35 Burst results for "ninety percent"

US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

"The trump administration has released complex plans for making covert nineteen vaccines available to all Americans once vaccines are established as safe and effective the government's laid out a sweeping plan for vaccination campaign starting first with healthcare workers and others and eventually ramping up to reach everybody who wants one the shots will be free and people will need two doses of most vaccines three to four weeks apart states and cities will be responsible for distributing the vaccines and have a month to submit detailed plans but the whole operation faces public skepticism experts say up to ninety percent of Americans must either be vaccinated or have their own immunity to effectively protect the nation from the corona virus in AP poll in may showed only half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated amid worries about safety Sager mag ani Washington

Ani Washington
US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

"The trump administration has released complex plans for making covert nineteen vaccines available to all Americans once vaccines are established as safe and effective the government's laid out a sweeping plan for vaccination campaign starting first with healthcare workers and others and eventually ramping up to reach everybody who wants one the shots will be free and people will need two doses of most vaccines three to four weeks apart states and cities will be responsible for distributing the vaccines and have a month to submit detailed plans but the whole operation faces public skepticism experts say up to ninety percent of Americans must either be vaccinated or have their own immunity to effectively protect the nation from the corona virus in AP poll in may showed only half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated amid worries about safety Sager mag ani Washington

Ani Washington
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 3 d ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
The Dignity of Work

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:57 min | 4 d ago

The Dignity of Work

"Guest today is Audie pen audience the principal owner of Audie Penn Consulting. He's been working in consulting for thirty years providing different services to several fortune fifty companies in diverse industries and organizations. Is Approach is a lean transformation by applying coaching. Training and project facilitation with local teams securing solid. Foundation. Audie has been most notable as a global consultant where he combines tactical leadership skills with pro processed focused improvements. Some of his clients are Caterpillar John. Deere. Martin Marietta and Han thanks so much for joining me today Audie. Thanks for having me Diane I'm looking forward to our conversation today. I am as well and we're GONNA be talking about culture in in business you know the impact that it has in. Most likely. Spending some significant amount of time talking about the current situation we were in an I had said in the introduction These episodes are evergreen and they are I think no matter when people listen to them. They're gonNA valuable information and We are recording this. I would love to say like toward the end but I'm not quite sure where we are with the whole covid nineteen pandemic and. So while there are things that leaders are going through and employees are going through therefore, companies right now I'm pretty confident that we're going to be talking about. Translates. No matter what the environment is that company finds itself. Absolutely Yep. Okay. So to start if we could. With you providing us with. A description of. Talking about the impact of organizational culture on business performance. The idea that comes to mind there is is a recent discovery of my own and I'll. I'll frame it in this language often I find. Organizations. Are Struggling with their lean or operational excellence deployments and there's a statistic that gets kicked around quite often that seventy to ninety percent of operational excellence. ORLEAN deployments end up in failure. and. My initial response to that was well, they're doing it incorrectly I need to understand why they're doing it incorrectly but I think, I've I've actually adjusted that language to not incorrectly but incompletely in, there's the connection to your question. And for me, the connection is we can do process improvement very well. But. If the rest of the organization is disconnected, the sponsors of the leadership level or the management level of process owners, then we can't sustain or continue to find ways to improve those processes in it seemed like we just continue to solve the same problems over and over again. That is so interesting. Okay. So, if I inherit you right. company decided they want to go through process improvement some area of the business, but they don't necessarily have. Complete buy in from everyone involved. So they go through the process and then everyone walks away. They go back to the way things were. Yes. Okay. So that feels to me like. The in has to start at the very top and then has to be pushed down is that A fair assessment. I would say, yes, there's there's one word though that mutiny short that is pushed because. When those sponsors and it's language that I use to refer to leaders when when leaders actually show up? and. They're clear what their organizations about what's important It's easy for organizations to align to that and questions that I ask often is how many of you came to work today to fail And no one answers the question. Yes. So I always say, well, if that's true of us, don't you think that's true of everyone in our organization we fail them by not being clear about talking about what's important.

Audie Audie Penn Consulting Deere Principal Martin Marietta Consultant Diane HAN
How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

Podcasting Q&A

04:20 min | 4 d ago

How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

"Welcome to podcasting where you learned the best tips and strategies to launch growing monetize your show. This week's question comes from Dan is Dan sky pilot faith quest podcast, and I have some questions about the apple podcast analytics. I love the buzz sprout analytics, use them all the time and find them very helpful. And I go to the apple podcast analytics and I find them really confusing. Sometimes, there's information about a particular podcast that is lacking on the screen. It seems inconsistent within its own podcast analytics as well as compared to what you all offer. Tell me what I should be looking out there. Should I even be using them? Is they're helpful information there. What are your recommendations thank you so much for your question. Dan So apple podcasts analytics offers some. Additional data points that they don't necessarily share with podcast hosting sites such as but sprout, and while having more information is usually really good thing. You kinda need to know what you're looking for and what you're looking at when you're an apple podcasts connect. So on this episode, we're GonNa, tell you in explain a little bit about why the data points might look a little bit different and then how to get the most out of apple podcast analytics. Let's talk about why you might see some download discrepancy between your hosting site and apple podcasts connect. So with a hosting site, they're going to show you across the board. How many listens in episode is getting Apple podcasts is not set up that way apple podcast connect is going to only show you information from listeners that meet specific set of criteria. The first is that the listener has to be using the most current version of the apple. PODCASTS at the second is that user also has given permission for their diagnostic information in their usage data to be on top of that, there is a seventy two hour lag time. So if someone listened to an episode that you posted on Monday, you're not gonna see that reflected in your stats until Thursday on top of that, if you get less than five people that meet that criteria, apple is going to register zero data for that episode so. The key here is if you want to find out information about how many listens and episodes getting, you're going to want to check in with your hosting site like bus browse going to show you how many listens to you over the course of all time as well as where maybe your audience listening from. You're not gonNA, get an accurate reflection of your download information from podcast connect. What is it good for? Actually there are three really good data points that podcast connect can offer you. The first is average consumption by episode when you land on the dashboard for your podcast scroll down until you see recent episodes, once you're there look at the stat in the far right column. The percentage you see here is the average amount of time your audience listening to each episode. For example, if you have a twenty minute episode with a seventy, five percent average consumption rating that means that people are listening to about the first fifteen minutes of that episode. For the next data point, you can see in podcasts connect episode listen duration click through to one of your episodes to see a graph showing you the percentage of listeners that are still tuned in at any point in your episode. If you're doing everything right, you should see a gradual taper from the beginning to the end of the episode. If you see a sharp drop in listeners, click on the portion of the episode and listen to it to figure out why so many listeners bailed at the same time. For example, there was an episode entitled finding the Best Podcasting. Microphone we noticed that people stopped listening around. The, nineteen minute mark when we went back and looked at that, we noticed that that was where we kind identified that podcasting microphone, and so people didn't really have a reason to keep listening. So what you WanNa do is really think about why people would drop off really explore that if that's that you've given them an answer and they don't need to listen anymore if it's more of a click bait kind title if you had an ad run in the middle reverse engineer, why everyone might disconnected at that point so that you can create more content that has people stay on for the duration of the episode. The last thing that you can learn from podcast connect is how many new listeners subscribed after listening to a particular episode blow the Listener Duration Graph for each episode, you'll see a role of additional statistics on the far right. You'll notice a percentage called devices, subscribed devices subscribed as the percentage of unique devices that subscribed and listening to the episode. For example, if you have an episode that has a twenty percent subscribe rate versus an episode that has a ninety percent subscribed rate, you're GonNa WanNa look at what you did to get ninety percent subscription because if you can do more of that, it will result in more podcast listeners. It's GonNa help you grow your podcast tremendously.

Apple DAN Engineer
Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:29 min | Last week

Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

"Employees at the nation's airlines are getting nervous many pilots flight attendants mechanics in customer service agents have been kept on the payroll since March only with the help of federal aid that funding runs out at the end of this month, and if it's not extended tens of thousands of them could be out of work on October first from Chicago. NPR's David Schaper reports. Several dozen flight attendants, pilots, and other airline employees masked up as they chanted and marched around the Federal Plaza Downtown Chicago Wednesday to draw attention to what they say is a dire situation. So I'm I'm coming up on four decades of service and I have to tell you I have never seen anything like this in my career with United Airlines United Flight Attendant Jeff Highs says he's not just talking about the calamitous drop in the number of people flying because of the pandemic lot. The impending mass layoffs year and his co workers are facing. Unless twelve thousand of our members are at risk for involuntary furlough and that's just one group of employees at one airline. Industry Wide Cub October. First layoffs could top forty thousand, and that's in addition to the tens of thousands have already taken early retirement or other incentives to leave their airline jobs voluntarily. The initial corona virus relieffactor past March Congress and the trump administration included twenty five billion dollars in grants to airlines to keep paying employees for six months. But now that time is almost up Democrats some Republicans and the president of all said, they favor an extension of the payroll support program but the airline aid was left of the latest relief package proposed this week by Senate, Republicans and the uncertainty weighs. Heavily on airline employees, we're in this limbo right now other holding is a Chicago based flight attendant for American Airlines. Are we going back to work in October? Are Do we have to figure out and find another job? You know we're kind of time crunch right now what our backup plans going to be airline employee unions held a similar rally outside the Capitol in Washington DC to put pressure on Congress. While their bosses at the airlines fret to right now we're fighting for survival make no bones about it. Kallio. Heads a group airlines for America. He says after a brief uptick air travel this summer that peaked over the Labor Day weekend demand is already slumping again is more profitable business travel bookings remain down close to ninety percent is going to be a different world people are to see you're already seen. Fewer flights come October. First, you're going to see a further reduction in the number fledge that are operating Kellyanne other. Say it may take four to five years for the airline industry to fully recover if it ever does wouldn't another round of payroll support funding for the airlines just delay the inevitable of mass layoffs warmer airline Executive Robert. Man Who is now an industry consultant argues the jobs are worth saving. Job in the airline is probably support somewhere between seven and eleven jobs. Elsewhere, the economy is hospitality in these support technologies in other transportation boats in man warns in a couple of airlines may not survive the pandemic without more federal aid. To Gut check question how much of an economy? Do you want going forward congressional and White House to go shooters? We'll have to try to answer that question this campaign season in which the two parties agree on almost nothing. David Schaper, NPR News Chicago.

American Airlines Chicago United Airlines David Schaper Congress Federal Plaza NPR Republicans America Jeff Highs White House Senate Consultant President Trump Executive
The Stages Of Relationships With Mistakes

Developer Tea

09:54 min | 2 weeks ago

The Stages Of Relationships With Mistakes

"Here's the thing about mistakes. It is invoke and. It is certainly popular. To accept that mistakes are going to happen. So I don't want you to check out too quickly because you've kind of jumped on that bandwagon this is something that. Has Been discussed a lot in. An podcast like this it certainly has been discussed in plenty of books. We talk a lot about the importance of psychological safety. In today's episode, we're GONNA take. Another step further. And not just talk about acceptance of mistakes. There's more to this discussion there's more to how we should behave or how we can behave. To deal with mistakes better to have a better relationship with them. So hopefully. You'll stick around. As we go through this scale and there's five kind of categories, five points on this scale that you can find yourself on almost certainly, you'll find yourself somewhere on this on this scale. Now, of course, we're going to talk about it in terms of very discrete points on the scale. But this is a continuum. You'RE NOT GONNA act only one way you're not going to fall entirely into one point on the scale but I encourage you to consider how you might react or how you might behave to move to a new point on this scale if you don't like where you're at. All right. So this this podcast, this episode is not intended to. Make you feel bad about where you are on the scale but instead to. Try to provide a clear picture of the full-scale. Altogether. So the is to zoom out of your own circumstance. and Try to imagine what other circumstances. May allow. At one thing that will note in advance before we get into the scale is that there's no point on the scale where you have escaped the relationship with mistakes. In other words, you always have mistakes. There's no point on the scale where you will be able to break away and stop making mistakes so. That should not be a goal as much as we wanted to be a goal, it shouldn't be a goal. And part of the reason for that is because. If. We don't have mistakes than we are probably not learning. We're not pushing past our previous. Barriers not just individually, but as teams, and we're not helping others grow. Okay. Let's get into the five stages of your relationship with mistakes we're going to start at the. least healthy relationship with mistakes. That is the stage one this willful ignorance willful ignorance. You've seen this done before you probably have done it at some point and perhaps he regretted it. But the idea here is that you just ignore the mistake. Whether that's a bug in code or some other mistake, some other faults. You are willfully choosing to ignore it. This isn't because you're not aware of it right It's possible that you're not aware of a lot of mistakes. which this kind of scale you can't really have a relationship with something that you're unaware of. So we kind of ignore that for the sake of this episode but. If you're willfully. Choosing. To avoid any kind of contact with the mistake in other words you're not investigating it. You're not. Trying to change it in any way. You're not trying to understand it in any way. You're just ignore you're going about it. You're going about your job, you're. Writing Your Code is if that bug doesn't doesn't exist at all. You might ship that bug into production knowing it's there. Now why is this important state to bring up? Because this is something that we do more often than we realize most likely we are choosing to. To. Prioritize one thing over another understanding that there's a mistake. That we're not rectifying. and. In some ways, this is actually functional. This is important to be able to do with the right kinds of mistakes but. The part that breaks down and what's unhealthy about this stage is the idea that we're choosing to kind of stick our head in the sand where willfully ignorant. It's a little bit different to be cognizant of the mistake to understand it and to be able to categorize it into a category that says, oh, this is a low priority mistake, right? But that's not what the stages the stage one is willfully ignorant. So you don't know what the priority is because you're choosing not to inspect any further. Now, you can be on the opposite end of the scale and we'll talk about the opposite end of the scale shortly, but you could be on the opposite end of the scale and still choose to ship known bugs into production because they're low priority Maybe you found work around or whatever the case is, but you're not being ignorant on that end of the scale right? We're GONNA. Talk about that in the scale but understand this will ignorance is the idea that somehow you expect the universe or heard some other force To manage the mistakes for you. What's strange is that sometimes that actually happens right sometimes, we ship a bug into production. And then we write code we rip out some Old Code Not even knowing that that co contain the bug that we shipped to production and that bug of course, because it's been replaced with new code and bug goes away so. This accidentally works right. Is Not by design, we're not dealing with our mistakes by design we're dealing with them haphazardly or by chance. Okay let's move on to stage number two. and. This is still not a very healthy stage but at the very least, we're not willfully ignorant. This stage is treating mistakes as anomalies treating mistakes as anomalies. The idea here is when a mistake occurs, we consider it to be. An exception. We considered to be out of the norm. And so we don't plan for mistakes. If we're in the states, right we ended up having to work extra overtime because we expect that we can work at, let's say eighty or ninety percent utilization of our time. and. We'll be fine because we don't make mistakes regularly, and so why would we build in time to deal with them? And this is where we find our problem. Right? Because anytime a mistake occurs not only do we immediately jump into kind of an urgent state. But we also don't plan ahead for them because if mistakes are anomalies than. At on average, we're not going to have them. On the average day, we shouldn't spend extra time preparing for those mistakes. Because, they don't happen often enough to prepare for them. Of course in that stressful state when we've made a mistake. And we're already at our limit. We're having to fix our mistake above our limit. This is a critically important thing for managers especially understand if you push your team to their limit. When it comes to a critical moment. Mike for Example if you ship a bad bug into production. But you're already at your limit your already pushing people to the point that they can't really give any more tired or they're. Mentally burned out. Then you're in a really bad scenario to deal with that mistake. And even though you're not willfully ignoring it. This is still a bad scenario to be in. This is still a bad relationship with mistakes. Because you're already at the limit, you're probably going to make another mistake. And you can see where this goes right as we continue to snowball our mistakes on top of each other rather than slowing down and having the head space to deal with them. Those mistakes continue to compound. Right so this leads to really bad kosher and of course, treating mistakes as anomalies. Makes People feel horrible. It makes people feel bad and not only bad. But also scared they're afraid to make mistakes and we know from plenty of research and we already kind of alluded to this at the beginning. That the opportunity to make mistakes is critical to success. It's critical to having an innovative in healthy team. in in this is something that has been shown in study after study, right this is not novel if we have people who are afraid because they think they're going to make a mistake and it's going to push everybody past their limit because mistakes are supposed to be anomalies. That's a really bad situation to be in both individually and does teams.

Mike
Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

Business Wars Daily

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

"If ever. There was a word that became a cliche overnight. It's the word unprecedented for a second allow me to stop bullying. Swamp when it comes to work life we're in unprecedented times there we have it. Millions of us are still working from home making managing projects and teams more challenging than ever before we can't just pop in Dave's cubicle and say, Hey, you finish that code yet. Even. Before the pandemic productivity in project management tools were on the rise because nineteen is caused some tools particularly those intended for teams to skyrocket. Soaring sales prompted at least one such business san-francisco-based Asana to file for an initial public offering. Asana is a work collaboration APP in a world filled with productivity tools designed to help overwork professionals hold chaos at bay. It was founded in two thousand eight by Justin Moskovitz, the much lesser known multi-billionaire co founder of facebook while at Facebook Moskovitz, and his co founder Justin Rosenstein were struck by how much time people spent doing what they call work about work. That's the mind numbing minutiae of organizing how things get done keeping track of work communicating about it an answering email about who's doing what when Asana claims that knowledge workers spend a full sixty percent of their time performing work about work rather than actually getting things done. It's an Rosenstein started. Asana. With the intention to fix that nagging problem by the way Rosensteins name sounds familiar. He's known as the guy who invented facebook's like button. Today is used by more than a million people worldwide at more than seventy five thousand companies. High profile customers include a t and t google and NASA according to Forbes Asana has been focused on growth. It took in one hundred and forty million dollars in sales last year up ninety percent over two thousand, eighteen from this February through April revenue shot even higher in its most recent fundraiser. The company was valued at one and a half billion dollars and yet. Asana is still losing money last year it lost one hundred and twenty million dollars. Those losses continue to mount as Asana plows money into growing sales. Still a little thing like earnings isn't holding it back from the stock market last week. Asana. Filed Paperwork with the SEC for an IPO in the New York Stock Exchange according to Forbes Moskovitz who has pledged to give his wealth away is taking the company. Public in order to reward employees. Asana, named for the yoga term is famous for the Mindful Corporate Culture Moskovitz is said to have built. If the CEO seems unfazed by Losses Moskovitz is also not letting competition hold him back from going Public Asana faces rivals wherever it turns there's the three billion dollar start up Monday dot COM two, billion dollar company notion and smart sheet recently valued at almost six billion dollars. Last week while the introverted Moskovitz was fending off interview requests about the IPO smart sheet was making news of its own the Bellevue Washington company made a one hundred, fifty, five, million dollar deal to acquire brand folder a Denver start up that manages digital assets in other words content like photos, videos, and graphics because a big part of producing content his guess what about work tackling content management is a way for smart sheet to grow. It's already large footprint. SMART sheets deal signals. What could be ahead for any work collaboration company that is they won't be satisfied with only helping US plan our way out of a paper bag like smart sheets, they could begin to acquire businesses that also store move and find all that content that no matter how hard some of his tribe gets lost anyway. As the culture continues to shift at lightning speed and we all continue to figure out how best to be productive from home. Our ways of working are almost certain to evolve work management. APPS. Like Asana will surely evolve within amidst all this uncertainty. One thing is certain. There will be a lot of money made by companies helping us all figure out how to get things done.

Justin Rosenstein Justin Moskovitz Facebook Facebook Moskovitz Co Founder Losses Moskovitz Forbes Moskovitz Google Dave United States SEC Forbes Nasa CEO New York Denver Bellevue Washington
The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

Business Wars Daily

04:22 min | 2 weeks ago

The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

"Perhaps, you've spent the summer exercising outdoors, and now you're starting to wonder whether you'll be able to keep that up when winter hits after all even though gyms may have reopened where you are many of us are skittish about exercising indoors with a lot of other sweaty hard breathing people a set of weights for home gym or garage or basement more likely seems like a great solution. Yeah. How often do you have a great idea only to realize everybody else's having the same great idea that's what's happening here folks since the early days of the pandemic stationary bikes, treadmills and streaming workouts have been hot commodities demand for one item in particular has driven scarcity dumbbells just try and buy a set the goods a newsletter published by Vox, says, we're in the midst of the great American dumbbell shortage. All right. So it's not like we're talking about a shortage of life saving drugs but if staying fit means not just health but sanity to to you, a dumbbell shortage could be a very serious thing. We feel your pain. Here's what happened according to the fitness fanatics experts at box think way back in your memory on March fourteenth the president declared the pandemic, a national emergency that was A. Friday the very next day ushered in the weekend that America changed. Colleen. Logan. Of icon health and fitness told Box Logan is vice president of marketing for the company which owns nordictrack other fitness brands that weekend they started seeing what she called crazy crazy sales every day in March sales doubled compared to March twenty nineteen. They quadrupled in April and were up six hundred percent higher in May Logan said. Rival bowflex was also inundated like Nordic track. bowflex sells weights along with bigger, more expensive equipment like bikes and treadmills less well known businesses that specialize in strength training are also struggling to meet demand. Visit S PRI site and you'll see sold out labels on Dumbbell after Dumbbell try to buy kettle bell iron balls with handles, and in many cases retailer rogue fitness won't even give you a ship date instead up POPs vague. Notify me button. The level of demand is unheard of as inside Hook writer Tanner Garrity noted people don't even buy this many dumbbells in the middle of winter when they're cooped up and drafting fitness resolutions. The result of these shortages predictable prices are high according to vox a pair of fifteen pound rogue dumbbells that usually costs forty dollars is currently listed on Ebay for one hundred, sixty, nine dollars. The shortages point to a much bigger issue in the American economy before the pandemic, the vast majority of Kettlebells dumbbells and other free weights were made guess where China? That's right China closed factories and highways from January to April when the sudden unexpected surge of interest occurred here. America's existing supply of weights went fast due to closures in China. Well, no new ones could be made much less ship to America. Now, Chinese factories are open again, but they can't keep up with the outsized desire a few companies including. Rogue. Have turned to small American iron foundries to make them here. But few of those foundries are interested in making consumer products like kettlebells. It's expensive and difficult for them to gear up and they fear retailers will give the business right back to China. Once the global economy is fully open again in the meantime experts say the boom and at home. Workouts is no flash in the PAN ninety percent of Americans who work out say they'll continue exercising at home according to a survey by Wakefield research for some those at home workouts will continue to replace the gym. Others will simply add Jim visits to their routine. Regardless that means booming sales and continuing supply chain headaches for Nordic track bowflex and the light. For the lowly exerciser waiting and waiting for that adjustable weights set to arrive it can also mean getting creative. What else can you pump besides iron weights? Well you could try the technique. One robust dad showed off a photo featured by vox lying on the floor. He's balancing his two little girls on a piece of plywood and he's holding over his body. Just, be very careful with those willing little subjects. Okay.

Box Logan China America VOX Bowflex Ebay Vice President Of Marketing President Trump Colleen Nordic Tanner Garrity Writer JIM Wakefield Research
Measuring & Managing Community Orgs, Developer Relations and Beyond

a16z

03:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Measuring & Managing Community Orgs, Developer Relations and Beyond

"Okay so wide Deverell. Going to be quite controversial here. Don't do it's. We are engineers that talk to other engineers and convinced them and help them to do stuff. Right. So if you're a star up, you need to choose between someone who developer relations and an engineer that is a hard trait, right? That is not easy and you only need to do it if you have to. So if you don't have to if this is a nice to have. Yes. And, we'll have a set of P is or maybe developers will help us then I really strongly recommend not doing any develop relations, develop relations expensive. It creates a lot of maintenance. It's a one way door. It's a decision that you can go back from. So if you open an API and then close it, developers will never ever trust you again. So remember it is a hard decision but. It's very empowering if it really drives your business so I would stipulate that more than ninety percents of startups do not require developer relations. It is required when you are building a platform when developers actually are the creators of the value of your up when they're your users at slack, we started without a develop relations and then we started building and develop relations, and the key here is that. We found out that the platform is the number one NPS net promoter score for using slack people were always super happy about the integrations when we asked him, what is the most important thing? They said they integrations when it wasn't number one, it was in the top three all the time. So the developers were driving a lot of value to our core audience which are paying customers. So how'd You have advocate C., which is the one too many. These are the people like me who speak on stages and say praise the Lord here's our API or here's our token in your case, and here's the use case, and here's the value. These are people who create scalable content they create the articles and all these other things that are super important to inspire developers. Then you have partnership engineering, that's the people who work with one. To one relationship, these are the people that you send to the top clients, the top developers and the first year I actually invested most of my money in partnership engineering I vetted most of my time in people who know how to do these type of relationship with top developers. Then you have enterprise architects. This is if you're doing an enterprise use case, these are people who go and do post sales support and make the usage wider. And then concentrator super important. These are people who write the docs for your developers. It is super critical to right the right docks I measured that's team by meantime to hello world. How fast is it for developer landing on the developers sites to reach success? Right. So that's I think the most important part of that team's job. The also are the voice of the developers develop relations. This is what you do. You Inspire developers you tell them what you've built and why this is important for them. So now they are inspired, then

Developer Engineer
Midnight Moment 5 - Social Media - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

06:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Midnight Moment 5 - Social Media - burst 1

"Greetings citations my fellow patriots. Welcome to the moment host by meetings. Something that is that notorious have been around for a very long time social media. It's no longer really social. We actually sat and looked at everything objectively of course what does it really become nothing more than ads base Mr and Mrs you who bragging about how good their is even though the snow that it's not a political sounding board for ninety percent of the world to bent their frustrations, their angst, their disdain for whichever party platform, they choose not to mention the actual ability for people to speak to each other. Now relies more on a personal device. Versus actually using your voice that said what the Hell's going to happen when y'all break both your hands can't use. Thumbs y'all going be Butte can't talk to anybody the art of speaking is obviously a dead form of communication. Everybody's got to be on their phone tablet computer email whatever you wanna call it or thumbs are what they used to speak with rather disappointing. Actually those of us in the generation X. Whatever you WANNA call still know how to write cursive still know how to pick up the phone. And call somebody still can write a letter. It's ship it off in the US. PS they're not against different story. The point that I'm really trying to get to is social media has no longer become been a social thing. It's one thing or another. It's nothing more than just a giant bent platform for everybody out there. God knows if you've got to sell something, put it up there online you can't reach people on television because quite frankly people are tired of watching three minutes of programming and fifteen minutes of. Sorry. Now. I can remember way back when watch program you got eight and a half minutes program three commercials that was it, and then back to your program, they filled up with entire thirty minutes spot with the program. But Hey, last time I tried to watch anything on television and had been neutered and chop down to the point that I felt like I was watching a spam program of nothing but ads By this, go get this. You need this you're a loser you don't own twelve of these. nope not happening folks. We've got another segment coming up right after this brief break. Stay tuned. Midnight Patriot nations spartan here with a shameless plug for our new gear shop shop. Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com. T shirts, hats, hoodies, mugs, phone cases just about everything else in between we got you covered whether you're looking to embrace your insomnia, show your patriotism or make a liberal head explode. Really, Shop Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com for a limited time. You can save fifteen percent on your order starting now. and. Now back to the show. So where we dive further and further into the rabbit hole, we would understand that social media is not social in. So much of the actual definition of social you want to keep up with friends see what they post on facebook want to find. Love and all the wrong places plenty of hidden acquitted places to go there too. It's disheartening to be for somebody that grew up. Knowing how to write a letter to express feeling in a written word versus here let me throw this in an email and hope that you understand it. Sorry. His plane as a text on the screen. But it has no heart it has no feeling has no. Guts real rather. Harder related is now saying that you know we need to go back to stone tablets and you'll sign A. Bloody fingerprint but it's nice to actually be able to read something that was written by someone who took the time to lay out a nice. He's paper, grab a pen and actually right not. Doctors Chicken scratch. Let me throw this on here and making notation. Well, there you go. Doesn't work folks honestly I'd rather go back to media has manipulated and destroyed the ability for people to social. Unfortunately. As we've seen as of late. The politics involved across every social media platform is enough to make anybody puke. It's not a this is what we're doing to try and better the country were trying to implement this. We're looking to get this. We're going to abolish this. It's now this is my opponent and they're ugly and if I tell it to you enough times, you'll believe it to sorry guys but. Not going to be manipulated like that truly, and unfortunately, social media has now become a narcissist tool remedy relation as much as I am. Having to research topics for our broadcasts and our mid, I've always and saw and so forth individual conversations accordingly it's disgusting that every time you turn around, it's one thing or another being degraded demoralized dehumanized smeared from one side of the other. It's depressing truly what all that said I, leave it up to you folks to research find out for your own stuff. See what goes on. We think I'm blind. Love me no. I'm always available for discussion whether it be through some form of social. Media. Funny I say that or when the time is, right we'll open up all lines and have you give us a call and we'll talk then until that point in time this is phoenix signing off everybody. Joy Your evening. Thanks for joining us for another edition midnight moment. Be sure to join us for the main podcast every Monday night and every Thursday night for more midnight moments. If you like what you hear poor. What we do about subscribing. Go to listen dot midnight. Patriots Dot Com. Support and subscribe. Be Pick up some merchant or gear store shop that midnight Patriots Dot Com. From the Mile High Command Center ABLE TO PHRASES DOT COM studio. This is sport reminding you of the Constitution. Is Not just a suggestion

MRS United States Facebook Mile High Command Center
With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

"From, wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily on this Thursday August twenty seventh something strange happened over the last few months we started drinking milk again think it might have had anything to do with pandemic for the last several years. It's felt like the dairy industry been singing swan songs milk sales fell thirteen percent from twenty ten to twenty eighteen according to CNN I one dairy. Then another collapsed under the weight of competition from plant based drinks soy almond, coconut, banana, Oat flax all. Those plants were out to get poor daisy the cow the dairy industry was so freaked out that it launched a pilot lawsuits against makers of those plant based drinks trying to forbid them from using the very word milk. You can't squeeze milk out of another grain they said but for the moment, at least dairy farmers are experiencing a bit of relief with. So many of us eating more meals at home, we're guzzling the white stuff again, it's long been true that milk drinkers tend to drink milk. Not at restaurants. So lockdowns have in fact, helped the dairy business cow's milk sales rose about twelve percent over last year for the twenty weeks ending. July eighteenth CNN reported your kid and mind mindlessly grabbing a swig from the carton added up to four and a half billion dollars in sales this spring, and that has spurred the dairy industry to revive an iconic ad campaign. Remember got milk. Vast company called it one of the most famous ad campaigns in history that campaign was launched in Nineteen ninety-three, its message, whatever you do don't run out of milk over time three hundred celebrities including Britney Spears Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton, and the simpsons all appeared sporting those milk mustaches. The ads became enormously popular by the end of the campaigns run in two thousand, fourteen, ninety percent of all adults were familiar with got milk to Huffington Post Contributor Gene Delvecchio but there was one a little problem. The ads didn't actually work over that same time milk sales declined steadily soda consumption bubbled over guess what those Soda Lovers used to drink you got it delvecchio a former AD industry executive argues the got milk ads were like bringing peace shooters to a gunfight, the gunfight being Pepsi and Coke Monster Marketing Budgets while the to soda makers battled each other milk lost but the dairy industry apparently believes their campaign was effective embracing Estonia the industry's marketing arm milk. PAP has revived the got milk campaign today's ads bear little resemblance to the Owens though. Sure there's still some celebrities Olympic gold medal swimmer Katie decades, viral tiktok video showing her perfectly balanced a glass of milk on her head while swimming a lap. That's certainly a turned heads but the bulk of today's campaign features, regular folks and a ton of user generated content milk drinkers were urged to do silly things with milk and boy did they respond people open gallons of milk with their toes jumped into kiddie pools filled with milk and cereal according to the trade paper? Agra. News will this generation's got milk ads do anything to keep the cow's milk train going if the wildly popular ad campaign of your didn't work well. Be Hard pressed to say that this one is a better peashooter. The dairy industry itself is making predictions. They say they're simply celebrating the quarantine induced sales boost. What is true however is that the competition from those plant based rivals is only getting. Over the same twenty weeks that saw a twelve percent rise in dairy milk sales oat milk sales went through the roof up two, hundred, fifty percent. Of course, oat milk sales are still tiny compared to cow's milk. They totalled only one, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars, but other signs point to the continued aggressive challenge from those gentle plant based alternatives. Oatley the. Leading oat milk maker recently attracted two hundred million dollars in investment funding from blackstone and Oprah it hopes to go public next year according to Forbes, and on Monday good Karma, a maker of flax milk bought itself back from bankrupt dean. Foods investors are Thurston lapping up all of these cream alternatives and no matter how beloved the Got Milk Gad's once were. All this competition puts a whole lot of pressure on twenty twenties version of the same campaign.

CNN Katie Decades David Brown Thurston Gene Delvecchio Gold Medal Huffington Post Britney Spears Agra PAP Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton Executive Blackstone Estonia Oprah Forbes Owens Pepsi
Hope for Herpes Cure

The Naked Scientists

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Hope for Herpes Cure

"Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away. And this works does it you can actually demonstrate that serve you chop up the virus then canola comeback yeah, exactly. So the study that we did was in mice mice get this sleeping form of the herpes just like we do and then we can go in and we use a a something. We call a vector, a different virus that carries these scissors to those same neurons and when it does that it starts cutting up the virus and then we can measure after. Our therapy how much of that sleeping form is actually left in the mice treated and what we saw as we eliminated well over ninety percent of that virus, and if we could translate that into human beings is likely to prevent lesions in Alzheimer's disease transmission to other people and all the things that we actually worry about how did you get the virus that was the Trojan horse that carried in the molecular scissors? How did you get that into the nerve cells in these animals? Well. That was a really important part of our study is understanding the best way to get the scissors where they need to be. We used another virus added. Associated Virus. Almost, all have it never causes any disease. We basically changed that to carry these scissors for us just injected into the bloodstream, and once it's in the blood, it actually goes in and actually find those nerve cells and introduces the scissors. It sounds like the woman who swallowed a fly and then swallowed spider to eat the flying, and we all know how that story ends because you're basically giving someone a virus to treat viruses this safe. This particular virus specter that was used called ADN. Associated Virus is probably the leading factor that's being used for many many types of gene therapy now, and there's several approved products out there in the EU and the United States that use adn associated virus or av to deliver different types of gene therapy, and so we're taking something that's quite proven to be safe modifying it slightly for our needs and then using it to try to cure an infection where we've simply not had any hope for cure in the past. You've been looking at herpes simplex virus. This causes cold sores and it also causes genital disease. But this is one member of a big family viruses that'll will work in a similar sort of way things like visa, the Vars, chickenpox and shingles in people unlucky enough to have that. Do you think you could prevent a person from succumbing to shingles by the same technique? The shingles virus actually goes into very similar nerve cells and acts a lot like herpes simplex, and so we can actually think about using the same therapy for that viruses. Well, we're also very actively looking at viruses that are similar but not herpes viruses in particular hepatitis B., and we have some really exciting results there where we can do very similar things. We're likely to see success there and maybe another viruses as well.

Herpes Genital Disease United States Brian Infections Keith Jerem Alzheimer's Disease EU Vars
Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

Moving2Live

05:20 min | Last month

Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live podcast. As you heard in the Intro, we are a podcast where we try to break down knowledge silos our ethos along with our sister podcast lab Pittsburgh is to spread the word that movement should be treated as a lifestyle not just in activity. Some of our best guests often come from recommendations or introductions from other guests and a big. Thank you to fred go PT Helper who connected me with today's guest. Fred was the sponsor or cosponsor with P T helper of a virtual clinic that was held with a company called urban polling. When I saw urban polling, I'm like I'm not exactly sure what that is. I looked it up I found out and I was fortunate enough the defender of the company Manish Shantanu who is a gerontologist occupational therapist. Was Willing to speak to me. So Mandy, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to live. Oh. Thank you so much for having me. Ben In I. Agree Sometimes, the name is a bit misleading in terms of. Away represents I know my first question I always liked to start out with with moving to live is what your elevator spiel and you get on the elevator someplace in your either carrying an urban pulling tote bag. You have an urban pulling sure people say, what do you do? Who Are you? What do you tell them? On okay, in two minutes well. Generally I'll say to them is that. Bourbon polling is based on Nordic walking which is. Security that. Is Very popular over in Scandinavia. Have the healthiest people into world. And basically, your upper body is doing something that looks like cross country skiing at your body you're just walking in urban settings so Sidewalks. Roads. Parks trails. For Friday other different ways. But that's usually my elevator pitch on the on the topic. and. I know we'll get into that more detail in the second half of the interview. Out of curiosity, just for the listeners, how does this differ from maybe somebody who's a hiker or a trail runner who uses polls on rough terrain? Oh, we're great question Whitmer gave asked that a lot. Well, basically onion I'm a big hiker myself and the different is died. It's one as the design of the poll and second round it's the technique. So when you're hiking usually you're you know you're elbows are banned in, you're using it to offload the weight off your hip Sidney used to give it more stability. Whereas this activity, your arms are straight more like cross country skiing not sure every volunteer this user familiar across cross scene, and it's about changing your walking into brisk walking or an athletic walk. You're using the pool and has got allege. That's designed. Did you press down that legislative move your arm back and you get insert you work like seventy five to ninety percent of your muscles. So it's all about getting like a high intensity cardio and including resistance training there as well. So just say different benefits, different pools and in different technique. So. It's almost like it's the exact opposite when the trail runners using the hikers are using it as you said, to offload the body or to offload the worker, decrease the work. In the case of polling, you're trying to increase the workload or make it more of a workout that is an accurate representation. Yeah. Absolutely. That's a great description however just to. Add to the confusion we. Developed in in different ways, what we did was we took the generic activity ignored walking and we looked at I'm as as an occupational therapist I I look at the research and then I was like Haney, how could we doubt this so that we can actually use this fitness activity for habilitation that case it's more like hiking. You Know Allen Allenstein posture offloading like hearing candidates since it's the best practices to use it for pre and post beneath surgery for those exact reasons. So on the one hand. You do all those use it for that reason for Rehab but on the other hand it, you wanted to use it for losing weight or you know increasing your intensity exercises. So for example. Here in Canada people with diabetes people recovering from cardiac heart surgery, a people who are beasts will action use the urban pollinger fitness technique whereas Parkinson's stroke pre abusive new surgery on you. Other neurological conditions they will actually use our activator which provides more balance instability and

Fred Mandy BEN Pittsburgh Manish Shantanu Allen Allenstein Haney Whitmer Scandinavia Sidney Canada Parkinson
Indigenous Artist to Artist,  Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

All My Relations Podcast

04:07 min | Last month

Indigenous Artist to Artist, Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

"Pam is a talented Laguna Pueblo and Apache Metal Smith who likes to push boundaries and expand the definition of what is considered native art. He came to fine art jewelry through the world of body piercing and learning to make his own jewelry there, and he now uses materials like titanium and complex. Processes to produce creative modern jewellery that reflects his cultural roots right now, he's working on these incredible titanium feather earrings that are colored brightly using some fancy submission process or something but they look like something a futuristic native warrior woman would wear and I absolutely love them. So he starts by telling us how Cova has deeply impacted the Indian art community. Everything started happening in the march timeframe right. So we had the heard show that those of us that were able to to participate in that we had that, but you could sense something was coming right I mean the attendance wasn't as high. And Man shortly after that is when the ish just hit the fan right like states are down like for for those of us here into Pablo's like the Pueblos shutdown really early I mean fast. Yeah. Just like straight up no visitors and then and then you really started hearing The reaction by organizations, riots swire. Then put out the notice that like we're going to postpone Indian market. There are number of other shows that I do outside of the native art market. Those shows are being canceled. A potentially had a museum opening like a Solo Exhibition slated for this year from the heard museum that gets postponed. So like all this obvious postponement like really happen rapidly right at the very beginning which I will say I'm very grateful that happened. Then because you can now plan right we're no longer we're not reacting to what's happening and I think that's what's really made. A transition in a sense a little more thoughtful and a little more purposeful because essentially I think all of us in the native art field we were I would argue to say we were one hundred percent or one hundred, very high percentage, right like eighty to ninety percent reliant on shows for revenue generation, and as you go into March and April and realize your entire year. Is Gone like there's zero opportunity i. think everybody really just dug deep and really started to think okay. How am I going to get through this? You know especially for those of us who are fulltime artists I, mean I've been full time for over twenty years. It's It's. So. So I think I think with any with any culture. That's. been resilient for centuries right. You're native population is really taken taking the bull by the horns in developing either innovative ways to to change their revenue dynamic oranges using what they already how which is. I think the case for most of us through social media these days right I mean being able to push out to get the word out to say, Hey, look, this is what I have available and I think more importantly there has been a lot of. Empathy in the sense that people within within the native art community and I think even a much broader sense those that collect art or are fans of makers that realize it's like if something is coming out right now the only way to acquire it as online. Right, there's no shows. So so I think you're seeing the dynamic by dynamic change a little bit more.

PAM Laguna Pueblo Apache Metal Smith Cova Pablo
Algae Oil for Cooking?

Diet Science

05:17 min | Last month

Algae Oil for Cooking?

"McCaffrey. So D-, what's the topic for this week? The topic for this week is. Culinary algae oil what is it and is it a good oil to cook with? Wow that's a new one. Now G oil. Yeah. I actually. This was somewhat new to me as well. I heard about it from a client as I often hear about new things. end. So piqued my interest because of course, I know about algae oil supplements for like a basically a plant source of the omega three fatty acids that we typically find in fish oil. And these are very important types of fatty acids for our brain and our overall health, and so I was thinking, okay. I know about that type of algae oil. But how do you? How could you have an algae oil that you could cook with because you would never want to cook with algae oil that has these very fragile Omega three fats in it because they would just burn up and turn around. Yeah. So I had to really kind of look around and and see what this algae culinary is all about. So there's a company called thrive and that's the name of the brand of the oil. It's called thrive algae culinary oil. And it's owned by a company in in the Netherlands. And so it they don't get their algae from the ocean like like the companies that make algae oil supplements do that type of algae is like marine phytoplankton type of algae, very high in Omega three fatty acids. This algae oil actually comes from an algae that grows on the bark of a chestnut tree in Germany one that's where they originally got their algae from. Now, they make it in these big. like. Steel that's very similar to making your. Yes and in fact, I believe I read somewhere that the company actually is housed in an old PABST blue ribbon factory, and they actually used the same fermenting bats. so they take this algae from a chestnut tree in Germany that's the original source of it. But now what they do is they can grow it now in there that and so they have sort of like a sustainable replenishable supply of this algae. So and they ferment it in the VATS and so during the fermentation process. What happens is they kind of feed a little bit of sugar in to get that fermentation started, and then the fermentation process turns the carbohydrate portion of this. Into oils and so then once they have their final fermented product that is rich in oils that press the oil out of the algae. And this oil is different from. Well, it's different from any other kind of algae. And and it is somewhat bioengineered which which I read is that they do they do add certain things together to make it so that it has a high percentage of mono unsaturated fats in which is the type of fat that's an olive oil and avocado oil. Only this algae oil has a much higher percentage of monounsaturated fats than any other plant oil. It's got like ninety percent of it is monounsaturated versus olive oil which has about seventy six percent monounsaturated so. Is this for would you treat it like olive oil when you cook or you treat it like something that can take a little higher heat? Well, the this one claims that it's great for high heat cooking because it has a smoking point of four, hundred, eighty, five degrees, which is really high and you know olive oils doesn't go that high come and so you know. So basically they have they've they've done this they said they've they've crossed bread. And otherwise. Genetically. Modified. Aspects of this algae to give it a high monounsaturated fat content. And then they you know. So they end up with an oil that has this high amount of monounsaturated. Therefore, it has a high amount of and has a high smoke point and one of the reasons. That you know they they talked about this smoke point in an oil comes from something called free fatty acids within the oil, which most of the fats in our diet, and especially even in our oils are in the form of what we call it triglycerides, which is basically three fatty acids attached to a glycerine molecule, and that's called a triglycerides and that's how most of our fouts exist in our foods a free fatty acid. Attached to a glacier all it's just kind of floating around in there and when you have free fatty acids in your oil as you're cooking it, those fatty acids start evaporating before the other oil components as it heats up and then that's what creates like these little soot particles and then eventually smoke. So

Germany Mccaffrey. Netherlands Fouts
The Impact of Voice Tech on Human Communication

The Voice Tech Podcast

07:11 min | Last month

The Impact of Voice Tech on Human Communication

"What do you think about? Do you have an opinion on the use of human voices with these devices and things like that. In general when you hear a device, should you know it's a device talking to you? Should it be differentiated from human voice are in your mind is the ideal for it to be indistinguishable from human I. think There's two elements I mean there's the the naturalness of the humanist of the voice, and then as knowing it wasn't a human who actually made the. Response. So I think having a human voice is beneficial and I understand the studies have shown that people respond better to human voices that more motive etcetera but I think people should know that they're not talking to a human. They're always talking to something that was designed by human. It still contains human bias. You know these questions not came from somewhere but I don't think people like to be tracked and at this stage in this kind of early stages talented. Build the trust in the TAC. I agree with that and there's no way when you're looking at that device on your countertop that you're like, oh my gosh, I thought there was a person in there there isn't like. To me, I think it's a very interesting question about. Because you can see that like Amazon gave their device a human name Alexa. Supposed to hearken back to the. It's got the hard x so it's easy for it to pick it up and it hearkens back to the library at Alexandria as I understand learn. A. personification and and what's interesting to You got like RTD to see three Po. Those characters would have a different feel to them if they were named Fred and George. Right because. I wonder about the act of naming something and embodying giving. An actual human voice I wonder and again, this is probably one of those things that I'll probably be revealed to be quite provincial. If that is not going to long-term corrosive to the notion of human rights in general. There's anybody thinks so yeah, just. Send a movement against the name Alexa in itself. There's obviously a movement against all these voices having female sounding voices, and now that people are generating these non binary voices. To give it the kind of sound of a robot, but still with those human element so it still sounds personable, but it doesn't necessarily sound like it's emulating. or account to the find real life someone childlike was submissive or any of these characteristics that you might not want to replicate in a robot. Right? You know when Alexa starts to say something and she ramble on something I just tell her to stop just like tell her shut up basically right do you think that affects human interactions more inclined to cut other people off if that just becomes the norm or do you not think that's really an issue. I reckon does to some extent especially, if you have kids who learned from an early age that cater to to have those kind of conversations, the more practice you get with these kinds of woods, the more likely you're going to let them slip into normal conversation with real humans. It does kind of reminded me a little bit of the Duval. Video Games caused people to be violent kind of question that we've been going. Around on and I tend to err on the side of no for that, you can tell the difference between fake onscreen violence and what real violence actually looks like. But when it comes to compensation given, our aim is to make these conversations as life as possible. I'm not sure whether the boundary there is as visible as is noticeable I would be hesitant and if I had kids and they were being extra retail voice assistant. Cut Out. Yeah. You know and it's interesting because we've had to claw early as a species to get to hiding this notion. Of Human Rights this that there are things you do not do to another person no matter what. Entertainment doesn't matter who they are, how bad they are, whatever you just don't do it because being a human nobles view and you wonder what happens if someday you build a device that looks basically ninety percent like a human and talks ninety percent like human and all the rest, and then one day when it's not working and you just throw it in the trash heap, and by Newin, is that corrosive to this very fragile thing we've made that there's something uniquely special about being human, right? You know. I was GONNA. Say I weighed by before she is read the heart of the machine is wonderful book talks about a motive machines, emotional machines, and after reading that book it was it was a good summary of all the different affective computing technologies that are out there at the moment and paint some examples of how they could be used and it did make me think at the end that if you do create these machines are more personable, more natural to interact with the number of fantastic use cases that you can. Use Machines fall well, really open up but at the same time, maybe make appreciate each other as humans because they won't be exact human they'll be nearly human and maybe it's in our interest to make them nearly human but not exactly human. You don't want to cross that threshold and I thought it might be similar to US discovering extraterrestrial life another planet that suddenly win alone sending we've got this other forced to contend with and we appreciate each other a little bit more because maybe that's naive you but that's why. Well I shouldn't familiar with wise and bomb and Eliza. Like the setup for this story is in the sixties, there was just fella named Weisbaum at early computer science guy and he made a chat Bot called Elisa and is a very simple chat bot because the computing power they had and you would say to allies on your touch about it. You would say I'm having a bad day in the program and say, why are you having a bad day and use having a bad day because of my mom is your mom making you had a bad day. And so on and Weissenbach bomb. Everybody knew it was a program but why isn't bomb saw? People pouring their heart out to it. And it disturbed him so much that he unplugged it and raced it said no because he said when Elisa says I understand. It's a lie because there's no. And there's nothing that understands anything and. oftentimes, the answers that they put in these systems. Where the devices purport to have preferences or things they like or don't like. I find it creepy and again, maybe that's just my I'm kind of Weissenbach. Of person there. There was this twilight zone episode back in the sixties where. Sky Stranded on some penal planet all by himself in solitary and they bring him a robot to keep him company, and then he gets a pardon because he turns out he didn't do it and they send to spaceship to get him picking up and they only have enough wait for him. You can't take his robot with him and so he says I'm not going I'm staying until I don't know that it's a great time to have those conversations because all of these are still open questions. I hope the technology develops in a thoughtful way and. You know not just like, Hey, we can make sound exactly like a person and give it a person's name and have it purport to have feelings let's do it because people want that

Alexa Elisa Weissenbach Bomb Alexandria United States RTD Weissenbach Amazon Duval Newin Fred Eliza Weisbaum George
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:43 min | 11 months ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ninety percent of my guys of strain guys would be a guy one on one and I think that's what the thing is done with put him in a position where you know to maybe have a direct angle with if you can at apart and then say Hey we want to try to get you matched up one on one and we believe if we can do that we got a great opportunity and Ethan has taken advantage of because of his F. because of his attitude and his belief in that what a blocked punt can do is change the momentum of the game if and when he gets credit for the one he had it easy you he'll be number one in the country in that category we got back at basketball coming up tonight at seven against Alabama a and M. football team is on the road at U. S. F. this Saturday night at seven and you'll hear those games on newsradio seven hundred WLW reason and I C. B. T. S. one seven hundred WLW the home of the Bearcats traffic and weather news radio seven hundred W. L. Cincinnati school shooting in southern California with the twelve o'clock afford a bright combs breaking now police are at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita right now massive complex in northern LA Callie's being cleared after shooter entered one of the buildings there earlier this morning at this point there's word to three people have been hurt the latest now from ABC news a search continues for a suspect after a shooting at a California high school today it happened at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita in Los Angeles county authorities now say at least one person was shot and at least three others injured ABC's Alex stone on scene the copters are circling they don't know where they suspect there they've got another ambulance now coming out they got all the walk through all of the hills around here rounded by police they're looking for the suspect right now ABC's Alex stone schools in the district about an hour north west of Los Angeles remained on lockdown and student sheltering in place Los Angeles deputy Eric Ortiz a lock down we stand that results in responding now I can confirm how many people or how many victims we have down at this moment medic crews are on scene at that high school campus barricades have been set up police are also also asking parents and the public to remain clear of that area I'm Michelle Franzen ABC news latest traffic and weather together from the you see how traffic center you see health our clinical research and scientific discoveries allow us to offer new treatments for epilepsy patients learn more you see health dot com slash epilepsy highways are in pretty good shape right now I'm not seen any major problems or delays the heaviest as north bound seventy one heading towards Red Bank in the construction barrels crews are working with the wreck on.

seven hundred W Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on No Jumper

"Like it honestly it gives you a weird us head high though put me fucking making wanna take a nap that fucking tobacco smashing you in the face especially 'cause a lot of people uk were all like ninety percent tobacco in that shit came puts it yeah but they smoke it nonstop that's what i think is funny i'm always making fun of my uk fans 'cause i'm like you got swagger pod heads and you're smoking note there ain't no weeding this shit the way you guys had any log on the side i forget got simpson on one side and i got says come out and i got right there yeah it's a knife katie twentyone savage you know as a knife i see how i think he had it before me he wants his forehead amid the craziest shit with a four hit it might atari one out you don't you're not answers i got tat like chest tat's also shoulder i got one of my leg oh no no i gotta get some shit though you're going for the face shit neck neck and neck i see you window right here and i'll say a man she her whole face just all vegetables i make i make enough money you never know in my fuck around making big enough bag where's the money come from this man the music yeah i've never had a regular i really but i but i respect the grinding all that in hustle but i've never had worked being one of my life music is crazy indicating the national what about what about epic those who you're with before right a signed copy wreckers hours matters by rock nation that without those adult 'em you know those journey to do the industry like learning the business but now my first outliving girl which is pretty dope man i am ups and downs with like industry with to regulate i dunno it was cool it was a good experience with a good learning experience for you ultimately came away from it like mom among almost an independent i mean i'm back like slide independent i got a partnership do ideas on a table but but you know i'm just working like i'm not in a rush and then like i'm more of this building my company and right now my infrastructure mhm you know what i'm saying where you think the compare like being a rapper like a new rapper right now from what you could gather so like what it was like being a new dope rapper in two thousand eleven it it's it's a life changing word is the game is different is like yeah it's a lot more opportunities for like independent artists and that's what i'm saying like you know it's a lot more respect a lot more opportunity tony for you to go get it on your own then it is to like you know go with the big company and what if you go into a big company that's cool is it is it they gotta understand what you come away they gotta understand you gotta be willing to bill which you know they can't just expect you just make everything hot in asia you know what i'm saying they got at least be there be a which you know we're because now there's a lot it's a lot easier for you to get your stuff up on on of apple music and spotify to get paid like that shows without necessarily having a label and stuff like man sometimes i end up in conversations about what the music games like even like a few years ago and they're they're like we're talking about kodak the other day and they were like bro you didn't see any like street rapper come up without a co signed before kodak and it's just like this is like really smart people telling me this and i'm thinking about it like i wasn't thinking about the industry like that at that time 'cause i'm like because yeah you know what i'm saying what goes on in the but seventy where like chief cave yeah there's a lot of different people actually the over a.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Ninety percent ninety percent did not show up caress. Okay. Well, well, now it's almost like Trump had a point. Of course, people you give people summons you give people papers to say, okay. Come back and we'll process your claim. And of course, they wouldn't show back up with you. No. If you if you really had risked, what you risked to get into this country. And you knew that you could say, I'm gonna claim asylum, and they would say, okay, we'll go on your way. Go live in America, come back at a later date to face a judge, if you're already willing to take the risk that you've taken, why in the world. Would you put yourself in danger of being deported later, of course, you know, and for anyone that says, well, it's breaking the law? Okay. If you're going five mile an hour over the speed limit what happens more times than not nothing. Yeah. Because, you know you five is fine. But man, if all of a sudden you started getting pulled over for one two mile an hour over you'd like gosh, dang, are you kidding me? You're pulled me over for that, when you let the gopher so long. I mean they're kids had soccer game scheduled on those days. They were supposed to show. Okay. You got to be a good dad. You know, that's true. Not show up, of course. I mean you're going to get away with whatever you can get away with is the point. Yes. Yes. Well, sure but and, and the longer this is allowed to go on the more you're going to have people showing up the more death. You're going to have at the southern border, the more problems, you're going to have because the resources are overwhelmed right now and nobody seems to be wanting to do anything. But if you're a political party say, yes, but it's also the more voters we will have for the future bra. Then what are you gonna do? Absolutely freak enough. And yes, yes, of course, if I hear one more person say, that's not who we are to. I'm going to put my face in a fan. I don't know who we are. What does that mean? I don't even know what his open borders. It's not who we are. We're not. Really? That's not who we are. Okay. So what we have the stats. Right. This is from the last year and a half or so. Yeah. It's been over eighteen months. Since administration ask for the legislative fixes. It would have prevented the current crisis in forty days since we asked for the emergency funding necessary to manage it in the last forty days, sixty thousand children, have entered into custody unaccompanied as part of family in its last month, as you noted, Mr Chairman, win Kennard a modern record of one hundred forty four thousand border crossers. It record day of over five thousand eight hundred mortar trough things in a single twenty four hour period in the largest single group, ever apprehended, our border, one thousand thirty six individuals. Though, k congress. And once again, thank you for failure. That's great..

Trump Mr Chairman America Kennard forty days twenty four hour eighteen months Ninety percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

"It was like you've got a never seen. You get so uncomfortable. When I bring that up. You know, you don't understand it or this is a cultural thing or it's never going to happen or. Oh, well, when you propose one day, I will. Yeah. And there was always an excuse. Yes. And that's when you know, that's your greatest challenge is when you're confronted with it you start making excuses you start getting uncomfortable. And so when we asked you, you know, are you stuck what is your challenge? Guys think about that. And I have so many challenges, and I've had so many challenges that I've gone through the whole thing with my family and for you the whole thing with your knee. That's not the only challenge we face Thursday Lee challenges as well. But we're talking about that big pit of challenge that we've had to overcome and conquer. But you know, what I think is funny by it's it's kind of funny, but kind of sad to is that this is the time of year when everybody is starting. To think about New Year's resolutions. Right. Everyone's starting to think about like, what do I want to change about myself going into twenty nine nine I want to know why we're putting a time stamp on. What is it about December thirty first of every year when everyone decides to just say I'm turning over that new leaf now is the time to do it. And if you're if you're not if it's not that time, you're like, oh, I'll just hold it off. I'll just wait. You know, let's say it was July. And you're like, oh, well, you know, maybe this year. My news resolution will be to do this forget, the time stamp. Why can't it be today? Why can't it be? Now. Why can't you start preparing your mind and devising a plan to get out of that pit? You know, why not what is it about human human culture that we've created these resolutions? And then what happens babe when you said a New Year's resolution. Let's be real it. Feels ninety percent of the time. Yeah. And what what always was a failure. For me was January first January first January first that doesn't mean anything. That's just another date on the calendar, y'all. I think people think we're just gonna somehow. Motivated on January first it's like a new leaf automatically turnover. But the thing is we don't have motivation. Right. You do motivation. And that's the thing is like you're going to be in that pit as long as you are going to allow yourself to be there. Okay. You start to get to comfortable maybe for some of you guys out there. This was me for awhile. You know was committing to a real relationship being committed. Right. So I started getting so comfortable with this sort of lie that we were living in and I was comfortable with us. Just not having a title. I mean, we were we were dating we really loved each other. But I was I was comfortable not talking about the whole like well where we heading are. We gonna have kids down the line. I didn't even want to think about that. So I was like really comfortable in that. And I think we need to break that we need to stop doing that. Because it's ultimately going to create the sense of comfortableness. And when we're in that pit it's like, no, I'm comfortable. And then when you start let's say for a single girl, she starts dating. And she's like, oh, I don't I don't think that's for..

Lee ninety percent one day
"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

"Eighty to ninety percent of that joint. How does that sound to you year from now without surgery and without crazy medications, you could be thriving and running and regarding joint tissue back to its original condition, and it's phenomenal. As if you have more questions on this. I'm doing to workshops on this in my office this month because I know you're going to have some questions here. This is not for everybody either. So if even if you have remote questions, I encourage you to come okay, we're doing two of these. So we're gonna do one Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM. And then we're going to do one Tuesday afternoon, November thirteen. Eighteenth at six thirty PM. So we've got one over lunchtime on Saturday and one in the evenings on Tuesday night. Okay. So this should be able to encompass almost everybody and get somebody at some point. You should be able to fit into one of those two classes an hour long each. There is absolutely zero cost for this. Okay. We're going to cater this. We're going to do food for you. You will be fad. You will not be hungry. I'm a pretty exciting guy. I love what I do. I'm high energy. This is not boring. I will answer your questions, and what it is. Everybody's got questions about it. Because this is I knew subject, and it's exciting, and it's exhilarating and it works. So well that nobody you sometimes you just go no way, doc. But remember this is here for you. I got so call us up. Now, if you want to take it to either one of these events so that is six one five four four five seven seven zero one that is four four or five seven seven zero one. So that is a free ticket. Tell him I wanna free tickets, and then you can tell them you want Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM or do you want to stay November thirteen at six thirty pm. And we're going to call you back..

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The world wants to see us get along we are the two great nuclear power ninety percent of the nuclear not a good thing it's a bad thing and i think we hopefully can do something about that because it's not a positive force the negative forest so we'll be talking about that a moment but and with that the world awaits and i look forward to our personal discussion which i think's gonna meet our whole you have quite a few representatives we all have a lot of questions and hopefully will come up with answers great to be with you i bet you heard it president trump and russia's president vladimir putin sitting down for the first time here the they're just exchanging pleasantries at this point and talking through translators and talking to the media in then just moments here they're going to be whisked away we're told and the two world leaders with only their translators so each each of them will have their own translator shaking hands right now and they're getting ready for their one on one meeting that'll be behind closed doors no cameras no recording no transcriptions no nothing we conceivably won't get a readout their meetings together but you can rest assured that the reporters will be asking them about what happened behind those closed doors during dare live joint news briefing which is coming up this this morning at nine fifty am you will hear that live here on news ninety six point five wdbo the reporters are now being shoved out of the room they're being asked to leave and then they'll have their.

trump russia vladimir putin president ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Person the room for the ninety percent of them yeah my pup i'm amazed every everyone else who didn't raise their hand can't fucking i'm curious if you did not raise your hand can you raise your hand now right but you can still right everyone can it's a waste of time in the end if you think about it you end up having more time if you type quickly over the course of your life because you get through your typing a lot more quickly if you didn't take a class though are you can you definitely can definitely talk more quickly if you're taking a class all right teach me something from you'll typing class something i don't know about typing it's out that practice and repetition in on that i was on your website when i was fourteen but i'm sure i can still type faster than you can have a type off i will destroy you are we going to type before or after the office suck on which we have yet to you've heard me on them mechanical keyboard before you know i can tear it up well congratulations gus i'm over here trying to think of something that would be more boring than typing contest and i literally can't think of it five hundred episodes will still listening also i hate looking over and seeing you in that metal i don't know why feels like we just had a spelling bee or something math camp everything you do you took a class not everything have it's a normal thing to learn to type did you did you learn how to write how'd you do that learn learn language and stuff so i was told that so you've already passed the first day of typing class where the teacher the letter you're you're way ahead do you know the numbers too because that's a day to coming from the guy who doesn't wanna use twenty four hours because it's too hot to do max at twelve number i just want to use it because i'm american and this our way superior that's it country i was just talking about taking the trip over for london go into over london in london and we are talking about how it's handdrive but somebody who went from ireland to northern ireland and the only way they knew that they had changed countries they were expecting like a checkpoint or something like that but the only way they knew they hitching countries was they went from alama tres in ireland two miles and miles per hour in the uk so you guys just choose whatever you want basically you guys these miles per hour is in the uk i didn't know that either yeah i thought they would have been kilometers yeah it's a mess over that choose from so let's break brexit is not going to happen right it's definitely happening is it who's just resigned resigned because breakfasts political portion of the podcast theresa may's brexit outline was not hard enough she's aiming for a soft brexit and not a hard brexit so three ministers have resigned in protest over that how do you let your brexit brexit over easy i like.

twenty four hours ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Suicide rate with the state with the lowest rate what do you think nobly mass now massachusetts is low i i would say southern state with heavy black population so ninety percent of suicides in the us are going to white people right because you know it's a weird fighting the buzzer a big racial effect new jersey new york had lowest suicide rate the highest rates are out in you know western states not california so nevada while you'll be and so on what we think of that has to do with at least in part population density that new jersey is new york very densely populated as you go out west people are more spread out and so perhaps more socially isolated we also did not yet published so don't share this but i i don't think any wasn't says podcast noble data from new smartphone study where we look at people's calls and texts going in and out and we see that you know the less people are are getting sending texts the more likely they are thinking about suicides have more severe there seems to be something across multiple levels of this connectedness being protective against suicidal thinking this is there's a huge always this like very weird discomfort in talking about people who attempt suicides and some people really want to say it wasn't serious you know the whole cry for help thing but from what i read in the literature that you reviewed it seems as if suicide attempts you are pretty strong predictors of future suicide attempts there's obviously you never want to not take somebody's suicide attempt seriously i guess that's that's right right yeah so i would say you know anytime a person says they're suicidal should take it seriously any type person makes it suicide attempt you should think seriously but we don't have a good understanding when someone says there are suicidal which of those people are going to die by suicide and which ones aren't when sewing makes the suicide attempts which of those is going to be lethal which one isn't twothirds of people who die by suicide told someone added time they were thinking about suicide so you take it seriously eighty percent of people who die by suicide explicitly denied suicidal intention in their last communication before time which is contra rights most telling others they're going to kill themselves but most people are also saying i'm not gonna come itself it's hard to know which cases were in which instance should be really concerned and in which instance might be still concerned but less oh and the same suicide attempts so we didn't know a lot of the biggest effects that are out there like for for gender for age for race they've been there for years and years and we just don't have been standing of of wider there so you don't there's no good hypothesis for why the rates are much lower among black people their hypotheses are they good as african is among african american right it's not even among like i don't know what the rates are in africa but is it's african americans in the us a much lower suicide rate and i thought sees people tend to to offer our will his greater social connectedness grabby more tied into community and so so perceive more social support the suicide rate is high as among white men it really skyrockets older white men and the idea you mentioned tamla earlier isolation than i bought this is older white men and not be as naked and they retire from their jobs and you know they lost their social network another on their own longer providing and so you know perceive that they have no leading in life their verdict to others and so are more likely to die suicide do you work in terms of suicidal suicide prevention with individual people i know if are you still in clinical psychology are you working with patients i'm a licensed clinical psychologist so i i have the ability to see patients i haven't seen patient from purely clinical purposes in over ten years about a lot of the work that we do is in hospitals and with patient so we have studies running in local emergency rooms in psychiatric inpatient units where we are trying to the one way.

massachusetts eighty percent ninety percent ten years
"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

AM 590 The Answer

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

"And ninety percent i agree with you but when i read zachariah fourteen versus sixteen and on we not talk about the holidays that jesus cats and pull kept after jesus why is it that you don't why i don't believe in keeping the jewish state's yes yes because you know jesus kept it is kept the sabbath you just kept the holidays and poor kept it and roll artless let me just run out of time i want to try and give you some answer just because jesus did something does not mean it's a law for all christians jesus was also very jesus was also circumcised and there's nothing wrong if someone wants to be but the bible's pretty clear that it's not required for a christian to be circumcised paul you read pulses circumcision is nothing uncircumcised is nothing keeping the commandments is what matters so we believe that the ceremonial laws they were nailed to the cross and you read about that in colossians chapter to the bible tells us in second corinthians crisis are passover which is offered for us and so to keep the old testament feasts the whole different category than the ten commandments and i you know if someone wants to their fine but they shouldn't mandated for others they all pointed to jesus jesus came by bracing jesus it's much more than the feast we don't sacrifice lambs anymore all friends we're out of time if we didn't get your question tonight i apologize give us another chance god willing we're going to be back again next week.

paul zachariah ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Groman hanke wits and roman i apologize if that's not how you pronounce your last name there's a bunch of seasons ease and they are so i think it's a great guest romans awesome and we go in there to do the color grade at harbor i don't know how many days we had a pretty tight schedule again there's a lot in this movie and there's sort of like the the first feature template for how many days you have in the in the sound mix and the color and i was always fighting for more time because it's not again you have always different looks and you have always seen there's one hundred scenes in the movie and there's action and there's high speed in slow motion in multi format i should mention in addition to sony f fifty five which is ninety percent of the movie there is phantom flex four k and then a lot of the social media stuff or the mix tape stuff was either shot on an iphone with the film acc pro app or my samsung note for i think it was at the time and some cannon consumer camcorder and just webcam stuff in the film there's panasonic h vx mix tape footage in there there's a whole lot of different formats in their takes more time in the grade not to mention visual facts take more time in the grade too because you're being given elements that are right there's a look up table for what you shot in the movie and in that has to be applied in match on what you're being given from the visual effects plates that go on top of the screen because of one if the if the surrounding world isn't one color space and then the cell phone screen isn't another color space now you're having issues and there's a matt around it to make sure that works the law in the film to deal with and we were definitely rushing through the color great but the the best part about the color great is the sort of creative side and this was finally in our our opportunity to say not only to be shoot all the basketball with panavision primo primes and all the off the court stuff with much less precise panavision ultra speeds but we want to grade these things differently and then we want to transition between this two looks so we.

basketball samsung panavision ninety percent four k
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Whatever that is in maybe you're addicted to food then you know that it's not always about hunger it's about this feeling and it becomes more mental than physical right like where you like i just don't feel like i can rest or that i'm going to be happy until i get my drug whatever that is so if you think about an addiction or craving in terms of an addiction and what we know about the brain is that it has neuro transmitters did you know though that fifty percent of your body's dopamine and you know it dopamine is it's that feeling that high that so many of us can become addicted to well okay now get this you know that dopamine and serotonin produced naturally in your body they should be produced naturally in your body they are responsible for regulating a lot of things like mood and happiness right like if you get too much dopamine or not enough dopamine you're going to experience mood swings the same is true of serotonin and most people think of these things happening in the brain but did you know that more than fifty percent of your body's dopamine is actually produced in your gut and ninety yeah ninety percent of your body's serotonin is produced in your gut and both dopamine and serotonin are known to have a direct correlation on regulating behaviors specifically behaviors that make us happy or behaviors that sued an addiction behaviors like eating in other words dopamine and serotonin when out of balance can create intense cravings food cravings and it all starts in your gut all of this is going to help you curb your own cravings i promise you this is all going to come together before the end of this podcast i give you my word.

dopamine fifty percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"A lot easier we have a modest seasoned homebuyers and home sellers listening to the burien larry's show we know that from the attendance at the boot camps and we love that this wonderful it's good it's fitting so some of them have bought a home in exile monitor years tuesday qualify for down payment assistance of course say deal well i say of course i we know about but what i thought most of us associate those programmes with first time homebuyer it's not that at all anymore is no you don't have to be a first time home buyer tu utilize ninety percent of the programs that are out there so like ninety percent of what these loan a payment assistance broken down payment assistance programs zeal for instance chaffeur csak mma unlike larry always point so who or they are cousins or who who i am a consumer i have no idea what a cheque is is that what is i do i buy that at target or there is a very actually government assistance programs that give you the money or burien she the money give you a second mortgage there are so many aspects to downpayment assistance that it's important that you sit in you talk with your lender and you say this is where i can afford this is what i can do this is what i need this is what i have what you just demonstrated jodie with no rehearsal at all well i thank you for putting up with me is i have these questions as consumers have and let's see what did we just here mm answers there were pertinent to our questions that's who jobe years she is with finance of america you wanna give.

larry jodie burien ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The blood flowing it's great to maintain a healthy heart rhythm fish oil is now being shown to have an incredible role in cognitive functioning we're talking about memory mood brain ageing infant development cell the cell communication focus fish oils will enhance or increase performance in the brain actually been shown to increase gray matter and it goes to work and only minutes when taken as a supplement new study showing immediate benefits studies showing longterm cognitive benefits they're looking at fish oil oil in just about every area of health joint health weight management prostate health skin health the list goes on and on the big issue for the average person out there in fact 9 out of ten of you out there right now are clinically deficient in e f azf as or called essential fatty acids and the two most essential fatty acids are the two that are found in fish oil dha and epa that's the business and the fish oil purity's fish oil products have three times more concentration of these two key fatty acids than standard fish oils these are called pharmaceutical grade fish oils meaning they're manufactured in one of only a handful of pharmaceutically licensed facilities right out in norway they make the best fish oil in the world ninety percent concentrations completely pure no mercury issues no fish taste no fish odors nothing like that just the incredible concentrated delivery system of dha and epa and if you're deficient in those two key fatty acids there's a a long list of symptoms that you could suffer from fatigue poor memory poor immunity certainly poor skin health dry skin obviously your cardiovascular health might be impaired you will potentially have mood issues very clear correlations now between mood problems and low blood levels of epa and dha circulatory concerns all of these things are associated with low omega three blood level most of us don't eat enough fish fish is really the only great source of these two compounds fish oil supplementation has now become the biggest category in the vitamin business because of all the benefits all the clinically proven benefits of epa and dha purity's really taken a leading role because we feel we have the.

norway dry skin epa ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The memo potentially is what you could point out too a some kind of law in the end the fis accord or in that in the petitioning of those warrants you brought up something early ninety percent of those warrants bohm their stamped and they they move on they okay is that because they're backed up by something or is it because there has been a level of integrity that's automatically assigned to certain positions and the intelligence community or in any administration if this guy brings us this stuff it's legit exactly which we asked earlier uh we probably asked for the first time sometime last year and and that's the you know the idea that somebody that it wasn't the content of the dossier that was presented to the fis accord that convinced the fis accord that a warrant should be issued it was the person it was the pro the it was the petitioner whether it's based on the actual individual and their own integrity or just their position and it within that apartment all of these questions have to be answered about the process and then of course we can then go on to the motivation behind what was presented uh who presented it who presented it knowingly how it was all brought about i mean we note there are so many things that we know already without warrant you talked about earlier about army without the memo what we learned uh from the when would circa news unveiled some of those those documents the concerns of the visor court and how far they go back and what the previous administration did on october twenty six 2016 oh yeah uh yeah we uh we know that you told us this years ago but we are uh sorry are bad uh we didn't do that but uh yeah we're almost on here so that's this again this arrogance or that behavior continued after being a reprimanded by the fis courts or now we still don't doubt or is one of the specifics it it rise possibly to any kind of criminal behaviour or did it rise between 2011 in 2016 to criminal behaviour this is what we don't now this is why the.

fis courts fis ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"You can baby step your way into hiring some people think oh i need help therefore i have to hire a fulltime teammember well maybe or maybe you don't and there are so many baby steps between where you are today doing it yourself and having a fulltime team member a contract employ is an example that a temporary employee is an example that parttime and poet ploy and seasonal employ now these are all ways to gradually baby step your way into make sure you really do justify needing the help that they are going to create the roy for you in your business and making more than they cost you and then you can always increase the commitment you can increase the position to say hey you work contract but this is worked out really well i'd like to renegotiate and bringing on fulltime or parttimers taiwan um but i would say it really depends on your goals in your position so if you have the demand where you are maxed out you can't work a minute more you have the money the margin in your business finances to pay and other person and here's the kicker you'll love the surmonter leadership can you want to lead someone just because you're maxed out and even if you have the money doesn't mean you have the desire to lead another person and you can actually still grow your business and make more money through sources of passive income and you never hire another team member everyone doesn't want only people i don't know if you know this but ninety percent of women on businesses don't have team members many of them make that choice because they don't want to lead the team and that's okay but you need to think through because i think there's a myth out there to think okay if a higher people they're going to take all this responsibility off my plate yes and they add a layer of responsibility to it you're now responsible for paying in leading and training and hold accountable other people and that was a big thing so it really depends on her goals and she has the option to hire a contract person to kind of dipper toe in the water of leadership validate that she has the demand and our business and then could always increase that to fulltime that would be would our record.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Ninety percent of what i want but because it's only ninety percent of what i want i'm vetoing the bill and because it gives the city chicago to some money which he defer called too much money uh which he called a bail out right which it simply was not in fact if you'll look you'll see the city chicago poor student is getting less than a lot of areas and illinois that are in republican areas he vetoed the bill out let me ask you just poses rhetorical question to you and to the listeners who gets ninety percent of what they wanted lie and who gets ninety percent of what they want in springfield nobody nobody gets ninety percent and yet when he vetoed the bill did he get involved in any discussions or any compromises earning to go she asians no and he threatened the very opening of schools now it turns out every cool in illinois every public school analyze going to open thank goodness but every public school in illinois particularly those in areas that rely on taxpayer dollars uh public dollars not property textile dollars but state dollars to stay open some of them were to close in a month to three all whole bunch of them would not have made it through the school year and we have a responsibility under the constitution of illinois to fund schools by try as we may to find that any republican votes to override the governor's veto we could not and so we embarked on what was necessary which was a compromise to make sure schools stayed open and i'm happy to talk to you about their criminal let me let me back up a little bit though clothes there were school superintendents across the state republican and democratic areas who didn't care about governor rounders feelings you didn't care about the politics they were ready for this legislature to override that veto because the need was for the children of elon knowing and and i and i and i in this fight this guy played down state against chicago divisive politics in the state of illinois let me even go farther there's not a single school superintendent that came forward who was not for the override of the.

chicago springfield illinois elon superintendent ninety percent Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

"To ninety percent but i still still some white scratches in there and i'm just water to fight i stay come on the goal overly doing i'm again but i was sick i would yeah fighting don't be for the fourth that eighty career that could have been i mean it's it's certainly able to get all those scratches how and i was just thinking when you're doing i can't remember the the great that's but when i had been involved in refinished we did three grips almost like a would floor i'm and and i can't remember oh's an eighty you're a fifty were what we started with but yeah if you still have i'd i'm sure you don't remember but are those small scratches since scratches up pretty much where the deep ones or don't know yeah that it's hard to tell because there are so many on you know just over the years and just kind of you know ben i guess center improved the eighty ninety percent numb one or are discord again i should maybe they can be for what the eighty and then just what i worry down and even gone the a lighter and no one fifty maybe go top or honor yeah i would say on all the above this away i would address it okay i would look at it and and you can you have a hard time looking at this one i think because you just it all this work but look at it as this is now the scout our top that you have that now has some scratch isn't it okay and i think amigo de koreans website it'll have a progression of grit you should use because i'd be guessing and followed that process i would say you know you're going to have i'm i'm going to be pretty certain that they have a three step process so it's eighty one eighty three sixty or whatever but there's going to be a process and you don't you'll get about the pair you'll get a matter i can go deep aside that there's with that after that's sticking up for like i'm not gonna you're not where it out with the a's course the more the more grit you haven't the more you take off the more you know you run the risk of having a not real smooth yeah you know me.

eighty ninety percent ninety percent