39 Burst results for "ninety five percent"

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

Environment: NPR

01:52 min | Last week

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

"California francisco. has a sea urchin problem. They've exploded in numbers off the northern california coast and these purple spiky urchins are wiping out crucial kelp forests so scientists are searching for ways to slow him down. Here's npr's laura summer diving. A kelp forest is a lot like walking through a real forest. The seaweed is thirty to sixty feet tall. It's very surreal. You're kind of coming around. And then you have this large canopy over you. That's kind of filtering light. At least that's how it used to be says. Meredith mcpherson a graduate student at uc santa cruz. She and her colleagues found that ninety. Five percent of kelp forests have disappeared in counties north of san francisco. Cal provides a key habitat for all kinds of marine life. We were expecting something like that. But it doesn't really make it any easier to digest in terms of the actual loss of the coastal ecosystem because of an ecological double whammy. I came marine heat. Wave known as the blob. Water temperatures rose far above normal then came a more direct attack. Purple sea urchins. Their veracious grazers. They devour kelp. Sometimes we see dozens of them. Crawling up the stem of the kelp and kind of taking it down from there. Normally urchins are kept in check by their main predator off northern california a giant starfish sea star scientists call them known as the sunflower see star. But they've been wiped out by sea star wasting disease. Scientists think that both the disease the blob of warm water were made worse by climate change even now with most of the kelp off northern california gone the urgency

Laura Summer Meredith Mcpherson Uc Santa Cruz Northern California NPR Francisco California CAL San Francisco
Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

Riders Lounge Podcast

01:03 min | 33 min ago

Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Riders Lounge Podcast

"Made the best of it. that's for sure lack. I didn't think if i could go back in time. I think it would change anything. It's just what you have to do it. I wasn't really in a position to ask for any more money. And has really proved myself and it took a is in the. Yeah it it eventually. It really high off. But it's just. It's one of those things for where i lived literally from europe. You couldn't really get any further away from europe. And where i live so to get that shooting in that coal up to come and ride one of the biggest events in the world. It's like i'm gonna do whatever after due to get out hyphen Flats have half to once. I get there then. I'm gonna show these people what i'm worth. That's what i did. So i won't change anything. Perfect response exactly. That's the thing like you contacted. And everything's kind of led to now saw it. It is what it is and you go to learn these lessons. You've learnt them. That's fish oil. But like let's say come back to twenty seventeen at nacho bowl games and then on my you're doing massive tricks. Front flipped rule is a notch are gains double becky's while you're outside. That was a crash. I don't know if that was supposed to be a double back onto the airbag. at nacho. wolfgang certainly did to backflips. you didn't what else rule of flips double hot flips. All these things that we just saw mastermind you at a lot of the frontiers of that moon. Bird front flip bloody thing. Yeah then you ended up actually thinking two thousand seventeen as well as saw were trying the tape payroll at travis's house riding on his arm to fifty like your ride and travis's by how the hell did that feel like. What was that arum line. Is that a heavy. Old suzuki or is he actually might reasonably good to rod. Not outback was clapped out knauss. The mayors like Right on c. Ride any black kailua Got into wheels. And i'll probably make it work and the fact that i've had my fair share of pretty big accidents on blocks too sketchy to rod to like a seventy five for hot landing like i've had throat okay. Snappin and crazy shit have him but to add bag was the worst. It could really happen. So i don't have any other. Black homes can ride this. It work trapezoid things have on a night for the Laxa mac seems to know what he's doing. I don't think that he would ride. Something was gonna kill him. Oh someone that he cares about. Sounds like i'm gonna. I'm gonna skim rods thing but But yeah i was trying to tape a seven in his. Life is one of the tricks where its lack easy to do ninety five percent of the trick but the loss five percent of the trick is the hottest pot to actually in. So i think that's that's why he went into the double Seekers if you hearing talk about his lack that extra Is of the backflip. Is what helps. You can get the extra like five degrees of rotation on the.

Five Percent Europe Ninety Five Percent Five Degrees Fifty Travis Suzuki Seventy ONE Seven Twenty Double Seekers Nacho Bowl Games Half Ride Two Thousand ON One Of The Biggest Events Payroll Nacho
COVID vaccine found highly effective in real-world US study

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

COVID vaccine found highly effective in real-world US study

"The CDC says it's encouraged by a first look at the real world use of covert nineteen vaccines in their own controlled studies flies remedy earnest said their vaccines were about ninety five percent effective in preventing cold in nineteen in the government's first real world assessments CDC cheaper show Wilensky says the results work nearly as good the study found the risk of infection was reduced by ninety percent after individuals receive those two recommended doses and says people started to get protection after just the first dose the study involved six states and nearly four thousand people focused on front line workers like first responders Wolinsky says the results show the vaccines are the key tool to helping end the pandemic Sager made Connie Washington

CDC Wilensky Government Wolinsky Sager Connie Washington
Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

00:42 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

"Go through it as a fan favourite or something like that. Yeah yeah do you know okay. So danny when we filmed the about sharon bachelorette for the most part. Everything's in real time like during the days. You're going on the dates. You're in the house with all the contestants or with the lead you're constantly being pulled for interview so it's all pretty much real time but i've heard and i could be wrong. But like housewives even like kardashians other reality shows like that. It's all filmed. But then they go back for like their interviews and does it make you feel like it's real time but they're really being questioned like all after the philippines done like weeks or months later. I think it depends on each franchises produced by different production company. So i think some of them do smaller interviews throughout the season and then other ones maybe do like a full day and they just maybe do like two full days or something. I don't know the exact details of but you know what's interesting talking about those interviews. As i was just reading about the world of the bachelor and I i don't know where this interview was. But they were saying like for the bachelor or bachelorette interviews people are asked the same question over and over again eventually just snap. Is that a thing. I don't remember that. Be honest during the bachelor. I was probably lit in ninety five percent of mine interface. Same like other legit to ask you a bunch of what do you want to know. You know what they'll do though is like i mean they're always kind of asking the same series of questions to get to how you feel your emotions about a certain person and for the men who go along longer. They're gonna keep asking you kind of similar questions to see where you started with in your relationship with this person versus where you ended up to get the story line but i never felt like they repeated the same thing over and over to the point where i mean. Maybe it's also too. Because i was like rachel when i was on on the bachelor i was just like drinking wine like it was my job. Because that's all we really could do just wasting time. Yeah but maybe some other people. I don't know everyone has such a different experience from it. All right you guys. Listen i keep it honest with you all the time mall on the go. I'm always moving around. One of my favorite pastimes is to read. But i don't have time to sit down and read a book as much as i do. Love flipping through pages. So how do i get to do my favorite pastime but also keep up with busy schedule. That i have well. I do that with audible. So i'm able to do what i love. And what's necessary also with my schedule and i can only do that through audible..

Ninety Five Percent Each Franchises Sharon Two Full Days Rachel ONE Weeks Philippines Kardashians
Pueblo leaders meet with Second Gentleman of United States

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Pueblo leaders meet with Second Gentleman of United States

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. In montana covid nineteen vaccines will be open to. All on april first yet is yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas reports vaccines on. Tribal nations are already available to everyone. Jennifer show is a nurse. Practitioner at fort belknap tribal health department. She says they are. Well positioned to distribute the vaccine because of partnerships with indian health service and a longstanding public health nursing program that trained nine local nurses who handled contact tracing at the beginning of the pandemic girls. Were ready to go ready to start helping. Get the axing out with our population which is another plus for us. The girls work out in that area and they know how to get a hold of them. Which i think kind of helped us with getting. This rolled out so much faster as well. Tribes are also try and create a vaccination strategies show says fort belknap tribal health began vaccinating teenagers in the area. During the week of march fifteenth by partnering with local school systems both on nearby the reservation by this point teachers in the area. We're already vaccinated bubble. So you know the more. We can vaccinate around us as well as us ourselves. The better off. We're going to be trying to keep our numbers on black. Sea nation is currently reporting ninety. Five percent of eligible enrolled members are vaccinated ihs data from the pakistan and born in sioux tribes and the chippewa cree of rocky boy's reservation show a third of tribal members in these areas are now vaccinated compared to about fifteen percent of montana as a whole molly lind the tribal health director for the little shell tribe of chippewa. Indians says. The tribe has partnered with alluvial health. Great falls and is trying different. Vaccine approaches all the time instead of appointments one week. They offered an evening walk in vaccine clinic to see if that attracted members working day shifts. Were really trying to make it. As convenient as canaan for all of our members to get vaccinated vaccines are coming to tribes from direct federal allocations to ihs and sometimes through the state native americans are also prioritised under the state's vaccination plan due to higher risk of death and health complications from covid nineteen little. Shell health director. Wetland says. i really do think that tribal nation have done a really good job. It's hard to disagree. Look at montana's covid nineteen vaccine tracker map. And you'll see the dark. Green areas of high vaccination rates almost perfectly highlight tribal nations for national native news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Group of pueblo. Leaders met with the second gentleman of the united states. Doug emhoff's last week when he traveled to new mexico part of a nationwide tour to promote the biden administration's covid nineteen recovery plan pueblo of alabama governor brian bio was one of four pueblo leaders to me with 'em hof at kua pueblo via says the trip to meet with the vice president's husband was only the third time he's left akamot pueblo in the years since the pandemic began aca has been under a number of emergency covid nineteen orders including a reservation closure bio says he shared with emhoff how the tribe prioritized elders and cultural leaders. I for covid nineteen vaccines. He stressed how the pueblo has had to put culture on the side which has been a great sacrifice. We remain rooted in our culture. that's what sustains and well we can't do we cannot practice what we not when we are not engaged in that process. It's painful and that was the case and still is the case during this time of what we are doing it because we have to protect our people file also shared with emhoff how the pueblo is continuing. Its vaccine. rollout plan everyone who is eligible every travel member every resident here. The people of alabama has an opportunity to receive the vaccine and doing all that we can also to ensure that our trouble members who do not live on the survey ship are also afforded the opportunity to be vaccinated and locations where they live one of the few tribes in new mexico working with the state vaccine distribution do its current legal battle with the indian health service over a reduction of care at a hospital on komo lands. I mean antonio

Antonio Gonzales Fort Belknap Tribal Health Dep Montana Fort Belknap Chippewa Cree Of Rocky Molly Lind Little Shell Tribe Of Chippewa Caitlyn Nicholas Caitlyn Nicholas Emhoff Doug Emhoff Jennifer Biden Administration Pueblo Brian Bio Sioux Kua Pueblo
Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

00:34 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Light touch In terms of centralization intensive central policies in terms of control to some extent know we found talent. We backed the talent we put it into a culture a vision that people believed it and and that's why we focused what we should be doing as we started. More and more businesses was also exponentially strengthen. Up is not required. A systems policies are governance needed to strengthen at the same time as the company became multifaceted now in terms of the complexity. I think that's also true. Boy i think that it did become too difficult to navigate from the outside and difficult to manage. Doesn't mean that we didn't have the right talent during the right things in some ways but it was the structure and the ability of plants to navigate the become too complex. So that's that's one of the first things that i looked at strengthening the center strengthening the governance simplifying to manage and simplifying it from a governance point of view. Because he's saying. I mean the the lazy perception of evan see is this is a very successful very creative agency in so in a lovely building in soho but actually this company is very diverse across data across talent management sport global issues and across. I think thirty countries. And you will know you've got the malls murray for From helping to set up all these offices to spend any of them recently. Yes i mean. In a way perhaps victims of our about pass the books the will written in the eighties and nineties the thatcher years the political advertising all extraordinary in its own way but at a drive a lot of the fame. But the way i look at it is that it's some of that. Let's call it analog fame that has obscured the extent to which it's a completely different beast to even ten years ago Leaden when we started the company as you say under ten percent of all revenues and profit come from advertising now what what would be cooled traditional advertising and there is an existential debate within our our industry around that. I mean it's almost painful to see the number of the company's desperately not trying to use the world what advertising to describe themselves and when extent we do the same goes as soon as you go down that road your advertising agency so your traditional now as soon as you get that no output his ninety five percent digital. But you're tradition that than a new guy so i think in terms of revenues and our output. It's as i said what what's company was known as is is a tiny percentage. Now i must have been the very early days few still. But what's been the big adjustment because of course You've been the top of this agency for many years. You were the worldwide ceo. I think you kindly called the previous structure idiosyncratic you reported into the group ceo david kirsch or who. You seem to be moving into his shoes for several decades..

Ninety Five Percent David Kirsch Thirty Countries Eighties ONE Ten Years Ago Under Ten Percent Evan See First Things Nineties Leaden Decades Years
The innovations we need to avoid a climate disaster with Bill Gates

TED Talks Daily

07:41 min | 3 weeks ago

The innovations we need to avoid a climate disaster with Bill Gates

"Would like to start where you start from the title of the book how to avoid climate disaster. Which of course presumes that. You're heading towards the climate disaster if we don't act differently. So what is the single. Most important thing we must do. So via caster the greenhouse gases we put into the atmosphere particularly ceo to stay there for thousands of years in. So it's really the sum of all those emissions are forcing temperature higher and higher which will have disastrous effects and so we have to take these emissions which are presently Over fifty one billion tons per year and drive those all the way down to zero and that's when the temperature will stop increasing and the disastrous weather events. won't get worse and worse so you know it's pretty demanding. It's not a fifty percent reduction. It's a all the way down to zero now. Fifty one billion is is a big number is difficult to register so understand that help us. Visualize the scale of the scale of the problem. Well the key is to understand all the different sources and People are mostly aware of the production of electricity with natural gas and coal is being big source. That's about twenty seven percent and there's some aware of transportation including passenger cars. Passenger cars are seven percent and transportation. Brawl is sixteen percent. They have far less awareness of the other three segments agriculture Which is nineteen percent heating and cooling buildings including using natural gas or seven percent and then sadly the biggest segment of all manufacturing including steel and cement People are least aware about one and in fact that one is the most difficult for us to solve the size of the all steel plants cement plants paper plastic. The industrial economy is gigantic. And we're asking now to be changed over in this thirty year period. We don't even know how to make that change right now. So you're correct momentum. Really here i'm simplifying. Is that basically. We need to clean up all of this the way we make things we grow things. We got around economy and so to do that. We need to get to a point where green energy is as cheap as fossil fuels and new materials materials cheap as materials and do ducal eliminating the green premium. So start tell us what you mean by green premium so the premium berries from emission sources. It's the cost to buy that product where there's been no emissions versus the cost. We have today and so for an electric car. The green premium is reasonably moss. Do pay a little more upfront. You save a bit on the maintenance and gasoline you give up some range. You have a longer charging time but over the next fifteen years because the volume is there and the aren't dis being done. We can expect that. The electric car will be preferable. It won't cost more will have a much higher range. And so that green premium that. Today's about fifteen percent is headed to be zero even without any government subsidies and so that's magic. That's exactly what we need to do for every other category now an area like cement where we haven't really gotten started yet. The green premium today is almost double the price that is you pay one hundred twenty five dollars per tonne of cement today but it would be almost double that if you insisted that it be green cement and so the way i think of this is in twenty fifty will be talking to indian same to them. Please use the green products is you're building basic shelter. You know simple air conditioning which they'll need because of the heat increase in lighting at night for students and unless we're willing to subsidize it or the price is very low They'll say no. This is a problem that the rich countries Created that india suffering from. And you need to Take care of it So only by bringing that green premium down very dramatically about ninety five percent across all categories. Will that conversation go well. So that india can make that shift and so the the key thing here is that the us has responsibility is not just two zero out its emissions. That's very hard thing. But we're only fifteen percent unless we through our power innovation make it so cheap for all countries to switch all categories. Then we simply aren't going to get there and so the. Us really has to step up and use all of this innovative capacity every year for the next thirty years what what needs to happen in order to for this breakthroughs to actually occur with kind of whatever the players need to come together well innovation usually happens at a piece of its own here. We have this deadline twenty fifty and so we have to do everything we can to accelerate it. We need to raise The rnd budgets in these areas in two thousand fifteen. I organized along with president lawn and obama. Aside event to the paris climate talks where what prime minister mode labeled mission innovation was a commitment to double rnd budgets over a five year period in all the the big countries came in and made that pledge. Then we need lots of smart people who instead of working out of the problems are encouraged to work on these problems. So coming up with funding for them is very very important. I'm doing through what. I call to energy fellows. We need high risk capital to invest in these companies. Even though the risks are very very high. And that's There is now a break in energy ventures as one group doing that and drawing lots of other people in But then the most difficult thing is we actually need markets for these products even when they start out being more expensive. And that's what. I call catalyst organizing the buying power of consumers and companies and governments so that we get on the learning curve. Get the scale going up like we did with solar wind across all these categories so it's both supplied innovation and demand for the the green products. It that's the combination that can start us to make this change to the physical in the infrastructure of the entire physical economy

India President Lawn United States Paris Barack Obama
Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

01:49 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ninety five percent" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"And on cancelable for on this ride together. I'll see you there. My full show is available. Daily wire members only go to daily wire dot com slash. Subscribe and use code. Sean for twenty five percent off your daily wire membership. Today aren't twenty five till the top the hour. So you've got all of these cities seattle portland. What happened with ice minnesota. What happened there. What happened in virginia. Georgia talk about a violent year murderer up almost forty percent in a sample of fifty seven large medium sized cities local murdering creases ninety five percent in milwaukee in two thousand twenty seventy eight percent louisville kentucky seventy four percents seattle. Seventy two percent. Minneapolis sixty two percent new orleans. Fifty eight percent atlanta needs a massive numbers new york through the roof. And what on the on. The of this does a lot of aspects to this. It's it's not a. It's got to be a cooperative effort for this to work. We've the police. Departments need better trading. I will concede the point. I think they need to not. I need i think they need nonlethal alternatives. The ratio brooks case was a perfect case in point know. I've talked about this gun that i had purchased. It's not a gun it's well. It looks like a gun acts like a gun shoots like a gun but it shoots projectiles of to pepper sprays and tear gas. Call burner b. y. r. n. a. A non lethal alternative. I'd like i much prefer that to the to the laser tasers that they police. Because you can literally hit your mark. Because i own i own a couple of them at forty feet away. And they're perfecting that technology more and more every day gives a non lethal alternative case of rayshard brooks. Somebody's walking away. You got a non lethal alternative available to a police officer. I've saying this for years also wore martial arts training continuing education. That's something i would. I would wanna see myself you know. And then you've got other sides of this. If you look at since the beginning of this on i i bet you. None of you have heard the names that i'm about to mention to you Because there are a lot of police officers that have died this year. Alone avenue agent Carolina municipal police department guy's name is. Louis the solomon conde cause of death gunfire agent luiz a mariah. Herrero diaz puerto rico. Police department gunfire death police officer brandon stalker toledo police department. He died this year this year. Twenty twenty one. Deputy sheriff adam gibson sacramento county sheriff's department. He died from gunfire this year. Lieutenant michael boot. Hancock county sheriff's office mississippi. He died gunfire this year. Special agent daniel alfredsson is an f. b. i. Investigator department of justice. He died a gunfire in florida. Special agent laura and schwarzenberger. Us department of justice fbi young woman cause of death. Gunfire florida patrolman dairy in jarrett new mexico. So when i mentioned earlier cause of death gunfire police officer dominic jared windham stanley police department. Virginia death gunfire this year reserve deputy constable martinez mitchum. Second city court of new orleans. Constable's office he died in february of this year caused the death gunfire. Captain justice williams. Bedwell decatur county sheriff's office georgia caused a death gunfire. Police officer. kevin. Valencia orlando police department. Gun fire police officer. Eric tally boulder police department. Cause of death gunfire trooper chad walker texas department public safety texas highway patrol cause of death gunfire just a few days ago. Sergeant james smith iowa state patrol cause of death gunfire. I doubt one question. I have is of any of you heard these names before with all the murder in that went on and all the shootings that took place in chicago. They still have never stopped the mayhem and the death in the shootings that go on in that city. I kept scrolling. The names of innocent people people shot people shot and killed. It's in the thousands and they didn't lift a finger biden and obama to to to help obama's home city some believable. And now you've got a situation where the defunding the police getting rid of the police are. There are a few bad apples. Yeah there are but then we go in the other direction. You defend the police who you gonna call. What are you going to do and many people. Now there's a record number of sales of firearms in march because people see what joe biden's planning to do in terms of rolling back second amendment rights but if somebody god-forbid breaks into your house what do you do. Who do you call even if you call nine one one. And you get through whatever's going to happen is likely well over by the time the cops get there even with the greatest response times. They can't be everywhere at once. And you have the situation of no bail on top defunding the police then things get nutty new york as you have a convicted cop killer sitting on a commission to reform police. You gotta be kidding me. You can't even make up and the violence continues. Just i don't have all the answers. I have a few ideas. I happen to and i have no financial stake in burner. You did meet with the the. The manufacturer talked to the guy. Great guy especially you know if cops use lethal alternative that shoots pepper spray and tear gas. Worst case scenario. Is you know the you're gonna have to wash. Somebody's is out and it's painful but they don't go blind and you don't kill somebody by accident. I think we could absolutely be looking to solutions like that. To give police. Alternatives are than the firing the lethal weapon and all training. His you know center. Mass is where they're supposed to a joe biden. Says we'll shoot him in the leg. It's not an option. That's not how you.

Florida Daniel Alfredsson Kevin Milwaukee Chicago Minneapolis Virginia Laura Joe Biden New York Sean Forty Feet Fifty Eight Percent Seventy Two Percent Two Thousand Ninety Five Percent Schwarzenberger Twenty Five Percent Adam Gibson Today
Optimize Your Brain: Fighting Cognitive Decline With Nutrition & Lifestyle

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Optimize Your Brain: Fighting Cognitive Decline With Nutrition & Lifestyle

"What is it about age or maybe neurology that makes people set in their ways as they get older. It is a weird thing right. It really is more difficult to entertain new ideas. I think it varies from person to person but in my experience just comfort you know when once you set a path in. You're comfortable with it. Your brain doesn't really allow you to change that math. It's like walking on a snow track. It's so deeply set in the walls or sol-solid that it's difficult for you to actually make a new pathogens and it requires a lot of reflection and judgment and being okay to make mistakes and the discomfort in being uncomfortable the comfort in being uncomfortable. They can help you set noise but it does seem like that becomes much more of a challenge. It does it does We the whole idea of change is not normal. I'm talking about chronic change acute chain. We're good at it because an acute change we had to for millions of years. There's a tree there's a lion you know. Better make change in my decision making. I'm not going to go down. This stop long-term change were not designed for that were not our brains are not designed for long term change. That's a completely different mechanism. And and if we and if we don't address that i mean to be honest i know that it's not be recalled. Our political stances. Everything is around this concept of being with change. I always say about. Five percent of population is future seekers. Another ninety five percent is passed protectors And you have to be pass protector in many ways because protection has worked. Whatever has gotten you here as you depending on the past patterns right but all the change in society in the world around us is by those five percent. Whatever i'm using arbitrary number that are comfortable. This is weird. People comfortable with change with the unknown. The three hundred sixty degrees of are known. You're willing to go there and yet this house. that's comfortable you're willing to leave it to go to the next place. That's an unusual concept Were which comes with the frontal lobe but but That's why as we get older. We become more set on all the strings that connects us to the past. You want us. To sever sever sever suffers to go to a new path. That is unknown at a time. Where i'm already vulnerable. Yeah that's too much risk. Yeah yeah is there a genetic piece to that when you look at that five percent can you isolate out what it is that distinguishes them neurologically from very early. You can tell there. There's a genetic component environmental component that genetic anxiety is at the core of all this stuff or term that is like anxiety we using anxiety as a just as a word. That's as filler. But it's a little more than that. Our ability to deal with the world around us for the most part for at the beginning is genetically you can see children. We have two children both trust me. We're gonna talk about them. But they're very precocious. Yeah incredibly but the understatement of the century go ahead make very different very different. Alex is what you could see when you when you I'm not putting him down. Because this is not a weakness this is just our proclivities. We can change you when you put him on the sand when he was six months. Old us som- do this. He hated sand. Sofi would crawl to the ocean. Having right away. I mean that's a threat. Why are you not threatened. By very thing you're supposed to be threatened by north right so that threat aversion versus not the river part of it is intrinsically ingrained in us part of it is actually data shows part of. It's actually program how your mother reacts to anxiety provoking moments mother because the is there all the time wherever you're around the most and how they react know how they promote challenging situations and anxiety provok- situation how they react with it and how they deal with it is the forget about leadership masters. I got a phd. Forget about that ends and starts there. Yeah you create situations that are a little bit anxiety provoking. You fail nothing. My parents didn't react badly. You succeed great how you react. And how does micro environments of threat version threat response. Threat creation and response is the foundation of all leadership. Yeah i would think from an environmental perspective or i mean an evolutionary perspective that You know maintaining your membership in good standing with your community is paramount right. So if that community is welcoming to people who pushed the boundaries and try new things. That's one thing but if that sort of thinking outside the box is gonna alienate you than You there's gonna be some pushback right there's a disincentive. That's that's butting up against somebody's willingness to entertain new ideas or try new things always an and the culture that's been set in place that creates an aversion to change the language the micro languages that anything that somebody brings that his little threatening to the status quo. You have things out. This is a this is arrogant. The word arrogant to push away. People who have new ideas is universe. It's it's such a ubiquitous silencing technique and When you look at when you look at the main reason why people are not willing to change his the fear of being ostracized like you said. Nobody wants to get out of that comfortable zone. Because it's really difficult to be alone in your way of life in your new methodology in your new habits and that's that's the first step that people have to challenge themselves to take over right given that though it's interesting that most environments are not really that permissive when it comes to free thinking and creative expression and most are pretty regimented around. What's okay and what's not but it would. It would seem like we should be more encouraging to that permissive environments. And why is that. Why are we not able to make that more. The case as opposed to you know the slim five percent or whatever it is. Yeah well we have ghanistan and with taliban around us yet. That same mentality exists here in the medical community and by the way this is me not bashing dramatic medical community like part of the only the medical community here to know about just their mentality. that's all know. But but the stagnant comfort with the status quo. Right is the same thing. I mean the hallways of your limbic system are the same You might have put it better clothes and better beards and you know my beard was a little better here than that but if the mentality is i must maintain it's not always over. I must maintain the status. And i don't know even why because it makes me uncomfortable. It's a satan. yeah. I mean to In two thousand two before we met two months earlier. I'm an experimental therapeutics branch. That's as wonky as as experimental as it gets speaking with nobel prize winners two months later. I'm in afghanistan. Speaking with taliban leaders. Both places trying to bring change. And i can promise you. The the the language was much more sophisticated But the blockades same protection of the status quo. That's why i mean when we talk about. Dementia we talk about stroke. We talk about mental health. Even now that repetition of the same patterns over and over again. I'm now some other. Studies are starting with clinical trial with hundred people. Fifty people six. We're done. We know what works.

Foundation Of All Leadership Sofi Alex Paramount Taliban Afghanistan Dementia Stroke
COVID-19 Relief Package Includes Billions For Transportation Sector

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:41 min | 3 weeks ago

COVID-19 Relief Package Includes Billions For Transportation Sector

"All right how often did you fly. Or maybe the trainer buster in the pandemic. Yeah the transportation sector has been hit hard but anyone who rides in trains planes or automobile should benefit from the one point nine trillion dollar cove relief package. Npr's david schaper reports. It was a year ago this week. The us what unlocked down highways and airports were suddenly almost deserted. People travelling overseas scrambled to get flights home at mass transit. Trains ran nearly empty in the virginia. Suburbs of washington. Dc forty six year old. Sandra vigil had been driving buses packed. with sixty. to seventy people are more. We ended up taking towards the end of march. He was like one two people per ride. If you had any people at all last march twenty ninth vigil says she about ninety five percent of her loudon county. Transit co workers were furloughed. Her's lasted four and a half months and unemployment wasn't enough to make ends meet. A lot of fail behind are not rental car payments. Because he was either eating or paint a car or paying the rent and thing they lakeville transit systems across the country so ridership plummet ninety percent or more in revenue fell with it yet. Mass transit is essential especially for many low wage workers. Again bus driver. Sandra vigil in order to keep the buses running and to keep us working. We needed this money. The relief bill includes thirty billion dollars for transit. It also includes one point seven billion dollars for amtrak enough to bring twelve hundred furloughed employees back to work and restore daily service on long distance routes and there's funding to help states continue fixing crumbling roads and bridges offsetting. They're lost gas tax revenue as for airlines. I have fantastic news year. That's american airline ceo. Doug parker in a video message to employees about the plan which includes another fourteen billion dollars payroll support. That's good news for the thirteen thousand american employees who were facing furloughs april. First so if you have one of those worn out notices we sit out in february. Tear it up. There aren't going to be any furloughs at american airlines in april and with vaccinations on the rise. Hopefully never again. Ceo parker says the last three weeks have been the airlines best. Since the pandemic hit with bookings and passenger volumes up that's happening at other airlines too so much so that after months of hemorrhaging tens of millions of dollars a day the ceo's of delta and united now expect to reduce their daily cash. Burn two zero this month or next while southwest is on track to break even by june. Of course that's relatively easy to do. When tax payers are essentially covering much of your payroll airlines have now received more than fifty billion dollars in federal payroll grants since the start of the pandemic. This was hugely important. And as a pilot for american airlines at spokesman for the pilot's union. The last thing i wanted to be is on our heels when everybody was ready to get back. Flying tiger says if pilots had been furloughed. They need weeks. If not months of training before being able to fly passengers again. You do not want to be staring at the recovery and turning around and seeing the flight deck empty. Because you weren't able to train. The pilots quickly. Enough joe sweet. Herman transportation professor at chicago's depaul university. Says this government aid is crucial is pretty clear that the airlines were such a desire straight federal assistance and a big way we would have lost an airliner to sweden and says the federal aid helps airlines amtrak transit agencies and highway departments continue critical operations while adapting to a post covid world a world that will likely lead to more operational changes in the near.

Sandra Vigil David Schaper Transit Co American Airlines Doug Parker Loudon County NPR Ceo Parker Virginia Washington Pilot's Union United States Flying Tiger Delta Joe Sweet
How to Increase Sales 20% Using Predictive Analytics with John Wall

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:49 min | Last month

How to Increase Sales 20% Using Predictive Analytics with John Wall

"Right. Everyone welcome to digital conversations. I'm your host billy bateman and today i am joined by podcasting legend john wall partner at trust insights and co host of marketing over copy. John thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me here billy. I appreciate it yeah. I'm really excited for this man so Before we get into it we're going to talk a lot about predictive analytics attribution the your data cleanliness within marketing. But before we get into that. Let's learn a little bit about you and what you do so tell us about yourself and a little bit about your journey. Yes sure so. I'm a partner at trust insights a marketing analytics firm. We we light up dark data which is our kind of data detectives. We help people figure out what's working in their marketing. What's not working where to go next. But my career path has been kind of crazy. I mean as far as marketing tech. i've been in the startup world since about ninety seven and have gone through. This is like my seventh startup. and we're actually three years in. I mean we're well beyond startup phase. But i've kind of cycled through a number of times and then before that. My background is actually economics. I graduated with a degree in econ. So i've always come at the marketing thing from the you know the quantitative analysis side and tried to automate as much as possible. So yeah it's been a long crazy path and a bunch of while pitstops along the way but everything with trust insights is going well and then the most of what we do at trust insights originally started when i was working with christopher penn. We started this podcast marketing over coffee about going on like fifteen years now. But we've you know every week talk about marketing and tech and that has just kind of finally gotten to a point where it's brings in clients for us for trust insights. We have a reputation as knowing about keeping an eye on what's going on in what's changing because the space is so crazy and dynamic and That has helped us build a community that were able to kind of trade ideas within could talk about. What's going on with martin and it's works. Well awesome awesome. Okay so you guys do a lot of work with predictive analytics and nice buzzword. I don't think a lot of people really know like what does that. What does that amount to in the real world. So i think what was just start there so when you guys were talking about predictive analytics what are you looking at. And what can you help. People forecast yeah. The most common thing that we did for. Predictive is topic analysis. You know we'll go take a look at grab a library of terms. Our chief data scientist christopher. Penn will run that against a number of models that he has and so the most common example that we use. We have a blog post. We update every year called the cheese report where we look at all the cheeses in the market and we come up with a calendar for the next twelve months. That says okay. These are when specific cheeses are going to be hot and moving and so if somebody who's creating content for website if you're in the cheese industry you know you know that come may and june. You'd better be teeing up all your content and videos about halloo me and i didn't even know who he was a thing until i read the cheese report and as we dug in. It's a grilled cheese so it always peaks in the summers when people are looking for louis. Recipes are wanna buy hulu me. It's because they're getting ready to throw it on the grill in july and so and then you know as you keep digging into the data you'll see mozzarella's on fire around christmas time Cheddar right around new year's as everybody's doing parties Monterey jack comes in around the super bowl when people making nachos and so the idea is that by looking at all this data and looking ahead you can't predict the future and say hey we want to drop our content on these weeks because we know there's going to be demand the week following that and you know we will have had content in place for a couple of weeks before the surge. It's you know these models can be applied to anything. I mean if you have enough sales data you can look and say you know get an idea for maybe what your seasonal sales cycle will be but we often find in. Beat a be that. There's just not enough data to really get effective models going But you know as far as applying that same model to other stuff. Women's shoes we have a client that uses the women's shoes fashion reports. So they know you know six to three months out from black friday. What's going to be hot and specific kinds of shoes and and where to go. It's and it's gotten a little bit rough You know it used to be rock-solid we kinda generate models and they would just always be you know ninety five percent greater confidence interval. You know we would just know that pretty much certain covert has kinda thrown a wrench in things. There's there's been a massive change in search behavior and so a lot of markets have been messed up so it's not as easy as it used to be. We used to kind of be able to say yeah. We can definitely do that for everything. And now a lot of projects. We'd say low will look will go in there and will run some models and we'll get back to if we think we can do some predictive because it's a lot more difficult than it used to be. Yes so with covid would what are you. Seeing is the changes and just consumer behavior since Yeah in one way. It's not radically different. Really what people have been saying. Some of the state we've seen is that it's it's as if we just jumped five years ahead you know we've kind of been on this ramp of ecommerce going in this direction and eating up one more brick and mortar and suddenly as if we just jumped ahead five years into the future because everybody now is forced to go online for purchases where there's this group of people who still like to go to you know the local big to buy stuff and now they have no choice because of the toilet paper gone or they don't want to go outside their risk or whatever so that's one thing

Billy Bateman Trust Insights And Co Christopher Penn John Wall Billy John Penn Martin Christopher Hulu Super Bowl Louis
Tape that: Dutch inventor of audio cassette dies at age 94

TechFan

04:45 min | Last month

Tape that: Dutch inventor of audio cassette dies at age 94

"Let's jump into tech fan here since you know we. We just mentioned about recording stuff off the right. Yeah yeah kinda sad news and we're also doing this as part of our wookey. Trolling thing but I saw this i. I'm i'm kinda glad. I i saw you know five seconds while i was on a lunch break looking on my phone. I saw and i thought. Oh that'd be something we're talking about so go ahead. What well this is This is the guy who invented tightly. Walton's died at the ripe old age of ninety four. Yeah a law people forget nowadays that philips the dutch company invented this stuff named ventured the compaq says as being the lead on the compact disc. It's funny his goal. I'm looking at the los angeles times. Obituary that you linked his goal is making tapes and their players. Far more portable and easier to use because. Look the cassette. Tape wasn't the beginning of Recording to a magnetic tape they had real to reel that that was invented and twenty three And they had a in recording studios in radio. Stations is early as the thirties and it was very complex stuff to use. This guy took that basic concept and although the tapes were a little different And he wanted he had. He carried a block of wood in his pocket and the goal was to have the player and a tape. Take up about same amount of space and you can't really argue with his success And think about you know he. He basically created an entire industry from his invention. So while we talk about this guy. Let's talk about the cassette tape as well. Because it's our wikipedia. Wiki trolling Commonly called the tape cassette cassette tape audio cassette or simply tape or cassette. It would to me. It was always those were always interchangeable. Do you got you got a blink tape you gotta cassatt you got you and you had really two kinds you had the prerecorded cassette which was records like. We were talking about earlier albums Do you remember the single cassettes. It would be one song young. Rip off to me. I think i had a couple of days. Oh everybody hype blank tape. Yeah it was just people people. Some people want to listen to singles call Yeah there's two things that conduct strikes strikes me about except tape. First of all is the miniaturization they something that was expensive and very fiddly a bake. There's something really was only yes. They're professionals or for very rich people. Yeah and they miniaturized it to something that the allowed portability and transform them the way we listen to music but the second thing for me. I you know anybody who's ever use cassette tapes now the every now and again there. We go wrong with tangled up in your player and it used to be the you know if a tangled up. Somebody's car you wonder. If sometimes you just wander around on the street or in accomplish something you need to see. The massive tangle of time resources obviously yanked out they call yanked till the bits that the come off and then and the end it was broken at that point and then just come thrown on the street when people to listenable A new see those long around but generally they were absolutely you know they were pretty reliable. Not particularly high quality but pretty reliable. And i think the reliability they built into that platform it really astonishes me more than anything else because it was completely mechanical and yet You ninety five percent the time. It was relatively flawlessly. It was introduced in september nineteen sixty. Three came in two forms already recorded content in prerecord content. Remember when you found out that you could stick a piece of paper or something in the little hole at the top and record over. A prerecorded tape mess right. Yeah that little tab out so you could. Nobody could record over that. That six you'd make you'd make a mix tape for someone. You had a bus. That little thing screwing up my mix tape. Technology was originally designed for dictation machines but improvements of fidelity led to the compact cassette to supplement the stereo eight track cartridge in reel to reel tape recording in most non-professional applications

Walton Los Angeles Times Philips Compaq
24,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson vaccine to arrive in Houston and other Texas cities

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:31 sec | Last month

24,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson vaccine to arrive in Houston and other Texas cities

"Learning that fema vaccination sites in houston and two other. Texas cities are set to receive twenty four thousand doses of the johnson and johnson. Vaccine tomorrow according to the state health department another two hundred thousand doses are expected in texas next week. The johnson and johnson vaccine only requires one dose and can be stored in regular refrigerators. Its efficacy rate is just over seventy percent the pfizer and moderna vaccine are both around ninety five percent

Johnson Fema State Health Department Houston Texas Moderna Pfizer
J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

Up First

03:45 min | Last month

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

"The fda is getting ready to authorize a third covid vaccine emergency use in this country. This one this vaccine is from pharmaceutical giant. Johnson and johnson. And if it's authorized it would join vaccines from pfizer and madera in the us vaccination campaign. But here's the thing those other. Vaccines require two doses. This vaccine from johnson and johnson needs only one single dose to be effective. Npr science correspondent. Joe palca is here to tell us how effective good morning joe morning. well one dose. that's exciting. How good is this new vaccine. Oh it's good. It was sixty six percent effect of overall in preventing moderate to severe disease and eighty five percent protective against more severe diseases. Now for people with good memories. They'll say wait. A minute i heard that madonna and pfizer wasn't that closer to ninety five percent effective and the answer is yes they were higher but those vaccines were tested before. Some of the new variants began circulating and prevent any five percent of severe critical. Disease is really good since the goal of the vaccines is to keep people out of the hospital and keep them from dying and the other thing about this vaccine is mentioned in the intro is that it's one dose which makes the logistics of getting it to people a lot easier to remember to come back so public. Health officials are looking forward to being able to distribute the j. vaccine. This is how anthony fauci chief medical adviser to the president. Put it on. Nbc's today show to have them come in and be in the mix with the other. Two is is nothing but good news. Nothing but good news. Foul cheat now. The process usually is before a vaccine gets authorized in advisory board has to approve it right. Well yes well. Though he has to is probably an exaggeration. It doesn't absolutely has to. The fda can approve things on its own lookout but like the other two vaccines. The the fda wanted to be extremely transparent. There were some questions about whether they were rushing the vaccine to the market before they knew it was safe and they want to assure the public that this was being looked at carefully so that committee has been around for a while. it's known in the trade as burg. Pack the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee i love that name ver- pack made of scientists and doctors with a variety of specialization relating vaccines before the meeting. Fda provides the committee with its analysis and they also make that analysis of the public So i asked. Bruce gallon president of global immunization at sabin vaccine institute. What he made of the analysis of the johnson and johnson vaccine. I didn't see anything in it. That i would think is going to be a show stopper for packed. Wanna recommend that. Fda act on so gallon is predicting the ver- pack will give the vaccine a thumbs up. How many doses. Johnson and johnson have ready to ship out. Well not as many as people had hoped a year ago when started trying to make these vaccines they all said. All we're gonna do this at risk manufacturing which means we're going to start making vaccine before they even knew it was going to be authorized even if it worked. And then they'd throw away if it didn't work and the government gave the money to do this but even with that company's still don't have the kind of inventory. The country needs in the case of johnson. Johnson they have about four million doses ready to go out the door and expect to have twenty million by the end of march and one hundred million by the end of june and remember. This is a one dose vaccine so one hundred million doses is one hundred million people vaccinated which is very big. Deal leslie and briefly. What is the timeline here. When the fda issued the emergency use authorization it could be any minute. I mean they knew it right after the meeting. They could do it tomorrow. That could do it in a few days. It'll be soon. I think if the committee gives a thumbs

Johnson Joe Palca FDA Pfizer Madera Anthony Fauci NPR Bruce Gallon Madonna Sabin Vaccine Institute JOE NBC Advisory Committee United States
Fauci urges Americans to take whatever vaccine is available

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Fauci urges Americans to take whatever vaccine is available

"A third vaccine is likely to soon join the covert nineteen fight but the nation's top infectious disease expert is urging Americans not to be picky Dr Anthony Fauci knows people look at vaccine studies and compare effectiveness seventy two percent versus ninety five percent and so on they may then decide well just wait for the next more effective one that I think is not a good idea algae on NBC news today show saying people should be confident in any vaccine the FDA approves for emergency use when the vaccine becomes available take it Johnson and Johnson's vaccine will take its turn before the FDA's independent advisers tomorrow and felt she's looking forward to with joining the dharna and Pfizer vaccines already in use they have to it's fine to have three is absolutely better soccer mag ani Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci Infectious Disease Nbc News FDA Johnson Pfizer Soccer Ani Washington
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | Last month

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:16 min | Last month

Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

"Dr analogy welcome to the broken brain podcast. It's an honor and a privilege to have you here. Thank you so much drew. I am so excited for this conversation. I think it'll be just fine Back and forth to share information. Yeah i love what. You're bringing to the world in this topic of anxiety and i think that we zoom out in the context of the current world even prior to cove nineteen pandemic anxiety. You could see that. The instances and usage of the word in just general language newspaper social media is skyrocketing and you know languages so powerful and sometimes we really have to parse apart a word to really understand like what do we really mean when we're saying that because sometimes we say anxiety and we actually could be meaning something else when you talk about this world of anxiety and your new book which we're going to get into in a little bit. What do you really want people to help understand. What exactly is anxiety. Yeah so i think that's a great question. And i will just tell you how i approach that When i started in practice about fifteen years ago Because i'm a naturopathic physician acupuncturist decided to specialize in mental health. And people were coming in. And saying i'm anxious and and i just didn't think it was like so. How does that apply. Physiology was really the question that i was interested in and because some for some people it's stress for some people. It's i'm afraid to move forward and take a step forward for some people. It's a i'm overwhelmed like there's all sorts you know. It's a catch word as you say. And but there's also a curious about what the physiology of depression or anxiety or whatever these words were saying. And and so i. When i started in practice i literally in my on my living room floor. I had stock physiology textbooks a stack of neurology. Textbooks and the dsm and the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual. It just describes. What the diagnosis categories for anxiety are and i was just like will. I think it's more than just an emotion like a candy but like the people were coming in with panic. Attacks like that is not an emotion that is a full embodied experience right. And and so i started just parsing out like what are the. What are the fizzy. What physiology causes these physical symptoms of shaky and racing thoughts and your heart racine. And maybe you're sweating and and all those symptoms that you know sometimes it starts small and Escalates to really big asu started to parse that out and then was like well. Once once i started to understand the physiology in the neuro physiology will. Where do we. Where can we intervene to help. People feel better and so answering your questions kind of copying out. But it's like. That's that's the approach that i took because so many people were using words and i was like i want a grounded in something concrete. Absolutely i mean if we look at the history and evolution of just anxiety and a lot of mental health. A lot of these things in early medicine were considered to be They're kind of in your head right like nothing else is going on right. We made a documentary a few years ago. Which then led to the name of this podcast. Broken brain my business partner. Dear friend dr mark hyman. We made a documentary called broken brain and the underlying premise. That documentary was what you do to your body you do to your brain. Your brain is not in. This isolated eight oregon that just as floating on top of your head. That's completely disconnected than the rest of everything. That's going on there actually an intertwined system and we have to understand that yes there can be. Let's call for lack of a better term emotional factors that are there right. Stressor is the complete driver of so many different things that we feel but let's also look at the physiology of what's happening underneath so when it comes to that topic of anxiety and the physiology gonna ask you a question which is a question that i came across a few years ago in a book by peter thiel little bit of a controversial character. But i really love this question that he had inside of this book. I think the book is called zero to one and he said what truth do you believe is true that other people disagree with in that category. So when you look at right what do you believe is true when you think about anxiety and physiology that people maybe traditional western medicine will say like. I don't know if that's true. Yeah so The one truth. That i see time and time again is it is really hard to have a panic attack. If you just ate. And i don't see panic. Attacks occur unless people are five hours from food or more at or they may have eaten some really sugary substance to at two hours ago. But if you had a real meal. It is really hard to have a panic attack. That's powerful right. There and people like that is not true and and the same applies to suicidal Which is know just part of the spectrum of people keep doing doing panic attacks they can get there and and and and the reason for that is that are i mean i can go into the physiology but but people don't believe that until they start looking mental health professionals or physicians and then when they want start looking at the pattern it holds true. Now there's always an exception to the rule ways but it holds like ninety five percent true

Pandemic Anxiety Dr Mark Hyman Drew ASU Anxiety Depression Peter Thiel Oregon
Increase your productivity with R.I.C.E

Run Your Day

09:56 min | Last month

Increase your productivity with R.I.C.E

"Talked about this many many times the chaos of abundance and the trying to figure out which rich priorities to hunt out which things to do which tasks are more important. Which things are more urgent. We've talked about the stephen covey time matrix lots and lots of times. I've talked about this in references. So there is a decision making like a scoring method. That is out there. It's called the rice method Now to talk through each one of these acronym right and it stands for reach impact confidence an effort k now. What i'm going to talk about this in terms in inside the frame of decision making and goals and targets that you're chasing down right and there's a there's a a really great course that i'm in the guy. He he gives a lot more succinct view of it. And like a three to four minute type of synopsis. Obviously i'm not the guy in the course talking you so i'm going to do my best to kind of explain this to you a little more long winded -ly about really how this works right so our for reach right when you're thinking about a goal when you're thinking about target that you're hunting down whether even if it's a physical goal if it's a a racer trying to do or a Weightlifting circuit. You're trying to do or anything like that Or even if it's a business goal or a personal goal or weight loss or whatever the case might be right. The reach is in a lot of times us inside of marketing so instead of a marketing goal right. It's it's how how big is this gonna be. How how how much visibility can you get right but in terms of your goal setting area right. You're thinking about okay. When i achieve this goal. How far have i gone. Like how far have i reached how much how much have i propelled myself forward right. Because there's there's there's certain goals let's be honest. There's certain goals and targets that you and i pursue that when we actually achieve them we realized we set the bar too low right. And then there's sometimes we set that bar and we realized that we said it way too high because we were all gung ho. Yeah we're gonna we're gonna set the bar high. We're going to do awesome. And then you realize that it's completely out of reach okay. So this reach factor elect to think of in terms of my. Is it the right amount of reach. Is it just far enough of a reach for me. That you know when i actually achieve this target when i achieved this will like that's that's a good benchmark for me. That's a good milestone for me because it's allowing me to kind of live my life to do the things i wanna do but it's also challenging me in the right amount and not overwhelming me making me drink from a fire hose and regret that. I have made this decision right. So that's the are now. I is impact right now. This kind of goes hand in hand. I think in terms of goal setting again. I'm kind of adapting this from marketing perspectives. But the impact. I like to think of in terms of not only impact on my own life but the impact. I have on others right and i think this is particularly. I was going to say. It's particularly in every area but it's particularly applicable inside of business goals right or finance goals career goals right when you think of when i achieved this goal or when i hit this target or whatever it is you're chasing am i. Am i only doing this to be self serving or am i actually creating something of impact for other people or am i. In my leveling up the level of service. I gave her the level of business. I provide or the The the level of customer service have or is the product that i provide. Actually you know impacting more people able to reach more people in my able to impact more people's lives right because if if you start to see like You know just. Because i'm going back to the drawing board in. Revamping my website. This am i really going to impact a lot of people No not really. It's just going to be more of a self serving type of goal and there's nothing wrong with self-serving type of goals right. There's absolutely nothing wrong with those. They have their place in their their validity. Right but in terms of thinking about impact. You know you're you're thinking about okay. I want to reach people around me. I wanna reach like. When i think about this in terms of making apps that i make in the pot in even inside of this podcast like. What's the impact going to be on you the listener. What's the impact is going to be on the end user of the technology that i'm building i'm providing right and when you think when you think it through and that level that's like next level deep thought and that really gives you more clarity. Why you're doing what you're doing right. Move onto the third piece in that is see confidence in. This is pretty straightforward. This is the confidence that you have in yourself that you can actually chief this thing right do you have. What is your level of confidence. Do you have confidence that you can hit it in this kind of goes back to to reach part right like are you you kind of assessing this and being like i don't know like new. This this is this is really make him a button pucker. You know what i mean like. I'm i can't do this or are you like overconfident. Are you just like your should be able to achieve this quarterly goal in a week right. Then you need to do some some reassessing. You need to be like okay There's probably a reason overconfident. In this in. Maybe maybe that overconfidence will be prove to be Nobody no right. Maybe it'll be like. Oh wow. I was way too overconfident in my abilities or my resources or my ability. Actually get this done right But then you might go the other way and you might be like well on of any confidence that i can get this done right in in this when you look at it through this frame then you start to say well okay. Let's go back to to the reach in the impact of my really doing the right thing in my actually pursuing the right thing. Because if. I don't have any confidence that i can get it done. Yeah it might completely change my life in the lives of others inside of the reach and impact category. But if it's if. I have zero confidence. I can hit it. Why would i pursue that thing right like why i'm wasting my time. Mangum ahead against a wall. And i'm gonna be miserable in it's not gonna benefit anyone. Okay now the the last piece. The fourth piece is e for effort k. Now what level of effort like is this going to is. This can require sixteen hours a day of your extreme deep focused to achieve or is it going to be ten minutes a day. Is it going to be an hour a day. Is it going to be three times a week. Is it going to be just on the weekends. Right what level of effort. And i like to put resources in here as well. What level of effort and resources is actually going to require to pull off. And when you look at a goal or target through this frame you start to be like okay. I'm having some good reach like this is actually pushing me forward personally and professionally. Okay the the impact is also there. It's gonna be you know it's going to impact a lot of people. It's going to push things forward. It's going to actually provide some new things. I'm pretty confident. I can hit it. But it's also gonna take me ten hours a day that i can't dedicate to it also pull off and then it falls apart right so is this is a really crazy awesome framework that i really like to to think through in terms of all this because i hope you can see kind of how all these are interconnected right as you go through each one of them in you really take your goal your target or your your aim in life. Whatever it is. You're chasing her hunting and you put it through each one of these frames like filter it down to be a lot more clear in what you can do what you actually can hit and then you start to also get more clear on that. Why like all of these filter into that y right and it's it's amazing. I've started to do this inside of pretty much. All the different business goals that. I'm shooting for over the next two to three months. And i gotta tell you like it's a game changer. For me it really is because like i said it. Just it really frames your daily decision making on a whole different level because once you have this okay. I know. I'm reaching for something that is within my grasp but also challenging me. I know that the impact that it's creating is going to be enough impact that i'm comfortable with making but also not just like doing it just for me. I'm pretty confident. You should be at least over fifty percent confident that you can hit this goal right. You don't wanna be down in like ten twenty percent range but you don't wanna be like you know ninety ninety five percent range like yeah if you're up there that's great but you're also probably not challenging enough. You're not reaching far enough right and see how the reach. The confidence are kind of interconnected and the effort is is another thing that a lot of people don't consider in in this kind of threw me off a lot when i started when i first started going down this path and rely when i really sat down and was like okay to to achieve this thing that i wanna do in business or to pull out like when i started pulling off the the run your day apple. I completely underestimated the amount of effort. That was going to go into it like it ended up being something that yeah like. The impact was there. The reach was there. The confidence was there and then the effort. I completely underestimated. But i didn't put that through this type of framework. So i didn't. I wasn't doing this at that time right. And if i would've known out been like okay you know. There's a lot more effort involved in this. So therefore my confidence score goes down but the impact also goes up in the region goes a little bit

Stephen Covey Weightlifting Mangum Apple
CDC study finds two masks are better than one vs. COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

CDC study finds two masks are better than one vs. COVID-19

"Government researchers say a study shows wearing two masks these better at slowing corona virus spread than just one the CDC lab experiment found one mask blocked around forty percent of particles coming toward ahead reading in a cloth mask over top of a surgical mask blocked roughly double that in two masks on each head blocked more than ninety five percent while the CDC stopping short of recommending everyone double up director Richelle Wilensky says the science is clear masks work and even though Americans may be tired of wearing them they need to keep doing it Sager mag ani Washington

CDC Richelle Wilensky Sager Mag Ani Washington
From wild idea to COVID vaccine  meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

Science Friction

05:20 min | 2 months ago

From wild idea to COVID vaccine meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

"Renew and november. When the first cases started the pop up and wuhan china their description of the virus there description of how easily it was transmitted between families once. We heard that we knew that. This virus had the potential to be a bad actor at that moment in time we said. How are we going to get the sequence for this virus and we started calling our friends and china. We called our friends at the cdc trying to get the sequence of this virus the minute that was published. We started to make our vaccines back on. I think it was january twelfth. We started making the first aren a vaccine that day. It has all happened. Unfathomably fast has an at twelve months later and the pfizer and maduna vaccines have made their way through large clinical trials with good results into syringes and now already into millions of arms. But this quite a back story here. We thought that it would be useful in a pandemic. We thought it would be influenza pandemic but you back in two thousand and five. When we made the initial observation we knew that aren a had a great potential therapeutics. Who with his collaborator catala career. How is a good bit to win a nobel prize for the science driving. Mri vaccines. he's one of my guests on science fiction today. What's been lost in the fast pace race to develop covid nineteen vaccine. This past year is a hidden story of dogged. Pursuit of a nollie scientific idea over decades often in the face of skeptics and nice ideas we went through pharmaceuticals venture capitalists. All other people. it said. Hey we have a great new invention here. And they weren't interested. They said now aren as too hard to work with. We don't think it'll ever work and they just weren't interested now with a pandemic bang with suddenly counting on mri vaccines lock eyes and medina's to help save us. But before this pandemic this brand new technology of marigny vaccines had never been approved for use in humans before. It's incredible isn't it. The heddon even made it to the stage of large scale clinical trials in humans. I don't think anybody could have predicted. Just how effective these vaccines were. And i still get chills. When i remember the moment when that announcement was made a few months ago biologist onto fox is future fellow and associate professor at the university of western australia. It has proved the nice as wrong. I mean given that fifty percent effective is the baa that the world health organization would've liked to say as the minimum to be getting ninety. Five percent is just astounding really hardly any vaccines have that level of efficacy. Cullen pat and professor of pharmaceutical biology at monash pharmaceutical sciences. He's team is working on two different. Mri vaccines for covid. Nineteen in collaboration with the doughy institute in melbourne change from the point of view the future of emo toy syrupy and we haven't had a vaccine working against corona virus. Before i could understand the science. And i could see how theoretically it might work. But i just couldn't see how we could actually make enough to be the billions of doses needed for the world. And that's still looking doc- rod it's entirely contingent on just to pharmaceutical companies meeting. The world's entire supply demands including ours here in australia. Will you receive the pfizer vaccine together just before christmas. We did the vaccine driven by your discovery. Can you describe what that moment was like figuring. My family always yells at me. Because i'm not excited enough. And they're right for man who co owns the intellectual property licenses to medina and i dream osman humble kind of guy. We were incredibly excited. When we saw the results of the phase three trial that are vaccine. Worked and of a safe and had ninety. Five percent efficacy. I'm already moved on to the next thing the next back scene. The next gene therapy you. I'm incredibly excited. That this vaccine is working that it's gonna make a dent in this pandemic many think that there's a nobel prize in chemistry waiting in the wings for you and dr katie. Rico what do you make of that. So people tell the too modest. And i really don't do things for prizes or recognition or anything else.

Catala China Pfizer Aren CDC Cullen Pat Monash Pharmaceutical Sciences Medina Influenza Doughy Institute University Of Western Australi BAA World Health Organization FOX Melbourne Osman Australia Dr Katie
The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

Building Psychological Strength

05:49 min | 2 months ago

The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

"Eleanor roosevelt once. Said you must do the thing you think you cannot do. I'm gonna tell you a little story about the beginning days of this podcast in twenty sixteen. I began this podcast on a complete wim. I noticed that. I had more freedom and flexibility with my time when i became an entrepreneur and i felt compelled to do something that gave back. Podcasting was becoming more popular at the time. And i wanted to give it a try but i knew absolutely nothing about how to do a podcast. I didn't know how to record. I didn't know how to edit. I didn't know how to get my episode out there once it was created. I didn't know how to book gas. How to interview people how to promote myself how to collaborate with other podcasters and on and on and on but i did it anyway and i sucked it was objectively bad and occasionally i actually go back to those early days of the podcast and i listened to my initial episodes. I cringe my way through them. They are awful but the thing. Is you want to know how many people listen to my first episodes back then less than twenty less than twenty downloads per episode and compared to what things look like. Now that's nothing yet so many when we stumble through something that's new or big or unfamiliar or ambiguous. We think everyone is watching us. We second-guessed and pick apart our decisions behaviors and failures because we feel like we are on a stage for everyone to see and to some extent. That's true. I mean in business and in anything we publicly do. Our actions and their results are typically available for people to see but in reality very peop- very few people are actually watching the stage that you think you're on it's as though ninety. Five percent of the audience is facing away from you. They're not even watching so today on this episode. I want to focus on something called the spotlight effect. This is the tendency we have to overestimate. How much other people notice about us. We tend to think there's a spotlight on us at all times highlighting. All of our mistakes are are flaws for all the world to see and to illustrate this effect. Let's take a really quick detour into some research conducted by a set of psychologists cornell in their study they had students where t shirts that either had flattering or potentially embarrassing images depicted on them and after wearing the shirts around in public. The students were asked to estimate how many people would remember what was on their shirt. And guess what they significantly over estimated. They believe that more people were paying attention to them than actually were. This is the spotlight effect and this tendency of ours can impact the decisions we make the risks we take and are alternate success in business. Now i began this episode with that quote from eleanor roosevelt. For a reason. You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Because that is a near constant in business one of the big challenges and businesses that we constantly bump up against obstacles that we think we can't overcome and then somehow we do them. But here's the thing if you're constantly having to overcome barriers and move through obstacles that are new and bigger than what you're used to an ambiguous and difficult it's inevitable that you'll stumble a bit or even fail the first or second or fifteenth time and as humans. We're social beings. It's baked into our dna. Our minds use a handful of tricks to get us to be overly concerned with the thoughts and opinions and judgments of others and the spotlight effect is one of those tricky little tricks. And there's no time when that's more apparent than when you're constantly having to stumble over barriers and obstacles that are new ambiguous and difficult the fear and anxiety that it can bring. I mean it's crippling. And if we give into our minds overreacting tendencies. We can quickly be pulled into a cycle of paralysis over analyzing our every move waiting until the path is one hundred percent clear before we take the first step and exactly. None of that is conducive to building a successful business. You'll make me. You'll hear me make this next point repeatedly on these friday episodes business success is born out of failure. You see failure in business isn't really failure. It's a lesson. It's impossible to move forward in business without experiencing a moderate degree of failure. And letting other people's watching is especially when those watching is our over estimated it's fatal for your business.

Eleanor Roosevelt Paralysis
A New Model for Bitcoin Mining Pools with Ethan Vera of Luxor

HASHR8

06:45 min | 4 months ago

A New Model for Bitcoin Mining Pools with Ethan Vera of Luxor

"One of the things that we've never really talked about. Is your background in mining. Even on show a couple of times but for a while there. You were running a facility in kansas city right. Yeah that's right ray. Six for a while like ninety five percent six okay although yes super bitter backstory. We started lecture in like august twenty seventeen and obviously those were crazy times back then nicoletti. My two co founders. They were looking at place like twenty of our own machines in the facility and there was no good qualifications back then you had to go through like a random website that connects you like a guy running computers in his back shed and that'd be like the hosting site. Yeah we thought like at the time like. Let's go into invest in one of these Sites said own some of the infrastructure side where software guys. We built software products but let's vertically integrated with it infrastructure level so invested some money into the site An hour north of Kansas city missouri had four megawatts total of power But none of the power was flowing yet the building so we slowly build up to it. We took a colocation approach. And so you know a lot of the paints we went through. I think that's why. I think compass it's such a great product is because like all the pains be went through. I think would have been helped if we had compass at the time but we went through a very painful process of like having hundred fifty retail clients into an entirely new business posting their machines in a facility. That wasn't will build wasn't equipped to deal with the kansas city. Summer at just under capitalized from the start and so kind of all the everything kind of went wrong. That could've and it ended up going under. But i think You know is a very valuable learning experience for our team. The infrastructure side of the businesses incredibly hard and so. We've learned kind of the difficulties there. We wanna build like the best software products. We tend to support that but No way do. I wanna head down to a facility again and i work with nick foster like two. Am at night with pizza. Hut trying to wrack minors this man. Did you guys moved to the area while the city was operational. Yeah i was about like a two minute. Walk away in this like a motel. Yikes in this town of a few thousand people. It was just me like making anywhere. They came to own a few weekends. But i kinda went. Live down there for a bit trying to turn thing around and you know jumping into this location he is. I think it's really hard to manage that many clients if your new business you know. Maybe a professional company like has the process down pat but for a lot of these new colocation. They may have incredible like power rates could facility but just like interfacing with a hundred and fifty. Two hundred clients is incredibly tough. So that's the compass like an incredible amount of value to these types of operations. Is you can kind of partner with somebody to do that for you. And it solves a lot of your headaches there. It's difficult for people and when you have good technical knowledge and you want to build out a warehouse and host minors. There's a lot to it you know. I think that you know people will find cheap power and they don't understand that like having cheap power is okay but like there's cheap power everywhere. There's reasons that even though people find cheap power they have trouble standing up a facility whether itself mining or it's hosting for other people is because there's a lot goes into it. It's not just you know building a a chicken coop and putting up some racks getting getting people in you know as restraining people for compass you can tell like you can tell when you have a conversation with somebody like who's ready to host clients and who is just trying to jump on the gravy train like who understands that there's an opportunity now they just wanna you know. Stand something up and get some machines in. There's going to be people that are out there that are going to end up. Getting wrecked by jumping in some of these facilities are just not ready to handle them. And i mean like the the cores and some of those other guys for them. It's prohibitive to take smaller clients. They have they have a ton of space available. And i think they're targeting a different clientele well well-capitalized. They've got the ability to understand the financials properly. They know what they're getting into a few machines. Goff line it's not the end of their world just a different bag. But i think that more people than ever now looking to get into bitcoin mining and i just think that's gonna continue to grow company Where you know investing capital into these facilities but you are investing time and Your your brand to a degree at in your reputation. So there is that level like due-diligence which you wanna pick the winners and losers. I think that's really hard. Because you know at the time that we had mighty tack back in early. Eighteen via like a dozen competitors probably only a few of them made it guys like compute north and frontier who are our competitors at the time. They're the ones who kind of went on to have pretty good operations where islam You never heard of again. So it's it's a very hard job to pick those kind of coming facilities which ones are going to make it which aren't You hope you get like a computer. North style But there is a possibility. You get something else So yeah the. I'm kind of jealous of you like getting to watch the life cycle of those Facilities because i you know. It's pretty cool to be with people during their setup phase and then moving on to see them have success. I think as we get like three or four years in industry here. It's been amazing to like. Do that journey with a bunch of Fellow miners whether it's like pilot. Frontier foster boomer acts like it's really cool to see. I'm curious to see how things will shape up globally. Now it i would say not. As risky to host outside of north america. It'd be interesting to see how that narrative changes you know when you guys were going through the process of that facility folding. It's never easy thing so it's easy now because it's done right like it's in the past and you found success since then. Current success allows you to talk about previous failures. In a way that is yes heart wrenching but as you were going through that When the facility was the process of folding it was what twenty eighteen as the market was starting. Yeah exactly so. How was that pivot mentally for you guys as a team. I think this is the point. Where it in a startup. You always have to see if you're going to double down on your strategy endure approach or if you're going to pivot and like every business book or every. Nba teachers like business pivot. Learn that in the classroom because it's just so different when you're in that situation it's like you've just invested a year of your time into building this thing you still have some level conviction in it and even if it's not going right at one point you had very big aspirations for low like how do you eventually blake. Pull the cord pivot spend capital in that that time elsewhere And that's a hard decision. I think it's you know we've gone through. That lecture before with various products is like is this product worth continuing to back had pushed and I think that's like one of the things you learn. I think early on startups is like when to pull. It would continue on in double down for this minority like we kept quitting in dollars investments. We're doing cash. Calls the shareholder level to fund it. Eventually it was just like we can't keep pouring money into this thing. That's just burning money and so what we did was basically. We told all of our clients. Hey you can either ship your machines. Two lightspeed in ohio or compute north in nebraska will pay for the shipping. I just let us know where you wanna go. We gave them like a few weeks. Heads up that we're holding and so luckily our customers than get burned. Who's kind of just the employees shareholders which isn't great. Obviously but at least we kind of maintain those those customers relationships and made read it like screw them over to bad but it was a hard decision for

Nicoletti Nick Foster Kansas City Missouri Goff North America NBA Blake Nebraska Ohio
"ninety five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Class of the ninety five percent consistently lose money yeah you know you say he you know you really believe that they're out there they're saying I don't want to be poor and and you know it goes back to you know kind of a a life long lesson the that we shared with me at a young age and it's like well you know you don't want to be port we sure act like you do you know an action speak a lot louder than words and so many times you will hear some he said well I don't want to be in this situation we sure act like you do because the some where we are in life is the sum of all the decisions up until this point time period right so if we don't want to be in the situation we're in number one stop acting like it because acting like it is what's got us there right so change kind of changed the whole approach really everything that we're doing and you know we go back through poor the whole passing over opportunities repeatedly again not taking advantage of an opportunity to say I'm not going to do that right now that is taking an action that is opportunity avoidance that takes us right into that poor mindset and it's one of the commonalities that you'll see over and over I see I I've seen and heard people come up with every single excuse I imaginable I have heard the phrase might ducks aren't in a row I don't know how many times and if I hear it one more time I actually may vomit because it is the oldest and the lamest excuse I've ever heard you want what you want to know why your ducks in a row because doc start ever in a row it's an excuse people use to not face their own issues and to not have to put any effort against it it is so much easier to do nothing and just sit back and complain rather than do something in own where we're at and try to make the necessary changes to make things better now one of the places where you can really get started off with this is really getting that education getting that foundation built take those first steps of getting over the fear because it's usually the fear the told you back and where can you do that but out of one of our classes and right now before the break Larry how but we do another give away let's do it right now I have a.

Larry ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In sync with the picture and a lot of times their specific beats you have to head I have to be at this bar at this moment I have to be this by this moment so the way that was achieved was there with her take a crayon and draw a line across the the film going from one side to the other and when it way that appears on screen as as a line moving from left to right streaming across the the screen and telling you that went by the time that line gets the right hand side I've got to be a bar thirty one and you know so that's a streamer punches were a way of giving the conductor some metronome information basically it be just that if you take a punch like you'd punched paper with a Huff and punch a hole in the ground like for every beat was her maybe where every bar was so we see this white dot and he would know if you were all had to speed up a little of that conduct would know if he was in time to meet its obligations to the picture and and do you conduct when you have composers my conduct and see all my sessions that's the fun part which I think the most fun it's the most fun yeah and and are you is it like we've seen in the movies about movies is the movie like screening in front of you well it's these days it's screen funny but on a tiny screen rights or they don't really do it that way if any of these stories these days so it is a big kick you know I I I spend ninety five percent my life by myself in a room yeah that's what I do as a composer but for that those few days when we're recording it you put on an Ascot entails exactly and and in an imperious tone and that's right so as you're sinking the the movie with the music that can be done very tightly where every bit of action and then it can be more freely.

Huff ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on WJR 760

"Those built be active documents to help you get the most out of your financial life is critical and what about for a married couple making sure that both spouses are actively engaged in all interactions with financial planner. So we are all very busy. We divide and conquer and we have to respect that. But what the mistake is is we aren't inclusive. So if the man or the woman are taking one's got the investment plan in one has the daily financial household management. We have to talk to each other to make sure the right and left hand know what they're doing when we get disconnected. And and don't have a sense of are we on track for our financial security your personal definition of financial security, which may be different than your spouse's. That disconnect can then create some distrust, not only in your relationship, but with the financial advisory team, you're working with. It's okay to have different motivations in goals. But you have the middle ground, and you have to talk to each other even unpleasant things have to come forward in the process. You know, it's really interesting. I think that that that definition is different ninety five percent of the time the financial security for the husband is different than what financial security is for the wife. And so what it reminds me of is let's say that a couple wants to build. A new house and they're going to build it from scratch. Well, obviously, you don't just go by and take a snapshot of a house from your phone or smartphone, or whatever and take that picture over to Home Depot and say, hey, this is the house I want give me the materials that I need to buy. No, you've got to start out with an architect. And right now, what couple would allow only one person to go speak to that architect and tell them what they want the house to look like because I'm going to guarantee you that there's things in the house that the husband wants that are totally different than things in the house that the wife wants, and there's some of the things that the wife wants the husband doesn't even care about and the husband wants to wipe doesn't care about. But they have to come together talk about there's going to be compromised because they're both going to live there when you're talking to a financial planner. There's things that each of you want that are different than the other. And if you don't both voice those things, and they're not listened to from the financial planning perspective. And you don't talk about those in reached the common ground. Then you're never going to be able to have that one ideal financial life that you really want that to me is what the heart of financial planning. Is all about it is understanding just like an architect needs understand what you want to build the financial planner needs to understand what is your financial life..

Home Depot ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Pure percentage of all the music, I listen to ninety five percent of it is new. Like I'm not one of these people that's like I listen to music for my job. But when I get home, you know, I listen to Waylon Jennings like it's not like that. Like I genuinely curious and interested in what's happening, right? This second, I want to know the narrative of pop music that's happening right now. And to be honest, I was like this before I had this job. Yeah, it just happens. I lucked into getting a job that requires this of me, but it's however always been. I've asked this of TV critics. I don't think I've asked him use it creding. Do you have like a regimen or you like two hours in the morning? Hit with soundcloud top fifty on it. I wish I, I wish organized an extremely disorganized person. It's very catches catch. Can we do a thing? We do like our Friday playlist at the paper. So like once a week, I'm kind of forced to soundcloud fifty. YouTube new music Spotify knew me like I try to engage with those things, but it's very haphazard because for me, no, no, no two weeks or a like like the only you steady things in my week or I record a podcast. My right this playlist but everything else like I could be traveling. I could be writing a profile when I did the Connie thing. I was basically off grid for three. If you look at my social media or you look at my byline page of the times, there was just three weeks. Right? Didn't write anything and why the remaining writing. Because I was like, trains I transcribed myself, but I was transcribing like ten or twelve hours of audio. You didn't wanna like send the off to the traditional. Never send an important tape out to be transcribed. Second of all, you know, you go on and off record with people. I don't trust other people that and third, when you transfer. -cribe your own tape. You remember the nuances. You remember the context you remember when the bag crunch happens? That's the Doritos, the remember. Yeah. And so I want to trigger all that for myself. So between transcribing first draft, second draft, like I was off credit, so no regimen, I wish Sunday with the red. If someone has a good regimen, I would love to know what it would be, but like I just can't imagine it would work. So I think we've been talking more about the profile side than the criticism side and would just didn't critic. So thinking about the critic side and this also applies to the profile because I think that the line is blurring a little bit when we say. It's hard to not like bring biographical information into a critical review. You're reviewing Drake, you can't be like Drake, the music, not the person, and also like I choose to do the profiles I choose to do because of a critical impulse. Right? Like it's not like we're like someone's gotta profile, Chris carrabba yet. I, I'll just do it like it's more like, I think this might be an interesting thing in the larger critical narrative. I'm trying to tells, but maybe I can tell the story a little bit more effectively through an interview as opposed to through Ryan essay. So in the critical round like taking, I Don, I'm sorry that this interview is had the word Drake in at like nine hundred. I don't know why not enough. Yeah, more so. Okay. So you talked about people who are in between the obituary story. First story, Drake, Fitzherbert rarely in that camp. Still number one streaming artists in the world still really on the throne on some level here much, but also you didn't interview him for his last album. Didn't necessarily feel like you had to. When someone like Drake, there's so much noise coming out of the internet. So many takes less. There's so many Instagram posts that Ogla we're talking about that. I wonder, I, I listened to your pop cast about the new Drake album scorpion just 'cause there's a million narratives converging on Drake, album scorpion and not only can you not expect your audience is aware of all of those narrative unless those narratives are kind of bullshit, but they're still kind of fun to talk about is the pop cast like a vessel for you to be able to bring all of that stuff in like, I guess I think that when I imagine what the.

Drake Waylon Jennings Chris carrabba Fitzherbert Instagram YouTube Spotify Ogla Ryan ninety five percent twelve hours three weeks two hours two weeks
"ninety five percent" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

Diet Starts Tomorrow

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

"You're supposed to kind of be angry and resentful. The fact that this is actually what screwing you don't stop blaming yourself and saw blaming the start blaming the diets. Yeah. And if you want proof for the fact that it's not like one diet is this is this beautiful, holy grail of it works because that's not true. We've all done it. We've all done every diet. We've and the failure rate for diets like ninety five percents for across the board. It has except maybe I think Weight Watchers is is better. I one, but that's, that's it. Other than that, like all the restrictive ones where you cut out this or that, or you can't this or that people fall off it like ninety five percent. Okay. So the second principle and this is sort of the underlying basis of it is the scariest one? Yeah, this is the scariest visit. It is because this is this is the, this is the thing that you're not doing that you then need to switch to learn how to do, and it's called honoring your hunger honor. You know what's actually crazy just. The fact of us both saying that it's scary show like a person who is completely normal. Like a normal relationship with food would never consider eating because you're hungry, scary. But like the fact that we've been on a diet for so long. We have someone in the back of our heads that's not really us like saying like starvation as good. Yeah, you're you should be restricting. What do you mean? You're not counting calories? What do you mean? You need to be like monitoring how much you eat all day? Like what do you mean? What do you mean? What do we know instead it's telling you should just eat? Well, it's sort of like honoring your hunger and your as when I'm not hungry all the time that honoring my hunger that's basically making my hunger and irrelevant signal my body sending. That doesn't actually mean anything to me because I'm not responding to actually. So the ideas if you feel hungry, eat, eat, like stop, trying to stop, trying to find the thing that's the lowest calorie that's gonna make. That's Bill you up. It's not going to satisfy. You stop seeking out substitutes for the thing that you want. If you're hungry and you feel like you want your body's craving protein, then..

ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I don't even think we get alice stockton rose ceo i'm sure alison apparently there is very little evidence that women have multiple orgasms and in fact a regional a recent national study united states found that ninety five percent of heterosexual men in eighty nine percent of gay men say they always climax during sex often more than once but in is going to stop this right yeah i've heterosexual women the rate is only six i would bet you lesbians it's eightysix what yes that's what it says this is what the guardian says you're talking about multiple what is the soap opera story i ever heard this in the guardian it's called the search for the multiple orgasms holy grail the depictions i'm surprised joe's did have multiple orgasms here's what here's what we know so far about the clitoris on the day stay it's a little bit up skoda let's move this to walk out of highbrow portion of the show a story about firefighter two firefighters in the akron fire department ohio they have been suspended after they were accused of shooting pornography inside the fire station with each other.

alice stockton ceo alison joe akron fire department skoda ohio eighty nine percent ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The web page for paying their tax bills using their bank accounts crashed the page was operation again later on but it was unavailable for most of the day the irs apologized for the issue and said it appreciated everyone's patience we can wait can't wait we can wait for the ninety five percent of the world's population breathe unsafe air and the burden is now falling hardest on the poorest communities with the gap between the most polluted and leash polluted countries rising rapidly according to a study of global air pollution a diamond burying space rock that exploded in earth's atmosphere in two thousand eight was part of a lost planet from an early solar system according to a study the parent proto planet existed billions of years ago before breaking up in a collision that would have been about as large as mercury or mars a team has published results in the journal nature what's amazing though when you look at some of the work of researchers like zachariah sicheng who talk about a collision with planets in our solar system and now science is beginning to find this out it's just it's remarkable up next the man stephen quayle back with us on coast to coast his latest work has called terminated the end of man is here we gotta wait and find out what that's all about next on coast to coast am today's technology makes a lot of things easier simply because everything is connected your cell phone is connected to your tablet your tablet is connected to your smart tv and they're all connected.

irs zachariah sicheng stephen quayle ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"And it changed our environment we went from we decrease the cross traffic by ninety five percents with with that fence and the roads in the whites and the technology so that's ninety five percent were they scrap metal wall that they just put together with excess material had it worked ninety five percent and that wall they get over these walls they can for the people that say no wall if you didn't have walls over here you wouldn't even have a country you wouldn't even have a country and by the way the state of california is begging us to build walls in certain areas they don't tell you that and we said we won't do it until we build the whole but there are certain areas as you know where they're really wanting us to build the wall and because the people are complaining people flooring it so you know they don't talk about that well i do have the problem is you have to have seen through you have to know what's on the other side of the wall and i mean a preferences something like that the problem is you don't know what's on the other side of the wall have you don't know what's i mean you could be two feet away from a criminal cartel and you don't even know they're there now we have to take care of that extra incentive but if you're on that side of the wall that's the hardest walter scale it's got a lot of assets the problem is tell them what do you think about the importance of through what i have seen through walser i know what's approaching borden ford approaches we have great partners in mexico law enforcement on that side i can call them for assistance i don't get the opportunity to get ahead of a threat if i can't see the approach and what's the danger of not having to see when the steel metal fence behind us we learned from that in back in the nineties we went in actually cut in sports where we could see on the south side we found that that smugglers were using the fence to hide by and they were either rocking our agents or they were the choir large groups of people in our connex and then they were.

california mexico ninety five percent two feet
"ninety five percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"So there's a foster flow of sweets to is dry for most low over the border in sweden where there's no sugar tax the revolved candy shops including one i visited that trying to entice norwegian shoppers with products which are half the price it's hard to imagine anything else quite like it the swedish owner says this is one of the biggest sweet shops in the world it has twenty of them all a short distance from the border ninety five percent of customers come over from norway some shoppers have made long journeys to stock up on chocolate sweets and sugary drinks stalls selling other goods nearby can also offer lower prices than back at home coming every once a month to buy food so it's it's what it it's not only because of the price but like to have a trip by when we come here matz it brought from the company got a bit in which owns the stores says he's noticed a sales boost since the norwegian tax went up we're getting more customers and we also see that the existing customers that we already had is buying more that we can also see the sugar tax in new way goes back to the nineteen twenties and was introduced as a revenue raising measure the government believes it has helped stabilize child abuse d levels for fifteen year olds over the lost decade sweden's a higher and have risen more rapidly the norwegian government has made efforts to get food companies to reduce sugar content ursa mickelson is the health minister now to step off that a visit tier of children and young people and i'm happy about that it means that what we had done unto now had been functioning on the right way.

sweden norwegian government norway ninety five percent fifteen year
"ninety five percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"So there's a foster flow of sweets to is dry for most low over the border in sweden where there's no sugar tax the revolved candy shops including one i visited that trying to entice norwegian shoppers with products which are half the price it's hard to imagine anything else quite like it the swedish owner says this is one of the biggest sweet shops in the world it has twenty of them all a short distance from the border ninety five percent of customers come over from norway some shoppers have made long journeys to stock up on chocolate sweets and sugary drinks stalls selling other goods nearby can also offer lower prices than back at home coming every once a month to buy food so it's it's what it it's not only because of the price but like to have a trip by when we come here matz it brought from the company got a bit in which owns the stores says he's noticed a sales boost since the norwegian tax went up we're getting more customers and we also see that the existing customers that we already had is buying more that we can also see the sugar tax in new way goes back to the nineteen twenties and was introduced as a revenue raising measure the government believes it has helped stabilize child abuse d levels for fifteen year olds over the lost decade sweden's a higher and have risen more rapidly the norwegian government has made efforts to get food companies to reduce sugar content ursa mickelson is the health minister now to step off that a visit tier of children and young people and i'm happy about that it means that what we had done unto now had been functioning on the right way.

sweden norwegian government norway ninety five percent fifteen year
"ninety five percent" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"That you can actually have decentralised money even if they're buying bitcoin like all these people right now that are setting up accounts on base probably ninety five percent of them don't really understand that this is a decentralized value transfer system right you know they get that it's like digital money be ends but it it it you basically have to church question and challenge your own assumptions about money that you are condition to believe since birth basically to really understand that a third party lists trust minimized decentralised money system as possible so the argument is you know if uh if the fees are higher than visa you know why would anybody use basically right so for instance bitcoin starch dropping in price starchy cratering you know all these new people are going to be like i'm losing money and every time i try and move it i have to pay twenty bucks you know he's crazy right this was like a ponzi i got i got duped into a ponzi scheme so that's like that's like a fair argument i would say uh and then the other argument is basically the bitcoin core argument is at this point in reality it's nearly impossible to scale bitcoin to the masses and thus we need a second layer solution essentially where what we do is we maintain decentralisation by keeping the bloc's ice cap as low as as as humanly possible centrally and we try and use great engineering techniques to minimise the amount of data that actually has to be used by someone spending digital currency that this is basically segue such that the number of transactions that are occurring are each using less data and therefore the block sized growth is going to really be impeded we can keep the bloc's ice cap minimal and weak.

ponzi scheme ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"And you could decide if you want to stay on the medication or not about ninety five percent of of said whoa i had no idea and we talked about this list of serotonin reuptake inhibitors they don't inject anything into your body what it does is it helps to maintain your body serotonin by inhibiting the receptors that will take in an integrated so the natural serotonin will last longer in your body and damp has that can be side effects you could also get some tolerance children later need higher doses so there's still not a medicine to play with but when a patient noticed is that something that simple changes the way they feel to that degree i'm like a just like if you weren't what one sugar fewer no one sugar and you took in sugar either you know you will notice the difference right away and some people will feel that way when it comes to the select the search 100 we have taken hitters like still loved lex perot paxil prozac they also have other medications out there what pizren while putrid though that's interesting worldview triggers the medication that i will provide first floor depression i'd like to give the syrup four depression right away i like to give what view trim because won't be introduced were stimulatory and the it seems that up the energy and it seems to have a really low side effect profile and it doesn't central of the sexual dysfunction a lot of people they don't wanna have sexual dysfunction so they're not gonna want to take medication that prevents them from having sex that'll really get them depressed so wellbutrin seems to help of that and sometimes the we'll vijn works so well that if i think somebody serotonin is low and i have to give them an has this right are and will be tricky to it to.

ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"We're not going to take out the the state local taxes we're going to be reduced taxes for everybody basically under two hundred thousand dollars will probably get at that covers ninety five percent of the people and just a little bit maybe to the millionaire's will cut the we'll cut the business tax rate the corporate tax rate even if it's the effective rate goes from eighteen to sixteen or fifteen it least makes his or seventeen point nine or seventeen point nine it makes us a little bit more competitive and the democrats were going to get some debris croats who will vote ford because uh you know they may say stable we need to be concerned about the debt but they don't care about the debt deck with no democrats don't care about the debt knob republicans don't and i believe that that is will be basically what you get i don't believe that the shell of the plan that we saw taking out all you know these deductions and everything else i i don't think you are i ever believed that that was going to be the case which again which is why we weren't as sky high as may maybe other people because we just went through three different healthcare plan yeah i mean i never even considered it as as as realistic as the as part of that you know just the the shell of the plan the just the the outline of the plan because there's no way it's going to happen there's no way it's going to happen on capitol hill with it's not going to happen with conservative republicans they're not going to they're not gonna take that deduction away the homeowners deduction they're not going to them you know we can have the discussion on on on child tax credit but sorry actually now take that back we can't have that discussion you know why you're evil its well becau here's yes i look i don't like kids let's face it they don't know a lot you know there was running around anyway the whole i really don't like children the whole idea it's going to end up somewhere at the whole idea behind it is the same as with healthcare or any other big government handout i mean it's.

capitol hill tax credit corporate tax two hundred thousand dollars ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"The the the i think the republicans understand that look okay let's play hardball little bit okay will throwing alba we're not to we're not going to take out the the state and local taxes we're going to be reduced taxes for everybody basically under two hundred thousand dollars will probably get at that covers ninety five percent of the people and just a little bit maybe to the millionaire's will cut the we'll cut the business tax rate the corporate tax rate even if it's the effective rate goes from eighteen to sixteen or fifteen it lease makes us or seventeen point nine or seventeen point nine it makes us a little bit more competitive and the democrats we're going to get some damage croats who will vote ford because uh you know they may say well we need to be concerned about the debt but they don't care about the debt democrat we know democrats don't care about the debt knob republicans down and i believe that that is will be basically what you get i don't believe that the shell of the plan that we saw taking out all you know these deductions and everything else i i don't think you or i ever believed that that was going to be the case which again which is why we weren't as sky high is maybe other people because we just went through three different healthcare plan yeah i mean i never even considered it as as the as realistic as the as part of that you know just the the shell of the plan the just the the outline of the plan because there's no way it's going to happen there's no way it's going to happen on capitol hill with it's not going to happen with conservative republicans they're not gonna they're not gonna take that deduction away the homeowners deduction they're not going to them you know we can have the discussion on on on child tax credit but sorry actually now take that back we can't have that discussion you know why you're evil its well becau here's yes i look.

capitol hill tax credit corporate tax two hundred thousand dollars ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on WDRC

"The the the i think the republicans understand that look okay let's play hard ball a little bit oh cable throw in all the moroccan we're not going to take out the the state local taxes we're going to be reduced taxes for everybody basically under two hundred thousand dollars will probably get it that covers ninety five percent of the people and just a little bit maybe to the millionaire's will cut the we'll cut the business tax rate the corporate tax rate even if it's the effective rate goes from eighteen to sixteen or fifteen it lease makes his or seventeen point nine or seventeen point nike it makes us a little bit more competitive and the democrats were going to get some democray rats who will vote ford because uh you know they may say well we need to be concerned about the debt but they don't care about the dead democrat we know democrats don't care about the debt knob republicans down and i believe that that is will be basically what you get i don't believe that the shell of the plan that we saw taking out all you know these deductions and everything else i re i i don't think you are i ever believed that that was going to be the case which again which is why we weren't as sky high as may be other people because we just went through three different healthcare plan yeah i mean i never even considered it as as the eggs as realistic as the as part of that you know just the the shell of the plan i am the just the the outline of the plan because there's no way it's going to happen there's no way it's going to happen on capitol hill with it's not going to happen with conservative republicans they're not gonna they're not gonna take that deduction away the homeowners deduction they're not going to them you know we can have the discussion on on on child tax credit of sorry actually now take that back we can't have that discussion know why.

nike capitol hill tax credit corporate tax two hundred thousand dollars ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on WDRC

"Reduce your debt load uh by as much as ninety five percent or have debts themselves reduced by that mon amount of money which is absolutely silly don't trust anyone who promises how much they can heavy debt reduced um and what happens is people will send them uh their money usually by an untraceable it that's a big red flag like uh wire transfer will gift cards and they get nothing in return but even and they're in a worst problem than they were before but there's no another a part of it that we have to be aware of and that is in some cases they will call again either criminals is not legitimate accompanies uh you pay the money and then they'll call now they say we need to process this week and personal information and it puts a student who is desperate uh here he may vary we'll give that information so with the best advice it better business bureau has for students were having difficulty or anyone else uh having difficulty uh trying to uh consolidate or reduce their debt load for his most important thing to do is if you're an overhead contact your lender to see if they can lower your payments or temporarily suspend him for a given amount of time um and what's happening in the case of these phony debt relief companies is this thing uh you know don't work this will be taken care of very very quickly and unfortunately like i said people lose money on it they lose a personal information first thing again go in and speak to lender there'll be more than happy to help you one thing you should not do is play catandmouse if indeed you're having difficulty handling your debt don't hide from the bank speak with them otherwise it can hurt you in a long time on in the longterm okay howard although shots of the whole those thought spread we've got to traffic update traffic update and day here she is cindy good morning again and how is the bumper to bumper crowd doing at this hour well bad it's that do ensue bad 84 we just have delays both ways through waterbury as you.

howard waterbury ninety five percent
"ninety five percent" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

Weekly Infusion

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"ninety five percent" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

"Is that a reasonable place to start uh well in by the way every throw it even a they they want they wants that more simple had never gone what complex i let me let me ask three different things a consciousness subjectively and self how do we understand these reader for thanksgiving because i think there will related very very much so yes they are and the and the neurosciences got something to say about the these matters also on the matter of consciousness again we're talking about what reaches conscious awareness in a human being the truth of it is that ninety five percent of the activities of the brain occurs at levels beneath consciousness now for a long time it used to be thought so this also has to talk about now the flip side of that not only consciousness but unconscious and suffer longtime he used to be thought that what is unconscious is everything that is repressed everything that the conscious mind experiences in consciousness that it no lauren can tolerate that it pushes adam awareness and for a long time essentially uh that was the idea end so the idea of therapy was make the unconscious conscious and that would be the resolution of the cure but we now know that the area of unconsciousness includes much more them what is repressed it also includes activities which are occurring in the brain that are so rapid like the ability to process a face and fifty milliseconds and to identify the person the gender safety danger cetera all of that is occurring again without conscious awareness now that is not because it's it's repressed or it is difficult the chefs again because so much is occurring in the body all of the or onomic never systems occurring essentially a consciousness.

lauren thanksgiving ninety five percent