35 Burst results for "nine month"

Court Rules Majority Of New York City Traffic Signals Violate Americans With Disabilities Act

Night News

01:19 min | 12 hrs ago

Court Rules Majority Of New York City Traffic Signals Violate Americans With Disabilities Act

"Who are blind won a case to get some help and safely getting around New York City that they had the fight for in court. Why don't traffic makes it more difficult for the blind to navigate busy city intersections as Laurie Sharpe, who also relies on other pedestrians for help? Because of the pandemic do not have access to the same level of pedestrians that they had nine months ago. A. Scharf is a plaintiff in a lawsuit to get the city to install more of these called accessible pedestrian signals off. Federal judge ruled in October that the city must install many more of these signals to give the sight impaired equal access to city streets. That's the great irony of Vision zero, says Attorney Torrey Adkisson. You know, the administration has been rolling out all of the efforts. Tonto improve pedestrian safety without making those improvements accessible to people with disabilities, and, in fact, in in the case of leading pedestrian intervals. Making the intersections last successful and more dangerous for blind pedestrians. The technology is not new actors and says the first audible traffic signal was installed in Queens in the 19 fifties. On the Upper West Side. Marla Diamond. WCBS news radio 8 80,

Laurie Sharpe A. Scharf Torrey Adkisson New York City Queens Marla Diamond Wcbs News
Why remote learning worsens education inequality

Reset

05:19 min | 1 d ago

Why remote learning worsens education inequality

"Education has gone online but not all education is proving to be equal according to the new york times. One analysis from the spring found that the move to online learning puts the average kid about seven spiked but the average student nine months behind the average black student ten months behind but are some schools. That are doing better. Some schools are adapting to help make remote learning better for kids and for teachers to shrink that gap. So how are they doing it. And a north is a senior reporter. Here in vox. Who's been covering this story. So you've got a piece about the difficulties of online learning and what we can do to make things better for students. You told us about one school in the bronx walked me into that school. What's it like. Yes so i talked to folks at com site high school. It is a charter school at part of the earth the network of charter schools but as a public school located in the bronx. It's a school that high poverty area about eighty four percents of the student body qualifies for free or reduced price lunch. It's also a school that's majority. Non white majority latin accent block student body. And you know it's in a part of the city that was really hard hit. You know really suffered a lot especially in the spring with covid nineteen. This was a place where a lot of kids had family members that were ill a lot of kids family members who lost jobs. It's definitely been one of the parts of the country. That's really been struggling. And what sort of technology are they. Using a kossi to teach during the pandemic every school uses different things. I mean there's been sort of a variation across the country in terms of what schools us but in a way it's not like that different. I think what You know what varies more across. Schools is the way they use technology and not so much. The tech itself is like you know they use google hangouts. They zoom combination of tools. That you'll find a lot of schools using but i think the difference Sometimes comes down to how the instructors are using it. Got it okay and tell me what were of the big issues with online learning there that made it harder to reach underrepresented groups. Yeah i mean again like a lot of these things. Just start like before the kids ever get online. I mean you know it's some pretty big percentage of kids in the city kids across the country. Don't have wifi in their home. They may not have a device. You know maybe they have a phone where they can get online but they might not have certainly their own laptop live in family with multiple kids. It's not like every kid necessarily has their own laptop and they might not have You know a quiet place to go study so if you live in a small apartment in new york city you don't have like a dedicated desk area for every kid to do remote learning so these are all things that are big barriers even before you talk about like is the interface working while for kids right like do they understand how to use. Google hangouts things like that. Do any guess about how many kids in general at least in america don't have access to the stuff yes so it looks like as a twenty nineteen seventeen percent of students across the country lacked. A computer at home in eighteen percent didn't have broadband internet. It's about one in five one. Five students and low income students and students of color are more likely to lack those things. Okay so you found a couple of ways in which this one high school in the bronx is doing things better when it comes to. Maybe not introducing new fancy gadgets but to use technology and to use to improve online learning. Tell me like what sort of things by doing. And is there any reason. Why every scorn. America this stuff. Yeah so i mean again. It's just really really basic stuff so but basic stuff can be the hardest stuff right totally. Yeah and it's something that frankly like a lot of schools and a lot of districts aren't doing for their kids and so we're talking about making sure that the kids are online so the school actually made available wifi hotspots. That families could pick up and like even before you talk about that. This school also made sure that the kids had food and you know even did a go fund me to help with some some other costs that the kids families facing associated with the pandemic so that may not seem like a tech problem. But if you don't have food in your house like you're not going to be able to log on and do your classes. There's also there's a few things that teachers educators really finding that. They're having to adapt the way that they do their classes. You one teacher told me. I thought this was really interesting. He said i relied really heavily on my presence in his teaching like he may be was very funny and just like very animated and he was able to really work the room and he can't do that over zoom. He's not in the room so he described kind of trying to use the students as a resource a little bit more. Try to bring in their expertise at one point. He had them like name all their favorite superheroes and villains than he made that part of the lessons so like making it a little bit less about him and a little bit more about them. If and that's just one example. But i think just constantly checking in with kids. This is something that every school. I talked to really mentioned is just that you know. It's a time when everyone's isolated when if they're not coming into school buildings building those relationships in any way you can is super important and so you know. I'm hearing a lot about phone calls. I'm hearing a lot about like constant texting even advisors. Just saying link. Were you able do your homework. Do you have any questions everybody doing okay.

Bronx The New York Times Google America New York City
The Good Dad Project With Larry Hagner

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

04:04 min | 1 d ago

The Good Dad Project With Larry Hagner

"I really want our listeners to have a sense of who you are and where you come came from in order to start to go dad project may one day i woke up and i was like i suddenly know everything. There's no about fatherhood cher with. That's obviously not true whatsoever. My journey into this whole dad's space really really started when i was a kid. My mom my childhood was was pretty complex. My mom was married three times. My mom did the best. She could with what she had but she was. She was married three times every guy that she married guy that she dated was kind of the same guy you know kinda like there's usually some element of toxicity drugs alcohol and physical mental abuse. So i always say that. I spent half my childhood without a father. Figure the other half with some sort of toxicity going on. But what i can tell you just really quick story. Is mom biological father. Remarried in nineteen seventy-one. They had me and seventy five. They got divorced really quickly about. I was about nine months old. He completely split no recollection of whatsoever. When i was four my mom remarried and at that point my life. That's how i thought moms found dads they just go out and find ads and so this gentleman came into our life. They were married for six years. They got divorced. It was it was a really horrible bitter end. They got divorced. I have not seen him since fast. Forward two years later. I ran my biological father by mistake. I wasn't expecting it. We had a relationship for a handful of months. Was this twelve. Yeah so i was. I think i was in seventh grade at the time. We had a relationship for a handful of months. He's remarried had a two year old son. Another one on the way and then it just got to the point. I think for him at that. Point is life where it was too much and unfortunately that relationship ended and it didn't end well and i completely went in a direction of i emotionally over eight. I failed the eighth grade. A lot of really crazy things can happen. My mom remarried a few more a couple more times and then fast forward graduated from college was in my first profession. I'm sitting in the coffee shop at a meeting When i was thirty when you walk in to get their morning coffee my father my biological father who i hadn't seen since i was twelve and i won't go into how we connected but we did connect and here we are fifteen years later and we do have a relationship. I spend time with him actually pretty often two younger half brothers. He's still married to the same woman but the good that project data is really started. Because i was struggling terribly had at the time for boys now the time i had to had a four year old and a six year old. Didn't know what. I was doing with really frustrated. Short on patience short temper The good nap project. Unfortunately there's there's a part of me that's very shame to admit this but it really came on a on a dark night in a dark moment. Where my son who's twelve. Now he was four. He stepped out of line as any four year old. Would i don't blame him. It was my fault. I spanked me. Hit the ground. And i looked at him and i went to help him up and The look on his face was i felt like i was staring myself and i knew in that moment i was like i don't know what i'm doing but i'm gonna find out how to do this better and i'm tired of living with no direction with patients. Having a hot temper all my life is only my career. And it's only my career. Because i don't know how i don't know how to be a good husband. I don't know how to be a good father. And i just surrendered. I'm just gonna. I'm gonna surrender my ego here and i'm just gonna learn and it was at that point in two thousand thirteen. I started good. That project dot com. It was a blog. I don't know how many people know this. But get that project actually me. I was this project. And then it's evolved in what it is today which we've been podcasting now for five years you've been one of our guests We've have over six hundred episodes and we have four hundred and fifty men that you live with us in our mastermind as a huge community and a movement and it all came out of absolute total struggle and dark places to be totally honest with you.

Cher
Boston - Cape Cod A 'Testing Desert' Amid Coronavirus Surge

WBZ Overnight News

01:11 min | 2 d ago

Boston - Cape Cod A 'Testing Desert' Amid Coronavirus Surge

"And the U. S climbing past four Million Cove in 19 cases in November, the highest total of newly reported cases of any month so far during the first wave of the Pandemic Cove in 19 cases on the Cape or relatively low, But cases have spiked a lot in this second wave. But as WBZ Suzanne Saz ville reports nine months into the pandemic and getting tested on the Cape still isn't easy. State Senator Julian Seer, says Cape Cod is a testing desert everything because with the exception of born and found that has the lowest rates of testing for Catholics, the state, he says, keep Qatar's can only get tested. If they have symptoms or have been in close contact with someone who's infected unless they pay out of pocket and wait for hours. The state allotted more than half a million dollars for testing sites on the Cape. But Sears says Getting that money was another story portion of it was released two weeks ago on the other bit just came in with for Thanksgiving. But the delay of this money really had set us back in providing the low bear. You're testing that we

Suzanne Saz Ville Cape State Senator Julian Seer U. Cape Cod Qatar Sears
Trump Acknowledges Transition Of Power, But Stops Short Of Conceding

News, Traffic and Weather

05:18 min | 3 d ago

Trump Acknowledges Transition Of Power, But Stops Short Of Conceding

"To most voters, the impeachment didn't play a role in who they would eventually vote for nine months later. The pandemic, Social justice and the the economy economy where where the the issues issues most most people people said said mattered mattered to to them them when when they they cast cast the the ballots ballots on on November November 3rd. 3rd. This This week, week, the the federal federal government's government's General General Services Services Administration Administration announced announced that that it it would would acknowledge acknowledge the the outcome outcome of the election and let President elect Joe Biden and Vice President elect Kamila Harris begin the transition of power. ABC is Karen Travers covers the White House for ABC News. She talked with Sherry Preston. What's your overall thoughts on where we've come this past year in in politics care act, you know, Sherry. It's like you blink and you kind of forget everything that has happened before October 1st. Let's use that as our marker because that was when the president announced that He and the first lady had tested positive for covert. And I feel like everything since then, has just been on this hyper speed that trying to put together a year in review pieces, trying to talk and reflect with colleagues and friends and family about what this year has been, and it's almost impossible to make this list. But it is incredible to think that we started this year in the throes of impeachment feels like four years ago. On and it was such a big story. And it was these story for so many weeks and how quickly we moved on from that. You remember, the president gave his state of the Union address in early February as all this was still happening, and at the time the Democrats were in their very intense primary. Bernie Sanders was surging. He saw him winning some states. Joe Biden was Trailing and kind of fading at that point and, wow how things turned around so differently in just two months, of course, with Cove in the Democratic primary settling and there was a kind of a sense of Panic and unease at the White House of what this crisis was going to mean for the president for his re election and for the nation. And when you look at what most people were talking about, and what mattered to them, mostly what wasn't even the impeachment wasn't even mentioned. I mean, you know it was the economy It was it was covert. It was social justice, all the things that we all have been talking about for this past year and played such a crucial role. In the election itself, going forward if you were to, you know, put your cap on and say OK, a year from now, you know, I know it's hard to do but any thoughts on that You know, I think the first year of a Joe Biden presidency is going to be dominated by his team tackling so many challenges and and big crisis that they have to jump in on day one, and it's very similar, you know, similar and not similar. Let's say apples and oranges. A little bit of I covered the transition from the Bush administration to the Obama administration. And if you think back on what was happening in 2000 and eight with the financial crisis, the incoming Obama team knew how critical it was to be on top of things quickly and that, you know, he promised a lot of things on the campaign trail. But they couldn't get any of that until they tackled what was immediate in front of them with the economic crisis, and I think there are some similarities and parallels with Joe Biden coming in, and perhaps that's good that he was around for that in 2008 in 2009 to see how the administration tackled those things. First and foremost because they're coming in with the pandemic raging, you know, certainly by all the public health officials accounts that the numbers over the next few weeks with the holiday season on You can have a big agenda of what you want to do and how you want to work with Congress. But they've got to focus on the pandemic, getting that under control, making sure the vaccine is being produced at a large scale and the distribution of the vaccine cherry. I think that's going to be the story that we're covering for months next year. How they roll that out How effective they are, how people get it. Do people get it or they're still questions and skepticism? About even getting the vaccine that is going to be the big focus for Joe Biden and his team and Jerry, you can have big legislative agenda, but depending on how things go in those Georgia Senate runoff races He may not even be able to get to that agenda. The Republicans control the Senate with a very slim majority. Democrats, of course, control the House. That's going to change all the calculations for Biden and his team, So they acknowledge that you talked to officials now and they say we kind of don't know the world. We're going to be stepping into in some aspect on January 20th. The sources have told Jon Karl that the president has no intention of stepping away from politics. In fact, he fully intends to run. President again, while that mean for all of us over the next four years, I mean, especially for the for the Republican Party to when there's a lot of people who were waiting kind of going OK, Trump's gone Now we move on, but not really right. And and it means and this is going to be like covering No other former president. I mean, how much were we talking about George W. Bush in 2009 through 2012. We weren't because he wasn't tweeting. He wasn't doing events. He went to Texas and laid low. President Obama for the most part, until recently it on the sidelines. He did not get involved in politics. He didn't respond when President Trump was tweeting about him, criticizing him. He was writing his book for several years and only recently came off the sidelines to campaign for his former VP Joe Biden. This is going to be a whole new model that we're not used to dealing with.

Joe Biden Federal Federal Government General General Services Servi Kamila Harris Karen Travers Sherry Preston Obama Administration Abc News Bernie Sanders Sherry ABC White House Cove Georgia Senate Bush Administration Jon Karl
Velour (MM #3538)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Velour (MM #3538)

"The with kevin mason was going through some of the emails from my favorite clothing stores the other day and i saw something. They just literally send a shiver down my spine. It hadn't been around for a long time. But i guess this is the year. Belur is making a comeback. I remember the last time when velour really became popular goes back about the late. Nineteen seventies early nineteen eighties. I was working at a gene store in virginia called hip pocket and we were always the first on the cutting transfer the young people working in a military town. We always had to be on the trends and when the lower shirts happened. Oh my gosh. I had an assistant. Manager's name was. Bob and bob loved velour pullover shirt. He had one in probably twenty or thirty colors and honestly think bob wore those nine months of the year except during the summer when it was too hot to wear the velour i may have had one velour top. It was just never a look for me. It's a little too all be nice and say flashy for me just not a good look especially on a fatman. You don't have allure anything on a fat man. That's just the way it is. But some people i guess it's hot. It's coming back at least for this season.

Kevin Mason Belur BOB Virginia
Velour (MM #3538)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Velour (MM #3538)

"The with kevin mason was going through some of the emails from my favorite clothing stores the other day and i saw something. They just literally send a shiver down my spine. It hadn't been around for a long time. But i guess this is the year. Belur is making a comeback. I remember the last time when velour really became popular goes back about the late. Nineteen seventies early nineteen eighties. I was working at a gene store in virginia called hip pocket and we were always the first on the cutting transfer the young people working in a military town. We always had to be on the trends and when the lower shirts happened. Oh my gosh. I had an assistant. Manager's name was. Bob and bob loved velour pullover shirt. He had one in probably twenty or thirty colors and honestly think bob wore those nine months of the year except during the summer when it was too hot to wear the velour i may have had one velour top. It was just never a look for me. It's a little too all be nice and say flashy for me just not a good look especially on a fatman. You don't have allure anything on a fat man. That's just the way it is. But some people i guess it's hot. It's coming back at least for this season.

Kevin Mason Belur BOB Virginia
Pittsburgh Food Bank CEO On Food Insecurity In The U.S.

All Things Considered

04:31 min | 4 d ago

Pittsburgh Food Bank CEO On Food Insecurity In The U.S.

"Had to make last minute stops of the grocery store this week to get Thanksgiving dinner on the table. Others idled in their cars for hours waiting for boxes of food and the assurance that at least this week they would not go hungry Food and security is at a crisis level. In the U. S. According to the census. Nearly 26 million people recently reported that they sometimes or often don't have enough to eat. The picture is far worse for people with Children to tell us what this looks like. Right now. In one big city, Lisa Scales joins us She's president and CEO of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Welcome to all things considered. Thank you, Ari. You know, back in March, a widely shared video showed a line of hundreds of cars waiting to pick up food from your food bank in Pittsburgh. That was eight months ago. What if things look like now? Well, we continue to see a higher than normal level of need. Here in the Pittsburgh area. There were people in line for food prior to the pandemic. The disparities in society have existed long before the pandemic. But here in the Pittsburgh area, we have seen a 42% increase. In the food insecurity rate and a 57% increase in Children's food insecurity rate. You have a sense of how many of the people showing up at your food bank these days air coming through. For the first time over 50% of the people were serving our our first time users we continue to receive. Phone calls every day from people who are recently unemployed. Or they've been an unemployed for several months in there to the breaking point now where they don't have enough to T And so you're seeing people who might have lost their jobs months ago but have have now just run through their savings and don't have a safety net. That's right. They've run through their savings. They're no longer able to receive their unemployment benefits, and they're now calling us You feel like the lawmakers and others who could make a difference are listening and appreciate the scale of the problem right now. Well, that's a great question, Ari. We know that the need is significant. And is incredible right now, more so than ever before, And we know that there's a need to do even more to help support families that are struggling to put food on the table. So there is more that can be done. We are looking to the federal government to pass new legislation to support the many families that were struggling. If that does not happen, we are anticipating another incredible spike in demand. You know, saying something like demand has increased more than 40% is a staggering number. But it's still hard Tol personalize that. Can you tell us about someone you've met? Who has Come to the Pittsburgh community Food Bank in need. I have let so many people Ari, who have come through. I've spoken with them. I've I've heard their stories. They shared their desperation there their fear since they're facing an uncertain future. I remember early on in the crisis meeting a woman who's a florist in the suburbs of Pittsburgh and and she had just been laid off, and she didn't know how she was going to. Survived. I've spoken with people who basically when they were getting a box of food said Thank you. This is saving my life. I don't know if I would make it through the month without this food. You talk a lot about the mental and emotional told it this pandemic is taking on frontline health care workers. You're a different kind of frontline worker. How are you holding up? Well, I'm holding up. Well, um the generosity of the community has inspired me inspires our staff. Our community here in Pittsburgh is so generous and that really keeps us going. But we have all had our our dark moments in our moments when this has just been overwhelming. The worst thing for a food banker is to not be able to provide you to people and there have been times over the last nine months where we have come very close to that. And in fact, when you saw that long line of cars, we had to turn away a couple 100 cars in our first distribution in mid March. And that weight on us. We vowed to not let that happen ever again. Lisa Scales is president and CEO of the Greater Pittsburgh Community. Food Bank. Thank you for talking with us. Thank you so much, Ari.

Pittsburgh U. S. Lisa Scales Greater Pittsburgh Community F Pittsburgh Community Food Bank TOL Federal Government Food Bank
Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:30 min | 6 d ago

Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

"Ehthiopian prime minister this morning has ordered his army to move on the capital of the tigray region in the north west of the country. This decision came after his seventy two hour. Ultimatum ended for tigray leaders to surrender. The central conflict here is between the new government of ethiopia and the old government of ethiopia. An aid groups have been sounding the alarm about a humanitarian situation that is deteriorating quickly. Tens of thousands of ethiopian refugees have fled the fighting into neighboring sudan. Npr's ada peralta is following this unfolding. He's in nairobi Good morning eater. Hey david let's start with his offensive. I mean the prime minister had been warning about this. It sounds like it's happening. Now what do we know. Yes so prime minister. Abby acclimate who won the nobel peace prize last year. He says that the last chance for this war to have been resolved peacefully has now closed and he says his troops are going into michaela to try to flush out the leadership of the left. The people's liberation front and he says that will try to do everything to protect civilian lives but michelle is a big urban densely populated city. Think of something. Like saint louis and and even the government has admitted that any fighting will result in civilian deaths in abbey's military has warned that they will use heavy artillery and that the left has said that they will defend the city so this war which has been going on for about three weeks now. Hundreds have already been killed. Tens of thousands have fled as you said and this will no doubt Be the most consequential battle so far. I know this is an incredibly frustrating situation for a year to try and cover this all but impossible to get in there and actually see what's happening firsthand But you know there's been weeks of fighting around the capital. What are you hearing about the conditions on the ground. It is hard to report. But i think we can safely say that there has already been Some pretty gruesome killings that the international community is saying could amount to war crimes We know for example that in a village near the sudanese border there was a huge Massacre videos from there have shown family members crying over bodies of their loved ones in the middle of the streets and the government's human rights commission sent a group of investigators there and they say that more than six hundred people were systematically slaughtered. They say that they were killed with machetes. Their houses were set on fire. They say that militants tied ropes to their necks and dragged them to death. The government commission blames a youth militia aligned with the rebels for this but the refugees fleeing into sudan say that it was the militias aligned with the government. Who did this. So we know with certainty who committed these atrocities but what we know for sure is that civilians have already suffered terribly in this conflict. Got it sounds like it. And what about these tens of thousands of people who are fleeing where they going. What are they facing so they are going into eastern sudan will. Carter is based there. He's a humanitarian with the agency norwegian refugee council. And let's listen to a bit of what he's been. Seeing many of total stories of happens not tillery and strikes and parts of western tigray region which is where most of the refugees we've seen have come from and of past couple of weeks. I guess troop movements militia movement through their this season. They've really fred for their lives. Are you suddenly and there. Was this one woman who spoke with who who had fled across the border and her story released stood out. Here's what happened to her. When the conflict began she was pregnant. Nine months pregnant when this broke out and have given birth on the way to the border crossing and had no one around that she knew it's women seeking safety stopped to help her deliver thankfully. There was no complications with the delivery and charges alive at the moment at least sleeping next to everyone in a big communal tent. So david i mean these are the kinds of situations and stories that show you just. What a tough humanitarian crisis. This has also become really What sounds like an awful situation. A dangerous one with a lot of people life. A lot of people's lives at stake

Ada Peralta Ethiopia Abby Acclimate Tigray Sudan Michaela Nairobi NPR Government Commission Saint Louis Abbey Michelle Government David Human Rights Commission Carter Fred
Meghan Markle reveals she suffered a miscarriage in July

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:30 sec | 6 d ago

Meghan Markle reveals she suffered a miscarriage in July

"Meghan Markle says she had a miscarriage in July. CBS is Vicky Parker. Last summer, Harry and Megan were being pilloried over reports of a split with Prince William and her attempts to sue a British tabloid on privacy grounds escaped the spotlight. And and now we know actually the pain and his Megan says, be unbearable Grief they were going through oil correspondent Katie Nicholl. Last month, a judge and Megan's lawsuit granted her a nine month delay for what at the time were called confidential reasons. We may have a better idea now. Just what those reasons

Meghan Markle Vicky Parker Megan Miscarriage CBS Prince William Katie Nicholl Harry
How different hospitals battle the pandemic to save lives

Morning Edition

06:28 min | Last week

How different hospitals battle the pandemic to save lives

"Thanksgiving holiday arrives during an escalating calamity. More than one million people are testing positive for Corona virus every week. Now that is a high enough number that there is a good chance that some of your family friends or co workers. Among them. It's certainly been true for me these last several weeks if you want to identify and especially hard hit state, just throw a dart at a map because the odds are that any state you hit will qualify. This morning we visit three. Sebastian Martinez Valdivia is a K B A. And Missouri Blake farmer is with WPL and in Nashville, Tennessee, and Bram Sable Smith. Is with Wisconsin public radio. Welcome to all of you. Good morning. Thank you. Morning, and Bram. How widespread is this surge in Wisconsin, where you are? It's quite widespread, you know, by September, public health experts were really sounding the alarm about the rise. In cases we're seeing in the state initially were seen surges and cities where the university started located, but very quickly. The virus is rampant in communities. All over Wisconsin. As you know, Steve cases they're just the beginning of a covert search. So our hospital started filling up quickly. And maybe most concerned involves our death. Worried. We reported the record 104 deaths yesterday. We're losing about 52 people every day, on average and over 3000 people. Wisconsin have died of covered 19 so far, and I should also note we are seeing a slight downturn. Our cases are slightly our cases are dropping ever so slightly, But we're still very much at the top of the mountain and Steve the death rates very similar here in Tennessee. But cases are still climbing often more than 4000 Day. And As we found throughout this pandemic destined to lag those big spikes in new cases by a couple of weeks, So Tennessee's bracing for what could be to come because so far they're just has no sign existing of cases, letting up. Blake, over here in neighboring Missouri were in a similar ballpark in terms of new cases on deaths. But the really troubling trend has been in hospitalizations, which are high and continuing to rise on. Hospitals are really struggling with capacity and a lot of parts of the state. Well, let's talk a little bit more about hospitals or doing in Missouri, then Yeah, well, one of the big problems is a lot of the smaller rural hospitals that traditionally transfer patients toe urban and metro areas for intensive care are really struggling to find beds because those larger hospitals are already full. S O. For example, Cocks Health, which is in Springfield, the third biggest city here in Missouri, has expanded its hospital capacity multiple times over the past nine months, but it's still had to turn people away. Steve Edwards is the CEO there. So we will have added 147 bed capacity, which is probably bigger than the Average hospital state, Missouri, he says the hospital keeps hitting what it would have considered a worst case scenario every couple of weeks. But adding rooms isn't really the half of it the biggest challenge, according to Edward to staffing, so training staff to care for covert patients, and then the draining work of actually caring for them. So that's the crisis in Missouri, Bram Sable Smith, Let's go back to Wisconsin Howard doctors trying to keep up where you are. You know, October the state we converted our state fairgrounds into what's called an alternative care facility to handle the excess capacity. We have so about 89% of the hospital beds available in the entire state for being occupied right now, in some regions, that's higher. At the alternative care facility. There's only nine patients right now, though. That's in part because it's voluntary to go there. It's also because it's where patients will go to recover kind of after they've cleared a hurdle in their covert treatment. The idea behind that is To free up resource is inside the hospitals to treat on influx of patients. Researchers like ICU beds that are in very short supply here and brand that the corps of Engineers build alternative care sites here in Tennessee is well, but increasingly, there's a concern about having the staff to open them. And a big reason for that is that so many nurses and doctors air out themselves with Kovar 19 or because they have to quarantine Well, Blake. What are hospitals in Tennessee, saying about that? Well, they're really starting to sound the alarm. In a way we haven't heard for a long time. Hospital administrators have wanted to make sure people knew that they would be able to handle the usual patients along with covert, and that's just less. So now. Dr Katrina Green works in an HCIA emergency room here in Nashville. We're worried about what the delays and care will mean for our patients, and I am personally terrified in my hospital. Being full could result in someone dying in the waiting room. The situation has become particularly severe in parts of Texas as well like El Paso and love IQ. For now that they're able to transport covert patients to other parts of the state. But there's going to be a time likely when those hospitals air capacity to You know, I spent some time last week and one of the five covert units at the University Hospital here in Madison, Wisconsin, where I live. I spoke to Mary Lowe. She's a nursing assistant in the unit. She's been there since the pandemic began. This has been going on for a long time. And right now it doesn't feel like there's an end in sight. Even though there will be a time it doesn't necessarily feel like that right now. You know that unit as 28 beds and they've been consistently full and she says, it's it's exhausting and remember, the whole reason for shutdowns early on, was to prevent hospitals from being overrun will now in a lot of these states like ours, Those restrictions are long gone, and hospitals are now nearing the edge of that cliff. But political leaders are really finding it hard to go backward after lifting restrictions, months, Okay, granted, that's granted. That's true. But suggestion haven't some political leaders at least faced pressure to approve more safety measures. Yeah, There's definitely been pressure here in Missouri. The State Hospital Association actually sent a letter last week to a Republican governor Mike Parson, urging him to kind of issue one of those statewide mass mandate, saying the Wolf is at the door. But like a lot of Republican governors, he's rejected that call just to the north of us, though. In Iowa, the story's a little different. So Governor Kim Reynolds, there, also a Republican, was initially against the mask mandate, and she even said that city's couldn't issue their own mandates back in the summer, But she recently reversed course. I would have seen one of the biggest surges in cases and hospitalizations in the country per capita. I will has roughly half the population of misery, but it's almost in the same ballpark in terms of new cases. S O earlier this month, Reynolds did end up issuing a statewide mass mandate as well as some restrictions on public and private gatherings, with exceptions for some businesses and religious services.

Missouri Bram Sable Smith Wisconsin Tennessee Sebastian Martinez Valdivia Blake Farmer Cocks Health Wisconsin Public Radio Steve Nashville Bram Blake Steve Edwards Kovar Dr Katrina Green Springfield Mary Lowe
U.S.’s failure to contain the coronavirus ‘mind blowing,’ colder months will be ‘very tough’

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:43 min | Last week

U.S.’s failure to contain the coronavirus ‘mind blowing,’ colder months will be ‘very tough’

"Everything that's happening right. Now was warned of six months ago. Nine months ago. I i'll i'll say it now. I was on the phone with zeke emanuel back in march and rem annual back in march. Zeke had been talking to the president. I said what are you saying until it said. It's gonna be really bad mr president. It's going to be really bad. You got to get ready and as bad as it's going to be in the spring it's going to be worse in the fall. That was the warning. Donald j trump guide in march and we heard every doctor tell him the same thing every medical expert. Tell him this same thing and of course you had the press conference where donald trump assured us that this would not come back in the fall. Dr fauci said yes. It's going to come back in. The fall and healthcare systems are going to be pressed remembered all the times. Donald trump said we had the best testing of the world. We've got more testing. You see that picture of those cars lined up around dodger stadium. The best testing in the world not even close because he reviews time and time again to implement the defense production act remember. Donald trump saying one person coming in from china and then saying it was fifteen. And then saying we're gonna be fine in the fall. Will the fall is here and looking at this at the lines of people waiting to get a test. It's worse now than ever before. Just as donald trump was warned. Back in march by zeke emanuel justice warned by anthony algae on live television in a press conference. And so here. We are coming up to two hundred thousand new infections a day. Over two hundred and fifty thousand americans. Dead and that number is skyrocketing a shortage of testing our hospital system at a breaking point. This was not stupidity. This was willful negligence. And it's on donald trump and its own. Everybody that's worked for donald trump. It's on everybody inside the white house and it's on every republican that kept their mouth shut because they didn't want to insult the president. Oh yeah now. They don't want to insult the president while he's trying to actively undermine american democracy this past year they haven't wanted to upset the president because well he was lying about the coronavirus and a lot of stupid people really ignorant people believing. That's why we saw. Actually the governor of iowa mocking a mask mandate a couple of weeks before the election but after the election now suddenly a mask mandate is good science. This is willful negligence and it is. It is party politics at its worse it is. And you don't have to take zeke manuals word for it. We heard it in the presence. Own voice on those tapes from bob woodward. He said he knew how serious it was. He knew it was deadly. He called it the plague but he said he wanted to play it down. And as you point out there are press conferences we can roll out the tape where the president would get up in that white house briefing room and say it's not coming back in the fall. This is the worst of it. He'd move aside. Dr fact would say it's coming back in the fall. This is coming back in the fall so we are right where everyone told us we were going to be the differences between march and now eight months. We haven't done anything to stop what's happening right now. The judgement of history is going to be incredibly harsh as bad as it feels right now when we have some space for this everyone can look back on it. Hopefully we get through this rather than later. The fact that our federal government led by president trump stepped aside and let this virus burn through the country. It's unforgivable and it's happening right now and if you hear the urgency in the at briefing yesterday you hear the urgency from the cdc here the urgency from the doctors who come on our show. Dr oester home yesterday. Said this is the most serious public health a moment we've had in this country right now since one thousand nine hundred eighteen and we did start acting like it

Donald Trump Zeke Emanuel Donald J Trump Dr Fauci Anthony Algae Mr President Zeke Dodger Stadium White House China Bob Woodward Iowa Plague Federal Government Dr Oester CDC
The Secret to Selling from Instagram with Elise Darma

The DigitalMarketer Podcast

04:24 min | Last week

The Secret to Selling from Instagram with Elise Darma

"Hello elise welcome to the digital marketer. Podcast thanks so much janet. I'm excited to be here. Yeah i'm really excited to have you. There's so much that we have to talk about. And before we get into the nitty gritty. I just want want you to introduce yourself and in your own words. Tell everyone who you are and what you do and why you do it. Sure i always find the question funny because like how far back do you want me to go. Troy by eight. My teens my twenties. Because i do see where i'm at today was a full circle moment in terms of who i've been my whole life. I grew up in a very conservative upbringing very conservative religion that taught me to live life. According to a set of rules and as a teenager especially a seventeen eighteen year old. I discovered i really did not like rules like as much as i was a goody two shoes straight a student top of class my whole life. I really discovered that. When i was eighteen and i went traveling with a group of people around europe for a month and i was free to be whoever i wanted to be like. No one knew my upbringing. It was addicting that feeling of total and utter freedom. So i really think that moment put me on this path of. Ooh i want more of that in my life and i got back home and i did the regular thing that you're supposed to do which is go to school. I went to three different universities before. I graduated with a degree in radio and television arts. It's called and i got a job. And i thought i was doing what i was supposed to do. Even though is a couple of years behind already. Because i delayed my studies and honestly within a year or two of working a regular day job i just was bored like the only way i could describe it was. I felt dead inside. I would sit at my desk. And i loved my co workers. I love the social aspect but the work the bureaucracy of the organization. The fact that i didn't want my boss's job like it all just killed me a little bit inside and my desktop at that time was of a co working space in called who booed and it literally is like a tree house. It looks like a tree house for adults that you work from mike. God this was in two thousand twelve. I think i discovered it and it was my screen saver. It was the goal and so that year someone in my network said haley's social media right. Can you grow my instagram for my new fashion brand. And that's when a light bulb went off. Because i i'd already read the four hour workweek. I wasn't sure if i should do like an e com business or like video services business and this person said. Can you grow my instagram in. This was in twenty thirteen by the time we got started so back then. Instagram was like a hangout for teenagers. My first post was of me with the movember moustache followed knee right. I just didn't care. And so that's when i was able to learn kind of undercover because i did have a personal brand. I didn't tell anyone about what i was doing. But i was able to learn how to grow this account specifically for teens to attract teens to grow their brand and we were able to hit a hundred thousand followers in less than six months when god's unheard of now back then we really dove into influencer marketing and that was my job sending free sweatshirts to teens around the world and making them post to post about it and so with that client. That really gave me the confidence to say yes to a few more clients on the side of my day job and nine months later i was able to quit when one of my clients wanted to hire me for two days a week. That was my fork in the road decision and it was harder than expected. You know. I thought. I wanted to be my own boss for so long. And then when the opportunity was there to leave benefits to leave my friends to leave that. Normalcy it was scary especially as someone who loves their routine in their creature comforts. I quit my job. And then that was in twenty fourteen. And that put me on the path to grow agency and have a fulltime roster of clients. Not too many just enough to satisfy my travel habit and then in two thousand sixteen. I thought okay. This has been fun. You know but my income has been the same every year

Hello Elise Janet Europe Haley Instagram Mike
Refugee Resettlement Numbers At an All Time Low

UN News

00:59 sec | Last week

Refugee Resettlement Numbers At an All Time Low

"Resettlement numbers are at record. Low this year the refugee agency. Unhcr said on wednesday with only fifteen thousand four hundred twenty five people resettled in the first nine months of two thousand twenty compared with more than four times that in two thousand nineteen this is one of the lowest levels of resettlement in almost two decades and blow for the ability to save lives and protect those most at risk said unhcr's assistant high commissioner for protection. Gillian triggs syrians affected by nearly a decade of fighting. Make up forty one percent of all those resettled. This year and sixteen percent are from the democratic republic of the congo drc other nationalities you have been given shelter in a third country include iraqis burmese and afghans. Unhcr said that three and ten violence or torture and nearly two in ten are women and girls at risk although the covid nineteen crisis has delayed the movement of asylum seekers to a third country. Unhcr said that the fifty thousand global quota for the whole year was disappointingly. Low in the first place.

Unhcr Gillian Triggs Democratic Republic Of The Con
Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

"Airbnb has found for a stock market listing MPR's Shannon Bond reports, the home rental company revealed a financial picture that reflects how the pandemic has up ended the travel industry. Regulatory paperwork made public on Monday. Shows of all the ups and downs Airbnb has weathered the first nine months of this year stood out its losses more than doubled to almost $700 million sales shrank to $2.5 billion. But Airbnb says business is turning around. People are booking stays close to home, and some who can work remotely are renting homes for longer periods. In the three months from July to September, the company turned a profit of $219 million. Airbnb was reportedly valued at $18 billion earlier this year. Well, the company has not said how much it hopes to raise by selling stock. It's public offering is expected to be one of the year's

Airbnb Shannon Bond MPR
Hardemon to be replaced after running for a seat on the Miami-Dade County Commission

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:24 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hardemon to be replaced after running for a seat on the Miami-Dade County Commission

"About nine months of virtual meeting city of Miami commissioners are gathering at City Hall again. Today's commission meeting will be the last for Cheon Hardiment, whose resignations effective tomorrow. Commission has scheduled a special meeting for Wednesday morning to debate how to select his replacement. Whether they should appoint a candidate or allow voters voters to to choose choose through through a a special special election election argument argument is is leaving leaving the the Miami Miami Commission Commission after after winning winning a a seat seat on on the the Miami Miami Dade Dade County County Commission. Commission.

Cheon Hardiment Miami City Hall Miami Commission Commission Dade Dade County County Commis
How You Can Make It as an Online Hair Educator

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

How You Can Make It as an Online Hair Educator

"Well come along to help you. Cut it in the hairdressing industry. Podcast my name's dom lane and this podcast as you just heard in the intro is one. I've been wanting to have for a long time particularly as we are now here in england in our next lockdown and many of you are thinking about a new direction in where you go in so who could be better than actually talking about online education than one of the best. I believe in the business. A huge fan of is our love style so delighted to welcome onto the show. The incredible chris. Moody chris welcome to how to cut it down. Thank you so much you such a pleasure to be here. I have to tell you real tingo just as as the show is stocking up there. It's it's such a privileged. This really is the gold standard of podcasting. It really is so excited to be on it. Thank you so inviting the suic- solano just before coming on and you know a saint. I'm i'm i have been a big fan of us for a long time and you know if there's anything we can learn from when it comes to be an educator is you really chris i know you deliver it to so many people i mean. How many people have you do you. Reckon youth now educated in hairdresser to become educated. I dunno most i dunno domino must tens of thousands in the last is really amplified in the last nine months since we went into our original lockdown in march all of our businesses pivoted since march. I think i've done about three hundred and fifty four hundred events. The biggest event is probably had about fifteen hundred people on so And most of the mavericks between fifty and one hundred people on a lot of those event so just in in this year alone in twenty it must be thousands but over the years maybe tens of thousands. I don't know i'm very privileged. I feel really blessed that people come and listen actually so it's really humbling. Think he's become such a big part now. There are so many people the want to become hairdressing educators. I suppose because there are so that you know that a lot of headdresses out there and ha handwriting education has become so accessible but also think you know in the uk all of the uk and island addressing has always been at a very very high standard. And i think people are recognizing in order to compete in to maintain that standard and to keep sort of pushing the barriers education has become more important than ever. It's not enough now to just simply learn your craft over three years or whatever and then you go into your behind the chair unpracticed. Craft things are changing all the time. Fashion technology styles of people are recognizing that they need to keep up with it. So i think as more and more an then it becomes cyclical as more people recognize. How much more there is to learn. The more people feel the need to learn it so it becomes absolutely anita you. You must hear it so often there where people say yet. I want to go into becoming an educator. And that's what. I wanna do ready today. Christie's learned from you the stuff that you take. Because i just to clear up the you have a few kind of different ports where platforms way you educate you. Chris just give us a quick heads up on those that you do provide in people that are interested in becoming educators. While i work a lot for a couple of different brands i work a lot for a global brand of which it has many different subsidiaries and do a lot of education for them Helping teach their trainers and helping to sort of evolve their education. I have some partners in the usa. I work with one of my original teachers. Guy chris barron who's a still a mentor and coach to get mine. And i'm fortunate that i now partner with chris on some platforms of the us in north america within. And i also. I'm part of a program here in the uk called the high performance educated with good friend and business partner. David barnard as well as well as doing some of my own stuff but primarily. I'm working in partnership with other people off or offer major brands for global brands. Now i interviewed. James atkinson the life. Who's a very good friend of mine. He's pretty good friend of yours. To and i said to him. I said chris just there seems to be so many things that you've grown in. The industry has leader name. And i think. I'm curious to actually know who you are. Chris because i see what you do with the education but just give a bit of back history to use the person that you are and how you've got to wear you wall well i. I'm just a working class lot from nov town. I originate from bombs bonds lease really good for producing headdresses. I don't know why bombs lease home to josh. Would andrew barton robert eating. You know we're all from was something in the water that creates these bombs. Lee is a is itself. Your peebles south yorkshire. It's a small mining town in south yorkshire. It's a very humble town. It's a lovely place. I'm proud that i'm from there. I love the place. But it's a very small town humble beginnings

Moody Chris Chris Solano UK England Guy Chris Barron David Barnard Anita James Atkinson Christie USA North America Andrew Barton Josh Robert South Yorkshire LEE
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
"nine month" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"nine month" Discussed on Post Reports

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> One million <Speech_Music_Male> is obviously <Speech_Music_Male> a big round <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> number. It's a, it's a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dramatic number. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's a frightening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> number when <SpeakerChange> you talk about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that many deaths. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> When <Speech_Music_Male> we saw that we were <Speech_Music_Male> reaching this one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> million marker <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> across the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world that just <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seemed to be something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that cried out for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> attention and <Speech_Music_Male> yet not attention <Speech_Music_Male> in that <Speech_Music_Male> Broadway of huge <Speech_Music_Male> numbers but <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> in a much <Speech_Music_Male> more intimate way of looking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at individual cases <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stories of families <Speech_Music_Male> that had been through <Speech_Music_Male> this trauma. <Speech_Music_Male> The purpose <Speech_Music_Male> of doing it this <Speech_Music_Male> ways is <Speech_Music_Male> really to <Speech_Music_Male> kind of lay down a marker <Speech_Music_Male> into to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bring people back <Speech_Music_Male> to what it felt <Speech_Music_Male> like when <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> gravity of this <Speech_Music_Male> pandemic I <Speech_Music_Male> became clear <Speech_Music_Male> because we've all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> adjusted to it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one way or another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and wildlife is not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nearly normal. <Speech_Music_Male> There is a kind of <Speech_Music_Male> sameness that sets <Speech_Music_Male> in and we kind <Speech_Music_Male> of find new <Speech_Music_Male> patterns and <Speech_Music_Male> so this was an attempt <Speech_Music_Male> to. Bring <Speech_Music_Male> this all back to <Speech_Music_Male> that moment when we <Speech_Music_Male> saw <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just how damaging <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this was to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everyone's way of <Speech_Music_Male> life and <Speech_Music_Male> in doing. So <Speech_Music_Male> kind of bring people <Speech_Music_Male> to both the sense <Speech_Music_Male> of common purpose around <Speech_Music_Male> finding a <Speech_Male> way out of this predicament. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a sense of realization <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that although <Speech_Music_Male> we live in different countries <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and different cultures, <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> disease has <Speech_Music_Male> hit people <Speech_Music_Male> in remarkably <Speech_Music_Male> similar ways around <Speech_Music_Male> the world and <Speech_Music_Male> they have reacted <Speech_Music_Male> with very <Speech_Music_Male> basic human instincts <Speech_Music_Male> of seeking <Speech_Music_Male> to be <Speech_Male> together

"nine month" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"nine month" Discussed on Post Reports

"What this pandemic has done. Two very different societies. We decided, we wanted to follow disease on its path of destruction across the world, and so we looked for statistics that showed win and wear the peaks were occurring. Then we went about choosing countries that had some larger meaning, and so obviously, we started this story in China. I'm Jerry she and I was the Washington Post correspondent in Beijing until March. The peak in Covid came relatively early in China. The country that was the presumed. Of the disease that was at a moment.

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Along with it and so there's just not really a history of republican lawmakers standing up to the president and if they did do this bill that would protect muller in the special investigation this would be really the first incidence of them in mass standing up to the president that's really interesting like charlie was you know the the in in watergate it was a question of standing up to to as criminal activity was starting to come out and we haven't gotten quite there yet with with trumpet certainly there's been enough that there are plenty of non congressional republicans who have stood up and said that what trump is doing about the this or that is wrong jeff flake comes to mind who's about to be a non congressional republican soon having decided that he'd had enough think the people that watch here are not the flakes or the ben sasse as the people that have have been very consistent in calling out trump for his abberant behavior in various ways it's the people like that i consider more independent voices within the republican party people like lindsey graham it's people like chuck grassley i think when you see them turn or not turn that will determine the outcome hero of of how congress treats the situation that's a great point so nancy all of this is unfolding this this is causing chaos within trump as bursting forth for all of us to see on tv and on twitter and you know for you guys to cover the white house in the inner workings of the white house meanwhile as you mentioned this is all unfolding as the administration is considering military action against syria and maybe by the time we published we'll have already done so nancy you mentioned the chemical attacking and civilians which seems to have been ordered by syrian president assad so where where do we stand on that is coming at a moment of flux for the national security council you've got a new national security adviser john bolton in president trump is cancelling his trip to peru the defense secretaries canceling his trip out west for the weekend where where do we stand at this point so we don't know exactly what's going to happen the white house press secretary sarah huckabee sanders and the briefing yesterday kept emphasizing that.

nancy white house peru congress republican party sarah huckabee sanders press secretary trump john bolton assad president syria twitter chuck grassley lindsey graham ben sasse jeff flake watergate charlie muller
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"That's really interesting and so like you said charlie what we've seen on the hill this week chuck grassley the senator from iowa who's the chairman of the judiciary committee is going to allow it seems like it's going to allow vote in his committee on this bill that would give a special counsel ten days to challenge a firing though we should add it's still unclear if it would ever make it to the senate floor as our colleagues alana shore and burgess everett wrote in their story the quoted mitch mcconnell the senate majority leader who said i haven't seen a clear indication yet that we need to pass something to keep him from being removed preferring to muller so we're seeing some cracks but in terms of the leadership in in congress they they seem still reluctant to take up that mantle that you just mentioned charlie and we haven't even gotten to the question of whether it could make it to the house floor much less the senate floor well nbc no evidence since trump's campaign that congressional leadership or even rank and file people there have been some rank and file people who have stood up to trump but for the most part congress has largely gone along with his things you know i think it's in part because they wanted a tax bill and they wanted to slash regulations but they've gone along with you know some of the things that he said some of the identity politics some of the racially insensitive things that he said you know they've gone along with access hollywood tape and some of the questions about how the president treats women he's derided muslims he's derided a bunch of different ethnic groups and they've got.

trump hollywood muller burgess everett senate chuck grassley president congress charlie mitch mcconnell special counsel judiciary committee chairman iowa senator ten days
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"So he was fuming publicly and then privately has been absolutely furious about it and so the other thing that we've really been watching and the thing that he's been asking people about is should he fire rod rosenstein who is the person over at the at the department of justice who's overseeing the special investigation and the white house has also been insisting this week that the president also has power to fire the special investigator robert mueller himself directly and so there's sort of two big things we're watching what's going to happen with syria but also is the president going to fire someone to try to make the special investigation stop this is all i mean we've seen trump go bananas a little bit over the the muller probe and rosenstein the deputy attorney general's oversight of that before but it seems like he he really went bananas about this and he was talking about you know the attorney client privilege is dead and so whereas in fact the process that prosecutors have to go through in order to raid law offices so onerous that i mean that's the real signal here that's why he's he's reacting like this it's so it's such a dangerous moment for him everybody is and it it's just another instance of the special investigation moving beyond what the white house thought typically would which was was there any collusion between the trump campaign and the russian government or any election and really into trump's inner circle and it's really it has been creeping into trump's inner soaker for a while the white house attorney don mcgann has been interviewed ryan's previous a former chiefofstaff has been interviewed but now trump's own personal attorney you know the fbi has rated his office and hotel room as i said and apparently what the fbi is most interested in is the payments that michael cohen made to to women one of whom stormy daniels right before the election and were those seen as a payoff and that's really what they're looking at and so this raises a whole bunch of other questions.

rod rosenstein white house president robert mueller syria deputy attorney general russian government trump don mcgann ryan attorney fbi daniels investigator michael cohen
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Try and do this again whereas scalise might because of that human interest factor that you're talking about maybe he maybe he would have a better shot at that whereas on the flip side if all you need is half plus one of your conference for that internal vote to become a minority leader maybe mccarthy has a better has the inside shot at that because of the longevity of his relationships and his work with within the house it's a fascinating question the question mccarthy becomes become minority leader but again his relationship with trump as you know there's been talking about mccarthy maybe white house chief staff and there's a possibly democracy one it'd be minority leader let me make one other point about being speaker you win the election in november speaker vote is not till january and you know they have they haven't eternal vote inside the republican conference at that point saying yes he's our speech speech your speaker designate but the floor vote doesn't start until the congress congress starts and you know the fallacy that people have about leadership actions is not whether or not they like a person are they may like kevin mccarthy then people vote for someone in speaker in a leadership race because it helps them on whatever low politically personally financially in terms of fundraising however it helps them and then and and you know if they think mccreadie means speaker would help them that's fine you know and not bill they won't vote for him and it doesn't matter if they lake or not that's the wrong brummer it's that they you know wouldn't benefit them to having him speaker and that's why being eventually lost his hold on the conference as a really good point.

scalise trump congress congress white house kevin mccarthy
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"When it was going to really start in earnest and you know which is why the news still kinda hit us like a thunderbolt on wednesday morning that that ryan was going to be making this announcement but you've got the house majority leader kevin mccarthy you've got the house majority whip steve scalise who are both kind of shadow boxing right now mccarthy us us running for speaker i mean there's no question about that or alternatively minority leader in fact both of them are but they're speaker has a different requirement speaker you have to be elected on the floor whereas minority leader you just have to be elected and said your conference so i mean it did complete it's much higher barnaby speaker i mean the thing about mccarthy is he tried for to be speaker in two thousand fifteen after being left and he failed he there was opposition from the house freedom caucus which is a group of forty odd hardline republican conservatives they didn't like bainer and at the time they opposed mccarthy getting the top getting to speaker and that opened the door for ryan to become speaker ryan jumped over mccarthy so now mccarthy has a second chance and you can see with mccarthy he i mean he's been running he's been running for a while i mean politico was writing about ryan's potential tyrant in december so i mean it's been clear for awhile that this was a possibility and though everybody assumed ryan would would stay at least through the election and i'm still shocked by this this so you know mccarthy his really he's he's i is as nancy it was talking about ryan never had that close personal relationship with trump of course he has it i mean he you know trump calls them my kevin you know jokes about it they talk constantly talk a couple of times a week if not more mccarthy's in touch with the top staff and the white house so mccarthy things you know trump support if they're show the majority come november would help him become speaker he's also really stepped up his fundraising and we mccarthy took in nine million dollars in the first quarter to help raise nine million dollars including a bunch of money with vice president mike pence who's a four rows colleague i mean probably won't be able to raise a lot of money you.

ryan kevin mccarthy steve scalise politico nancy vice president mike pence boxing nine million dollars
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"That's a really great point nancy can you tell us a little bit about about trump's relationship with ryan and you know how it's evolved over the last year and a half or so and also his his relationship with some of the folks who potentially could replace him yes so i think that trump and ryan at this point have a pretty good relationship and it really wasn't always that way you know ryan was really critical of trump during the presidential campaign and our colleague tim alberta had a piece up on politico today talking about how you know ryan had assume that hillary clinton would win the election and had the speech prepared that was going to disengage himself from a some of trump's identity politics and some of his comments divisive comments about race and sort of dog whistles to white nationalist he was going to deliver that you know on election night or the day after the election he ended up shelving that in order to sort of forge this pretty decent relationship with the president and intern he's gone some of the things that he wanted you know ryan used to be the chairman of the house ways and means committee which is the tax writing committee he's always wanted to do attack bill you know i covered ryan in the house when he was the chairman of the budget committee so he's always really loved these wonky issues and he did manage to help pass a historic tax bill and that's a huge thing but i think in order to do that he had to overlook some of trump's you know personal issues and i feel like that will be part of his legacy i also just on the policy stuff wanna point out that he did pass a tax bill but the congressional budget office also showed that that tax bill is going to blow a huge hole in the deficit and it's expected to top one trillion dollars by twenty twenty despite the fact that the country has really good economic growth so that will also be part of ryan's legacy so i think the legacy is going to be complicated i wanna read a headline from politico the race to replace paul ryan is on however the the story ran on monday two days before ryan's announcement so brazil tell us a little bit about the.

nancy trump tim alberta hillary clinton president politico paul ryan intern twenty twenty brazil one trillion dollars two days
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"I think it's just i mean i i will ryan retirement a disaster for republican there's no other way to to say not only does it put his own seton play which is tough seat for the whole the message the would the image it gives the you know the speaker is leaving why you know why should you know why should anybody but republic ryan's leaving you know the the you know the democrats are already spending this is you know you know ryan knows they're gonna lose the house he's leaving he's bailing out now so you know the the idea is like i think with a lot of members if ryan is not gonna stay white white would he want to be stay on as speaker i mean that just seems to some members as you know you know we you know it's fine these days in congress that's right that's his is his responsibility to his constituents if he feels that's the way that's the case but you know how can he lead them if he's leaving i mean i you know and i think that's a powerful argument i need that's going to resonate with a bunch of members so i think as members sward through this i think ryan has a big problem that's a good point charlie you know we can jump into the political side here a little bit the house republicans as alena schneider wrote for us this morning have kind of built the foundation of their defense of the majority this year on three pillars basically one has been a favourable political map that we were republicans hold a lot of districts that were drawn by fellow republicans tell black them then there's the incumbency factor that they you know they said they have incumbents in these places who have been battletested who've known locally who can run campaigns to win and then there's paul ryan's massive fundraising and he's been pulling in millions and millions of dollars.

congress charlie alena schneider paul ryan
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"What i realize is if i'm here for one more term my kids will only have ever known me as a weekend dad i just can't let that happen so i will be setting new priorities in my life but will also be leaving incredibly proud of what we have accomplished so what now there are two threads i wanna pull here there's congressional you know what happens in the next eight months on the hill what happens in the year two years three years after that on the hill and also the political threat how does this affect republicans fight to hold onto the house majority in what's already shaping up to be a strong year for the democratic party so bracelets dive into the congressional side i seven months ago until the mid terms nine months until the new congress is sworn in ryan says that he is going to remain speaker and serve out his time there but that's a long time to be a limb duck right it is and i'm not sure he'll be able to dave at long to be honest rachel beat an just story this morning i ran this morning raises some members raised questions about the state actually like there to be speaker election now ryan's gonna leave we've than step down as speaker you know he can continue to hold his congressional seat until the end of the year allow a new speaker to be elected whether it's majority leader kevin mccarthy or majority whip steve scalise or whomever it is you know and then that person would you know lead the house republican conference into the elections november elections as the incumbent speaker i think this is a huge problem for ryan out the ryen circle says look they they're you know it's a minority of members are saying this but i do think that this settles in members look at this i think rang has a big problem i do i am not sure he'll be able to stay i'm not i'm not entirely sure what specifically is the issue with with being a lame duck speaker is that are there stuff coming down the pike legislatively that he needs to enforce unity on that people would be less likely to listen to him on or what you know what what what's driving these concerns.

republicans congress ryan rachel steve scalise dave kevin mccarthy eight months seven months nine months three years two years
"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"This week under cast paul ryan says this term will be his last both as the house speaker and as a member of the house of representatives i read that somewhere two months ago he talked about on a podcast in any case we will unpack what this event which happened wednesday morning means for congress in the near term and republicans in the midterms plus the f b i raids the office of donald trump's personal lawyer and the president lashes out at his own justice department so another hohum news last week at the white house we'll have nancy cook here to break it all down for us and what to look out for next a reminder to our listeners to subscribe to the nerd cast rate us and write a review and stay tuned for the end of the show we've got a contribution coming from one of the nerd casts biggest fans one more note before we begin we're taping this a little bit before noon eastern on thursday april twelfth so it's all up to date as of then all right let's get started i wanna welcome in our guests we have in studio charlie tests in our senior politics editor i charlie got nancy cook white house reporter hey thanks for having me on the phone we have politicos catholic teeth in wrestling thanks for being with us thanks for having me all right so let's jump right in our first data point three three years is how long paul ryan has been speaker of the house it's also coincidentally the number of children that paul ryan has and he said this week that being with his family as his kids move into their teenage teenage years motivated him to pull the plug on his speakership and his time in elected office he says he's going to leave congress at the end of two thousand eighteen he's not planning to run for anything in the future.

paul ryan congress donald trump president white house nancy cook editor reporter charlie three three years two months
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"United press international security correspondent lorry thank you thanks the european union's highest court came down hard on labour this week it ruled that the at based ride hailing service should be regulated like any other taxi provider across the european union now lubar has fought for a long time to be treated by governments like a digital platform only just an app that connects people who like to drive to people who need rides and that identity justin app let's uber avoid most of the responsibilities and liabilities and regulations of a traditional taxi or transportation business well no longer at least not in the eu meanwhile uber has seen similar fights all across america a sooner rajin is an expert on that kind of model and these fights that are going on with ride sharing a room thanks for being here thanks for having me a ruined let's talk about this eu ruling first what did the eu sayed uber and what does it mean for drivers and for riders there so this was an anticipated ruling from the eu you in deciding whether huambo was a digital platform o'day transportation service they came down on the side that over is a transportation service just like a traditional taxi service at a black car service a what this means is that all rubel drivers will have to be professional drivers in all likelihood of buubas relationship with its drivers will have to change from contractors to them being fulltime employees and so it dramatically changes lubos cost structure if it wants to operate in different european cities if we were wants to operate in paris or tracked you can no longer just say hey person with a toyota in an app driving gets a mighty you have to treat them like a person with a job with benefits and and a pension and everything else i think the specifics of exactly how would the drivers need to be treated are gonna theories city to city i'm like in the united states across europe transportation is regulated at the local level.

United press international european union lubar huambo paris toyota united states justin america eu rubel europe
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Democrats or fifty republicans fifty democrats and so that really determines who the speaker of the house is how the committees are set up who is in control of its are republicans obviously they'll elect their speaker even with a onevote margin i've it's fiftyfifty the democrats or republicans will be forced into a powersharing situation which actually happened in the late 90s and so all the committees had even numbers of democrats and republicans and actually had cochairs so instead of having one chairman for a committee the actually had a democrat and republican share very few people were happy with that situation it was very frustrating for everybody so both both sides here are actually obviously looking to rule the house but there are also preparing for a very difficult and frustrating powersharing situation if they need to go there all of a sudden america is watching one race in virginia for a house of delegates seat and i don't think this is the last day that we're going to be doing at michael pope with virginia public radio michael i'm glad we happy for this thanks for being here thank you for nine months beginning last october iraqi soldiers and an americanled coalition carried out a huge assault on the city of most of them it was all part of an effort to take back the iraqi city from isis that mission was achieved in july but only recently has the huge human cost of the operation become known a new investigation from the associated press finds the number of civilian deaths in that campaign for mozell was much much higher than previously reported at least eleven thousand lorry hit it was one of the reporters on that investigation she's an international security correspondent with the ap and chris woods is director of air wars there a uk base nonprofit the track civilian casualties caused by international military actions it helped out with the ap story our own analysis made clear but thousands of civilians have don't need a muzzle i think the challenge that we had is in so many of the cases we were looking at we simply couldn't determine who had killed.

Democrats chairman the house america virginia michael pope assault mozell chris woods director speaker of the house ap uk nine months
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I want to make it very very clear in this last election is there was one really really big lie after another one of them was that somehow thirty percent of the latinos voted for donald trump we'll guess what in the fourth congressional district that i represent you got 10 percent of the vote you can go and look it up my congressional district is not uniformly latino it's 73 percent latino but it is a majority latino district and you can see how people who voted and i'm gonna tell you something i wanna make sure the american public on this this is a priority for us these kids degrees euled that have come forward signed up given their names their addresses gone through a background check and are now bone ropel to this mass deportation policy up this president we asked them to sign up and now it's our responsibility to protect them and the way to protect them if that means the we deny our votes in the government shutdown that's on the republicans they're the majority party in the house in the senate our responsibility is to bans on agenda of justice and fairness and of priorities and i gotta tell you where the us banic or not as bent where the immigrant ornate year you'll know those kids deserve a pathway forward and congressman in january do you think enough of your democratic colleagues let's say probably in the senate i think you're right about that are going to be willing to go to the matter where you are for a government shutdown they had better or they have on the standing one thing there will be a lot of disillusionment and a lot of anger um at the democratic party i know where the party in the minority but if we had the leverage you'll have the leverage to stop something bad from happening and you don't do it then you're an accomplice of those that are taking that an evil actions against the american people congressman lewis gootia.

donald trump president the house senate congressman lewis gootia thirty percent 10 percent 73 percent
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Troops are looking for the fixture they're putting the pressure on and and you're referring to it uh spending deal today probably only goes a few weeks uh are you convinced that democrats will have the leverage in midjanuary for some kind of dhaka fix our that they'll be able to push down on republicans and get this deal done then because that seems to be the plan now here's here's the essence of it right where the minority party we've got it use our leverage so with our leverage if you need our votes if you need democratic votes than it's got to be a it's got to be something that's reflective of our values but they want to celebrate christmas and race home for the christmas season and leave millions of kids on without healthcare but what about after christmas congressman because it looks like there's going to be another showdown i don't know maybe around january nineteen through 20th went when this current spending deal expires but here's my point we can do it now we can say look if the government is such a government that is treating people badly and is abusing people and is not fulfilling its commitment as use here than you have a responsibility to say no to that government and the funding that government and if the senators join republican democratic center join republican senators in the senate then you're not fulfilling your commitment than what you said is you can turn your back on a constituent group and you know i wouldn't termite back on women i wouldn't turn my back on gay people i just wouldn't turn my back on the environment just like i wouldn't turn my back on these immigrant youth congressman you seem to be sending a message to democrats everywhere who who largely have latino voters on their side that if they don't come through here they're putting a core constituency at risk look.

christmas congressman senate republican democratic center
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Natural matter disgusts next year the president's given a strong march to address that issue we have plenty of time plenty of time says the republican leader but is that how 700 dr recipients in this country feel congressman lease gutierrez is a democrat he represents the fourth district in illinois congressman thanks for being here oh it's a pleasure to be with you thanks for the invite congressmen your reaction to the democratic leadership in congress backing off here at least before this next spending deadline yeah well i'm pretty proud of the democrats in the house seems we're going to stick together today remember this is all dependent on one thing that is republicans are the majority the to london already weak strong in the house of representatives and they need to underline eighteen boats if they present a republican budget a republican cr and that doesn't include our priorities are values then then they need to find the votes and if they find them than they are going to approve it i think it's our responsibility to stand up and say we're not going to work with you we're not going to collaborate with if you unless it includes a clean fix epa dream act in the senate another issues and that's where i don't see the kind of firmness and commitment nihro that the minority leader in the senate chuck schumer stands up for those dreamers they visited unmih's office because here's in essence my point you know you cannot say you love them and then put them on the stage at the 2012 democratic convention since you can go out to the communities of boaters than america nc look what could people we are with good public policy we are and then not fight with them with the same kind of integrity and the same kind of importance and they're just not doing that i think so congressman lots of advocacy group.

president lease gutierrez congress the house senate chuck schumer advocacy group congressman illinois unmih
"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nine month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is the takeaway for thursday december 21st 2017 this is the away i todd's where it's great to have you with us today it was the scene on the south lawn yesterday republicans lined up on the south portico the white house to celebrate with president trump a giant tax cut and the first tax overhaul in three decades meanwhile back on capitol hill democrats had just let another legislative priorities slip away at least for now we feel very strongly that dhaka must pass and passed by december 31st we must keep our word and our promise to them these are young people who study who work who lived next door to us every single day we must pass the bipartisan dream act now we have the hits i had no question is lifted in the floor it will lean we think we're going to have a good number of our republican colleagues join us and so i am very optimistic that it will pass the democrats as you heard have pledged for months there would be no government spending deal this christmas unless affixed fixed to the deferred action for childhood arrivals program went along with it to put it plainly the dem said deal with dhaka republicans or you've just bought yourself a government shutdown well that was then the senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said on tuesday this week the government will be funded at least until midjanuary even though dhaka's still hangs out there unresolved his daca on the show senator schumer novel he discusses the will all be doing gawk of this way.

republicans capitol hill dhaka mitch mcconnell todd president christmas senate majority leader senator schumer three decades