35 Burst results for "nine percent"

Sell Me Your Climate Bombs

Planet Money

07:16 min | 3 d ago

Sell Me Your Climate Bombs

"Okay. So there are countless outdated old refrigerant tanks scattered around the country and Tim and Gabe say that the problem is you cannot just dump these tanks in the trash you wanted to take it to a dump, their knocking ticket they'll say, no, no that stuff's like hazardous material we don't want here. Material. The only thing you're allowed to dump, there is the empty tank when it's all gone. So you're really stuck it sits there on your shelf you have no use for and it's eventually going to leak through these cylinders cans into the atmosphere. If you're a professional like an auto mechanic or an H. back installer or if you're just one of those tinkers who hangs out at autozone, you might have one of these bad band canisters and. You could pay to safely dump the chemical out, but only a few places in the US will even do it and it's expensive. That's why they're canisters of this stuff just sitting in old garages rusting away and leaking leaking a greenhouse gas that is thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide and getting rid of refrigerant is one of the most important things we can do to address climate change according to a leading climate solutions organization called drawdown. which is why Tim, and Gabe have come all the way to the gas station in middle of Nowhere Illinois to meet a man in a red jeep renegade named Geoffrey. Geoffrey. Geoffrey is standing next to a two foot tall canister refrigerant that people might recognize by its common name Freon. Jim In fact recognizes the brand name Dupont igloo. So what does this is? igloo Freon twelve. So where did you What did you find the material? Jeffrey says a friend gave it to him years ago Kim asks him if he was in the Business Jeffrey no but my friend was he said he got the refrigerant because he figured maybe he'd use it in the systems of antique cars that he was thinking about rebuilding, but he never got around to it. Nineteen years. Business on shelf shop. How did you hear US oft up on my facebook one day At this out of the blue, a facebook ad popped up that said, we pay good money for old refrigerant Jeffrey. I have some of that answered the Ad, and now here we are Tim and Gabe take a sample from Geoffrey. They do a couple of calculations where they add up the weight of all the refrigerant and have Geoffrey signs informs you're signing here that your. This is your material. Now you're handing over to us. You're also a test saying that it was sourced within the United States and not the US government or a native American tribe. Correct correct. Okay. And then gables out a wad of bills and starts flowing them one by one into Jeffrey's hand. Material. So. Shop. The Money. Except for the signing of the receipt and everything, it feels almost like a drug deal cash transaction in this dusty remote middle of nowhere. Tim wouldn't tell US exactly how much changed hands but he said it was in the low hundreds and yet this is Tim Gabes legitimate business. Their company is called trade water and they make pickups like this of all sizes from a one pound can the size of a spray paint bottle tweet forty, thousand pound job they did a while back where they vacuumed the refrigerant out of an old industrial cooling system after a bit of Chitchat Tim and Gabe wrap up with Geoffrey Geoffrey tells them. If he hears anyone else with spare refrigerants, he'll send them their way. Right on. Jeffrey how is that? That was painless was. Is If you find anymore you know where to call welcome you John Here In Europe somebody's got one of the. Transaction. Takes care. Did you hear that Tim just said we'll take good care of it for you. Yeah. Well, me and my how to Save Planet Co host we're listening in on this deal. Of course, we're on facetime with them and my co host name is Hannah Elizabeth Johnson. She's a scientist and she and I asked him and Gabe about that particular comment and you said we'll take good care of this for you. Because you you aren't GonNa take good care of it. You'RE GONNA destroyed. Exactly. Probably not We, don't really. We don't really talk about that very much. Yeah. They transfer all the gas from the little tank they collect into a huge tank that looks kind of like a missile and then they drive that missile looking tank to a fancy destruction facility. Essentially, an incinerator permited hazardous waste. Rotary, King Incinerator. So you burn it we burn you burn. Your like setting it on fire and we are. Do you see gas in flames? Is that what it looks like? We don't generally watch it being burned. View, it's see to their view window flame. Yeah. A big bright flame incinerating refrigerants at this special facility actually neutralizes most of the dangerous stuff ninety, nine, point, nine, nine percent of the bad stuff doesn't go out into the atmosphere time bomb diffused, which if you're trying to address global warming, this is a fantastic thing right after all this is Tim and Gabes mission. So, why don't they tell their customers about it? Well Gabe says, their customers aren't always on board with that mission. In fact, a lot of them don't even believe global warming is real. This is A. Farce that's been pulled by the EPA or a U.. N. and so people will hang up and say I'm not going to sell to you. I'm GonNa find someone else who's GonNa use this the way it was meant to be used. Now some people are really attached to their to their refrigerant. So now generally. Advertised we're gonNA destroy because we just never know somebody that will make people uninterested in the deal. That's interesting because it seems like. Is My co host I oughta it's all over your website, right? Like your website makes it pretty clear why you're doing this and if people are finding you through facebook ads they. Already know are you on the trade water website? Yeah. So. When we do these transactions, we actually use a different name doing business. Call refrigerant finders. Go to refrigerant finders website. You will see a different framing of what we do. The homepage of the treated water website has the words reducing the world's carbon footprint in big letters huge font over background of leafy Green Fernley. The refrigerant find a website there no leaves there's no mention of climate change. It just says we buy your old refrigerant and has pictures of men in work boots carrying around rest canisters.

Geoffrey Geoffrey Tim Gabes Gabe Jeffrey United States Facebook Autozone Us Government Illinois Europe Dupont Igloo King Incinerator JIM
Why Talking Politics Could Be Hurting Your Career

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

03:39 min | 4 d ago

Why Talking Politics Could Be Hurting Your Career

"SO MONSTER DOT com. PADS done a survey. And they pulled people and they came up with that close to forty percent of American workers, Joe Engage in political discussions at work. Now, this is funny. In the Control Room Madison does not engage in political discussions probably not even outside of work she does not. Joe Engages in political discussions at work at home. Sleep talking sleepwalking he is engaging in political discussion, but I'm trying to cut it down a little bit. I'm not judging you. I'm just saying that it's very funny to me that this is what I'm teaching on today and you and Madison are on opposite ends of the spectrum. Yes, we are. All right. Here's the breakdown nearly forty percent engage in active political discussion at work thirteen point nine percent. Of people actively engaged. That's Joe I I thought it would be higher by the way, but it's it's right at fourteen percent. Thirty four point, eight percent. Say. They listen to political discussions at work but don't participate. and. Then twenty three point one percent passively engage in the discussion. So, that's where the forty percent engagement number comes at I gotTa tell you. That if you're listening but not participating, you're engaging. So I think that number's higher but I get what they're saying when it comes to engage because here's what Saudi these thirty four point, eight percent that say well, I'm listening but I don't participate and these people are going. Well, that's not engaged yet is because here's what's happening there listening and later when when everybody that's like really engaged leaves they're talking about it to everybody else and this is my point why this is dangerous. Here's the deal I used to work in politics. Joe knows this Madison as. I worked at it fulltime from the age of twenty, two, twenty three and then got out I love politics and the game and I love following it. Okay. I'll love it as much as anybody I. Enjoy a good political discussion as much as anybody. Well here's one thing I've learned Joe and I'm passing this onto the audience never once in my life ever. Have I heard somebody with a strong political opinion in a social gathering in an engaged conversation or debate. Let's be honest. That's what it turns into. I've never seen or heard somebody change somebody's mind Thanksgiving table or at the workplace never once. So. What happens is you engage? and. Their spirited conversation. It turns into possibly a debate. or a contentious situation and no matter how strong your logic is no matter how clear you're talking points are Joe you are not going to change the person's opinion. You're not. It just never happens. It's never like Oh, really. So. Here's the point when politics come up. It's probably best. To just listen not participate. That's what thirty four point eight percent of people are doing. Probably a good idea to just listen and not get involved because here's what happens. One conversation happens and I've done this by the way and you think you're having a fun healthy spirited conversation and you make a really strong point on something and somebody who's not engaged with you walks up and hears it and they are of a very different opinion. Now, all of a sudden you offended them. Don't even talk to them.

Joe Engage Madison
Yesterday's Short Trades Is Todays Profits

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:17 min | 5 d ago

Yesterday's Short Trades Is Todays Profits

"Not only was it a good day because the fishing solder things, but it was a good day because there was monet. was money yeah money to be. Made. But you guys went was actually Did. The podcast so I can remember but anyway. Eight of. Those tried to set up Zeke Took it profit year beauty. All side I took tease. US Prophet you beauty. So yeah, it was It was really good dice him some good profits in this came about that I will to snaffle and take advantage of. So really buddy die I'm still by shortened by them by Toggle targets obtain hidden one has had a stop loss move to lock in profit, and this is the thing is. As the markets. Shine a little bit more weight nece at the moment. It doesn't mean that we still do. Well that's I really frustrates me when people don't understand is that you don't need to have a mock it moving Haya to do well. Gina you don't need to have. The market go up and up and up and up out you to make money I it's it's about getting in to a market. And understanding that market. Knowing what you looking at more importantly knowing what you'll looking full now as I, look at Bitcoin rotten now I'm looking at a market that saves I wanna go at the moment we we've got another low high and low allow you to go with it. So we we've got a four hour downtrend the Idaho downturns now they're the daily looked at daily could still pop up at any minute, but there's definitely selling pressure I mean we've gone from eleven thousand, one, hundred to. Ten, thousand? Two hundred. How to die hard on I. Don't know it's nothing to be sniffed out. So, you know it's important for us to keep that in mind and. If you not. To tried. That's just an excuse me making. I'll be honest. You can try you. You made a choice not to. and that's why you don't have to. But you've made a choice not to whilst amok foles you feel pine. You can feel a very different emotion and it can be a pleasurable one. Anyway bitcoin rotten out stand point three, percent yesterday closed down point seven, nine percent. Now, we still we about ten. It's GonNa be interesting to see what happens. Are we GONNA push down through ten not concerned we unless we break down through the all lows of nine, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, one because it just Chinese the whole picture then back into a bit of a downtrend on a daily and the weekly also will add to that picture of that trending down I'm not really want to say that you know what I really WanNa see that. Ten Thousand Children Seventy three dollars rotten. Theory three, hundred, twenty, three dollars and ninety eight cents. It's down. It's up one her sent to diet was down seven, six, point, nine, percent yesterday knauss looking down to a matter of fact A. Quicker is one out. ooh. Man. For come back to that off the ways in a downtrend on that four momentum is definitely shifting bearish. And it's yes three twenty four much motorcyles exa pay right now break that support at twenty, two, point nine and twenty, three, seven mock that I spoke. She goes today. Look I'd love to say it pull back up into that low pull up into that region giving a little bearish candle off of that twenty sent market just be cracking set up but it's not to be further to go is point seven at twenty two point two cents Bitcoin cash twenty. Twenty are two hundred, nineteen dollars eighty, which was an old level of Resistance Asari support became resistance fell from their hod as a matter of fact, yesterday bitcoin cash was down five point five percent prog looking jot will to forty five right

United States Monet. Idaho Haya Gina
AP Source: Chargers' team doctor punctured Taylor's lung

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

05:47 min | 5 d ago

AP Source: Chargers' team doctor punctured Taylor's lung

"Adam, Schefter just reported that tyrod Taylor. The reason why he did not get to play this past week in an intern air bear started for the first time against Kansas City chiefs at ended with hitting a fifty eight yard field goals and another fifty eight yard field goal. But a highly contested matchup between the chargers the chiefs it is now being reported that the chargers team doctor accidentally punctured his own quarterback tyrod Taylor's lung just before kick-off. Sunday while trying to administer a painkilling injection to the quarterbacks cracked ribs league and team sources have told ESPN. According to my sources. Adam Schefter says, now, this sounds terrible whenever you give your I read this and like especially the way she afterward it there the chargers team doctor punctured his own quarterbacks lungs, and that sounds absolutely bad and I was kind of mind blown by this believe it or not. We are given a heads up on this yesterday but we're not a big news breaking world I don't want to dive into the news breaking world because there's a bunch of Peron in sharks in. Going ever dive in there. So I asked around to a couple former teammates in friends of mine that have maybe gotten the same procedure how the hell can something like this happens this sounds terrible in the answer I got from everybody who has had this procedure done, which by the way is marketing, which is in the Novacaine. There's another Cain the mark which is. A numbing agent basically that gets shot directly into the area that is injured for instance, in this particular case, the cracked ribs. Now, the reason why it's done. So close to game time is because it only lasts four four and a half hours so they can't get it done in the morning because the numbness wear off, they can't get it done the night before because. Off they have to do it right before the game, which is why it was surprised to everybody that air bear was starting over tyrod Taylor, including Air Bear, and I would assume the entire chargers offense. Now, what happens though just like whenever you're in surgery now granted this happened to the people I talked to harm percents short happened to tyrod Taylor but just like whenever you go in for surgery for anything, they tell you the possible side effects this could. Potentially happen because surgery this could potentially happen. It's like basically this small print at the bottom of contracts like, Hey, this is all the good looking come from this but also this can happen every person that I talked to got a similar treatment as this said that they were told by the doctor that there was a chance that along could get punctured in the process because when you're giving a shot into the ribs, the long obviously is right there one. A. Hundred percent sure of tyrod Taylor. Was told that before we got the shock. I'm just telling you what I was told by people who got very the exact same situation here free. The bruised ribs are cracked ribs allegedly this is a much more common practice than even I knew about I've probably seen guys potentially get this shop before and didn't even know this was happening because I had nothing to do with me but I guess this is a pretty Common practice whenever you have a crab or bruise rib because it works like a charm I was told and I was also told that they shoot it a little bit above wherever the crack or the bruises in. Let's just settling in for four and a half five hours. You feel amazing. It's that next day you see more that night when it wears off that you feel absolutely terrible thus why I am incredibly happy that I played a position where no motherfuckers. where I could potentially need that. So that is what happened. We obviously tease piece for the punctured lung and the cracked ribs for tyrod. Taylor but from my knowledge of my research calling people that got a similar thing, they said that they were told that was a possible outcome. It's like point one percent that it could happen. But in surgery just like anything in the medical field, there is obviously a chance at something bad to happen it happened tyrod Taylor. I'm not giving an excuse for the doctor do your fucking job right? Especially whenever the people that told me, they said it's like a ninety nine. percent chance it goes well and nothing happens. So if you get that one percent and it's a failure, obviously the doctor did not do here and I would assume would have to answer for that. But that is what I've been told about this entire process. That is why it was such a shock to everybody including air bear who said he was surprised in ancient said, let's go and do this. So I think that is why everything happened the way it is I've been told I'm not a doctor they are not doctors but a punctured lung on punctures itself somehow I don't know that means I guess. Shout out to the human body for puncturing itself. He could play week to week is really could potentially play next week. What do you say day breaking news just from in report he's not GonNa play this week harbored is going to start. Okay. So here we go. There's big news not playing this week. So as long isn't completely on punctured and also. I think that is why because the way one down in him losing the starting job was actually the chargers fault that is why Anthony Lynn came out and said unless. tyrod is he's still are started because I would assume Anthony Len former player was like we gotta fuck this guy here. So whenever he was asked about who's the starter even after incredible debut by Air Bear in the game that they had against the Super Bowl Champs Anthony Lynn probably was. I mean, we couldn't say it obviously because worn one hundred percent. Sure because at the time they're probably still reviewing and Anthony Lane. Prada. Didn't get a chance to do a full checkup on house whatever the case maybe didn't and he didn't want to be like. tyrod Taylor's by the way. We're the reason he's out and he is we made this disease like they. Couldn't say that. So that's why I think I was confused by the way insulin handled the question I think a lot of people are potentially confused but now we know air bear starting this weekend tyrod Taylor not only has cracked ribs but also punctured lung hopefully that unpunctual quickly we're not doctors they have no idea but it is nice to know that this type of thing does happen has happened in the past we probably. Haven't heard about it for whatever reason, and this is something that happens on a regular basis with success. So it's not like they were going above and beyond to make him put him on the field. This is something that has happened in the past

Tyrod Taylor Chargers Adam Schefter Espn Chiefs Intern Kansas City Anthony Lynn Anthony Lane Peron Prada Novacaine Cain Anthony Len
Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

Post Reports

05:07 min | 5 d ago

Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

"The reality is in the Senate right now, it takes just simple majority to advance any presidential nominee Paul Kane is the senior congressional correspondent for the post whether it is to some random commission overseeing the Great Lakes or the Supreme Court of the United States of America, and that has left the minority party with very few options. The reality is that there's not a whole they can do. and. What are some of these theories that we have heard of that Democrats could do or that people think the Democrats could do right now oh, there's this thought of if you impeached someone anyone bill bar or in the trump again and sent to that resolution across the capital that it would instantly stop all other action and forced them to hold an impeachment trial. You know I got an email from a reader asking about they could just deny unanimous consent blocking unanimous consent is something that blocks the action from taking place and basically would make the voting process go much more slowly. Yeah. But there are provisions. Already in line for how to deal with those things, you file something called a cloture motion. That's the that's the way you blocked a filibuster defeat filibuster and yes, it'll take three days to overcome that process but think of it this way if there really were away for this minority party to block this Supreme Court nominee then Mitch McConnell would have thought of it in the eight years that he served as minority leader and was considered the obstructionist in chief. He was considered the greatest structure in the history of the Senate blocking Brock Obama at every possible way if there were ways for digital block Supreme Court. Nominations of Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan from the minority position McConnell would have done it but he couldn't do it, and then I've heard these ideas that potentially if Democrats were to win control of the Senate in November, and if there were to be a Democratic president that there's this idea, you could pack the court afterward, you could just change the number of justices that there are on the Supreme Court and increase them. So you could have two more. Democrat appointed justices or you could have four more. Well, that is a the that is something that can legitimately be done in the legislative process. There was no. Foundation in the constitution that set the number of surpreme. Court justices at nine. It started with six justices the chief and five associate justices an grew over the years and you know to be sure you know the considered the greatest Democratic president of all Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried in the nineteen thirties to pack the court and very infamous way and eventually was shot down and the reality is if Democrats were to go through the couple year process of adding justices to spring court that would immediately be met in return with Republicans. Next time they have the power and you know we just would go back and forth by. In twenty years, we might have twenty one justices and also probably need support from actual democratic leadership, and this seems like something that Congressional leadership isn't that interested in something that Joe Biden has said that he straight up doesn't think should happen Yeah Biden had got a little bit cagey the other night when he was asked about it in a local interview I think it was in Wisconsin and he basically said that he didn't want to answer the question because of the answers the question. Then that's GonNa change the. Discussion and what Democrats are trying to do right now is to avoid these. These are processed fights. I know that there is a bigger bigger goal at hand here in terms of overall policy and how that policy is reviewed at the supreme. Court. But most of the public tunes this stuff out because they, they hear things about over Republicans are being hypocrites and well like eighty nine percent or more of the public says, yeah, they're all hypocrites no big deal and they really want to try and focus this fight politically. On, what the impact of trading in Ruth? Bader GINSBURG. The most iconic liberal justice of the last twenty five years for a very staunch conservative jurist like amy, Coney Barrett like that is the biggest ideological jump that the court would have seen since thurgood Marshall was replaced by Clarence Thomas They WanNa make this fight politically not about these seemingly random efforts to put more justices on the Supreme Court and they want this fight to be about the impact on the affordable care act on voting rights on clean air clean. Water

Supreme Court Senate Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden President Trump Great Lakes United States Bader Ginsburg Sonia Sotomayor Brock Obama Paul Kane America Ruth Thurgood Marshall Elena Kagan Franklin Delano Roosevelt Wisconsin Clarence Thomas AMY
Bank stocks knocked as Suspicious Activity Reports come to light

CNBC's Fast Money

01:26 min | Last week

Bank stocks knocked as Suspicious Activity Reports come to light

"Bank stocks getting crushed today a new report about the big firms dealing suspicious finds Wilford. Frost Scott the details wealth harmless. So Bank stocks were down sharply today following large declines for their European counterparts, Deutsche Bank for example, closed down nine percent on European trade. Standard Chartered down about five percent both hitting twenty five year lows in London trade earlier US banks ended up down about four percent. This is in part due to investigation by the International Consortium of investigative journalist that highlighted suspicious activity from various banks in the past specifically money laundering following a review of more than two thousand, one hundred reports filed by the US Treasury financial crimes. Enforcement Network a slew. Mentioned including I said HSBC Bank Standard Chartered JP Morgan and Bank of New York Mellon amongst others clearly, this activity is embarrassing for the banks however important to note in the past and that government and regulators were already aware of these details since suspicious activity reports by their very nature all reports between the banks and the government in the first place for example, for example, Deutsche Bank told me this is not new information to us or regulators Today off therefore much more down to the broad cyclical selloff linked to covid economic headlines, and also that Supreme Court news further making a stimulus bill less likely something that banks are disproportionately reliant on compared to some other

Deutsche Bank Hsbc Bank Standard Chartered J Bank Of New York Mellon Standard Chartered United States Us Treasury Wilford Supreme Court Scott Financial Crimes International Consortium Of
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last week

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Apple says Epic is 'marketing' with Fortnite lawsuit, Epic hits back

Mac OS Ken

01:44 min | Last week

Apple says Epic is 'marketing' with Fortnite lawsuit, Epic hits back

"Epochs back an apple with a big. I told you last week about apple's assertion that fortunes for epic sport night were waning before the APP store dust stopped. According to a recent court filing by apple by July Twenty, twenty interest in fortnight had decreased by nearly seventy percent as compared to October twenty. Nineteen. This lawsuit and the front page headlines at his generated appears to be part of marketing campaign designed to reinvigorate interest in fortnight. Q. The NAH. The piece for men, gadget has epic indicating that apple was using Google search data for that seventy percent number the same piece as the gamemaker asserting that the number of daily active fortnight players actually grew thirty nine percent over the same timeframe. The Game Company had other arguments as well. According to n Gadget denied. Apple's claims that removing epics OPS help security and privacy arguing that apple hadn't referenced a single security issue with fortnight's direct payment and in game updates systems. The APP and use the endgame updates for years without objection epoch said. It. Also argued against apple stands on in-app purchases for games surprising. No one. And it refused apples assertion that EPA created the current situation maintaining that it was simply exercising at Supreme Court backed power to reject. Contractual conditions. The two sides next made in court a week from today Monday the twenty eighth of September.

Apple Supreme Court Game Company EPA Google
Wall Street posts third week of declines as tech slide drags on

Wall Street Breakfast

00:13 sec | Last week

Wall Street posts third week of declines as tech slide drags on

"Things aren't looking brighter for US equities following wall. Street's third straight weekly decline with Dow futures down two point one percent and contracts tied to the p five, hundred and Nasdaq off one point nine percent.

United States Street
AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

"As he pushes for another term findings in a new poll indicate president trump is facing risks by down playing the corona viruses risks his re election rests at least in part I'm convincing voters the pandemic is receding both in words I really do believe we're rounding the corner and actions like speaking to tightly packed crowds the president's been trying to give the impression of a nation moving past the pandemic but sixty nine percent of respondents that AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll say they are at least somewhat concerned about the virus including about half of Republicans just thirty nine percent approve of how the president's handling the pandemic Sager mag ani Washington

President Trump Ani Washington
AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

"As he pushes for another term findings in a new poll indicate president trump is facing risks by down playing the corona viruses risks his re election rests at least in part I'm convincing voters the pandemic is receding both in words I really do believe we're rounding the corner and actions like speaking to tightly packed crowds the president's been trying to give the impression of a nation moving past the pandemic but sixty nine percent of respondents that AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll say they are at least somewhat concerned about the virus including about half of Republicans just thirty nine percent approve of how the president's handling the pandemic Sager mag ani Washington

President Trump Ani Washington
AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

AP-NORC Poll: Trump faces deep pessimism as election nears

"Election day is fewer than seven weeks away and president trump is facing deep pessimism as he bids for another term in a P. and R. C. center for public affairs research poll finds roughly seven in ten Americans think the nation is on the wrong track and while the president argues the U. S. is turning the corner and a virus pandemic that has killed nearly two hundred thousand Americans we have done a phenomenal job just thirty nine percent in the poll approve of his pandemic handling sixty nine percent say they're still worried about themselves or a relative getting the virus including more than half of Republicans showing the president faces a risky and downplaying the virus over the campaign's final weeks Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump R. C. Center President Trump Sager Ani Washington
Today Cryptotraders Could Be Busy

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:51 min | Last week

Today Cryptotraders Could Be Busy

"Tonight's looking good today is looking good bitcoin play the game yesterday it pushed onto another daily high pushed higher trendies day we grinding why? Grind Grind Grind, is what we? Currently. Doing and look I tell you what? It's It really does look could. Let me visit numbers? We got two, thousand, one, hundred, seventeen, all thereabouts thereabouts that he's effectively a A point of resistance that was a support level that I raised my orders to buy Bitcoin It's come back up towards it tapped on. Yesterday, it just tapped a little tap tap tap. TAP. Aroo. And now. I'd love to say that level guy we get through that level and we stopped to get a lot more going on a lot more interest and bitcoin will the news that's coming at continues to be stronger and stronger and stronger we currently from those lives that we saw. In the full which happened to be nine eight to one way up twelve point, two, five percent from those lows. So the last three days have been pretty pretty conscious nothing major nothing major but let's get back to I. Think it was Monday Monday. Will we all right now we're up nearly seven percent. Or thirty seven percent thus far actually the best way to do that it's just a little weekly six point six percent the guy. And this off the weekly. So I just gotTa plant in the minute now, willy pushed through today will we see bitcoin pulled back a little bit and give us that or low on the high timeframes twelve-hour will the daily before we go through? That's the probability that I'm waiting to save plays at a couple of tries came out yesterday that was one on that was one K B while. X which is perpetual. Okay. B. p. e. By Doing the thing that look right now you know. BITCOIN's momentum guards at starting to look a little bit dangerous. He smashes through that resistance plays going the whole of the top ten is lit up wrought now and looks superb arts bitcoin eleven thousand and thirteen dollars a half percent to die look yesterday. Let's not forget what Adidas I did go all the way out one point six percent closing at ten, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, loy eleven, thousand theorems pretty a pretty good. Push out of the Guy Fawkes up three point seven six. Now, we're only one hour into the trading day and the three seventy nine, point six, three yesterday was flat and do anything except pay another one stop it's pushed hard full percent at twenty five point, six cents we sitting at right now starting to see that momentum increase once again, mole bullishness coming across these top ten bitcoin cash yesterday was damn point three percent today currently up two percent to thirty fuss what seven zero locking up three percent today. Yesterday. It was down one point one percent. It's at forty nine dollars and twenty three cents vase at one point four, three percents still one of the most ugly shots in the top ten. The, right. No data bats up one point four percent at one, sixty, five, forty, four. Donna closing in at ten sent me was down yesterday was only down one point seven percent today so far up two point, five percent bonds had bullish cattle in the cradle dot closing. It's broken the high of that now that doesn't mean tried to vital to me right now. It just means it's done something. It's I didn't get along on that tried to it because it wasn't there. There was low a high hall I don't play that game. Ply The guy, a tried trend. The trend wasn't set. We currently twenty dollars twenty one, one, point, nine percent on the day. Saifi ails would. Up One point two percent rejected the lows yesterday at one stage the law two, dollars fifty, seven, a closet toodle seventy one, point three, it's up two percent of the minute. Two hundred seventy six is what you WANNA theory else full length is up three point five, six percent off the being down one point out yesterday we are eleven and twelve cents holding again above that ten dollars, he's a story of the day thus far. Off Donald, my scans Adema scans across the markets that I like to try. On the full list full scan, it's Now seeing green lit up everywhere at the moment really really is a positive looking stopped to the dialogue full of so other continues to kick on. But if you look at the daily shots, there is a potential for lot of these dialing shots to have a high low in a bitcoins already continued movie it's dominated. than any of the others as far as moving. Hi, this way cerium look give if we can get above three ninety point seven, one, the high blood of high lows, but they'll be. Then we'll have an uptrend

Bitcoin Guy Fawkes Donna Willy Donald Trump
Snowflake's Stock Price Soars in IPO

CNBC's Fast Money

05:53 min | Last week

Snowflake's Stock Price Soars in IPO

"Welcome to pass money a blockbuster debut for the biggest. IPO. Of the year cloud companies snowflake pricing. It's public offering at one hundred, twenty dollars a share closing at two hundred and fifty three dollars a share that is a gain of one hundred and eleven percent. But this isn't the first time. We've seen a monster move in public debut. Let's get to Bop Bassani with more on that Bob. Hello Melissa see you. So you think snowflake over one hundred percent of its first day is a big deal. Not really there's been plenty of companies that have had I ate POPs bigger than that this year loan and they include just take a look here. Biotech firm cure back was up two hundred and forty percent on its first day of trading software as a service firm big commerce up to one hundred percent biotech firm. Berkeley light of nearly two hundred cloud company and Seino up one hundred, ninety, six, percent insurance fintech firm lemonade up. Thirty nine percent on their first day of trading what they have in common is there either tech or biotech firms are they outliers marginally but the first day pop for IPO's this year is notably higher than usual. So the historic first they pop for an IPO usually about fourteen percent. That's. Historically but not this year the average I stay pop in two, thousand, twenty, thirty, six, percent. What's going on? It's not stocks are cheap. The multiple of tech stocks are historically high people are willing to pay more protect because there's just a higher degree of risk appetite out there, and if you're suddenly inspired to start buying these high flying IPO. Cautious. About this look after the first day the post first day returns of other high fliers is not encouraging. So there's been eleven IPO's this year that have popped more than one hundred percent. On the first day they have average a minus, one percent return from the first day closed forward. So be very careful Melissa here big pop on the first day for some of these. But after that very difficult to maintain continued momentum most about you bob thank you good to see you Bob Cassani and who is holding the bag in the aftermarket when these Ip has declined from the first day pop guy probably the retail investor this has been the story of the issue markets. Began though and it continues today. So. You wonder why people get exercise when they see things like this is exactly that I mean I'll say it I'm not. I'm not a banker I never was a banker and I'm sure to upset some people by saying this but. There's no way to put it other than the fact that this was completely misplaced. Now I'm sure the great bankers are J. P. Morgan and Goldman and whoever a city I think was on this deal and company will say, no, we price it right. You can't tell me that a company that has a seventy billion dollar market CAP, which was open it you know price at one twenty and tripled almost in price and had to be halted its some point today for price volatility was priced right and the people watching saying, how is this not a game I? Get it it it upsets me as well but that's the way the business works in that to me is problematic mill. Why does it upset me? WHAT'S THE PROBLEM Tim i? Think they thought it was valued at something investors in the market. Thought it was something else I mean that's the way the markets work right? Again, though it's it's it's terrible price discovery because you have some sense and bankers WANNA price and the companies want a price that deal that leaves him upside for investors but but to be clear this is three times more at least the guide from last week and so the the question really is, how can they be so far off environment where we know people are paying almost anything for growth and actually wear and cloud services but but ultimately, I think the real question is who gets access to this. IPO and the thing that's troubling is that this is not a fair game. And the allocation process is one that makes sense that there are plenty of opportunities for people who did not deserve big allocations to get them and I realized this ultimately. The dynamic of a company. First of all will say I want a certain institutional investor base on my cap stack and those are the people. I want my deal. I. Don't want certain people. Read investors typically are not the group that companies want There's a perception that they're going to be in their flipping those stocks faster. The reality is that there's a lot of hedge funds. They'd probably flip this thing aggressively today. So again to me, my issue is with the allocation process and that it's not. It's it's not a fair process maybe it's not supposed to be asked the bankers that because I think that's what this comes down to to be fair. There are some companies that actually say in the allocation that they want a certain amount to go to retail trading firms like a td Ameritrade for those firms. So then Dole out to retail investors but gosh, I think to brings up a good point in terms of the average per se popping thirty six percent this year that really shows you what this market is these days the search for growth and what investors are willing to pay for that growth. Yeah, and also you got to you have to factor in we're in a different environment. So the offering price is different than the opening price, and all of that is based on interactions with institutions trying to figure out supply demand while everyone is filming from podcast or from an ipad in their home. So it's very different than last year. Very different. The whole IPO process having said that it really speaks to the reach for growth. So, if you have the price action that we saw today. Think about it. It's Tim said you want to have if you're coming out as a public company, you WanNa, put your stock in institutions hands where they're less likely to flip out of that stock on the day of the. IPO. And that's where the whole system. Might be flawed, but it's worked this way for a tremendous amount of time, and there's always going to be a problem with any system anywhere.

Bob Cassani Tim I Melissa Bop Bassani Berkeley Seino Dole J. P. Morgan Goldman
Chrome tackles Abusive Ads

Security Now

08:39 min | Last week

Chrome tackles Abusive Ads

"Chrome Fortunately will be getting tough on abusive ads. In a posting on get hub. Google's engineer John. Delaney has spelled out the chromium projects, intentions regarding abusive ads. So. First of all modern web pages are a jungle of stuff. So how does chromium the chromium engine determine? For itself what's an ad and what isn't It comes down to something known as add tagging. Chromium is able to detect some ads and the resources they load in the browser. This enables the browser to measure the size, the performance and the count of ads displayed. To its users, it also allows the browser to intervene on the user's behalf when ads run counter to what they decide is the users interest, for example, using crazy amount of resources engaging in some abusive behavior or whatever. So that add detection infrastructure, they call at tagging and it's not very inspired. It works by matching resource requests against a filter list to determine if they're ad requests and in there in a sample that they've got of some code, they show them you like importing the easy list, which of course, is a well known list that's being maintained by a community of a known domain names that are providing ads. So they said any requests. Matching the filter are tagged as adds further requests and some dom elements such as I frames made on behalf of previously tagged scripts are also tagged as ads by the AD tracker. So it's not just it's as images that match the filter. It's if scripts were coming from a a known add source than the things that are essentially descendents of those scripts would also be tagged as ads, which certainly you'd want to have happen. They said I pray will be marked as an ad I frame. If it's your L. matches the filter list if tagged. Is Involved in the creation of the I frame or if it's parent frame is an ad I frame. So you know you can't get can't sneak out of it by creating a frame within a frame and say look I'm not the original one. The mainframe on a page will never be tagged as an add good. and. Then they said any request made within an ad I frame is considered an ad resource request. So drilling down on this one level. We learned that this sub resource filter loads the filter list, and then perform this url matching of any requests against that list it's distributed. That is the filter list is distributed via the component update, which is just part of the chrome installation. So it's be main, it's being kept current constantly, and the same list and component is also used for blocking ads on abusive sites. And those that violate the better ads standard. they explained that each sub resource request in the render process is processed by the sub resource filter before the request is sent from the browser out. So it's not that it blocks things coming back. It never makes the request in the first place. It just you know denies denies it on the from the the page making the request. Okay so you get ads identified as such. How were they treated differently this is where John, explains what they they call the heavy add intervention. A small fraction of ads on the Web us and John Likes the word egregious will see there's a couple of times and egregious amount of system resources. He says these poorly performance ads whether intentional or not harm the user's browsing experience by making pages slow draining the device's battery and consuming mobile data. He says for those without unlimited plans and then he says, in these egregious cases, the browser can upload the offending adds. To, protect the individuals divide. I'm sorry that browser can unload saying wet the browser can unload the offending adds to protect the individuals device resources. He says, this is a strong intervention that's meant to safeguard the users resources with low risk because unloading and add is unlikely to result in loss of functionality of the pages main content. Is as examples of observed at behavior that are intended to be discouraged. Are Note no surprise adds that mine crypto currency. ADDS that load large poorly compressed into is So just sloppy ads ads that loge large video files before a user gesture. Or adds that perform expensive operations in Java script such as decoding video files or seat. CPU Timing Attacks Yeah we don't want those. So Google notes that is not their intention to discourage any specific ad creative formats such as display video ads. So they're trying to be as agnostic as possible. So the user agent, the Browser will unload ads that US and he says again and agreed amount of network bandwidth or CPU usage. We define reaches as using more of a resource than ninety nine point, nine percent of ads as measured by the browser. That's well, you know. So that sets a very high bar says he and he says only adds that have not been interacted with by the user will be unloaded. And here's what's interesting and this is some tech We've never talked about before that's therefore worth mentioning. All unloaded frames will be notified via an intervention report. That the intervention occurred. This feedback is necessary to help advertisers or their AD technology vendors to identify and fix ads that are triggering this intervention. So first of all, just a little bit a little last word on the classification of ads. He says that's left to the discretion of the user agent. For example, chrome detects ads using what we talked about the ad tagging feature. An advertisement is considered heavy if it has not been clicked on by the user and meets any of the following criteria. It uses the main thread for more than sixty seconds total. The or used the main thread for more than fifteen seconds in any thirty second window. So they they said and parental fifty percent utilization over thirty seconds. Or used more than four megabytes of network bandwidth to load resources. So any of those thresholds get crossed the that the new chrome technology will say, nope and just boot the ad it's you know, sorry, you're a bad. And he said that the thresholds above were inspired by the I. ABC's lean standard that's in caps but chosen to but has chosen by looking at crumbs metrics at the ninety nine point ninth percentile of network and CPU usage in ads so again. Most ads are not gonNa Cross that line but those that do, and there are some bye-bye.

Chromium Google John Delaney Engineer I. Abc
Under Trump, US reputation hits rock-bottom: Pew global survey

PRI's The World

02:10 min | Last week

Under Trump, US reputation hits rock-bottom: Pew global survey

"For the past three and a half years the united. States has not been very favorably viewed by other Western countries that's according to survey results from the Pew Research Center but a new study they paula shows that our reputation has taken even deeper nosedive just over the past year Jacob poster is at Pugh in Washington Jacob Pugh does a lot of surveys and this is not the first one about America's image what made this survey nick. Well, we've actually been doing surveys for twenty years now, and we've been tracking the international image of the US during that time period and in the current survey in two thousand and twenty, we're finding some the lowest ratings we've ever found among traditional allies of the United States in terms of US favorability including in Japan, the UK Canada you know more than four in ten have positive views of the United States and these are some of the lowest levels of favorability we've ever measured for the United States. The title of the survey says a lot. I think US image plummets internationally as most say country's handled corona virus badly. So how did your survey respondents about the US and the corona virus like what was one of the questions? Where we ask people on whether various countries including their own were doing a good job of dealing with the corona virus outbreak and on that question when we asked about it for the United States, no more than twenty percent and any of the thirteen countries that we surveyed said, the United States was doing a good job of dealing with the krona virus outbreak and that's different from what people told us about their own countries and most of the. Countries we surveyed people were actually fairly happy with how their own country had dealt with the outbreak. The there are places where the US image is seen more positively than other places. What country had the most people who thought the US was responding well to the coronavirus in terms of response to the coronavirus no country was over twenty percent. But when it comes to the US favorability, there are countries were a majority still have a favorable view of. The US, but that number has shrunk dramatically in the last year. South. Korea's one country where fifty nine percent have a favorable view of the US. But even there that's down almost twenty points from two thousand nineteen when seventy seven percent favourable view of the US

United States Jacob Pugh Pew Research Center Paula Korea Washington America Canada UK Japan
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
"nine percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The first debate he kicked ass after that. I'm not so sure what the what his plan was. But the exit polling seemed to be right there completely dead and horrendously wrong in two thousand sixteen and I really do believe that the fake news media that our president complains about as much as he does. I really do believe that the fake news media is putting up these polls in the hopes. He'll stay home. Very interesting to me. That's really really what I think is going to happen. So we're keeping a close eye on at carry any updated anything new. The Georgia governor's race. Everybody's been talking about Abrahams. The democrat has twenty percent camp has seventy eight percent. But that's less than one percent reporting. The Indiana Senate race Donald of the democrat thirty eight percent Republican Bron fifty nine percent in Florida. It's really neck and neck for the governor. And the Senate race guillemots forty-nine percent. The Santa's has forty-nine percent Nelson in the Senate race as the Democrats forty-nine percent. Scott has fifty percent in that race near thirty four percent. Reporting already in Florida. I wonder this. I wonder those of you who are listening right now. How many of you? This is your first time voting, and it was different than you thought. It would be it was the same as you thought. It would be you're excited to go vote. Why was this the election that made sense for you to go and vote definitely want to hear from you on that eight nine four one pags joepags dot com. Let me go to John in Kansas City, John minute. Like seriously a minute guide. Hey, Joe, thanks for taking my call. I got three sons that are voting age right now. No conservatives, and I can tell you they're all in college. And I'm just challenging ever care to go out there and vote with their kids. You know, my dad did my first election was during Reagan, and I can tell you that if you take the time to go out with your kids and vote with and then explain the, you know, the candidates is they'll be informed, and they'll want to vote for the rest of their lives. They were very excited about voting. And I'm really glad they went out and they did their part. I think he's very smart advice. I think that's awesome advice. Yeah. Go and vote with your kid for the first time. I think that'd be great. Why not shown the process tell them the process talk to them about it and get people who will be voters for life. So they can take part and actually make a difference have a voice here with the country. Looks like going forward. It is edit eight nine four one eight eight eight nine four one seven two four seven joepags dot com. Got Ronald McDaniel the RNC chair when we come back. Some last words about voting today.

Senate Democrats Reagan Florida John minute president Abrahams Ronald McDaniel Indiana Georgia RNC Scott Joe Kansas City Santa Nelson forty-nine percent seventy eight percent
"nine percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And they say, okay, rob. We can't float anymore. It's time to go to closing. You have to lock the rate in before you can go to closing. And you know what? My sisters brothers best friend was wrong. Oh rates did not get better. And in fact, they're much much worse. And I'm not going to give you a nine percent interest rate. What are you gonna do? And you're gonna ask me to bring more money to what are you gonna do? Rob. I mean with you got me hand, are you gonna walk away from the dream home? Are you going to walk away from the home that you're in? That your wife's in love with that. You've showed the kids, and you put the pictures on Facebook and you've enrolled the kids in school and everything or you're going to take the ridiculous nine percent right now. That's obviously, a very outlandish example. No one's going to raise the rate that much. They could what would you do? I mean, what are they raised the rate to four or five six seven eight nine ten twenty. If it's the day before closing, what are you gonna do? You're stuck your stock? You have two choices take the higher rates or walk away from the house and the industry knows that most people will take the higher rate, and if he actually attached if I walk away. There's also penalties attached, right? I'm gonna lose my escrow. Absolutely. You can even get sued by the seller at that point. Because see the thing is you have financing in place. Now, some real estate contracts are written that you're financing has to be below a certain rate or else it doesn't qualify. But even that expires with the finance contingency. So it's just a bad situation. So the way to protect yourself from. This is simple. Make sure you get the the rate lock locked the rate in up front do not let them convince you to play the float game the only person who benefits from you playing. The float game is the mortgage company. Okay. Because remember it costs us money to lock your rate. Rated right. So by locking your rating upfront we take more risk in the market because I have to lock your than if the inspection comes back bad or the appraisal comes in lower. And he's things I could potentially have losses in the market, and we have really complex formulas. I wrote for our hedging software that that I wrote the does all this here at our funding. And and I think we do it better than most people. So we don't take as much risk. But some lenders have a really high risk, especially when when you're dealing with a mortgage broker because the. Mortgage broker the Leonard is even know if they're actually going to get the loan. So the mortgage broker to lock the loan with the lender. And the Leonard is even if the mortgage broker really has a file interview met you. And so there's all this cost built into rates around locking..

Leonard Facebook nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Movement Mortgage is, a national company and Matt was just telling us how they. Give forty, nine percent of, the. Proceeds fourteen nine percent of their proceeds to a cause that goes out and helps construct. Schools churches the whole nine in in in countries that. Need it you know probably the, most yeah, the, next part of. My career is to get more involved in that part of it so you can sign up and go to mission trips customers can sign up and go. You know we we host them. Then there's a, cost, of like a plane ticket and. Whatnot to get there and everything else is paid for? You stay with the, community help two kids you meet a lot of people. You, bring this, you you become very much humbled by do you think you're more valuable here bringing business in 'cause I, mean, you you. Are one of the top producers in? The northeast so I mean don't you think that you'd be more valuable. Here. Instead, of swinging And a. Hammer because I I don't really. See you swing, a, hammer as I look at an. Opportunity to explore the world because we you know an? Over around very well, I do have a fantastic team that works behind me. That, supports me, so couple of days I'll be back yeah you'll be you'll be You know when I when I want vacation Matt radio just went to, Bahamas I I gotta tell you I. Was so excited because for the first time truly the first time since. I've started my business it ran so. Well, probably better without me I would, not say that I'm kidding but I when you're talking about your team and, your back and support for your clients and and that's really what it's all about and there's so much that, can happen in the real estate transaction there's so..

Matt Hammer fourteen nine percent nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on 99 Percent Invisible

99 Percent Invisible

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on 99 Percent Invisible

"This is ninety nine percent invisible i'm roman mars log is a radio producer you might recognize his name in the credits of the npr quiz show wait wait don't tell me or as the co host of the now defunct podcast how to do everything which i just loved it such a good show he has a new podcast out right now launching this week and it's delightfully weird well the show is called everything is alive and it's an interview show in which all the subjects are inanimate objects so i talked to things so what made you want to do a show like this well a couple of things like one i think it's just like a would just sort of think this way like i you know i get up from a chair and think about what a terrible job that chair had and and like how the chair must feel about being sat on all the time and then also like i think producing for so long you're always trying to get to like the primary source you know and like you're always looking for experts i thought it would be really fun if like you know you're putting the other piece about rainbows or whatever and like rather than talk to the physicist who understands rainbows if you could actually talk to the rainbow so that that's kind of the idea i know that listeners to ninety percent of his bowl of fully capable of accepting that even the most mundane objects are infused with great meaning and can say something about us as humans but you may not be prepared for that object to actually talk so i asked ian for a primer on how to listen to everything is alive you know if i was talking to a candle say like a bedroom candle like it's not every candle it's not speaking for every candle it is one candle that has sat on one night stand forever and like been blown out by one person forever and has a relationship with that person but they're kind of aware of their object communities like it knows more about candles than we do it also has very distinct lifetime of experiences but the things that it says are all factual i think i was surprised by that when i first heard the episodes that i've the samples that i've heard yeah they know things they know real things about their world for the most part they're the inanimate object version of the person at the party who like always has an anecdote for everything they're very aware air of history and of stories of what they are so even though the situation is quite absurd on the face when you hear fact it's a true fact yeah there is so much about the kind of personal life of the object that you know you know isn't exactly real but when i'm telling a story about something real i don't cite it you know i don't tell you where i heard it and so we're just letting the objects behave in the same way and so there's probably you know there's going to be some mystery and hopefully people will google pick out if things a real or not this is everything is alive hosted by ian to log let's let's just start settle in have you introduce your self fourth my name is louis and i am ken of goto cola that's storebrand goto keough to go so it's similar to coca cola similar people call it a knockoff i've been called.

producer npr ninety nine percent ninety percent
"nine percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The nine percent is a fallacy the governor is pushing there we go going right into the governor governor actually gave you enough money to give you the raises and it's a fallacy only because now you're gonna have superintendents the local side and school boards agree to give that some of that nine percent to people that aren't teachers love it so the twos on education associates really oh my god this is crazy all right billy welcome to kansas city hello billy hey guys how're you doing all right all right so listening to the show here obviously and i hear about a sodium getting rain they wouldn't that kind of raise the money because they're supposed to be the first line of the shooter situation you maybe they should get a raise for that then rachel cedric wants them to be the eyes and the ears to be unarmed and go hey that guy is a gun maybe they should get hazard pay that very true i guess you know an increase to tell somebody i love you instead of don't shoot me it's probably the way it's exact yeah you know what my job has gone from being what normal custodial duties to go over and try to give a a shooter a hug to try to stop shooting up the school i should get a raise maybe the right thing maybe they're right too much going thank you i appreciate it brother thank you appreciate it well there you go this is why you like the show you know maybe doug should call in and talk to us because this doug ducey oh dougie do no chance i know but here's a chance to go hey teachers look at i told you i'd give you this i gave it to you in now you should go on the offensive the the actual people who control your salaries are the ones not giving it to you so what are you what are you blaming me for you want more winds from trujillo the message has been clear throughout the red for me who way way way way way the message has been clear throughout the red fred movement this isn't just about paying me as the teacher i want to go into a classroom where the ac works i want to go into a clip well there's a hundred million dollars to that he put in the budget to get the capital improvements i want to go into a class where the ac works i wanna go new classroom where we have textbooks that take us pass the reagan administration now i thought it was only bush anyway are there really only books that i was michael hicks listening are there really books at usd that only have reagan as president i wanted to go into a classroom where the wifi works i want to go into a staff lounge where the fossil works i want my monitors who have my back to have a livable wage i want the librarian to have a livable wage but four million won't go very far towards sobbing the district's massive infrastructure needs this this is epic right here new school buses we need thirty of new this new that.

nine percent hundred million dollars
"nine percent" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Yeah yep guys i'm actually got a pretty good idea on the horizon i want to get your take on it and see if maybe you want to be a interested in this and stop you there zac i'm gonna start off a saying i'm a i'm a like a ninety nine percents no really for job ninety nine percent yeah okay well then ford i have the offer for you evacuate still be decades could jake you have that one percents right now i want to open up a breakfast place called i hop because move because there is no i hop anymore now it's i hob and i was thinking wow i'm totally going to jump on that name i'll take all their stuff for l trade market they've already got the signs up i'll take him oh you're in you're in also the name i hop well whatever you want and we can make it now that's up for discussion i thought you know international house of anything to the p i guess instead of pancakes baby paninis panini shop international house of people uhhuh yeah pie possibly imagine how's the pebbles like fruity pebbles.

jake ninety nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

"Ninety nine percent of our our specialty is working with hr directors has they put together programs as they're transitioning people out downsizing rightsizing whatever you wanna call it as well outplacement firms in that being a firm that helps people find their next job so during that twenty five year period when nine out of every ten new individuals that i need just lost their job that that's really become a focus a lot of these individuals as well as the outplacement firms and even a few hr directors that want to help individuals is they're transitioning now they would ask me if i had something that i could give them so that they could kind of read up on what to do what not to do during this time and i research trying to find things that i could provide people as a resource i discovered that it did not exist so that's what really prosecutor write the book i want people to have a tool that they can turn to during the period of transition so that they do not make financial errors that destroy their short term in in greatly reduced the possibility of them accomplishing their longterm objectives as well so let's get into the little what can a reader expect well i i i let me tell you what they should expect and that's a boring block with a bunch of financial terms and ratios and boring grass i wrote this book because i wanted it to be an easy and engaging read so i used to road trip with road signs as metaphor because i think we can all relate to a road trip in using gps to navigate our way and i hear i said you know navigating the financial bumps in the in the unemployment road in a very wanted to guides the reader through every stage odd financial planning registry during a stressful period especially what that what do i do immediately for the short short term and that's what we're talking about really wet to immediately do and then you can worry about the longterm once you you've taken care of what matters.

prosecutor Ninety nine percent twenty five year
"nine percent" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Nine percent are doing it in a porta potty is the most disgusting thing ever it's not possible it's well it's probably possible dan because if you think about mile high club stuff that's really not that much bigger than the space on an airplane just disgusting don't we disgustingly not possible just it's so goes against every instinct of survival to be well if they are feeling like getting intimate i suppose i have to believe and the only thing that would make me feel better about this as if they're just a nieve rated and don't know better or something like there's just no way in a with a sound mind do you think that that is i feel like the just the very aromas that come off porta potty they light up something of me something something primal that says go the other direction get away from this this is so gross awful awful awful and the other places at festival settings where people more private thankfully or tense maybe an rv of those things make sense even a vehicle or you know back of a vehicle or something more sense than a porta potty the porta potty rockin don't come knockin i cannot is no way no way now i will never be able to look at a porta potty the same guess exactly the same as it grows thing is to be avoided at all you can read more about it on the toby until he page awash fm dot com and coming up in a few minutes what mothers really want for mother's day and i'll share kind of what i'm hoping for although i feel like it's very selfish for me to want this that's coming up in just a few minutes time is running out six.

dan toby Nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The general feeling towards immigrants in the survey was positive seventy nine percent of californians support a pathway to citizenship for dreamers sixty six percent are against the mexico border wall but fifty nine percent said they find it important to increase deportations of undocumented immigrants despite believing they should also be able to purchase state health insurance so they should be able to they should be able to purchase state health insurance as your deporting them okay nari california's typically hold positive views of latino asian american and african american people white people were viewed most unfavourably with sixty nine percent of respondents claiming they hold held held positive views of the race by the way i couldn't answer that question what they're asking me to judge an entire race wait a minute i can't answer that question what's your what's your view on blacks you have a rebel what are you what's your favorite race what wait a minute wait a minute wait a minute is this is this the hitler survey group i've heard about them what what what what are you talking i'm sorry you asking me to judge an entire race what go white meat a judge an entire ethnicity horrible his identity politics are you go that's what you get with identity politics.

hitler seventy nine percent fifty nine percent sixty nine percent sixty six percent
"nine percent" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on The World Transformed

"In other sometimes sometimes the height of of a movie that uh anything can beal no matter how good it is the doesn't heal the planet and save your marriage partnered up to the high wife tipper vets promise keeping siliconsomething ninety nine percent on rotten tomatoes i'm i react badly to that i'm like well it can be accurate right you want to be the you want to be the one guy them on i don't wanna viewers at just who i am okay that's you know i don't want to be checked off while ninety nine percent will love it we will uh will uplink you factor should we will we will pick it up i i guess we shouldn't spend too much time talking about a movie we haven't seen in don't know anything about the so a although hayuth our show we can do what we want and we will once again next week when we come back and do three more brand new shows it's been great having you all with us this week look forward to being with you again and until next time lived to see it inspiration to help you do insurance of okay turned out you're going to let your budget be the boss of you take control with progressive name your price tool tell us what you want to pay for car insurance and we'll help you find options to fit your budget here's the music to get you pooped down don't don't don't i i hear your budget laughing at you oh wait that's just those kids laughing at me.

beal ninety nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Meditation practices but as we talk about in the book we've done a case study of a very very long term 'practitioner in our lab pu his consented to be identified in his name is media rinpoche a in he's a tibetan lama who has done many years of intensive retreat practice in his brain ages in the ninety nine percent tile of a large group of individuals against which we compared it uh using these objective parameters when you say ninety nine percent of all you made he he's if if you had a hundred people in the room of his age his would be correct on just brain thus convene a reverse mortgage slows it i think it's important to make that point yes than we have cereal mri scans over a 14year period with him and his brain is definitely changing an aging just like your brain or my brain is but the what is showing is that his brain is ageing more slowly so what we just said is that there is it in the vendee diagram of you know what meditation is good for and purpose for and all the other things about the mind and human life that concern us there is imperfect overlap between those two circles but we should say that there is significant overlap so what meditation is good for and what meditation was designed for an we've used words like awakening and deconstructing the self and they're they're other terms like enlightenment and insight these are at least as conceived advertised antidotes to human suffering at its most basic or lease as as it was conceived to be its most basic in the traditional buddhism and it's also i'll add one more piece here is also an antidote to or at least connected to.

ninety nine percent 14year
"nine percent" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Children seventy nine percent are you assistance according to our guest lordhill from the nonpartisan ppi see so these statistics indicate that a good number of children in california schools come from families with an undocumented immigrants what are the numbers it's about twelve point three percent of an a k through twelve schoolchildren are undocumented california and that's probably at over eight hundred thousand students in the state and that that impacts them i'm guessing stood the scores of of of some of those schools because these kids are having probably different more did little more difficult time in school and well we don't look at them separately in any of the data that's collected by the state uh many of them are likely to be english nurse and we do have a variety of curriculum in place to help english honours and then the state has been focusing on at uh with local control funding formula the government attempt to his legislature the governor been at attempt to kind of phone those programmes more let me kind of switched to let's talk about daca uh the deferred action for childhood arrivals program the news a lot lately can you briefly describe the program and the number young people who are affected nationally and also in california so nationally it's about eight hundred thousand young people who have successfully applied for dhaka and in california it's something like two hundred thirty thousand that have successfully applied so again where that about a quarter or more of the on undocumented immigrants that fall into the daca category large number it is a large number and the daca program what it does is provides a way for young people who came.

california dhaka seventy nine percent three percent
"nine percent" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"They're just shuffling the numbers around our going to reduce taxes over here were to raise taxes over here to pay for it at the end of the day whatever change happens to your tax is going to be so inconsequential for ninety nine percent of you as to not even be worth discussing the ideas of radical tax changes were we clean up the tax code where we eliminate the mountains of pages and gray area that exists in our task owing to go to something like a flat tax or a consumption tax or one of the other really simple and straightforward tax programs that have been proposed time and time again he's not even on the table aside the being discussed what we get our a bunch of people in washington acting like they're fighting for you acting like they're doing the right thing for your benefit and working for the people when in reality behind the scenes nothing changes it makes me want to pull my hair out and you want to know what makes the change because governments not gonna just implode on itself in venezuela is collapsing in on itself right now in the government those in power are still in power and when venezuela ultimately implodes and they have their whatever their coup is in their rebirth and whatever the next thing is that comes along they'll be a government there too this idea that we're going to live in a government list society is is a grandiose dream.

venezuela washington ninety nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on KELO

KELO

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on KELO

"And these are some of the incidents that took place but the ninety nine percent of people they protested peacefully and they were there to protest what they said as racism and bigotry and white supremacy and for that i applaud them now oddest thing about the whole weekend is in i i never saw the crowd from what i saw the people that were the free speech rally i only saw highlights of one speaker who was talking about the need to all be united and and again i didn't see a lot of it was only tiny blurb but i don't know what happened is that tv stations didn't air it and then you've got an anti for purse and cursing out a trump supporter and ntv protesters telling a black female police officer you're supposed to be on our side and then we got some of the sounds of van tifa and what i'm saying is you'll live early have in these events you do have agitators but the good part is that was not the representative group of people protested peacefully for all the right reasons and you've got to give an awful lot of kudos to the mayor of boston and to the police department they did their job and they had people getting in their grill in their face coming up to a push in them shoving them and it's amazing how prepared they were and how professional they were and how nobody as far as i know got hurt in this thing but that but those agitators were the with the small amount that was not the overwhelming ninety nine percent and for that that that's that makes america stronger stand up against racism and bigotry and hatred and a people want to want to do that i support them and some of you got mad at me this week and 'cause i said yeah it's it makes america strong when people speak out against white supremacy racism and bigotry four you know whatever the protest was amount anyway let's let's play some of these sounds and bringing up to speed everything you yes um i want us and we should have be afraid throat right right hearts now trump's what one ooh.

officer van tifa boston representative america trump ninety nine percent
"nine percent" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"That's down to fifty nine percent now fifty nine percent of republicans strongly approve of the job he's doing that that proves potentially problematic it was 73 percent february sorry about that seventy three percent in february of republicans strongly approved of the president john performance it now down to fifty nine percent in march it was sixty nine percent so it's gone 73 sixty nine fifty nine among his most core republicans strong approve errs of his job performance that's been chipping down that is also a troubling sign for the white house so that is where we are on approval but what is probably the most eyepopping number in this entire poll is the trust issue now i know a lot of trump's supporters miss eight nobody in the country elected him president thinking that he was some angel truth teller and had a very good bond with the american people when it came to trust that wasn't true and i say to those folks who are uh trump supporters you're right you're right this may not be as crumbling to the trump presidency in the trump a brand as it is for other presidents because he did have a trust deficit going in to the presidency here's the difference at that time in the election people were making a choice and the person he was running against hillary clinton was also seen as totally untrustworthy not honest so in making a choice between two untrustworthy people that is what they did the voters did last november it is a very different context now with donald trump.

president hillary clinton donald trump john fifty nine percent seventy three percent sixty nine percent 73 percent
"nine percent" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"I'm not trying to argue that the lord was on one side or the other of the debate about europe my my point is that when he your when the gospel writer who was looking for the supreme symbol of political control he picked the coin of course he did the economic policies and some site issue that ministers get around to in their spare time offer harte's governing it is the fundamental purpose of government and if your economic policy is set at a continental level then eventually that becomes a political union that was all radic was always honest enough to make that argument as we're most people on the continent if not here and the logic of that argument it seems to me now becomes inexorable it will it will either break apart or it will have some as the germans have done incredibly well out the you run a massive balance of payments surplus with the rest of the eurozone indeed until the eurozone italy actually ran a balance of payments surfaced with the germans now because they run a massive deficit with the germans you join the euro zone of the euro at a highly advantageous rate so you now run a balance of payments surplus nine percent of gdp nine percent highest in the world highland china's against european lull by the way which doesn't allow nine percent surfaces it doesn't allow both than six percent over a threeyear period is this not sometime when you have to give something back in the form of a transfer union of moving funds to countries that are not doing so well out of the european out of the eurozone 900 you'd have to make me feel embarrassed with being from gemini but this comes back to your question the month 'transfer union is it is the political will on out.

writer harte china italy nine percent six percent threeyear
"nine percent" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nine percent" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Point nine percent accuracy knowing what was on the original manuscript protocols we don't have now because they were up of power they disintegrate a long time ago but we're in incredibly fortunate position uh uh you know with the new testament of having an extraordinary way to detect pitstop price of of actually getting back to the original and and that's something that will make no other documentation of that period has in terms of the reliability and so what oh what bought cost you know at the gloss off empty kind of approach to scripture a today williams with every shot she glock glass half full and i am brimming over really because we've got these amazing results is that really do show us what the original fat that we can be very very uh you know a happy about reliable uh to show so soon and so on it the me that was an interesting example wet you you hit you see one thing you hear an argument an argument which if you any red bought book you might go away thinking wow that's really put the nail in the coffin of christianity by its any once you have the conversation with someone who knows what bought about your nice kind of where he's coming from that you realise actually does away to fight judge to every story yeah well that's that's will put and i i think that um i had just come to say when i read f f bruises famous book the new testament documents are they reliable and i remember thinking how i never dreamt did there was so much proof that the the new testament estimates documents are in fact reliable 'cause you hear these silly things like well they were changed in the middle ages or of you know and it's it's really based on nothing when you actually look at it you say the reliability of these these documents and of these narratives smart outstrips the reliability of anything leaking compared to it i mean if you talk about what evidence do we have that aristotle or socrates ever existed it's instantly less than the evidence we have you know for the new testament accounts and so and so forth and but nobody ever.

williams nine percent