely put the tourism business back on ice anyway depend on travel. Uk says but everyday day. I get comments from members in our community that continuing to bring visitors into hawaii during this time is really putting our community at risk. It's something that weighs very heavily on myself. And the mayor's every day as we see the virus counts increasing on the mainland.

Hawaii Kirk Caldwell Queen's Medical Center David Ige Hawaii Emergency Management Ag Kawakami Honolulu Derek Kawakami Caldwell Koci Thomas Lee Oahu Catherine Purple University Of Hawaii Minoa Johns Hopkins University Manoa University Of Hawaii
Buffett's firm trims Apple stake, invests in drugmakers

CNBC's Fast Money

01:16 min | 5 months ago

Buffett's firm trims Apple stake, invests in drugmakers

"Seeing a thematic rotation out of bank stocks into farmer during the quarter. Let's start with the new positions in the pharma sector berkshire-hathaway taking new stakes. An abbvie merck and bristol. Myers squibb each of those positions worth about two billion dollars as of the end of september. Warren buffett's for also disclosing a smaller position in pfizer. Worth about one hundred and thirty six million at quarter end and maintaining nine digit home in teva and biogen on the financial side. We're seeing a continued reduction in bank names by berkshire hathaway the firm almost selling out of j. p. morgan entirely paring back at stake by ninety six percent. Hold just under one hundred million dollars worth of stock also sizeable reductions in mt and p and see as well berkshire-hathaway providing interim filings on wells fargo and b. of in august and showing a slight decrease in position since then in each of those names. Interestingly there was no change in the firm's nearly five billion dollar stake in us bancorp and speaking of multibillion dollar steaks. I know we love to talk about apple here. The way into three sold about four billion dollars worth of apple stake at today's price. Although that was a paring back of less than four

Pharma Sector Berkshire Abbvie Merck Myers Squibb Hathaway Warren Buffett Biogen Teva Bristol Pfizer Morgan Us Bancorp Berkshire Wells Fargo Apple
Trickbot is Down But Not Out

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

06:17 min | 5 months ago

Trickbot is Down But Not Out

"So what are. What are the efforts. Been to take trick but down and how has how people running. That net responded one of the things that i sort of want to get ahead of two is. Our data suggests that This review campaign is not in re in response to trick takedown efforts. We saw domains Being registered in august for this campaign Certificates and servers being stood up a couple days prior to the first trick bought disruption Now i think it's a little silly to say that they're not related. You know if you're preparing to I guess engage with someone in a you know wreck your car or something like that. You're going to be more aggressive. I would imagine. But i don't think it's one to one trick Trick take downs led to this. The first of these A us government entity is alleged I don't know if anyone from that area or that entities confirmed but they pushed in a in a very clever way Pushed faked configuration updates to trick of victims effectively. Cutting them off from the botnets. Which was i think. I think it's been a little bit undersold. How cool that is. They were able. They knew enough about how this maller operated function. You know we're able to be their government entity They have the legal right to do this. Compromise at least some portion of their network and their infrastructure to then push these fake updates to effectively poison the their implants. It's fun it's funny calling it a takedown attempts because when it really did is severed ongoing intrusions to me is a little bit more effective If you have like a day to do something because we've seen over time is really really tricky cutting off current infections and buying those victims some time who knows how many more ransomware incidents we'd be looking at in late october early november had that not occurred And i think that that occurred on september. Twenty second in the next couple of weeks after that Microsoft put out legal proceedings that they basically went to a judge and got the rights to seize a trick dot command and control servers. Initially this was just in the us but microsoft's lawyers seem pretty good and they were able to sort of lead what what was an industry coalition Lumine and e set and symantec on. Fsi sack was also involved To push all that grab identified you know trick bots both tier one and plugging infrastructures. Which are sort of the initial communication and customer management infrastructure and then sort of The secondary infection management infrastructure to add plug ins move laterally etc. They were able to seize roughly ninety six percent of the botany of botnets command and control servers which turns out to be a pretty limited number. Compared say you know older or bigger botnets which again is they did this on a Pretty interesting Legal reasoning in that dietrich authors had abused microsoft trademarks in their code which is pretty unique and and it seems to be a clever legal way of being able to action against these actors and again i i know that some our industry have a sort of said that this effort hasn't been effective. I would argue that. It has taken down. I don't think that microsoft and e said these other companies have sat around and said you know try this. I think that it's a calculated move and so in in the wake of that you know. Obviously that probably meant a number of you know their control. command control. infrastructure is messed up for lack of a better term It probably meant a loss a number of infections and so from that. We've seen the botnets Battle back a microsoft themselves stated that odd they don't expect the botnets disappear they expect a fight and so we've seen trick Back to a command and control infrastructure. That wasn't taken down and some of their They've created more infrastructure but they're pushing it out at a much slower rate than they were before when they've been trying to spread and you know get new infections since this on predominantly through email spam they have at is another very very large. You know one. Of the most prolific spam senders in the world. They they sell access as a service and in a lot of instances. Since the trick takedown efforts began Email ted has been observed dropping trotz usually or historically there have been anywhere from thirty to forty servers embedded into trick bots configuration So it's an encrypted file that trick about reads once it executes on victim host and then tries to connect to one after another to see you know if any are online and then once they're online they sort of get instructions from there and then you go about their their evil business. What's changed is as a number of those servers have been taken off. Line the amount of services that we've seen included in every configuration has dropped significantly I think it dropped to a minimum of around twelve servers And then jump back up to around sixteen. The last time. I checked i was about two days ago. What's interesting about including all those servers is that it does tip to us. They at least that they have some amount of control left on the servers. They've they've played a little bit with the protocol that they use to communicate They've used Instead of traditional servers they've used a tour onion sites of the alleged dark web server not available Not accessible normal web browser but requires using a tour browser or a tour based connection to connect to it using that as a fallback command and control channel. And so it's been it's been pretty interesting watching them scramble. The sort of piecemeal their botnets back together.

Growing Biologics

The Bio Report

05:46 min | 6 months ago

Growing Biologics

"JAMF thanks for joining us. Thank you very much Dan. We're going to talk about Zia biosciences its efforts to US plants to produce biologics and nutraceutical, and the absence taken to turn this into a predictable and reliable manufacturers process. Maybe you can begin with making the case for using plants to produce biologics. Sure. Well plants around for over five thousand years medicinal purposes over in Asia and in India plants actually have been part of our human population since the beginning of time and they actually have been proven many many times over and there's numerous a much research about it. To deliver the address, the issues of disease And have the ability to Help. Our population in a much better way than our synthetic counterparts parts do. You grow these plants in a clean room. I imagine people you know envision fields upon fields of of plants but why use a clip rim? Right right. Well, it goes back to I. Think what we want to start with is The it's not just that we grown cleanroom it's a technology platform and the cleanroom is only one part of that. Specific purpose is to answer your question about the cleanroom is when you grow plant in a pathogenic. Free Environment. You have the ability to turn those into plant based medicinal drugs whereas plants they're grown say in a greenhouse or in a warehouse or in the open land run the risk of pathogen clearly Pathogens with them that probably would not be able to be filtered out and it runs a risk to the general public. That's why we grow inside a game. You mentioned the technology platform, you build a platform. Rather. Data intensive. What's the range of data collected and how to use this produce plants that produce biologics? Well. So let's back up and talk about the platform. There's two parts of the platform and I'll answer that question in in in the second part. The first part is the physical part. The plants are grown inside and ice. Oh, seven cleanroom. The second part is the data science side where we. Hook Up. Over thirty parameters thirty centers. Inside that room that collect everything. Some of them are normal that you would think of, which would be Ph temperature humidity but some you may not under a would never think about the. The amount of parts per million a of Co two across the plant the airflow crossed the plan the. Megahertz, of electricity going through the hydroponic water, and so we take all that data collected on average every. Fifteen seconds to one minute. So we have millions and millions upon data points stork with. What are those data points allow you to do? We actually can generate a formula because our. Our. Whole reason for being at Zia. is to optimize claimed growth. So we are creating a formula. That are customer comes to us and says, I would like you to grow this plant and I would like you to optimize or express this certain enzyme protein some sort of substance in the plant itself. Such that on, it actually is expressed in a way that can be used in some sort of downstream pharmaceutical drug. Now. That being said That being said, what we would do then is we have to figure out so to speak a recipe and all that data allows us to optimize the plan to optimize that certain protein or substance in the plant. Such that it would be then. It would allow us to go downstream and give the best value for our customer. And how consistent is the output? Well, that's That's what amazing about our platform is. So in any type of Pharmaceutical product you are focused on. Two major things as an ingredient supplier to the pharmaceutical companies. Minimal variation that is he must have very little variation batch to batch and you must have maximum produce ability that is that I'm delivering ninety, six percent of what I say every time I'm producing a batch of the equipment.

Zia Biosciences United States Asia DAN India Zia.
India's new paper COVID-19 test could be a ‘game changer’

Latest In Tech News

04:06 min | 6 months ago

India's new paper COVID-19 test could be a ‘game changer’

"India's new paper covid nineteen tests could be a game changer now. I'm one for tech. News and if there's something new and interesting I, love highlighting it. This is one of those times. A team of scientists in India has developed an inexpensive paper based test for corona virus that could give fast results similar to a pregnancy test. Just wait the BBC's sue took Biswas and crew pappy unpack how it works the test named after famous Indian fictional detective is based on gene editing technology called crisper scientists estimate that ticket called SALUDA would return results in under an hour in cost five, hundred rupees that translates to about six dollars and seventy five cents us. Flu will be made by a leading Indian conglomerate. Totta and could be the world's first paper-based covid nineteen tests available in the market. Interesting According to the professor, it's a simple. Zeiss. Reliable scalable and Frugal test researchers at two delhi-based CSI are Institute of Dynamics and integrative biology where food was developed as well as private labs try to test on samples from about two thousand patients including ones who had already tested positive for the coronavirus. They found that the new test at ninety six percent sensitivity in ninety eight percent specificity. The accuracy of test is based on needs to proportions attest that's highly sensitive will detect almost everyone who has the disease and attest that has a high specificity will. Correctly rule out everyone who doesn't have the disease The first test ensures not too many false negative results in a second test not too many false positives. India's drug regulator has cleared the test for commercial use with more than six million confirmed infections. India has the world's second highest COVID. Nineteen Caseload more than hundred thousand people in the country have died of the disease so far in India after Seoul start, India's now testing a million samples day in more than twelve hundred laboratories across the country, and it is using those two tests was. Is that? The first time tested gold standard. Pr, slob tests, which uses chemicals to amplify the viruses material laboratory. The second is a speedy Antigen Test Antigen one of those to which works by detecting virus fragrance in sample keep in mind the PTR test is generally reliable and cost up to twenty four hundred rupees has little false, positive and low false negative rates. The Antigen tests are cheaper. They are more precise in detecting positive infections, but generate more false negatives than PCR test. Scaling of testing in India hasn't been easy availability at Long wait times and unavailability of kits and are currently doing a lot of rapid antigen testing which have problems with false positives. Now, this is where it gets interesting Dr Bond. Researcher in Global Health and Health Policy says that Florida could potentially replace the antigen tests because it could be comparatively cheaper and more accurate. So. It's interesting still has to go through some other tests. Articles on to explain a couple of things further, but it's it's. Quite impressive, quite impressive technology like cove nineteen test kits. It's as simple as a pregnancy test. Could. Like that just blows your mind like this only made headline news in hit the world in the beginning of this year or in October of twenty twenty. And this kind of test has already come out and and it's going to be heading out to commercial testing very soon. This is this is impressive and a cost. It's a lot more reasonable I mean.

India Twenty Twenty BBC FLU Zeiss Seoul Totta Frugal Biswas Professor Institute Of Dynamics Global Health And Health Polic Dr Bond Researcher Florida
Italy votes to cut number of MPs and senators

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:57 min | 7 months ago

Italy votes to cut number of MPs and senators

"Cara the initiative. First of all to reduce the number of MP's this was a big headline initiative of the five Star Movement. Why was that? Did they have a sincere belief in reducing the the role of government in Italian life or did they just think that you never lose votes by leading up on politicians? Well, the movement five stars as people who do follow Italian politics will know was born essentially as an anti elitist movement from the very onset in fact, it was never. Going to be a party, I told at the very beginnings it's very point was to remove the privilege of the ruling elite and the the the reduce reducing the number of of MP's was seen as part of that historically There is a consideration, the one of the main considerations from the point of view of the movie stars and other parties that have. Box. This referendum is to save on the cost of politics whether the cost is actually relevant enough. The savings are relevant enough to actually make significant difference is to be determined but it's difficult to oppose such measures from the point of view of symbolism writes in the. PD. So the center left Party, the Democrat, party has had to back this referendum eventually partly because we are they are now in a ruling coalition. With the move and five stars and they don't want to be seen at odds with one another because that could put the government risk. But also because nobody wants to be perceived as the party who's protecting the elites ultimately because the cost thing is nonsense isn't it's one billion euros over ten years which in the context of the national budget of a country, the size of Italy is beans it is and that's been remarked a number of times As I said, it's more about the symbolic gesture than anything else in front. One of the a practical consequences that this reduction will have is that a will significantly decrease the amount of representation. So that right now, there is one MP in the Chamber of Deputies. Every. Ninety six, thousand, Italians dutton number will now go up to one each one, hundred, fifty, one, thousand Italians, and think the will be particularly seved at the level of the Senate because the Senate is elected kind of via regional route so that there is different electoral colleges, etc, and set in regions will see the number of their elected representatives go down by or more than half, and that's significant from the point of view of how much. Swayed will have in the chamber. Extremely significant and does appear to be the obvious drawback of this game. Nevertheless, it was very popular among your fellow. Italians with seventy percent voting for why is that? Do you think? Do you think that's an if you think about Europe as a whole? Is that an unusually high number more than usually sick of the people who are running the country? I think one of the reasons why the result was so high as because it was ultimately backed by lot of parties so that the party division line was less dark than it would've been now the situations in which these referendums have been politicized the moving five stars of course voted yes it's electorate voted compactly. Yes. Like almost ninety six percent or something this deal moving five-star electorate voted. For, yes. But the PD also officially backed it and the vast majority of the electorate of the Lega and all the rest of the center right also did. So when you sum up all these different parties that there's less of a political kind of undercurrent to it, other than a win for the moon five stars and a not rocking of the current political establishment because ultimately PD also bacteria. That's the political meaning that you're going to be gleaning out of it. So on the subject of gleaning political meaning from things, these regional elections were held at the same time. What did they tell us? It's very interesting because a lot of people over the last few years have wondered whether Salvini could get back on on his horse. Matteo Salvini. Yeah, no indeed and these regional elections where a very important appointment because it's the first time that Italians do vote after covid right? And there were a number of regions that historically have been left wing regions that were thought. They could go to the center right and that hasn't largely happened the centre-left has held in many of the places where it wanted to hold a apart from a mark wearing fact, the candidate that's now become the governor doesn't come from Salvini Spotty, but from Italy Italia, which is the other far right party but less of a kind of northern secessionist heritage more of the Roman heritage right. What we're seeing across the bode board in these results is that Salvini is losing grip on many things, other challenges from within the center right IRA merging not least Georgia Maloney the leader of Fratelli d'italia. So this other far right party not least. Competition within his own party Ziad. The governor of Benetton very popular in his region because of his management of Cavite has skyrocketed to six to seventy six percent. Results in in the region and so I think we're what we're seeing is that the left wing is holding where it probably didn't even think it would hold this much and that context government despite content not being an elected official of the centre-left has actually given a lot more credibility to the current coalition that I think anybody would have expected doesn't strike you though that this is a a left versus right question on more of a professionals versus populists question because a like a pandemic is about a stern test that any government can face and obviously Italy was one of the first places in Europe to face it on a very large scale. Is it possible that something of this sort has reminded Italian voters that maybe there is something to be said for voting for blandly competent and relatively calm people who are actually capable of doing stuff i. think that's exactly the point partly because the populist narrative, very much centers around narratives around you know migration and other issues that don't really relate necessarily to what many Italians rating about right now, which is administration economic recovery, which is returning to schools on you know relatively less appealing because they are much more ordinary budget still, very, very important concerns and interestingly you mentioned you know that the rise of the. Leader? Many, of the regional leaders. The. Regional governors are now coming onto the national stage and where in the past I think we used to see a lot more mess come into national politics right now we're seeing a lot more of these figures that used to be very much in the background because not many people focused on regional governors. Suddenly they were putting a spotlight because of covid this new whole generation of politicians coming to the full, and we will have to see in the next few years. How many of them will make the jump to national politics?

Matteo Salvini Center Left Party Italy Europe Senate Star Movement Chamber Of Deputies Centre-Left Salvini Spotty Benetton Fratelli D'italia Italy Italia Official Georgia Maloney
Escaping monogamy

Ladies, We Need To Talk

04:59 min | 7 months ago

Escaping monogamy

"Women are more sexually liberated than we've ever been, but in spite of. Work, nece. The majority of his still believe in monogamy monogamy means the search is over. You'll here now arrived where it's safe, secure and familiar. But if we admit it, it can also get kind of well. Being polite, he bit kind of repetitive. After you find someone, you think he's Jesus settle down with its completely assumed that your in monogamous relationship. And that presumption isn't just coming from society it's coming from you. According to the Australian Study of Health and relationships ninety six percent Australians expect monogamy from themselves and their partner. But what if instead of one pot now one bed and one stupid advice to look at every morning it's two, three, four I don't know maybe five stupid faces. We're exclusive to each other people might say like, why did you bother game? Then sometimes I do think that myself. This is Khloe she's in her thirties been married for three years and with the same partner for ten. They're still working out the rules of the Pali Game. We talked about threesomes, but it never happened because like how'd you engineer that like neither of US wanted to go on the APPs because it was it would just be embarrassing like all. What if someone that we know US knows that we have sex. And then earlier this year basically all started I developed this huge crush on a friend. And it was actually really stressful. Because I was terrified that it kind of meant that I didn't love my husband anymore and maybe I wasn't supposed to be with my husband and maybe are supposed to be with this guy and my partner knew about this told them from the very beginning like, Oh, I'm having these squishy feeling. So this guy and I was very honest about all of it, but then the more intense feelings. The more stressful. It became because like I said I was worried. That it meant that I needed to get a divorce. I'm been in therapy for a long time and I remember me telling the therapist, all of this and her being like I'm just going to tell you something all of these feelings your feelings have got nothing to do with your relationship with your husband. It's all on you and I was like say. It. Just needed to say that because I was so scared and I think talking about that with other women like we all get crushes and it doesn't mean that you've made the wrong decision. So, yeah. That didn't go anywhere but then old friend of mine called me around my birthday happy birthday. Then a couple of days later he text me and invited me over to his place and I showed my husband this text and I was like isn't it with like we don't see each other often I've never been to his house before yet he's inviting me over. Do you think is like trying to sleep with me and my partner was like Nah sounds like he wants to hang out and have a few drinks and I said Okay Should I continue with this story? This is where interesting. So I went to this guy's house. So I, my PJ's I really didn't think that he wanted to have sex with me. And we sat up and we were talking for ages and we're watching telly and he just suddenly turned. Hey. So I can't get Netflix on this. TV. In the lounge room but I can get it on my laptop. This question like watch TV in bed together is that too weird and I was like, oh no, that's fine. So we lay down in bed and I was like as far away as I could possibly get from him on the other side of the bed and we sat there and we watched about twenty minutes of Queer Eye. And he was like, can I just I just? Can you come a bit closer? If. That's a good idea and he was like why and I was like because I think if we touch than, we might have sex and he was like, would that be? And then weakest, and then we had sex. And it was very intense like that was the first time I'd had sex anyone side from my partner. In ten years. It was intense. What about your husband does he had any? Yeah. He doesn't tell me unless I ask I think because he knows that it it makes me feel icky by also know that that aching. US. Get smaller with time like when I first found out, they had slept with someone. I, was on a train. Carriage on a drain. And he text me Tomiichi I. Yelled like what the fuck? Everyone in the. ME. And I couldn't I kind of couldn't stop laughing because I was so shocked. I mean he's a sexy man. Obviously I, love him I married him but it was just so weird to thing that he actually likes let with someone else. And it felt horrible. And I got off the train and he met me and I just. I I couldn't stop laughing. So. Like I moved through their emotions pretty quickly obviously shock I. But then it was funny and then it felt a bit gross. Then it was kind of sexy which I didn't see coming at all.

Partner United States Australian Study Of Health Netflix Khloe Engineer
Bitcoin Dominance Increases

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:43 min | 7 months ago

Bitcoin Dominance Increases

"Trading. Wise. It nothing really neglected the markets and the felt damn good. Every day just tighten awakened away from from the shots was read honest refreshing thing and it's brought me into position now feel better about looking at once again. Yet. So it's been good as far as the mangams consent of talking about eleven thousand, one, hundred, twenty dollar mock around that region, which was the also pull level as before the the full bitcoin fell and you know we we have found resisted that level. We bounced off it on. What was Saturday. Pullback yesterday we're up point four, percent yesterday were down one point five percent. We actually close the wake up five point, seven percent, which is a pretty good week following on that cradle break it's a, it's a good week No complaints from me at all the markets have been a little bit slow for the traders. There was a couple of good trades on the I think it was five, four hour las not. The showed up It was at six PM Bob Wilson. Wasn't. So I wasn't there They look quite good. Right now, I was sitting at ten, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two save push up through the high that was created on. Saturday. Leading thousand, one, hundred, ninety, five. Thousand two hundred, we got three there, and hopefully we can say goodbye to that resistance and get a good run on get some good trends BEC into play because it has been a little bit. LASTA over the last few days and that market hasn't done a great deal of moving locker said ten, thousand, nine, hundred, and sixty one point four percent rotten. Now, a theory is still very sought look at realistically needs to get about four hundred. That's the point where I think we might see some is there on a theory of the weekly. Dig Close, up not by much one point, two percent were up twenty, three, percent three, hundred, seventy, three dollars raw now little market. I'm really jumping up and down to try to the nor is exa pay, which is currently twenty four point six cents flat. On yesterday thus far the weekly Kennel it did close up. Enclosed at one point, eight percent. So a little a little pop of wind to the upside, their daily trendies office it's very average. It's not. You know it's not exciting me in any. Sense, of the word. Bitcoin. Cash was down yesterday solid three percent closing at two twenty, six, twenty interestingly the weekly a dig close up. But again, only one point eight percent against showing that bitcoin dominance is starting to return to be the perfect storm that potentially that will speak to you about in just a moment. Bitcoin to Bitcoin cash to twenty, seven, seventy five, which represents a point senator sending so far on the dye lot finished the week actually down, it was down two point, two percent it closed at forty seven dollars and nine saints. It's forty, seven and fourteen, which represents a point one percent. It looks very wake at the moment that thanks said you could very easily push up. It's GonNa get three, fifty, one dollars thirty four to get that trend looking. The why? Though I want to look full for to be essentially reasonable for me? It's not there yet, and until we do get there until, of course, we full further It's not trying to make base again bit of the of a good full yesterday I fought the sent Dan it's a market that I'm watching this show is it was down lost weight five point seven, three percents. Well, it closed one hundred and fifty three dollars a ninety, six percents and look. It it's in a daily death. It is a daily down trend is a weekly momentum down the to our. Quite, good there on faith cradles physically city. They're just waiting to see how that goes throughout the and save account. Get anything. It's a one, fifty, four, fifty, five, point four. percent. Today. Cod Donald. Love to see a low coming here in a push up through that ten cent motte to get daily trim back into. The swing thing. It's not done that It was Dallas weeks pretty heavily six percent Pretty heavily considering it was a sly wake at sitting I point nonsense rotten now bonnets. Lost Weight was down fourteen point nine, four percent closing at twenty, six, thirty full. It's on the twenty six, thirty four right now which oversees. On, the Diet and yesterday down three point three percent bonds will sort of get his engine running again on. I'm sure probably will if we get a bull market but there's nothing that fraternity for me at this time of also very flat the weight that was was pretty average. It was down two percent very, very little volatility on a US at the moment and Sorta does it. Will Spike that way its up point four percent rotten out to sixty three cents. But Very Saad wise. Not Try to

United States Bob Wilson Dallas Senator DAN
"ninety six percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"You're starring in the next Wonder Woman film sometimes you got it okay ask somebody to it you know I'm very happy for it while you're writing like the K. U. K. thinking you could probably fill that in New York you wouldn't have to leave because you know you'd be like you'd be this big time big city inner city girl fighting crime we'll stick to the markets okay soybean farmers are feeling the pain I'm guessing because the terrorists part of it American soybeans are drying up in more ways than one China the world's biggest so importer just announced purchases in July jump to the highest in almost a year but those purchases were all from Brazil losing market share US farmers but adding to the stress is a stretch of dry summer weather that's making this year's crop look worse than it has for the past several years so weak demand a lackluster harvest could spell trouble for farm income so it does a bunch of soybean farmers just north of here and I drove by in last week and I couldn't understand why it was just like you know specs of things in dirt now I don't see that I look look it up now I know I didn't even have to wonder about that I could just ask it's so strange that we had so much rain that that hurt the crops could couldn't get the men and now it's dry they'll sit just can't win you can't win now pay hike so want to talk about pay hikes because I think I'm in line for one but are about about a manager would he manager be online for pay hike I mean well they may think they are I mean everybody expects to be right right it's might wanna manager pay hike expectations on coming here a survey by consulting firm Willis towers finds yet employers do plan to give them but they're holding the line on budgeted races despite low unemployment and a tight labor market ninety six percent of the companies reported they do expect to give races they'll be in the same though three percent area is this year although for top talent there will be more employees with the highest possible rating this year received an additional bumper an average bump of four point six percent that's a lot of money yeah that's awesome yeah could be a lot of money so you're telling me orange farmers are the victims of their own success of a growing too many oranges is that what the problem too many and too big to healthy member couple years ago we were talking about citrus greening disease the food was just falling off the trees before could get right and the trees themselves were dying well the farmers they've been they've been working at it and they've done very well they've been reinvesting in more resistant tree varieties strengthening existing trees with new trance and for the last two years it's kind of turned around the result they're getting bigger fruit and a rebound in the amount of oranges they're growing but that larger crop is now under cutting the price of orange juice by twenty percent so far this year and one of the problems is we don't drink orange juice the way we used to run don't Sumer demand for that it's gone away do we objected indoor arms hot we just don't buy it don't play I thought it was this was a technique I wasn't aware of no I'm thinking you probably are on top of all the techniques all well you know it's funny when I was in high school mind if there was technique wait a minute the other day was slim or something like that while I was in high school physics for six years you know they get six different name six different names we haven't even gotten a cream puff let's not okay yeah if you choose this morning are higher now S. and P. of ten points nasdaq up thirty eight and the Dow looks like they're of eighty points right now from the Bloomberg news room I Petry Sikora on newsradio seven hundred.

K. U. K. New York ninety six percent twenty percent three percent six percent six years two years
"ninety six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Like for. A year even longer some economists are rerating their base cases. Where does that hurt? I mean, is it more consolidation? Is it margins? Like what's the end result? Right. So it's a guess all what we're seeing is consolidation happen in the sector, you know, you're saying as I say, animals move acre shift, because you can only hold on for so long and a low price in Byron in, I am so impressed with farmers. And we are farmer own. I'm so impressed with farmers. They are incredibly resilient. They work and a lot of them are onto the into their balance sheet now. They're using loans. They've been losing money for a few years, but when they're trying to do is work towards income diversification. They're looking at different ways. They can be entrepreneurs. And I think of them as the original entrepreneur, they figure it out too hot to call to what to dry trade issues and they figure it out. But what you're going to see is consolidation in the sector in at the farm level at van will little, and then, of course up. And down the sector Beth and other industries when you hear about consolidation. It's two big companies getting together in the farming business. We hear about agribusiness and the shift from family owned farms to really big corporations, the, the pressures of trade, and perhaps weather as well going to exceleron that process. Well, we are seeing acceleration, but I'm gonna be ninety six percent of farms are still family owned. So what happens when happens is, you know, a an individual doesn't have somebody to pass their, their farm onto, and it's next to a neighbor. And so they say we're going to sell the farm. And so the neighbor acquires, the farm or leases the farm, so there is consolidation acres move. But I think that there's a narrative that, you know, this is going to corporate farms, and, and yes, there is increased scale, but I want to be very clear, ninety six percent of farms are still family owned, and so that, that, that narrative, isn't actually directly on point. I wonder what this means more specifically for Landau licks, ma'am. Looking at say dean foods. Before all this got worse. They were already really struggling desperately wanting to sell themselves, but no one's taking the bait with that. How do you play that trend? I mean, do you look to buy certain assets like from dean foods, for example, news, kind of sit back and wait till assesses out? The lace isn't really in the drinking of business. We are in butter cheese, Vermont creamery. Cozy shack pudding, you know, so we are in different elements of the dairy sector but of course all place together. Sometimes fan supply agreements for for drinking, though, businesses. How do we see it? We'll play out. Well, you know, again, we see investment in parts of the country, we see animal numbers and animals shifting in different parts of the country. We pay attention to it all the way back to the producer level for our direct business. It's all about innovation. We are focused on innovation in the dairy portfolio new products, new product entrance into the marketplace, partnering differently with retailers because retailers are going through their own consolidation grocery retailers. So there are a variety of ways, we're thinking through this at the farmer level, but also at the store shop level. I also want to wrap up talking about what's happening with hogs, and in China. Swine flu that devastating is at three continents. Now there's also worms infecting. The pigs there, we, we talk a lot about how Sweden's getting hit by trade, but that's some fundamental soybean meal demand that's going to be lost because of the hog production. What are you hearing? We're hearing the same thing. I mean, we, we see a significant portion of, of that industry coming out. I think I heard twenty twenty five percent so right. There's some industry fundamentals. And that's why I say you know, we talk a lot about trade. You're right. Trade is a significant issue. But there are so many other factors brought up earlier the weather factor. And then, you know, the, the swine flu is another issue impacting producers impacting the sector when you came in. It was last summer, some of to eighteen it was the first openly gay woman to be CEO. What difference does that make it make to lend a lakes? What difference does it make to you interacting with other corporations? Well, it doesn't really again, the I was chosen for the role because the board believed I was best. Suited to drive the strategic performance that they were focused on, and that we were aligned to, you know, this business is member owned business. So what they were also clear about as I was aligned with their families and their members. Of course I hold them in high regard. So it wasn't one of the criteria at the same time, I think we celebrate. But it certainly didn't hold me back from being named to that position. And it really has had no impatience, not something we discuss. It's not part of the criteria that was Beth Ford president and chief executive officer at.

dean foods Beth Ford president and chief executive Byron Landau Vermont producer Sweden China CEO ninety six percent twenty twenty five percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Valley. Most of our fencing is on the eastern side. We have some technology over there to help us out an awful lot. And he used to be back in the ninety s was the busiest area in the country. It was in the nineties the busiest area in the country. Now, it's about four percent of what comes through where there's no fence Ninety-six per fencing. Not ninety six percent come through whether is fencing some kind of barrier. Four percent, come through the Democrats like the ninety six percent. They don't like the four percent. Rao Ortiz who is the the boss of this huge section of Texas border right now, we would like to see about another one hundred twenty miles of fencing in the sector alone. We've got two hundred seventy seven miles of river country. It winds an awful lot. But if we were able to get the infrastructure a few more agents is certainly the technology. I like our chances against the transnational criminal organizations out there. Anybody who says that we don't need those things come walk in my shoes, come walk in my shoes. Now, this this is not somebody that's going to be invited on CNN or MSNBC because they want to shield their dwindling number of viewers from the facts from the truth, but on MSNBC, this was this is a congresswoman democrat Pramila, Jay Powell, Pramila J appel. I wonder if she's related to pay pal? Pramila J appel is a democrat from the state of Washington. She was on MS DNC, and they don't like talking about the numbers, and whether they're effective in the criminals and MS thirteen and the rapes the murders and the cocaine and heroin. They don't like to talk about that. So you know, what they do? They call everybody racists. Here's a left-wing democrat dimwit named Pramila J pal. She's a member of the house of representatives from the state of watch from Seattle and the Seattle area MSNBC. This is never been about a wall. Actually gotten funding a couple of years ago or a year ago. I can't get a wall of a deal that was proposed not all of us agreed with that proposal again. Was proposed to him and he turned it down. Because his alternate goal is as you said to make America pure in the sense of not having immigrants not having folks of color here and shutting down every form of legal immigration. That woman is a pathological psychotic liar, and she's a menace to western civilization and the fake news media creeps that put her on and sit there with pursed lips and furrowed brows letting her spread those clan. Lies should be bleep canned in a heartbeat because they. I'm I'm becoming angry. I need to come down. Let's go to sound byte number twelve. Now. Here's the racists white. I think Barack Obama is not a white supremacist. He's a half white supremacists. Because he can't be a white supremacist. He's half black and he's halfway so a half white supremacist. Senator Barack Obama in two thousand six.

Pramila J appel Senator Barack Obama Pramila J MSNBC Pramila Rao Ortiz Seattle CNN America Texas Jay Powell cocaine Washington heroin ninety six percent four percent Four percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Budding entrepreneurs realize what the implications of raising money actually means ninety six percent now? Bummer. I think most people don't get it. I think it was very attractive. You're young you're going to build the next Facebook. And let's go on. Okay. And that's what happened, Jen. Right. They're very young. Yes. What do I say? I'm forty. So are you does being an entrepreneurial genius? Is that only for people under the age of thirty five? What if you are forty fifty sixty or seventy this whole entrepreneurship game, isn't in it for you. Because we keep using the word, you're young you're young. Well, what if you're not young? I mean a couple things on that front. It's funny. You said that it's something I've been spending some time thinking a lot about number one. If you're at thirty five forty forty five and you've worked as a non entrepreneur, you're not an entrepreneur, first of all, I think anybody, and you couldn't be you can be you're more than welcome to be. But you're not a pure bred. Entrepreneur, listen, this is something a lot of you guys know that I get razzed online because I say that if you ever worked for anybody else, you're not an entrepreneur because my definition of an entrepreneur. You can't breathe at the thought of working for somebody else. That's my my personal my personal point of view on being true bread. Entrepreneur. If you are as an aunt if you are true entrepreneur, the notion of working for somebody else is so devastating that you would rather live on a couch with your four buddies with fucking cockroaches and shit food every day to try to build something. I truly believe that. What about the argument that we're all entrepreneurs, and I could say seventy rural Bloomberg media. I worked for myself, and if you mind shelf, and if you respect. But why because somebody pays your paycheck? Yes. That's just Google fucking entrepreneurship. That's not what it said. But why can't why can't one take in entrepreneurship approach to their own? They can they can. So again, a lot of people that follow me know that the way I decipher from an entrepreneur is used the term entrepreneurial tendencies, I think you have them you've been very smart in my opinion from afar twilights, why want you here tonight. First of all, I knew it wouldn't be. I mean, some of them are probably confused beginning. I knew it wasn't going to be a Cush interview. Right. Said and everything, but it was gonna be the normal like, Gary, hey, unless it can be when did your genius. I. Wonder it's right. And so that was interesting for me. And so, but more importantly, I think we can have entrepreneurial tendencies, I think that's great. And I do think that people need to be practical. I do think if you're sitting this crowd right now, and you've debt if you from college, right, or if you have I mean, look, do, you know, many people are dealing with real life stuff, including stuff like that. Nobody ever talks about including like, I sit up here and be like be an entrepreneur. And meanwhile, you sitting in that audience and saying my spouse died my fucking spouse died like my spouse died, I've got two young kids. Like, it's not so easy to be entrepreneur. And there's real stuff that happens people's real lives. Here's what I'm saying. We are living through the luckiest period of time ever for all of us because there's something called the internet when your spouse died in one thousand nine hundred seventy two right? You had no practicality after seven or eight or nine PM when you got home to change your life..

Facebook Jen Google Gary ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Damn you always surprise us use a. Center I thought you're going to hear about the hot water and salt, water a hot salt water is supposed to. Be she's making She's making art. Art there Unifil arts And I. Get that I just thought it talks about And it says to. Put a piece of x. flat Can't resist it. Eighteen legend Netflix, in the mall 'cause it dehydrates them, and you know dick chrome a number of years ago dick and I actually we lost actually quite. A bit of money on on worm flavored ex lax To. Attract moles. And just it just didn't go over as. Well as we thought so anyway what I'm calling about, with the dryer I, would probably the last caller next week and you guys ran out of time Let's, see the dryer I don't take my close up on immediately most of the time Get ready to take them out it's. Still a little damp And. I finally figured it out Ninety six percent humidity outside, makes it in the dryer vent Oh you've. Lost your little flipper flapper on the outside No doubt it it's under living in an apartment building but I have not. Noticed, it at all until the humidity was so high Well it's down you don't have a bit of problem If anybody has any problems with. Their, place still. Feeling damp in this kind of weather Check, that before they have their man come out All, right Deb hey thanks for the phone call, personally, I will tell, you Pat that call said Deborah humidity in dryer Not that age. Challenge humidity. I didn't know that was, a bug that with my fingers type displays. On, when it's happened on screen halls all. Right so when we come back. We're going. To do our social media, questions. Okay, great room for a couple. More. Calls so that's when we come back sounds, great, ninety three WABC Hey alexa Give me a quick rundown of the local and national news at any relevant traffic and. Weather info nobody wants to hear, a computer read. The. News okay Alexa play three WIBC and by the way you can do that on any smart speaker trying if you're, smart speaker, can you.

Alexa dick WABC Netflix Deb Deborah Pat Ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The charts yes as of two thousand fourteen it was decided that streaming would be included into into the charts and that's that's basically accompanying the decline in people actually buying music and the rise in streaming say for example we bought only one hundred ninety three million singles last year on nine hundred ninety six percent of which were born i jeans but we streamed over seven point four billion tracks so there's a huge do you see that we use a streaming service i mean have you gone up on premium or would have to pay one you pay one louise me though not owning the music because the thing is that in the past and i have gone back to owning a record player and for an album that i particularly like i will dig out and see if i can find the vinyl lionel's having a resurgence well it is to love people love i mean you can't beat the sound of final it's that authentic you almost feel like you're in the room whilst they were recording it but it's also because even though there are some infections with vinyl that there is something about the sound experience that i think we went through this state where we were told that digital was amazing and cutting out all those sort of various noises making perfection but in fact what we like is is when there is a lot of performance and you can hear a stall scrape across the grand you can hear somebody to pick something up exactly making lots of people are trying to bring that into this sort of clean cut digital recordings now at sheeran is is one of the pioneers of bringing back that kind of real music vibe he often will start a track and you'll hear his vocal hidden talking to michael something turned producer is sort of just brings you into the reema bit which i love i have he when he when he wasn't quite as successful as he is now he was touring with the band coots sabin and he was sleeping on safest and mine was a safer in which he slept well for three or four nights these you know i've been lucky enough to meet various musicians along the way and i think the other the other thing is the whole thing about the music industry i suppose is that sorta historically arab in order to sort of make all that sort of money but then i think people forget that there is a there is a downside or you know the whole so being followed by people in fandom and the fact that you'll you'll largest isn't private and you can't do normal stuff anymore is is extraordinarily to the extent i was chatting to tommy del once i met him and he said you know that that there's also extremely loneliness that if you're a solo musician yes you got your band and stuff but you come off stage and then then what i think any celebrity create is accompanied with the deep loneliness because actually you find that fewer and further between people that understand you got dog your say famous that you can't exactly the case the week that's why i have to hide on other chief in the buffs and the way i people always come up to me and that they care less academic imagine the thing is i think if i was unable to do what i would describe as normal things i get a huge amount of joy of going to my local purveyors of fine because i'd really not gang shopping i like going by and fresh produce isle against the market doing all sorts of things and if an on occasion when i have done stuff where people recognize it and it takes twice as long i can imagine this place not to do out and about type stuff is actually a loss of freedom so it's it's and it's in periods of my life that happened to me it is is does affect you quite deeply because you generate a bit of an insecurity towards actually going anywhere well then the other thing is you worry about you know if you if you look your best or something else that you just thinking.

nine hundred ninety six percen
"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Around the world in devaluing ninety six percent of humanity and thinking of them as lesser and and in the united states government not just turning away actual emergency aid after natural disasters out of you know national pride but turning away the the wisdom of of other countries that have tried things on learned things that the united states could benefit from so i suggest in part three of the book that it does enormous damage to the people who believe in it as well as everybody impacted by it and in the fourth and final part of the book i suggest how we ought to try thinking differently thought experiments role playing role reversals different uses of language how we could start to think in a way where when you know donald trump says that he's going to bring north korea to back to the table by threatening total decimation of nor you know whatever that decimation means to strain ten percent of something he wants total decimation so it's not clear what that means but but you know it is it is a crime to threaten to attack another country it is a crime under the un charter it is it is evil it is immoral ended is illegal and it doesn't bring anyone to the table i mean here you have south korea having intervened and proposed peace and north korea having responded and said okay let's pursue peace negotiator and trump and bolton crowing about how their threats and belligerence but she piece which of course immediately reverses those gains on does the piece and you know so the last thing that is going to bring north korea back to the table is threatening to turn it into libya or to rightfully decimate.

united states north korea south korea libya donald trump un bolton ninety six percent ten percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Teacher cape rate school in the south west side right that's how do you integrate technology into your daily teaching routine every day use technology and what i try to make sure to do is that all my students know that it's a tool that they can all use it doesn't matter what background their from but their english language and their nurse my school is ninety six percent hispanic and all the students have the opportunity from kindergarten to eighth grade to use technology and they've been using it as a great tool to learn like we all said they're really engaged with the technology that we're using but because let me ask you and also dr jackson with when you're thinking about coding does everybody have to code i mean it's been a big push montana's requiring it now in schools idaho is working all these states are pushing it and it seems like the an tim i'd love you to sort of win it is it just the latest answer because everyone's like coat you must code you must go to almost like you have to speak you know you have to learn history or cycles that the reason behind it is problem solving you know that's a tool that we all need to learn in entering any job force and learning how to code is really enhancing that and making sure that everybody knows how to solve problems on how to take on a challenge and it's okay to make mistakes and once they learn that in those skills are available through coding they are able to apply them and then successful in future but to answer your question yes everybody has to code in chicago it's a graduation requirement.

montana chicago dr jackson idaho ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Assem teacher case rate school in the south west side right that's how do you integrate technology until your daily teaching routine every day is technology and what i try to make sure to do is that all my students know that it's a that they can all use doesn't matter what background or from their english language and their nurse mice school is ninety six percent hispanic and all the students have paternity from kindergarten to eighth grade to use technology and they've been using it as a great tool to learn like we all said there really engaged with the technology that we're using but let me ask you and also dr jackson when you're thinking about coding everybody have to code i mean it's been a big push i know montana's requiring it now in schools idaho is working all these states are pushing it and it seems like the tim i'd love you to sort of win it he's just the latest answer because everyone's like coat you must code you must go to almost like you have to speak you know you have to learn history or that the reason behind it is problem solving you know that's a tool that we all need to learn in entering any job force and learning how to code is really enhancing that and making sure that everybody knows how to solve problems and how to kind of challenge and it's okay to make mistakes and once they learn that and those skills are available through cody they're able to apply them and then successful in future but to answer your question yes everybody has to code in chicago it's graduation requirement.

montana cody chicago dr jackson idaho ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That protection in one of the areas i'm thinking of online piracy there was a ruling recently that comcast is on the hook for copyright infringement and they said hey section two thirty we can't help it if people are using the pirate bay or whatever through our internet and a judge said well you've got enough notice that it's bad and you do have a role to play and so now they want to bring this idea to the issue of these opiates because you may or may not be surprised how many places online will sell you prescription drugs that aren't supposed to both on the dark web i think we've known about the dark web for a long time and and remember that big prosecution of the guy who ran a place called the silk road which was on the dark web you had to use a special browser you know to get to it and you could buy at thing name an illegal drug you could buy it there in fact you'd have multiple sellers vying for your business that place got shut down but ten more took its place but we're not just talking about the evil denizens of the dark web here we're talking about businesses that are operating in the open most of them are online pharmacies for example you really ninety six percent of all online pharmacies are illegal and it's because the providers of the drugs have strong restrictions on anything that looks like it's advertising drugs that's why even though you see on tv ad after ad after ad for prescription drug you'll notice they always they don't tell you go get it they don't tell you find a pharmacy online that will tell you this drug they always say ask your doctor about it and then when somebody says hey you're not supposed to advertise prescription drugs they said we're not really advertising the drug it's like a public service announcement it's medical information you can go ask your.

comcast ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"And he's got rental furniture and rental properties and motel bills and fuel bills and he's got three different cars you as an investigator how do you learn to think like the people that you're pursuing because there's got to be some moments here but to think okay i'm looking for a guy buying ten burner phones seems maybe a little bit like okay that's an easy one i get that one but i wouldn't think rental furniture that strange x box and food bills and these this tax return the way the cash works with add going into the accountant busting the whole thing out by the way how do you learn to think like the people that you're pursuing so that's a great question and this is the big problem the industry right now you know i mentioned that ninety six percent of the system generated alerts are deemed false positives and are close without issue ninety eight percent never make it to a regulatory filing a sar report so out of one hundred alerts generated from the system on average industrywide across globe ninety eight out of one hundred alerts never been a government investigation only two out of one hundred and the problem is that banks detection logic in these in these transaction monitoring red flag detection scenarios it's based on really broad overarching basic transactional action based concepts you know you deposited a lot of cash in your account you wired money to a high risk country you know you structured under ten thousand dollars i mean these are so basic if we come back to understanding who is actually laundering money if it's really transnational criminal organizations and corrupt governments and sanctioned countries and major terrorist groups are we dealing with dumb people absolutely not we're dealing with major transnational threat we're gonna sations that have resources and the fact that they have money means that they have resources and they need to clean it so they're going to put their best and brightest people people that have accounting backgrounds people that have law back on people that have backgrounds like.

investigator accountant ninety eight percent ten thousand dollars ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"You'll pain the other ninety six percent of the nerves go the organs and cells and tissues so i some people don't get headaches some people get sleeping problems some people get anxiety or anxiousness in no one would consider the fact that it might be actually coming from their nervous system spinal damage most people will not put those two things together to take the x rays we see she's lost ninety seven percent of the curve in her knack that's causing tension on the spinal cord causing tension on the joints tension on the blood vessels and ultimately change in the balance of her muscles now he would that be causing your headaches but she's also getting restlessness difficulty sleeping and we talk through how this is not normal but there is a way to attack this that's right in a way to attack that's wrong and so we are exactly how to take care of the health problem how to correct then blind cause of it its so she doesn't have this issue for the rest of her life shudder exercises to do a home she comey the office to get adjusted and if she is now she's got no more headaches off of all of her medications she said her life is so much different now she has more energy no more anxiety she sleeping at night again she tells us that she's a completely different person a a different mom and certainly a different spouse she said dr in her husband agrees that she's way more pleasant now that uh that she no longer has these headaches again it's not about the headaches it's about that these headaches are warning sign in what bothers me so much is the seat people struggle with their health taking medications i necessarily i think about all the people who are struggling with their health issue.

anxiety headaches ninety seven percent ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on WREK

"Detect over ninety six percent of infections were blood culture is typically detecting fifty to sixty percent of the infections because sometimes the cells don't grow there are various reasons why that might be the case but if the cells don't grow you get a false negative test result in and that's a real problem for the patient the fungal part that candied apart in not just getting that hospital people have these can diva infections for all kinds of reasons you do have a t to candied a diagnostic rat we do us or t to can dita was the first product that got fda cleared a back at the end of two thousand fourteen uh we've role that product out very exciting lee uh we have over 35 hospitals now adopting an using that diagnostic tests panel uh were actually uh actively testing patients and five different countries as well uh and the candied a panel is detecting the fungal pathogens associated with substance that have the highest mortality rate that's why we started there the mortality rate for these candied infections today is forty percent the bus exciting time honestly that that that i personally experienced it has been over the last six months as these hospitals have gone live in testing patients we have just so many stories of patients that were detecting that were messed we're seeing a reduction in the use of drugs on patients who don't beat it so what what what happens today is while you're waiting for that blood culture result patients are being blasted with drugs it's a guessing game because you want to try something because you know the patient is second course that's leading to all sorts of resistance and susceptibility where the drug stall work uh and it's also a significant costs of the.

mortality rate ninety six percent forty percent sixty percent six months
"ninety six percent" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Finally cognizant of that matter of fact one of our fastest growing departments here at the radio station is our digital department a we wanna make sure that your audience should you do a radio show has no excuse when it comes to the question how do i access your show right i wouldn't want to put you in final i was an absolutely and galthie them probably about five different ways you can lose in on a lot of people uh i i've i've talked to have come to us from a podcasting situation which is of course very popular and people are are really into it and there's cost factors and things like that but it still doesn't have the traction yet additional radio you know ninety six percent of america of all pretty much six plus ages listened to radio at some time during the week that's right and so just like television and to some degree even newspapers that they've there's still a lot of legs left yeah this is one of the main if not main ways audio wise people were getting information well that's true in the thing about podcasters is there a grapefruit joined mike brearley long form still offer really short stuff but you know what they lack is that live interaction with the audience and that's something that to a terrestrial radio station can actually provide that a podcast just simply can't imagine as really one of the magic things about radio is is the fact that you can interact with your audience in their mind they start to see was a trusted friend or maybe a a sibling or even dipping on their age maybe they see you as an elder who can help them and and as i said earlier a lot of our hosts that's why they come to a cessation they say you know i'm a successful in what i do and i'm sure would be nice to have some more clients or or maybe some more business but what i really want to do it really gets me excited is helping mankind and woman guide i want to go out there and i want to better the lives of those people within the terrestrial signal of this radio station and i said that's great because that's what we look for in our hosts and if that is you please give me a call four to five six five three one one.

america mike brearley ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on Talk Human To Me

Talk Human To Me

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on Talk Human To Me

"Philosophy of consensus necessarily but i'm just saying that like the idea that there's like one person out in front who's deciding anything i think is a is a weak form of leadership and i really appreciate that about that movement in particular and i think that this is a way in which black women moved to the world if we look at the last election where ninety six percent of black women voted for hillary clinton like i'm clear that like we voted for hillary clinton not because we liked hillary clinton but but because we recognized that having trump as president would be detrimental for our families for our communities for the environment like we basically and fifty three percent of white women voted for him voted for a man who is who makes zero effort to hide the fact that he is a total misogynist bright but fifty three percent of white women voted for him so black women were black women make decisions and choices in the world we moved to the world when it comes to things that we think are going to have consequence and we're thinking about how it infects not just us but like our communities and we're constantly showing up we showed up for white women in a way that they didn't show up for themselves when it comes to came to the election and i'm curious about like you know as we as we move forward like like seeing how those fifty three percent of white women like how are they thinking about you know what this administration means for them what it means for their daughters what it means for you know they're they're women friends and it kind of blows me away that that any woman voted for him but we'll do think maybe we actually take what you said in the beginning about nasty.

hillary clinton president fifty three percent ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"Um no i don't have it i don't have anything like that on we don't have anything like that on toro of like i mention where a market maker so we're providing the pricing um but i can show what i can show you is the toro sentiment omni therion official which has been pretty consistent since we we launched e e e theory i'm in february for trading only toro um and you can see right here he theory i'm on my watch list the ninety nine percent is buying a case amongst the crowd of trade islami tore that's among everybody who's got a position on ethiopia excluding excluding copied positions excluding positions right here because i was down rewrite right now it's the sentiment is basically accounts anybody who has a pure position so it also excludes if somebody's hedging has won by position oneself position anybody's who it is it a pure buyer pure sell position is gonna be counted and it would be we give you the percentage of the total to ninety nine percent i mean that's pretty much a consensus amongst the trade as there yet bitcoin is i ninety six percent and that's pretty low but some ahmet well thus does really really interesting dan you guys are supporting the big when in a theory moreno at the moment we have a bitcoin any theory i'm available for cfd trading um we do plan on introducing more i showed you like coin which is already on the platform it's not tradeable yet what were what were we'd like to do is to actually create see the the issue is that if we opened up like coin for trading today and just let everybody have at it we have such a a huge demand that it would very likely create a liquidity crunch in the market which could lead to an asset bubble gum which is not something that we want to see.

official ethiopia moreno ahmet ninety nine percent ninety six percent
"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"ninety six percent" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"An laxatives billion dollars i did not know that yet in a dumpster most people listening to know that in in it's a function of americans not eating enough guts they were plant week if we were plant strong if instead of eating according to latest figures from the us economic ouncil we are now eating as a country ninety four percent of our calories you're coming from refined processed foods that have zero fiber meat and dairy products that have zero fiber at ninety six percent four percent coming from fruits vegetables walgreens and being no wonder you need fiber to be regular that dagloc it and and and the and the benefits of fiber go way beyond your reran fruits and vegetables and whole grains and beans you're actually developing whole different sat of these micro by on these bacteria got then meet in and and dairy products the basically caused inflammation make it easier for you know uh deposits in your brain for alzheimers inflammation for heart disease the cancer all this stuff so i would love to have this is not going to happen today i've said but they would be fascinating to have this discussion with with you as a as a whole foods plantbased guy in a in a palio guy and a vegetarian and a guy that he to mcdonald's that are year just because he is the passion bike just i mean i'm listening to him in the passionate which india in you we talked about this lot the password i think the people listening i mean the passion comes through clearly the passion that the palio guy has yet know he's gonna say.

us india alzheimers mcdonald ninety four percent ninety six percent billion dollars four percent