35 Burst results for "nine months"

Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:46 min | 17 hrs ago

Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil

"Has just gone through. Its deadliest week of the pandemic daily fatalities. Hit a record level of more than nine thousand nine hundred on thursday bringing the total number of deaths to more than two hundred sixty five thousand and cases to more than eleven million. The discovery of contagious new corona virus variant in the amazon region has fueled the brutal second wave but the government's response has been slow and patchy and has failed to contain the spread. The sense that you get living here is sad and almost fatalistic. It feels like this country has given up on dealing with this pandemic in a responsible life saving way. Many months ago ceremonies. Lynn is brazil correspondent. Even though we are all seeing that the cases are higher than they've ever been. The hospitals are full in nearly every part of the country. The restrictions that have been introduced feel completely out of tune with that reality. They've been late. they've been minimal. And some cities are slightly stricter than others. But i think the feeling that most brazilians have is that covert is just going to happen. Overtake this country like a tidal wave. And there's nothing that anyone can do about it and the concern right now. Is that the. The health system is buckling under the weight. Right so the difference between this second wave compared to the first wave is that for the first several months of the pandemic. The virus was sort of ping-pong between different brazilian states whereas now most of the country's twenty six states are seeing their hospitals at or near capacity. And there's really a limited ability to sort of transfer patients or doctors or supplies between the different states recently. The health secretary of the amazonian state of honea mentioned this desperation in a video aimed at those who weren't taking the current virus seriously is typical seymour's known them was laid to swap mine. Nothing lead today but also by a sweatshirt but he says we have no icu. Beds for your mother your father for your aunt. It doesn't matter if you're rich. Poor young old. We simply have no. Icu beds available and those rising in numbers. Those strains that are coming about. Is that down two new variants of the viruses. That the big problem here. That's definitely part of the story. They found this new variant in the amazonian city of manaus late last year. It's called p. One and recent studies show that. It's one point four to two point two times more contagious than other versions of the virus. And the really scary thing is that it looks like it is much more capable of reinfecting people who have already been infected. That might be why people in manaus were hit really badly by second wave. Even though some studies suggest that as many as three quarters of the population had been infected in the first wave the other thing that seems really scary is that it looks like this. Current wave is affecting young people and much higher numbers than before so this variant is clearly causing some of the trouble. But you also say that. There's a certain sense of fatalism. That's contributing here. I mean how much does that have to do with the leadership. We talked a lot before. About how president of brush off the pandemic bolsonaro hasn't changed a bit at a recent event. He told brazilians to stop whining about the krona virus. Sugar jimmy because the club and said how long are you going to keep crying about it. But it's not just him the first wave you saw politicians trying to take a different stance and even going to the supreme court to fight for their right to shut things down even though the president disagreed this time it's different. Brazil has been seeing cases creep up for months now and it's only in the past few weeks. That mayors and governors have really started implementing serious restrictions closing businesses fulltime rather than. Just say from eleven pm to five. Am which is what we had in sao paulo for a few weeks. And what do the brazilian people think about. The the patchy measures have been put into place. I think there's a real split. You definitely see the outrage that brazilians especially the more educated and richard brazilian have had from the beginning. But there's also a real feeling among the middle class and the working class that putting in more restrictions is going to do more harm than good because the economic situation is so bad. Unemployment has barely come down from its high of around fourteen percent and the emergency cash payments. The federal government paid people for nine months last year. Have now been cut off to. Millions of people were basically plunged into poverty when the clock struck midnight on december. Thirty first congress is trying to push past a smaller version of the cash payments. But it's going to take some time but certainly one path out of all of these kinds of trade offs is vaccination. How is the country's program of of inoculation going. It's had a frustratingly slow start. Brazil has administered vaccines to only about three percent of its population that's way behind neighboring countries. Like she lay here in brazil. Most of the problem is that boston otto is anti vaccines and many months ago. When he had from different vaccine companies including some that were doing trials here in brazil he kicked the can down the road and signed with astra zeneca but that one provider hasn't been enough now here in sao paulo. The governor signed a deal with the sign of that company to produce its corona vac vaccine in the federal government. Sort of found itself forced to make a deal as well but they've also been all sorts of supply bottlenecks and problems with distribution and real kind of ineffectiveness by on the part of the national health ministry. Which is overseeing this whole effort. It sounds like a fairly bleak picture all around but it's not just a problem for brazil if these new variants in particular are allowed to run rampant. That's true and it's really scary. The longer the disease is left to fester. In in countries like brazil greater chance that new variants will start to emerge that reduced the effectiveness of covid nineteen vaccines elsewhere in the world posing a threat to nations that have already immunized their populations in a lot of these countries. That are still really struggling with the virus. You see their leaders just begging for the rest of the world to send them vaccine so that they can vaccinate people as quick as possible so far. We haven't seen that from bolsonaro he's been really against vaccines but just in the past few weeks. It looks like maybe he's starting to change his tune. He signed a deal with pfizer and he suggested in a recent interview that he himself might get vaccinated. So i guess the hope is relieved. The bolsonaro will understand that vaccinating people is essential to the economic recovery. That he's been prioritizing from the start and that that combined with attention from the rest of the world in getting vaccines to brazil will start to allow brazil to get a handle on something that feels right now like. It's totally out of control very much for your time sarah. Thank you jason

Manaus Honea Brazil Sugar Jimmy Richard Brazilian Lynn Sao Paulo Seymour Amazon Astra Zeneca Federal Government National Health Ministry Supreme Court Congress Boston Bolsonaro Pfizer
The Jobs Numbers: Who's Hiring in America

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:44 min | 4 d ago

The Jobs Numbers: Who's Hiring in America

"Hundred and forty. Five thousand is the number of the day on this thursday. At of course is the number of new applications for state unemployment benefits filed last week astronomically high as i think i've been saying every single thursday for going on a year now. The bureau of labor statistics is going to hit us with the jobs report for the month of february tomorrow. Another snapshot of how this economy is doing as a whole good in parts. Not so good in others. One part of the labor market. That is doing all right. Actually manufacturing marketplace's andy euler going where the jobs are. The john deere engine in tractor museum in waterloo iowa celebrates the history of mechanized agriculture but the museums hosting an event. This weekend. That is very much about the present a job. Fair randy venzke labor relations manager at john deere's waterloo works where they make those big yellow and green tractors the jobs that were currently focusing on our your general assembly. Some well living in some machining jobs. He says the company started its hiring push back in december quickly had over a thousand applicants. And we're able to fill more than two hundred jobs since then you know. The number of applications have really dropped off fact. We've received about hundred hundred ten applications in the past two weeks. He says they're trying to hire about three hundred more people by april problem is there's only about one hundred thirty thousand people in the county in unemployment is currently under four percent across the. Us manufacturing activity is up increasing three year high in february as consumer demand rebounded after the early stages of the pandemic manufacturing's been growing not quite for a year but for the last nine months. David berson is chief economist at nationwide insurance. Because it's been growing has needed workers and they're starting to run out of workers for whom manufacturing jobs or the appropriate physician and jed cocoa chief economist. The job website indeed dot com says. There's a skills mismatch between those hiring. And those seeking employment sectors have laid people off service leisure tourism and the sectors that have done a lot of hiring endemic manufacturing warehouse. Construction do require somewhat different skills and he says those industries that initially lay people off this time last year are starting to hire people back. I may dealer for marketplace a little bit lost in the news. Firehose today was data on fourth quarter worker. Productivity widgets produced for our work to is the very simple formula down four point two percent october through december the biggest drop in forty years. Not great. no but this is a little bit misleading in terms of understanding. What's going on you aren't s. Q is at the university of pennsylvania school of social policy and practice businesses that were not as productive normally just by the nature of the activity such as restaurants and so on have started reopening. So that drags down the average productivity and today's numbers not entirely unexpected. Well that's happening. There is what we call a regression to the mean. Now why are we telling you. This is amount of zilder is at the conference board. It is a basis for future living standards if productivity rises sustainably. That means that down the line Wages are going to be increasing on a more steady stable basis and so from the history matters filed this bit of context. Productivity growth was really sluggish after the great recession wage growth back then also super sluggish as well

Bureau Of Labor Statistics Andy Euler Tractor Museum John Deere Randy Venzke Waterloo David Berson Nationwide Insurance Jed Cocoa General Assembly Iowa University Of Pennsylvania Sch United States
Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 6 d ago

Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

"From one three. I'm david brown. And this is business. Worst daily on this tuesday march second. Let's say you were invited to a party. Where the guest list included oprah drake and jared lehto as well as top venture capitalist business executives journalists and all manner of influencers. Would you go well. That party is happening on a beta version. Social media app called clubhouse and in about nine months. The app has gained an estimated three million users and a billion dollar valuation clubhouses content is like a series of audio only presentations and panel discussions he s. That's right audio. We'll get to that in a minute. These talks happen in so-called rooms which are really like well conference calls there's a presenter or panel other people are listening to anyone can raise a hand and ask a question or participate in the discussion. You can meet people and have conversations and because presentations are not supposed to be recorded by users. You're either there or you missed out the thing about clubhouse though is that it appears to do everything wrong. First of all as i said earlier. It's audio based that's right. Viral video challenges or memes. Not even a cute cat photo. That means that all of those people who hate to use the phone have to logon and have an actual conversation also android users. Sorry you're out of luck. This app is for apple devices. Only at least for now finally membership is by invitation. So unless you know someone who's willing to fork over one of their coveted invites you're locked out again for now. Clubhouse founders say that eventually the format will be open to all but what is that for now. Exclusivity is what's driving growth in roughly nine months. Fomo fear of missing out has fueled the apps popularity some even say that the old school style of having conversations is the key to its success. You have to listen and be able to say something meaningful. So people are striking business deals finding content partnerships and having conversations with some truly interesting people. Some are even finding romance on the app. According to a report in forbes clubhouses his popularity is even turned the head of industry giant facebook. Which has reportedly started developing an audio product to compete with clubhouse the new york times reports facebook founder mark zuckerberg made an appearance on the app earlier this month to give a talk about augmented and virtual reality. Facebook didn't confirm the report but the times also noted that the social network has a habit of buying upper competing with apps that dabble in areas. That could pose a threat to its user base like most media platforms clubhouse. Has its issues to the app. Urges you to give it access your contact list and uses that information to identify others for you to invite according to forbes quote even if you've no interest in joining clubhouse whatsoever the service may well know your name mobile number and how many friends you have on the network. It may even be violating european privacy laws. The report suggests clubhouses apple exclusivity also has some trying to hack the app so it can be streamed on android devices tech crunch report last week. Clubhouse had its first significant data-breach when someone managed to stream audio feeds on a third party website according to bloomberg the stanford internet observatory or s. I o a stanford university internet watchdog programme race security concerns earlier this month in light of these issues clubhouse says it has taken measures to prevent any such breaches from happening again. But it's not clear. Exactly what is being done.

Oprah Drake Jared Lehto David Brown Facebook Apple Mark Zuckerberg New York Times The Times Stanford Bloomberg
Stocks Surge, With S&P 500 Logging Best Day Since June

WSJ What's News

00:59 sec | Last week

Stocks Surge, With S&P 500 Logging Best Day Since June

"Us stocks rallied today as bond markets began to calm down. After last week's volatility the s. and p. Five hundred had its best day. Nine months closing up two point. Four percent the dow climbed two percent and the nasdaq jumped three percent. Our markets reporter. A connie otani has more but in the last couple of weeks of course we've seen the yield on the ten year five year the thirty year. A you name. It yields on. Us government bonds rising very substantially in a pretty short period of time and that had put a lot of pressure on riskier assets stocks. Because it's sort of fundamentally brings into question whether investors have missed price expectations around growth and inflation. But what we saw monday was actually pretty good. Data on the manufacturing front and that sorta helped calm down the selloff in the bond market. We saw yields retrace a little bit from the levels. They had hit last week and not in turn. I think helped. Calm the equity market side of things as

Connie Otani United States
Vaccine optimism puts S&P 500 on track for best day in nine months

Balance of Power

01:08 min | Last week

Vaccine optimism puts S&P 500 on track for best day in nine months

"In fact, right now we're looking at the S and P 500 near session highs on pace for its best day since June of last year. So investors traders all in after two down weeks, buying the dip. Lots of having, of course, to do with vaccine optimism, creating a sense that the reopening the economic reopening will occur. Perhaps more smoothly. War quickly We have the reflation trade and play. So this means we have the major averages up bonds down that in itself is very risky on and because of the reopen play, travel stocks are doing even better. Your airlines, your cruise lines, hotels. The idea that if folks get vaccinated that the dearth of traveling over the last year that folks will really want to get out there. In fact, I just saw an article about around the world cruise lines that they're completely booked because people really want to get back out there traveling and, of course again. One of the impetus is for today's big rally. Johnson and Johnson that great news around the one dose vaccine receiving the emergency authorization over the Again. J and J is popping higher and again a big spark for today's risk on Day, the best day for the S and P 500 since June of last year, David half ago. Thank you. So very much has

Johnson David
Vaccine cheer puts S&P 500 on track for best day in nine months

Balance of Power

01:08 min | Last week

Vaccine cheer puts S&P 500 on track for best day in nine months

"In In fact, fact, right right now now we're we're looking looking at at the the S S and and P P 500 500 near near session session highs highs on on pace pace for for its its best best day day since since June June of of last last year. year. So So investors investors traders traders all all in in after after two two down down weeks, weeks, buying buying the the dip. dip. Lots Lots of of having, having, of of course, course, to to do do with with vaccine vaccine optimism, optimism, creating creating a a sense sense that that the the reopening reopening the the economic economic reopening reopening will will occur. occur. Perhaps Perhaps more more smoothly. smoothly. War War quickly quickly We We have have the the reflation reflation trade trade and and play. play. So So this this means means we we have have the the major major averages averages up up bonds bonds down down that that in in itself itself is is very very risky risky on on and and because because of of the the reopen reopen play, play, travel travel stocks stocks are are doing doing even even better. better. Your Your airlines, airlines, your your cruise cruise lines, lines, hotels. hotels. The The idea idea that that if if folks folks get get vaccinated vaccinated that that the the dearth dearth of of traveling traveling over over the the last last year year that that folks folks will will really really want want to to get get out out there. there. In In fact, fact, I I just just saw saw an an article article about about around around the the world world cruise cruise lines lines that that they're they're completely completely booked booked because because people people really really want want to to get get back back out out there there traveling traveling and, and, of of course course again. again. One One of the of the impetus impetus is is for for today's today's big big rally. rally. Johnson Johnson and and Johnson Johnson that that great great news news around around the the one one dose dose vaccine vaccine receiving receiving the the emergency emergency authorization authorization over over the the Again. Again. J J and and J J is is popping popping higher higher and and again again a a big big spark spark for for today's today's risk risk on on Day, Day, the the best best day day for for the the S S and and P P 500 500 since since June June of of last last year, year, David David half half ago. ago. Thank Thank you. you. So So very very much much has has

Johnson Johnson David David
Orders for U.S. durable goods climb 3.4% in January

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:19 sec | Last week

Orders for U.S. durable goods climb 3.4% in January

"In January, more than expected, showing strength across the board as the economic recovery gathers pace. New orders for durable goods or items meant to last at least three years, rose 3.3% last month from December, orders have climbed nine months in a row and now top their pre pandemic levels. Gap will invest

Barcelona sees sixth night of protests for jailed rapper

Planet Money

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Barcelona sees sixth night of protests for jailed rapper

"Were held for a six consecutive night in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday to support a jailed rapper. And for a six night they turned violent with clashes between police and demonstrators who threw rocks and bottles. The demonstrations were prompted by the arrest of a rapper for his songs, which authorities say glorified terrorism and insult royalty. At least 95 people have been arrested in several Spanish cities since the rapper was arrested in jail Tuesday night to serve a nine month sentence.

Barcelona Spain
Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

The WoMed

06:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

"Lauren. Welcome to the wo- med. Thank you in fact i to be here so for those of you who don't know morin. Sharp pain is a speech pathologist. And i have been dying to get speech. Pathologist on the wool med. So when you tell people what you do what's the first thing that they automatically assume. No people automatically assume i work with kids. I just can't sit kids and teach them how to say either s.'s. Or their ps. And i mean with all this do that but i actually work with adults since i think. The stereotype with speech pathology sitting down playing games working on different sounds But there's so much more to it than that so yeah well. I'll admit one of my good friends is literally dreading the day that her two year olds list goes away. It's really cute though because right now. Her z's literally come from the back of her mouth. Like all the kerr molars and she's just adorable. It's really cute it is. Oh my gosh yeah so you mentioned that you work with adults so did you. Is that kind of where you got started with. Everything or your passion really was but actually started my career working with kids. I worked with kids for about two years. Two and a half years and i liked it initially But i quickly found out. Just it wasn't like farc me like it wasn't my passionate area and so i worked really hard to kind of tradition over to the medical side of each pathology and i started working at outpatient rehab. I was seeing a lot of patients who had had strokes in like traumatic brain injuries and swallowing disorders. And i really found that that was really my passion and that's really what made me feel fulfilled at the end of the day. And so that's what i've been doing. Ever since that point. I love that i feel like i. I mean the only real interactions and stuff that i've had working with with speech was i used to work in the nikko. Nice and so. We'd have speech consoles all the time you know. We had like paralyzed vocal. Cords or you know. Cleft lip or palate premiums just couldn't quite figure out how to suck swallow breathe. Exactly yeah echo cool. Yeah so there's just it just sounds like there's so many different fields within so p. wrote there are there are. Mike said i think most of the time. Most people associate s. l. p. With you know working with kids like in the school. I think the school was really popular. But like you said there's so many different areas you know. We can work in hospital. We can work in nursing homes and you know fools and fire practices. So there's there's really a lot of different options in terms of you know where we can work which is really cool. So what led you into this career like how did you first hear about it and you know get interested in it so it's funny excellent to be a lawyer up until my senior year of high school and i remember i had already declared my major and a second of sociology class in high school and their story about the young girl. Her name was genie. I don't know if you've heard the story. But she was locked away for twelve years that her parents never interacted with hers. Get no human interaction and yeah it was. I saw that and like she had no communication at mike whatsoever and so she worked with the speech therapist and he was able to communicate. It wasn't all verbal. Nonverbal buys using pictures. But i thought that was so neat that there was something out there. You could help people communicate and the rest is history. I just fell in love from that point. that's really beautiful So greenwich some little video. Yeah what's the school pathway lake like do you guys have to clinicals. is it Like a bachelors. Is it a doctoral degree. Now or like how like if you're going to coach someone through eight or tell someone you know what they're in for. Yeah so it's four. Years of undergrad And then you have to go to graduate school so for me. My program was in graduate school. But if you don't have speech as an undergraduate degree typically a two and a half maybe three years for the graduate program and then after that your life and your certify after a nine month period. There's no doctoral degree right now. That recommended or like that's required to be a speech pathologist but you can most certainly get them back degree that not in my pets whatsoever But after getting your master's degree through what all the clinical fellowship here and so that nine months after you graduate where you're essentially practicing. Slc like getting a salary and everything. But you're still technically under supervision and so after that nine months Once you have all of your hours your than a certified speech pathologist so you don't need any supervision or you know no one's giving you feedback just kinda on your own completely after that point. Wow yeah is there different routes that you take if you want to be more on the medical side of things versus you know in schools or or working with pedes a good question so i know in graduate school. We do externships so typically if there are two externships one is medical. One is typically pediatrics. might be in the school. There might be private practice. But i know that's alive. Students really kind of narrow down where they want to be in terms of their career so a lot of students. We'll just try to warm more relationships with people a medical they feel like they wanna pursue medical side or vice versa with school side and then with the clinical fellowship years so that nine month period actor graduation many students will try and get their cf wire the clinical fellowship your and that desired area of speech that way after they're done they can't hopefully get a medical job or a pediatric job. You know what they don't need this revision to

Morin Lauren Nikko Mike
Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update

"Everybody robbing our here and today we're going to be talking about the semiconductor supplier issue that has been affecting the automotive industry as a whole and we do have a few other topics to go through as well. This is a live episode because after we go through this. I do have some thoughts to share. But i thought it'd be best shared live so we're gonna do the kind of normal episode structure But it will be live so bear with me as always but we'll get into it will start off just looking at the stock today so finish down five point three percent to eight hundred and four dollars eighty two sons. I compare to the nasdaq which is on the video. But down a quarter of a percent so it was a tough day for tesla today especially relative to the broader market other automakers. Did you know at least the ones. I looked at fare worse than the market today as well thing. Gm ford were right around down to percents neo. Probably in that ballpark as well So i don't know that this drop was entirely isolated to tesla but certainly tussle moved a little bit further perhaps related to the supply of semiconductor. So let's move into that topic For whatever reason. I've had i don't know fifty to one hundred people. Ask me about this over the last two days whether that's in the youtube comments or on twitter or on patriae on a lot of people for some reason seem to be incredibly interested in this in the last forty eight hours even though this has been something that's been discussed in the automotive industry since back in mid december And tesla has already talked about it a little too so we'll go through tussles comments. I'm here as well. So essentially what's going on. I'll go into some links here in a second. But what's going on here is that there is the semiconductor supply shortage which is a factor of multiple different things that factored into it so primarily what has been driving it is two things the pandemic and then the rise in some areas of consumer electronics. So the work from home movement during the pandemic has caused increase supply for things like laptops and stuff like that. That people are upgrading for working from home. The five g cycle with phones has caused an increase from what i gather in semiconductor needs and then the next generation consoles with the xbox one whatever it's called now and the bs five launching those things have worked together to create more more demand in the consumer electronics base and then in the automotive space because of the shutdowns that were experienced in the first half twenty twenty the a lot of automakers cut their orders or their contracts with semiconductor suppliers to help get through that period of time. So what that is caused. Is those autumn those suppliers to necessarily want to cut production. And things like that. They worked through Their safety stocks. So let's let's get into you some comments here from Chipmakers the first one. That i wanna look here. This is from microchip technology. So this is from a couple of weeks backer. Just not only one week back. But they kind of talk about how they got into the situation that they're in In terms of semiconductor in the automotive supply chain so they're talking about how their customers generally pulled back very hard. During the pandemic there was no backlog visibility in this environment. They had no choice to down inventories and safety stock to protect themselves from what looked like severe economic contraction and they saw similar similar actions from their suppliers that worked that they were together for Actually producing their semiconductors so they said during his time no one in the industry was adding capacity. Obviously given the uncertainty about win things would recover And that uncertainty extended significantly as the bottom of market as well so one of the things that they talk about here. That will come back. A little bit later is that they're offering this microchip. Preferred supply program called bs to offer the prioritized capacity to companies. That are willing to work with them. To order. twelve months of continuous non cancelable non reschedule will supply So they're not guaranteeing capacity for that but they're prioritizing people that are willing to make those longer term commitments and because if we rewind it back to the for salvatore nineteen because other because a lot of other because a lot of automakers were uncertain about their demand they were unwilling to give a lot of certainty to these two suppliers. So that's kind of brought the semiconductor situation into where it is today and they're trying to work through this now and that's impacting. A lot of different automakers couple other quotes here just from people in the industry so this one is from continental Major supplier in the space. They're talking about lead. Times for semiconductors saying what with lead times of six to nine months. The semiconductor industry has not been able to scale it fast enough to meet this unexpected growth. In automotive demand which really is a return to previous levels not necessarily new growth than they continue saying quote the bottlenecks from the semiconductor industry expected to continue well into twenty twenty one causing major disruptions and continentals production. So that gives us a bit of a timeline in terms of how this issue looks. We don't necessarily have a scale from that. Then let's move into one of their quote here. This is from Tmc one of the obviously major manufacturers. I think they do like seventy percent of some semiconductors or something like that so specific to their automotive customers They continued to decrease demand for cms t s emcees semiconductors in third quarter of two thousand nineteen. The chipmaker only began to see southern recovery automotive orders in the fourth quarter. Their ceo said earnings call earlier this month

Tesla GM Ford Youtube Twitter
Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

Latinx Therapy

06:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

"Back with another segment but this is one of our special segments that we haven't done in many many months. This segment is a break. The stigma episode and in these episodes. We talk with amazing professionals. Amazing people out in the community globally. Who are doing things differently. Who are doing things to advocate and empower our community with education through the use of their voice and story so for today. I want to introduce you to our guests. Her name israel saliha ribeira. She is a consent. Educator abuse prevention specialist sexual literacy advocate speaker change agent and founder of consent parenting which will hear all about in a moment. She's the host of about consent podcast and creator of consent. Wear both of those are trademarked. By the way rosalia teaches parents particularly child sexual abuse survivors out to educate their children on body safety boundaries and consent so that they can empower their families to prevent abuse and break intergenerational cycles russell liaison mission to end child sexual abuse dismantle shame and help survivors heal and become drivers rosalia certified through the canadian centre for child. Protection's omit two kids program and darkness to light stewards of child program as well as the human trafficking prevention training program auld on watch safehouse project although leah was born in el salvador grew up in new york and now she resides in northern canada with her parents and three young children welcomed leah inc. You so much for having me excited to be here. Yes i've known you now. Maybe for a couple of years more so in the digital realm space though i was also a guest in your amazing podcast. That was probably maybe like nine months ago. I think so yeah. It was one of my favorite episodes because it was about very much the same breaking down the taboos dismantling those taboos that are so hard for people to talk about but some necessary so rosalia can tell us what is consent parenting. Yes so consent. Parenting is my online platform. Where i teach as i said child sexual abuse survivors who are parents. How to empower their families and they do that through workshops courses a membership in. This is really to help them. Have those conversations that they find. Maybe they didn't have that. Nobody taught them and of course because of their own traumatic experiences they may feel triggered by the content of of how to teach this so i helped walk them through that process of educating them so that they can educate their kids and dramatically lower the risk of those children being abused and being able to break those cycles. And what motivated you to create all your programs so when my oldest at the time was five sos about four years ago. I realized that i hadn't done enough at that point. They were starting to go into kindergarten. And i had like panic attack because as a survivor myself. I did not want them to obviously have that experience. I wanted to make sure that they were staying safe and realized that i had waited too long so i started educating myself about how they teach children abuse prevention because it was not something that my mom taught me. Unfortunately she's also survivor but she didn't. It's not that she didn't teach me because it wants to. She just didn't know. And i didn't want to be in that same position so i started educating myself and i had actually a lot of suppressed memories which i didn't even know about until i started learning about abuse prevention and these memory started to surface and i was getting triggered because diving into this kind of education. When it comes to your own kids you become brittle thanks. -iety and panic that. How are you going to keep them safe. So i would do the training myself. I would try to teach my child. I'd get triggered. I'd stop for a while and i realized that i really needed to step into my own healing journey. If i was going to do this and if i was going to do it right so i started doing some of that and as i was learning about the things that i needed to teach i realized that most programs were teaching you why it was important and what you needed to teach. But they didn't show you how to teach it like and there was no one that was even speaking to the survivor. Experience to say this might be really triggering. And here's how to navigate that so that you keep going so that you teach this comprehensively and so that's when i realized you know all of the stuff that i was learning in the healing that i was going through in the therapy that i was seeking out had all helps me to learn how to do this really effectively. And i saw the transformation my children and i started to realize that it was actually part of my healing being able to empower children. And then i realized like nobody was teaching this and nobody was talking about this from the perspective of survivor to talk to other survivors because unfortunately children of survivors are actually five times. More likely to be abused because their parents shy away from teaching this or altogether. Don't realize what the other risks are because they don't talk to other survivors about it. So i ended up deciding two years ago now to embark on doing this myself so i got certified and i got all the trainings that i needed to do. And then started actually innovating some of the products that i create myself for those two pieces like i would always hear create a safety network and it's like okay. How do i do that though you know so. I started creating that like exact process for parents to make it easier. My mission has been like. How can we make the easiest possible for parents to do it and also to be able to reach the spanish speaking community so i started also creating products in spanish which are all free all of the products that i create in

Rosalia Saliha Ribeira Canadian Centre For Child Leah Inc. El Salvador Leah Israel Canada New York
Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

The Book Review

06:43 min | Last month

Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

"Chang. Rae lee joins us now. His new novel is called my year. Abroad chang thanks for being here by pebble. See you are joining us from hawaii. Which leads to an obvious question. What are you doing in hawaii. Other than carrying out. Perhaps every quarantined person. Who's not in hawaii corentin fantasy. Well there are plenty of those people here. Those ex-pats well. We try to come every year income last year because long ago i was the writer in residence at the punahou school barack obama's old school and a lot of other famous folks and we had a wonderful year friends on the faculty Miss seeing them so we do the usual things. Eat a lot of asian food like the body board. Wow yeah i think now any any or spiring authors like putting this on their list of aspirations onto like to be the writer in residence at obama's old school so my year abroad is your first novel since on such a full sea which came out in twenty fourteen. Did you start this book immediately. After on such a full sea do tend to start your novels before the new one comes out. I'm curious how you kind of work that well. I started probably about a nine months afterwards. Attended a waiting period as it were before. I start something in earnest because i don't write short fiction. Sometimes i write short on fictional Essays about me my family but but with a novel. The commitment is so great. And i know the road ahead will be difficult. So it's really hard for me to get to committing to a book. I'll sketch you know three or four different versions of a book on. Sometimes they're different books for the first six to nine months sort of a thing on doing right now and then. Finally i'll bland on one and decide yes. This is the one that i think. I can sustain that may be consistency. Well it was going to ask. What is your starting point with a new novel. But maybe i'll change to. What are your starting points like is it. The is at a premise. Or a challenge to yourself as a writer. It's actually a diverse range of things. Sometimes it's a character and right now. I'm working on like maybe three or four things. It's a premise. I like this idea about the summer camp. That went do that was for korean. Kids only green christian kids. Then sometimes it's atone a lotta times. I've i've felt as if starting a new novel. That's kind of a reaction or response to what i been doing before. And so i just wanna change of mood change of a certain kind of sound and maybe that's something that has followed me throughout my work especially at the inception stages a certain kind of sound overtakes me and either. That's personal voice for the character or the narrative voice or even just the kind of atmosphere mood of the piece of what i think the world of the novel be. And then i'll i'll just around with that for a while. I wanna talk about that certain kinds of sound and also the reaction to on such a full sea but i have to pause and ask you about that camp. What was that camp was that in the. Us it was. I grew up in in new york in the city and then in the suburbs so it was a camp that was run by an association of korean churches in the state area so for two weeks. Every summer from the time i was five years. Old to ice think was probably fourteen. Maybe thirteen fourteen. It definitely didn't go past there because they didn't want real teens at the camp because they didn't want to invite a different set of problems right because it was a church base camp so they all got together and i guess rented a camp for two weeks north of westchester. I think putnam county somewhere. I can't even remember where it was may be brewster and so for two weeks this place and it was a very low in camp. You know there. There were no jet skis or no horses. There was hardly any fields. Basically there was a volleyball net and just kind of a high grass in really spare unheated cabins with barely running water. But i tell you it was some of the best times i've ever had also has camps. Go they introduce you do all the problems of the world but on a scale that you know the kids kids can understand jealousy corruption out just all kinds of things that go on but but the funny thing about it was. It was my time for two weeks to to be with only korean kids. In american kids was out by your parents sent you like. Did they want to kind of help. You reinforce in an affirm. Your identity is a korean american. I think that was their hope and they weren't religious people so so even though there was a bible study element to the camp. That was the part that we all didn't want to Kind of slacked on but yeah. I think they were absolutely hoping that. I would connect with other kids not speak the language because we none of us really spoke korean because many of us didn't come from an ethnic enclave saying in queens or something and so as i did in westchester did not grow up with any other gets all so it was our time. We'll read about this summer camp. I hope in your next novel. Hopefully it'll be one of the threads that you're currently working on that wins out. 'cause i'm i find that fascinating but to get to the novel my year abroad. Tell us a little bit about it. And then i want to talk about in. What way is it was kind of a reaction to on such a full sea. Well it's a kind of a crazy book in particularly. I think for people who know my work. It was sort of a surprise. you know. i'm sure my editor was surprised by what she got in quite describe it the way it turned out but It's a book about twenty year old college kid who's at loose ends in every way in his life not very moored in his comfortable but drab suburban existence than he meets up with a local entrepreneur. A chinese fellow. who's not quite chinese-american. He's really just chinese but has made a big time life in the suburb in new jersey and has businesses all over the world than this young man named tiller gets taken up by him and they go travelling together and i guess they have what might fall business adventures but those adventures get quite intense. I would say

Hawaii Rae Lee Punahou School Barack Obama Association Of Korean Churches Chang Westchester Putnam County Brewster Volleyball New York Queens New Jersey Tiller
Nintendo profits soar as people play games during pandemic

Buck Sexton

00:27 sec | Last month

Nintendo profits soar as people play games during pandemic

"Its profits for the first three fiscal quarters, nearly doubling as people all around the world stayed home from the pandemic and turned to playing games. Japanese video game maker reports that it's April to December profit surge to $3.6 billion In 10 does nine month sales jumped 37% to 13 billion the October to December quarters, always crucial for Nintendo because of year and holiday shopping. It is correspondent Jeremy House reporting one

Nintendo Jeremy House
Nintendo profits soar as people play games during pandemic

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:28 sec | Last month

Nintendo profits soar as people play games during pandemic

"And Tendo reporting its profits for the first three fiscal quarters, nearly doubling as people all around the world stayed home from the pandemic and turned to playing games. Japanese video game maker reports that it's April 2 December profit surge to $3.6 Billion in 10 does nine month sales jumped 37% to 13 billion The October to December quarters, Always crucial for Nintendo because of year in holiday shopping

Tendo Nintendo
Deploying and running Django web apps in 2021

Talk Python To Me

03:12 min | Last month

Deploying and running Django web apps in 2021

"We're gonna talk about specifically Deployments on gangland we can go on and on about obviously all the intricacies of django. But i think suffice to say. I'm an educator on the on the board. In carlton's a fellow he's he makes the releases happen including three two alpha. Which just dropped today. And i guess you mentioned. Lts that's confusing to non django people so since having ellos carlton chango has a pretty rapid release cycle where it's every nine months or so so. There is three zero three one. Three two. This december i think carlton is four zero ev. One of those is a long term service release so that will last two and a half years so that is a three years. Yeah it's it's on. There's a link on the project site so that's a way that so django doesn't really have. It's rare to have breaking changes these days but the lts designed to help people who can't keep up with that cycle. Stay up to date that. We have a lot of podcasts and opinions about why should always stay up to date and it's worth it because that's one of the most things you because as carlton mentioned there's bug fixes constantly so it'll be three one three one two. They'll be three to go three to a month later or so. I'm a big advocate of you. Know if you possibly can get ladies major release so you hang out. Historically the longtime released was really the lts release was really important because there were breaking changes right in each major version of jangle. There were new things and it was difficult to. But that's not the case anymore. It's really easy to update so. I'm a big advocate of that. Now and then when i talked to fellow people in the django community. They're like well. You know. I work in the real world. And you can't keep up the ladies major budget so for those folks than you know. The lts is a really good option. Because it's once every three years you know it's coming you get six month window of overlap of supports. The old lts gets six months of security release after the release of the new lts. That's your window to update. Well i think that running and maintaining software built upon frameworks like django. It falls into two categories for me if falls into. Here's something that we have a team or at least somebody dedicated to owning this project and we care about its ongoing life and then we have the ones that are the oath. Please don't touch it and the oh please don't touch it is we've long since stopped developing that maybe the person who developed it left. But it's still important and we don't want to break it. It's working right now but if you touch it new break it you've now adopted it. You know what i mean like. It's that thing that just like if you break the build. Yes but but worse. 'cause it's legacy build so to me i feel like that. Please don't touch it. Side the lts make perfect sense for them. Yeah in tiny entirely the way. I like to think of it is. Is this a thing that you feasibly going to add new features to and if you feasibly going to add new features to then you should be on the latest matrix version. Because it's only once every eight months you need to allocate a day or two to keep up to fix download the new version. Run the test suite. See the deprecation warnings. Fix deprecation mornings. You know maybe you have to wait a couple of weeks for dependency to update and and then you can push board. And that's once every eight month that process and if you're adding new features if it's a live project ideally be there. Yeah there's something which you just need to keep running for the long run. You could do that much less frequently.

Carlton Carlton Chango Django
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell files lawsuit against Daily Mail in New York over Jane Krakowski affair story

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:00 min | Last month

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell files lawsuit against Daily Mail in New York over Jane Krakowski affair story

"Mike Lindell has been suspended from Twitter. As of late last night, Lindell's account shows a message saying it's been suspended for violating the Twitter rules. And does been an outspoken supporter of former President Trump has openly supported claims of fraud surrounding the election. It's unclear exactly what led to his account suspension, and he's filed a defamation lawsuit in New York over the story of a reported secret romance that he allegedly had with 30 rock actress Jane Krakowski. He's suing the Daily Mail, which had reported the relationship lasted nine months. Lendell says the defamatory statements about him have caused harm to his personal and professional reputation. Well. Krakowski denied the claims, and she released a funny statement that read. Quote. Jane has never met Mr Lendell. She is not and has never been in any relationship with him Romantic or otherwise. She is, however, in full fledged fantasy relationships with Brad Pitt. Reggae, John Page and Kermit the Frog and welcomes any and all coverage on those

Mike Lindell President Trump Lindell Twitter Lendell Jane Krakowski Krakowski Daily Mail Mr Lendell New York Jane John Page Brad Pitt
Swaddling - burst 07

Your Grandparents Did What?

00:46 sec | Last month

Swaddling - burst 07

"So i get it. I get it i do see yes. I do. See the practicality of it. I just the whole like binding them so they grow straight like. I'm just curious like where that spawn from like. Were babies like having like gross scoliosis or something and they probably a lot of malnourished. Your camera just nourish domingo. Maybe there's there's a lot of medical practice in history. That is why they're like. Ooh you have the flu with bleed. You know you of the playing retired chicken to your body not an exaggeration. Like yeah like this chicken shit makes this goat blood and put it in the spirit or whatever

FLU
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:46 min | 2 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
"nine months" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

03:29 min | 5 months ago

"nine months" Discussed on Post Reports

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> One million <Speech_Music_Male> is obviously <Speech_Music_Male> a big round <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> number. It's a, it's a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dramatic number. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's a frightening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> number when <SpeakerChange> you talk about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that many deaths. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> When <Speech_Music_Male> we saw that we were <Speech_Music_Male> reaching this one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> million marker <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> across the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world that just <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seemed to be something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that cried out for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> attention and <Speech_Music_Male> yet not attention <Speech_Music_Male> in that <Speech_Music_Male> Broadway of huge <Speech_Music_Male> numbers but <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> in a much <Speech_Music_Male> more intimate way of looking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at individual cases <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stories of families <Speech_Music_Male> that had been through <Speech_Music_Male> this trauma. <Speech_Music_Male> The purpose <Speech_Music_Male> of doing it this <Speech_Music_Male> ways is <Speech_Music_Male> really to <Speech_Music_Male> kind of lay down a marker <Speech_Music_Male> into to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bring people back <Speech_Music_Male> to what it felt <Speech_Music_Male> like when <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> gravity of this <Speech_Music_Male> pandemic I <Speech_Music_Male> became clear <Speech_Music_Male> because we've all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> adjusted to it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one way or another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and wildlife is not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nearly normal. <Speech_Music_Male> There is a kind of <Speech_Music_Male> sameness that sets <Speech_Music_Male> in and we kind <Speech_Music_Male> of find new <Speech_Music_Male> patterns and <Speech_Music_Male> so this was an attempt <Speech_Music_Male> to. Bring <Speech_Music_Male> this all back to <Speech_Music_Male> that moment when we <Speech_Music_Male> saw <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just how damaging <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this was to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everyone's way of <Speech_Music_Male> life and <Speech_Music_Male> in doing. So <Speech_Music_Male> kind of bring people <Speech_Music_Male> to both the sense <Speech_Music_Male> of common purpose around <Speech_Music_Male> finding a <Speech_Male> way out of this predicament. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a sense of realization <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that although <Speech_Music_Male> we live in different countries <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and different cultures, <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> disease has <Speech_Music_Male> hit people <Speech_Music_Male> in remarkably <Speech_Music_Male> similar ways around <Speech_Music_Male> the world and <Speech_Music_Male> they have reacted <Speech_Music_Male> with very <Speech_Music_Male> basic human instincts <Speech_Music_Male> of seeking <Speech_Music_Male> to be <Speech_Male> together

"nine months" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

06:02 min | 5 months ago

"nine months" Discussed on Post Reports

"What this pandemic has done. Two very different societies. We decided, we wanted to follow disease on its path of destruction across the world, and so we looked for statistics that showed win and wear the peaks were occurring. Then we went about choosing countries that had some larger meaning, and so obviously, we started this story in China. I'm Jerry she and I was the Washington Post correspondent in Beijing until March. The peak in Covid came relatively early in China. The country that was the presumed. Of the disease that was at a moment.

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"You know all options are on the table meanwhile president trump seems to be forecasting what he is intending to do on twitter i mean this is such a remarkable moment in the presidency because we have the president sort of fuming about the investigation to reporters in the oval office you know earlier this week but also he's talking openly about potentially doing airstrikes on on twitter and so it does seem like the administration is moving towards it and the new national security adviser john bolton is definitely a much more hawkish force we don't know privately exactly what he's advising and he also is really shaking up the people on the national security council this week justice morning a fourth person resigned and he's only been there since monday but i think that this is something really to watch at the end of the week and a lot of things in the trump administration happened at friday early evening so you know it was a white house reporter i basically i'm settling in for a long night on friday night with the assumption that there could potentially either be airstrikes or a major firing it the sad thing let's see it's because it's only generate so much more cynicism in a system that's already wallowing in cynicism is we're moving on these parallel tracks towards a wag the dog moment where you could have a situation where trump is lighting up muller on twitter or fires him or rosenstein or something like that at the same time that he's raining missiles on syria which is going to tell the world not to mention are already cynical electorate that every worst thing feeling opinion they had about the way american government operates is true at least in their mind that's what's gonna look like that is a sobering thought nancy in in terms of just the internal dynamics at the white house this week is it a tense place right now at these people coming and going with the president flying off the handle there's a line in one of your stories about the president tweets being a war cry.

trump twitter john bolton reporter muller rosenstein syria nancy white house president
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Along with it and so there's just not really a history of republican lawmakers standing up to the president and if they did do this bill that would protect muller in the special investigation this would be really the first incidence of them in mass standing up to the president that's really interesting like charlie was you know the the in in watergate it was a question of standing up to to as criminal activity was starting to come out and we haven't gotten quite there yet with with trumpet certainly there's been enough that there are plenty of non congressional republicans who have stood up and said that what trump is doing about the this or that is wrong jeff flake comes to mind who's about to be a non congressional republican soon having decided that he'd had enough think the people that watch here are not the flakes or the ben sasse as the people that have have been very consistent in calling out trump for his abberant behavior in various ways it's the people like that i consider more independent voices within the republican party people like lindsey graham it's people like chuck grassley i think when you see them turn or not turn that will determine the outcome hero of of how congress treats the situation that's a great point so nancy all of this is unfolding this this is causing chaos within trump as bursting forth for all of us to see on tv and on twitter and you know for you guys to cover the white house in the inner workings of the white house meanwhile as you mentioned this is all unfolding as the administration is considering military action against syria and maybe by the time we published we'll have already done so nancy you mentioned the chemical attacking and civilians which seems to have been ordered by syrian president assad so where where do we stand on that is coming at a moment of flux for the national security council you've got a new national security adviser john bolton in president trump is cancelling his trip to peru the defense secretaries canceling his trip out west for the weekend where where do we stand at this point so we don't know exactly what's going to happen the white house press secretary sarah huckabee sanders and the briefing yesterday kept emphasizing that.

nancy white house peru congress republican party sarah huckabee sanders press secretary trump john bolton assad president syria twitter chuck grassley lindsey graham ben sasse jeff flake watergate charlie muller
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"So he was fuming publicly and then privately has been absolutely furious about it and so the other thing that we've really been watching and the thing that he's been asking people about is should he fire rod rosenstein who is the person over at the at the department of justice who's overseeing the special investigation and the white house has also been insisting this week that the president also has power to fire the special investigator robert mueller himself directly and so there's sort of two big things we're watching what's going to happen with syria but also is the president going to fire someone to try to make the special investigation stop this is all i mean we've seen trump go bananas a little bit over the the muller probe and rosenstein the deputy attorney general's oversight of that before but it seems like he he really went bananas about this and he was talking about you know the attorney client privilege is dead and so whereas in fact the process that prosecutors have to go through in order to raid law offices so onerous that i mean that's the real signal here that's why he's he's reacting like this it's so it's such a dangerous moment for him everybody is and it it's just another instance of the special investigation moving beyond what the white house thought typically would which was was there any collusion between the trump campaign and the russian government or any election and really into trump's inner circle and it's really it has been creeping into trump's inner soaker for a while the white house attorney don mcgann has been interviewed ryan's previous a former chiefofstaff has been interviewed but now trump's own personal attorney you know the fbi has rated his office and hotel room as i said and apparently what the fbi is most interested in is the payments that michael cohen made to to women one of whom stormy daniels right before the election and were those seen as a payoff and that's really what they're looking at and so this raises a whole bunch of other questions.

rod rosenstein white house president robert mueller syria deputy attorney general russian government trump don mcgann ryan attorney fbi daniels investigator michael cohen
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Try and do this again whereas scalise might because of that human interest factor that you're talking about maybe he maybe he would have a better shot at that whereas on the flip side if all you need is half plus one of your conference for that internal vote to become a minority leader maybe mccarthy has a better has the inside shot at that because of the longevity of his relationships and his work with within the house it's a fascinating question the question mccarthy becomes become minority leader but again his relationship with trump as you know there's been talking about mccarthy maybe white house chief staff and there's a possibly democracy one it'd be minority leader let me make one other point about being speaker you win the election in november speaker vote is not till january and you know they have they haven't eternal vote inside the republican conference at that point saying yes he's our speech speech your speaker designate but the floor vote doesn't start until the congress congress starts and you know the fallacy that people have about leadership actions is not whether or not they like a person are they may like kevin mccarthy then people vote for someone in speaker in a leadership race because it helps them on whatever low politically personally financially in terms of fundraising however it helps them and then and and you know if they think mccreadie means speaker would help them that's fine you know and not bill they won't vote for him and it doesn't matter if they lake or not that's the wrong brummer it's that they you know wouldn't benefit them to having him speaker and that's why being eventually lost his hold on the conference as a really good point.

scalise trump congress congress white house kevin mccarthy
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"When it was going to really start in earnest and you know which is why the news still kinda hit us like a thunderbolt on wednesday morning that that ryan was going to be making this announcement but you've got the house majority leader kevin mccarthy you've got the house majority whip steve scalise who are both kind of shadow boxing right now mccarthy us us running for speaker i mean there's no question about that or alternatively minority leader in fact both of them are but they're speaker has a different requirement speaker you have to be elected on the floor whereas minority leader you just have to be elected and said your conference so i mean it did complete it's much higher barnaby speaker i mean the thing about mccarthy is he tried for to be speaker in two thousand fifteen after being left and he failed he there was opposition from the house freedom caucus which is a group of forty odd hardline republican conservatives they didn't like bainer and at the time they opposed mccarthy getting the top getting to speaker and that opened the door for ryan to become speaker ryan jumped over mccarthy so now mccarthy has a second chance and you can see with mccarthy he i mean he's been running he's been running for a while i mean politico was writing about ryan's potential tyrant in december so i mean it's been clear for awhile that this was a possibility and though everybody assumed ryan would would stay at least through the election and i'm still shocked by this this so you know mccarthy his really he's he's i is as nancy it was talking about ryan never had that close personal relationship with trump of course he has it i mean he you know trump calls them my kevin you know jokes about it they talk constantly talk a couple of times a week if not more mccarthy's in touch with the top staff and the white house so mccarthy things you know trump support if they're show the majority come november would help him become speaker he's also really stepped up his fundraising and we mccarthy took in nine million dollars in the first quarter to help raise nine million dollars including a bunch of money with vice president mike pence who's a four rows colleague i mean probably won't be able to raise a lot of money you.

ryan kevin mccarthy steve scalise politico nancy vice president mike pence boxing nine million dollars
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"That's a really great point nancy can you tell us a little bit about about trump's relationship with ryan and you know how it's evolved over the last year and a half or so and also his his relationship with some of the folks who potentially could replace him yes so i think that trump and ryan at this point have a pretty good relationship and it really wasn't always that way you know ryan was really critical of trump during the presidential campaign and our colleague tim alberta had a piece up on politico today talking about how you know ryan had assume that hillary clinton would win the election and had the speech prepared that was going to disengage himself from a some of trump's identity politics and some of his comments divisive comments about race and sort of dog whistles to white nationalist he was going to deliver that you know on election night or the day after the election he ended up shelving that in order to sort of forge this pretty decent relationship with the president and intern he's gone some of the things that he wanted you know ryan used to be the chairman of the house ways and means committee which is the tax writing committee he's always wanted to do attack bill you know i covered ryan in the house when he was the chairman of the budget committee so he's always really loved these wonky issues and he did manage to help pass a historic tax bill and that's a huge thing but i think in order to do that he had to overlook some of trump's you know personal issues and i feel like that will be part of his legacy i also just on the policy stuff wanna point out that he did pass a tax bill but the congressional budget office also showed that that tax bill is going to blow a huge hole in the deficit and it's expected to top one trillion dollars by twenty twenty despite the fact that the country has really good economic growth so that will also be part of ryan's legacy so i think the legacy is going to be complicated i wanna read a headline from politico the race to replace paul ryan is on however the the story ran on monday two days before ryan's announcement so brazil tell us a little bit about the.

nancy trump tim alberta hillary clinton president politico paul ryan intern twenty twenty brazil one trillion dollars two days
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"I think it's just i mean i i will ryan retirement a disaster for republican there's no other way to to say not only does it put his own seton play which is tough seat for the whole the message the would the image it gives the you know the speaker is leaving why you know why should you know why should anybody but republic ryan's leaving you know the the you know the democrats are already spending this is you know you know ryan knows they're gonna lose the house he's leaving he's bailing out now so you know the the idea is like i think with a lot of members if ryan is not gonna stay white white would he want to be stay on as speaker i mean that just seems to some members as you know you know we you know it's fine these days in congress that's right that's his is his responsibility to his constituents if he feels that's the way that's the case but you know how can he lead them if he's leaving i mean i you know and i think that's a powerful argument i need that's going to resonate with a bunch of members so i think as members sward through this i think ryan has a big problem that's a good point charlie you know we can jump into the political side here a little bit the house republicans as alena schneider wrote for us this morning have kind of built the foundation of their defense of the majority this year on three pillars basically one has been a favourable political map that we were republicans hold a lot of districts that were drawn by fellow republicans tell black them then there's the incumbency factor that they you know they said they have incumbents in these places who have been battletested who've known locally who can run campaigns to win and then there's paul ryan's massive fundraising and he's been pulling in millions and millions of dollars.

congress charlie alena schneider paul ryan
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"What i realize is if i'm here for one more term my kids will only have ever known me as a weekend dad i just can't let that happen so i will be setting new priorities in my life but will also be leaving incredibly proud of what we have accomplished so what now there are two threads i wanna pull here there's congressional you know what happens in the next eight months on the hill what happens in the year two years three years after that on the hill and also the political threat how does this affect republicans fight to hold onto the house majority in what's already shaping up to be a strong year for the democratic party so bracelets dive into the congressional side i seven months ago until the mid terms nine months until the new congress is sworn in ryan says that he is going to remain speaker and serve out his time there but that's a long time to be a limb duck right it is and i'm not sure he'll be able to dave at long to be honest rachel beat an just story this morning i ran this morning raises some members raised questions about the state actually like there to be speaker election now ryan's gonna leave we've than step down as speaker you know he can continue to hold his congressional seat until the end of the year allow a new speaker to be elected whether it's majority leader kevin mccarthy or majority whip steve scalise or whomever it is you know and then that person would you know lead the house republican conference into the elections november elections as the incumbent speaker i think this is a huge problem for ryan out the ryen circle says look they they're you know it's a minority of members are saying this but i do think that this settles in members look at this i think rang has a big problem i do i am not sure he'll be able to stay i'm not i'm not entirely sure what specifically is the issue with with being a lame duck speaker is that are there stuff coming down the pike legislatively that he needs to enforce unity on that people would be less likely to listen to him on or what you know what what what's driving these concerns.

republicans congress ryan rachel steve scalise dave kevin mccarthy eight months seven months nine months three years two years
"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"This week under cast paul ryan says this term will be his last both as the house speaker and as a member of the house of representatives i read that somewhere two months ago he talked about on a podcast in any case we will unpack what this event which happened wednesday morning means for congress in the near term and republicans in the midterms plus the f b i raids the office of donald trump's personal lawyer and the president lashes out at his own justice department so another hohum news last week at the white house we'll have nancy cook here to break it all down for us and what to look out for next a reminder to our listeners to subscribe to the nerd cast rate us and write a review and stay tuned for the end of the show we've got a contribution coming from one of the nerd casts biggest fans one more note before we begin we're taping this a little bit before noon eastern on thursday april twelfth so it's all up to date as of then all right let's get started i wanna welcome in our guests we have in studio charlie tests in our senior politics editor i charlie got nancy cook white house reporter hey thanks for having me on the phone we have politicos catholic teeth in wrestling thanks for being with us thanks for having me all right so let's jump right in our first data point three three years is how long paul ryan has been speaker of the house it's also coincidentally the number of children that paul ryan has and he said this week that being with his family as his kids move into their teenage teenage years motivated him to pull the plug on his speakership and his time in elected office he says he's going to leave congress at the end of two thousand eighteen he's not planning to run for anything in the future.

paul ryan congress donald trump president white house nancy cook editor reporter charlie three three years two months
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"United press international security correspondent lorry thank you thanks the european union's highest court came down hard on labour this week it ruled that the at based ride hailing service should be regulated like any other taxi provider across the european union now lubar has fought for a long time to be treated by governments like a digital platform only just an app that connects people who like to drive to people who need rides and that identity justin app let's uber avoid most of the responsibilities and liabilities and regulations of a traditional taxi or transportation business well no longer at least not in the eu meanwhile uber has seen similar fights all across america a sooner rajin is an expert on that kind of model and these fights that are going on with ride sharing a room thanks for being here thanks for having me a ruined let's talk about this eu ruling first what did the eu sayed uber and what does it mean for drivers and for riders there so this was an anticipated ruling from the eu you in deciding whether huambo was a digital platform o'day transportation service they came down on the side that over is a transportation service just like a traditional taxi service at a black car service a what this means is that all rubel drivers will have to be professional drivers in all likelihood of buubas relationship with its drivers will have to change from contractors to them being fulltime employees and so it dramatically changes lubos cost structure if it wants to operate in different european cities if we were wants to operate in paris or tracked you can no longer just say hey person with a toyota in an app driving gets a mighty you have to treat them like a person with a job with benefits and and a pension and everything else i think the specifics of exactly how would the drivers need to be treated are gonna theories city to city i'm like in the united states across europe transportation is regulated at the local level.

United press international european union lubar huambo paris toyota united states justin america eu rubel europe
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Democrats or fifty republicans fifty democrats and so that really determines who the speaker of the house is how the committees are set up who is in control of its are republicans obviously they'll elect their speaker even with a onevote margin i've it's fiftyfifty the democrats or republicans will be forced into a powersharing situation which actually happened in the late 90s and so all the committees had even numbers of democrats and republicans and actually had cochairs so instead of having one chairman for a committee the actually had a democrat and republican share very few people were happy with that situation it was very frustrating for everybody so both both sides here are actually obviously looking to rule the house but there are also preparing for a very difficult and frustrating powersharing situation if they need to go there all of a sudden america is watching one race in virginia for a house of delegates seat and i don't think this is the last day that we're going to be doing at michael pope with virginia public radio michael i'm glad we happy for this thanks for being here thank you for nine months beginning last october iraqi soldiers and an americanled coalition carried out a huge assault on the city of most of them it was all part of an effort to take back the iraqi city from isis that mission was achieved in july but only recently has the huge human cost of the operation become known a new investigation from the associated press finds the number of civilian deaths in that campaign for mozell was much much higher than previously reported at least eleven thousand lorry hit it was one of the reporters on that investigation she's an international security correspondent with the ap and chris woods is director of air wars there a uk base nonprofit the track civilian casualties caused by international military actions it helped out with the ap story our own analysis made clear but thousands of civilians have don't need a muzzle i think the challenge that we had is in so many of the cases we were looking at we simply couldn't determine who had killed.

Democrats chairman the house america virginia michael pope assault mozell chris woods director speaker of the house ap uk nine months
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I want to make it very very clear in this last election is there was one really really big lie after another one of them was that somehow thirty percent of the latinos voted for donald trump we'll guess what in the fourth congressional district that i represent you got 10 percent of the vote you can go and look it up my congressional district is not uniformly latino it's 73 percent latino but it is a majority latino district and you can see how people who voted and i'm gonna tell you something i wanna make sure the american public on this this is a priority for us these kids degrees euled that have come forward signed up given their names their addresses gone through a background check and are now bone ropel to this mass deportation policy up this president we asked them to sign up and now it's our responsibility to protect them and the way to protect them if that means the we deny our votes in the government shutdown that's on the republicans they're the majority party in the house in the senate our responsibility is to bans on agenda of justice and fairness and of priorities and i gotta tell you where the us banic or not as bent where the immigrant ornate year you'll know those kids deserve a pathway forward and congressman in january do you think enough of your democratic colleagues let's say probably in the senate i think you're right about that are going to be willing to go to the matter where you are for a government shutdown they had better or they have on the standing one thing there will be a lot of disillusionment and a lot of anger um at the democratic party i know where the party in the minority but if we had the leverage you'll have the leverage to stop something bad from happening and you don't do it then you're an accomplice of those that are taking that an evil actions against the american people congressman lewis gootia.

donald trump president the house senate congressman lewis gootia thirty percent 10 percent 73 percent
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Troops are looking for the fixture they're putting the pressure on and and you're referring to it uh spending deal today probably only goes a few weeks uh are you convinced that democrats will have the leverage in midjanuary for some kind of dhaka fix our that they'll be able to push down on republicans and get this deal done then because that seems to be the plan now here's here's the essence of it right where the minority party we've got it use our leverage so with our leverage if you need our votes if you need democratic votes than it's got to be a it's got to be something that's reflective of our values but they want to celebrate christmas and race home for the christmas season and leave millions of kids on without healthcare but what about after christmas congressman because it looks like there's going to be another showdown i don't know maybe around january nineteen through 20th went when this current spending deal expires but here's my point we can do it now we can say look if the government is such a government that is treating people badly and is abusing people and is not fulfilling its commitment as use here than you have a responsibility to say no to that government and the funding that government and if the senators join republican democratic center join republican senators in the senate then you're not fulfilling your commitment than what you said is you can turn your back on a constituent group and you know i wouldn't termite back on women i wouldn't turn my back on gay people i just wouldn't turn my back on the environment just like i wouldn't turn my back on these immigrant youth congressman you seem to be sending a message to democrats everywhere who who largely have latino voters on their side that if they don't come through here they're putting a core constituency at risk look.

christmas congressman senate republican democratic center
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Natural matter disgusts next year the president's given a strong march to address that issue we have plenty of time plenty of time says the republican leader but is that how 700 dr recipients in this country feel congressman lease gutierrez is a democrat he represents the fourth district in illinois congressman thanks for being here oh it's a pleasure to be with you thanks for the invite congressmen your reaction to the democratic leadership in congress backing off here at least before this next spending deadline yeah well i'm pretty proud of the democrats in the house seems we're going to stick together today remember this is all dependent on one thing that is republicans are the majority the to london already weak strong in the house of representatives and they need to underline eighteen boats if they present a republican budget a republican cr and that doesn't include our priorities are values then then they need to find the votes and if they find them than they are going to approve it i think it's our responsibility to stand up and say we're not going to work with you we're not going to collaborate with if you unless it includes a clean fix epa dream act in the senate another issues and that's where i don't see the kind of firmness and commitment nihro that the minority leader in the senate chuck schumer stands up for those dreamers they visited unmih's office because here's in essence my point you know you cannot say you love them and then put them on the stage at the 2012 democratic convention since you can go out to the communities of boaters than america nc look what could people we are with good public policy we are and then not fight with them with the same kind of integrity and the same kind of importance and they're just not doing that i think so congressman lots of advocacy group.

president lease gutierrez congress the house senate chuck schumer advocacy group congressman illinois unmih
"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nine months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is the takeaway for thursday december 21st 2017 this is the away i todd's where it's great to have you with us today it was the scene on the south lawn yesterday republicans lined up on the south portico the white house to celebrate with president trump a giant tax cut and the first tax overhaul in three decades meanwhile back on capitol hill democrats had just let another legislative priorities slip away at least for now we feel very strongly that dhaka must pass and passed by december 31st we must keep our word and our promise to them these are young people who study who work who lived next door to us every single day we must pass the bipartisan dream act now we have the hits i had no question is lifted in the floor it will lean we think we're going to have a good number of our republican colleagues join us and so i am very optimistic that it will pass the democrats as you heard have pledged for months there would be no government spending deal this christmas unless affixed fixed to the deferred action for childhood arrivals program went along with it to put it plainly the dem said deal with dhaka republicans or you've just bought yourself a government shutdown well that was then the senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said on tuesday this week the government will be funded at least until midjanuary even though dhaka's still hangs out there unresolved his daca on the show senator schumer novel he discusses the will all be doing gawk of this way.

republicans capitol hill dhaka mitch mcconnell todd president christmas senate majority leader senator schumer three decades