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Fresh update on "nigeria" discussed on Doctor Health Radio Show

Doctor Health Radio Show

00:32 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nigeria" discussed on Doctor Health Radio Show

"Lifting of the lock down. To try to lift the national measures, but also be absolutely crystal clear that will tackle local flowers when we see them. Hancox of the vast majority of people did the right thing. West Virginia's experienced its biggest two day jump and confirm Corona virus cases. Department of Health and Human Resource is website showed an increase of 76 positive cases on Sunday and 118 on Saturday. Officials say suspected Islamic extremists open fire on a U. N aid helicopter in northeastern Nigeria over the weekend, killing two civilians. Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari blame the attack on militants linked to the extremist group Boko Haram. Indeed, flood waters in the risk of more mudslides that left about 20 people confirmed to presume dead are hampering search and rescue operations in southern Japan, including at elderly home facilities. More on these stories, a townhall dot com A leaf factor. Effective pain relief. That really, really works. How do I know that? I don't have a script. I don't have talking points. I live it. I've been taking it for a year and 1/2. I had lower back pain issue that had been plaguing me for nine years. Almost a decade. I took really factor for two weeks. Yes, two weeks and my pain was gone and it still gone. That's the experience of Tens of thousands of Americans who are taking really factor right now. Don't take my word for it, see.

Muhammadu Buhari Department Of Health And Human West Virginia Nigeria President Trump Japan U. N
PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

podnews

03:04 min | Last week

PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

"Well, it's next stop to S. an ANDROID Kawhi s is the third most popular mobile operating system in the world, aiming to help the three and a half billion people along US connected in India. Seventy million kaiwas s phones have been cells. They cost seven dollars each. Pain, is the first podcast. APP for the platform Thomas Barosso pod that Nigeria Uganda and Tanzania are among the top countries using the APP so far. Free podcast hosts sounder has launched these sounder discovery suites, which they call the first-ever Keyword based analytics tool along with audio seo and sound bite sharing all free for creators. Be, W scripts is apparently looking at setting stitcher poppies told by someone familiar with the matter that the company has been looking for buyers for some time, audio craft and Australian Broadcasting Conference has announced its first set of speakers. We linked to those today. The event normally held in Sydney in New South. Wales will be virtual this year. IHEARTMEDIA and vice news it's produce a new show called Vice News reports a weekly investigative series, covering critical new subjects from around the world at launch, next quarter Conde nast as also announced a podcast network. The Independent Filmmaker Project has extended its twenty two thousand submissions process to on July the first. They're looking for innovative audio. Audio creators in any stage of development is a link in our show notes and newsletter today. Fox is planning a podcast. Advertising Industry summitted free to virtually attend, and on June the thirtieth for one eastern time whereas I in your podcast stats, probably nowhere, I'm guessing there's good news I've vokes -application currently used an anonymous user identifier and don't have their own user agents, but they plan to implement one soon. Hariri megaphone is now hosting podcasts from noisier, a Bristol based production company. My lover that I show real narcos has topped the charts in many different countries zoom offers end to end encryption to all of its users after work by the F.. F.! Paula Rogo is to write a regular column on medium about the African podcasting scene. In focused news marketplace minutes is a new show from Westwood One and marketplace. It's a sixty seconds reports updated three times a day for smart speakers and podcast also air on commercial radio in the US from Gimblett, the latest episode of science versus has a return guests Dr Anthony. FAO CI the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, giving an update on the spread of the pandemic in the US. Bloomberg has a new serialized podcast called foundering out. It'll bring. It's listeners inside one big story from Silicon Valley each season the first season we work and launching today all hands talks with CEO's and other sea level leaders about how being people I. Company is a strategic advantage.

United States Vice News National Institute Of Allergy Pain Bloomberg Paula Rogo Australian Broadcasting Confer Wales Conde Nast Thomas Barosso Westwood One Silicon Valley Hariri India Nigeria Bristol FOX
Yewande Komolafe's Nigerian Kitchen

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Yewande Komolafe's Nigerian Kitchen

"Right now it's my interview with your. Juande LAFI. She's a chef. Recipe developer, also a food stylist who grew up in Nigeria and now lives in Brooklyn. A recent feature for the New York Times. Come Lafi collected her ten essential Nigerian recipes. She's also the creator of the Dinner Series My immigrant food is which she runs out of her own kitchen. You one day welcome to milk street. Thank you for having me. Let's talk about like us for a second. Could you just give us a walking tour? What does it look like? Where do you see on? The street is a street food. Just give us a sense of the place it's it's a bustling city. It's colorful. It's crowded. There's traffic. There's all kinds of smells coming from the street food there's. A street puffer and ensue. Use the. Grill. Grill beef or goat. Puff puff is the fried dough, but yeah, it's it's very much alive. It's very colorful and actually I I live in Brooklyn right now and live in new. York and that's one of the things drew me to New York has has the city felt alive in the same way that Laos does. If if you and I cooked together, we what are some of the things would learn from you. I think the layering of flavors and spices is. Something that sticks out to me about Nigerian food. It could seem like a lot going on, but they all play very well together and. When it hits your palate, it doesn't overwhelm your palate and I think that in itself is a very specific technique that you can add smoked fish and. Little dried crayfish and you can add Lucas being all of which are really heavy flavors on their own, but you could add it to one dish. It doesn't overwhelm the dish anyway. They all just kind of play well together so I think that the the style in which the flavors are layered. Is a very specific thing. you mentioned in the piece near? Times you had some essential recipes, you talk about the white bread. That was surprising to me because it sounded like kind of wonderful something I mean it is kind of like wonderful. So what's the story with that? I mean so. I gave bread. The name to me is in itself a story, so the name comes from this huge bakery that existed in a very particular part of legos called Ikey, and it was everywhere growing up it was you know it? It would come to your house. House, actually because people would hawk it on the street, and I remember it being just so tender and soft, and it's it's kind of like wonder bread, but it wasn't sliced, and so to get it slice with like a special thing, and I think it's also really heavy because it, it's used as a vehicle for a lot of our soups and stews into that memory to me that like it's this big hunk of read. That's like really heavy just sticks out to me your dinner series. My immigrant food is tell us about the. So my dentist series is something that came out of My desire to explore my cuisine I had always cooked in restaurants I'd never really cooked Nigerian food, and so dinners gave me an opportunity to cook and share Nigerian food, and also tell the story of my immigration story, but also share the story of Other people who have immigrated to this country, so what is your immigrants or in other words? If you were to summarize, which is impossible, the nature of that story? What what is that story? A very condensed version is I I feel like I've always been an immigrant i. was born in Berlin moved back to Lagos with my parents, and my family moved to the US at sixteen to go to college and I've been in the US ever since, but also within that time I lost my. Student status here and stayed on without paperwork, and so I lived here undocumented for about ten years, and so in that time I wasn't able to go back to Nigeria, and now I am I got married, and they've been able to go back to Nigeria and so the dinner started out of a desire to be close to a place where I felt distance from.

Lafi Nigeria New York Times Brooklyn Developer United States York New York Laos Lucas Lagos Berlin
The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | 2 weeks ago

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
Coronavirus: The human cost of virus misinformation

BBC World Service

04:26 min | Last month

Coronavirus: The human cost of virus misinformation

"We here at the BBC have been tracking the human cost of coronavirus misinformation this includes the souls awesome injuries and deaths as a result of room is false speculation bogus cures and fake posts online Mariana spring from BBC trending has some of the findings Brian lives in Florida in April he posted his thoughts on corona virus on Facebook he wasn't quite sure what current advice really was but because of things he read online he was convinced that the expats were lying I saw those may be is there you know are they still working on the five G. because I've heard rumors not from any news sources but people talking about old you know it could cause fax people getting sick over a five G. towers and being too close just one of the many conspiracy theories that have been circulating online during the pandemic Brian and his wife didn't keep away from other people or seek help when they fell with corona virus the couple ended up in hospital that's why he was when I speak to him by fighting he was getting better but still struggling to breathe his wife was in a much more serious condition one of until later in a nearby ward the battle that they've been having is with her longs there in flames and they've trying to get to the best medication that they can sign I was available to be able to help with that and her body just is just not responding Brian is no longer karenna vice conspiracy theorist and this case is just one of many examples of how dangerous misinformation can be the BBC's anti disinformation unit has investigated hundreds of misinformation cases and found dozens resulted in real human cost like the virus is spread all over the world misleading information about the drug hydroxy car Quinn has let the poisonings in the U. S. Vietnam and Nigeria online remiss led to multi tax in India those conspiracy theories that Brian mentioned about five G. mobile technology well fed masa possess a light in the UK and other countries perhaps the deadliest incident happened in Iran where health authorities say misleading messages about the preventive effects of drinking alcohol went viral on social media Cheyenne's Atari's all day is a disinformation expert with BBC monitoring we start seeing posts eighteen telegram which is one of the most popular messaging apps in Iran I'm also on Instagram that was means videos that was suggesting drinking alcohol can actually boost the immune system and disinfect the body and soul and someone from catching Corbett ninety the authorities say the room is because nearly eight hundred deaths is difficult to verify each case in a country where the media is heavily restricted experts say there's no reason for the Iranian authorities to downplay the deaths coronavirus present something of a nightmare situation for fact checkers like clam mailed from the British organization full facts we know that bad information can ruin lives and at the moment in the middle of such a huge part of that make such great potential for harm if people aren't getting the right information it's not just touchy Facebook group so what messages causing harm some of the most misleading information comes directly from world leaders and public figures and then I see the disinfectant we're not set up in a minute one and is there a way we can do something like that doctors and poison centers in the U. S. told us they've seen patients coming to die right Tom because of misinformation promoted by president trump and others Dr Duncan Marie treats crate of ours patients at Elmhurst hospital in New York City I do think that president trump's comments are a really tragic example where I think that the spread of misinformation actually influenced some of the messaging that comes from our public officials particularly if they have constituents who are vulnerable to that misinformation throughout the pandemic conspiracy groups have seen the number swelled on Facebook this is what some doctors respect T. fear the most Brian the current of ours patient in Florida has a message for the conspiracists we just can't be playing around anymore distancing Israel and yeah sure we'll listen from the beginning I agree I didn't do that and I'm sorry I don't know the people there won't forget me

BBC
Qatar makes COVID-19 app mandatory

Newscast - Africa

00:51 sec | Last month

Qatar makes COVID-19 app mandatory

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Ghana Bank Africa President Trump Hong China Brazil United States Executive Kong Officer Vice Uk Commodity Petroleum Aviation House Apple Kong Development China Andrea Lagos ADB Kaufman Congo
Lagos may reinstate lockdown restrictions due to trouble social distancing

BBC World Service

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Lagos may reinstate lockdown restrictions due to trouble social distancing

"The governor of Nigeria's largest city lake also has warned that coronavirus lockdown measures could be reinstated if its citizens continue to flout social distancing rules on Monday Nigeria decided to ease restrictions following a five week locked down but the governor wrote on Twitter that it was disappointing to see crowds of people ignoring the ban on public

Nigeria Twitter
Afrobeat Drummer Tony Allen Died of Heart Attack in Paris

All Things Considered

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Afrobeat Drummer Tony Allen Died of Heart Attack in Paris

"Drummer Tony Allen is widely hailed as one of the founders of afrobeat alongside his longtime musical partner Philip boutique the seventy nine year old Allen died Wednesday evening in Paris of heart attack NPR's honest ideas he'll guess has this appreciation sitting behind his drum kit Tony Allen used his whole body to lay out intricate poly rhythms with all four limbs Ellen didn't begin playing drums until he was eighteen years old but just months later he became a professional musician Alan met Fela Kuti in the early nineteen sixties and the Lakers Nigeria and in nineteen sixty nine the forms the legendary bands the seventy no one was injured the band's drummer he was its musical director blaring horns and soaring vocals often with highly political lyrics over driving through in nineteen seventy nine and in part because he felt he wasn't being recognized and compensated for his contributions but he continued to be a musical adventurer dipping into everything from Afro funk electronica his last album was released only last month it's a collaboration with the late south African trumpeter Hugh Masekela some of Tony Allen's own music was explicitly political but he believed in rejoicing in the small things of life too as he told NPR in two thousand ten CellaVision is everybody does we would look at it is like this every day we said it's a message he delivered through his exuberant music for more than five

Tony Allen Paris Ellen Alan Fela Kuti Nigeria Director Hugh Masekela NPR Afrobeat Partner Philip Lakers
Learning How to Forgive

Criminal

08:59 min | 2 months ago

Learning How to Forgive

"I don't subscribe to the idea people a- bad and I I don't subscribe to that because I believe that these inherent good in everyone. I think that crime It's all to be honest with you. Very relative What might be criminal in. Some communities are excused in other communities. Delia Muna was born in London and raised in Nigeria. Her mother is Nigerian and her father is from Sierra Leone. She went to college and Law School in the United States and then she became a public defender in Washington. Dc main motivation for me is that throughout my time as a public defender. I and as a Christian I operate from the presume that if Jesus swear on earth today he'd be a public defender. He was always defending people who were accused of various Nefarious activities Tax Collectors and you know Prostitutes and and and people that we will consider unsavory but as a public defender. I got to learn and appreciate that. Each person has a story and that my role as an advocate was to tell that story in a way that will shoot to the lead experiences to give voice to them I learned to appreciate the fact that but for the grace of God Right. and fat Human beings have the capacity for change today. We're talking about forgiveness. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal I'd like to ask you about where you grew up in Nigeria and and how growing up. You saw forgiveness injustice Criminality in differently than than we do here right. So we're very very communal society and so compared to to the US where It seems that we exist in silos and a very much individual pull yourself up by your bootstraps sort of mentality in Nigeria we. It's sort of those mentality that if one person is going astray we all collectively are going astray. And so the idea is You know we rally people will rally around you to make sure that That you don't go astray and that if you do that there are resources particularly human resources to help you Sorta recalibrate Your life trajectory And that's really critically important. I guess it's kind of a flip the whole idea in on the head which is in other communities when someone does something bad it it looks bad upon the community. Exactly as opposed to here. Where if someone does something bad when this person must be intrinsically bad or evil and let's remove them from the society? Oh yes absolutely. You absolutely correct here. It's you did something you something that you did and in other communities. It's like well what? How did we fail? How could we have prevented this? And now that you have indeed some done something. What can we do to restore your humanity? What can we do to make sure that you become one of us The question becomes. When is enough enough? When is punishment enough? When can we say you have paid your dues? It's time to welcome you back into society because we still think you've got value. We still think there's much more that you can add to being a productive member of our community in two thousand eleven a twenty five year old woman Nimble Shonda Armstrong drove her car. Into New York's Hudson River with her three children inside later. Leshan to Armstrong's neighbors came forward and said they knew she was in trouble. The often heard yelling. Her landlord leader said that she asked him twice in six months to change the locks on her doors. Delia Luna wrote about Louis Armstrong and other women who'd committed similar crimes she asks how is it that American society bears no social responsibility to support. Its most vulnerable members. In raising their children she proposes that we watch out for each other not just watch each other but really look out and offer help as she says communities in Nigeria. Often do she writes. It's imperative that the legal system take steps to foster a sense of communal obligation towards the most vulnerable members of our society single mothers and their children in two thousand fifteen delia. Muna was made clinical professor of law at Harvard. The law school's first Nigerian professor. She's also the deputy director of Harvard's Criminal Justice Institute where Third Year Law Students under supervision. Essentially work is public defenders. We asked her to tell us about the cases that stay with her the most and she says it's the ones where children are charged with crimes. She told us about representing a nine year old girl and she was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and she was charged because while Throwing ten from classroom. She picked up a book a textbook and threw it at a teacher. Miss the teacher. The book hit the wall The child was promptly taken to a The principal's office and when she got there she was then arrested put in handcuffs. She was transported at the back of a police car and brought to the courthouse. She had to be placed in isolation so in solitary because she was nine years old and I went into speak with her so she is tiny little person and I was trying to explain to her. What my role was as her attorney and advocate and she had no idea Just even process in what that meant and she looked at me and she said where's my grandmother. And when can she take me back to school and then she said to me? Do you have any food? I'm hungry and so there. I was trying to figure out how to advocate for this child. In light of the very serious thing that she'd been charged with I mean assault with a dangerous weapon. book But clearly this child at other issues that we're contributing to Her behavior in class that day and he really will have been a very cruel and capricious thing for the legal system to continue. Its prosecution of her. It's easy to forgive a child and to consider all the social factors in play in their behavior. It's not always so easy to forgive adult. Well that's correct I it's easy when you paint a picture of a very vulnerable child but what about those evil adults and evil men and women who do such terrible things well. The truth is A An an an evil adult or terrible adult just didn't You know pop from just didn't become that way. They've had most likely a terrible childhood A childhood where they will likely abused likely neglected. And so you have children who wants. That's happened to them will indeed grow up to be adults who then Commit crimes I don't ever believe that an adult just takes actions without something being the catalyst for whatever it is. They that they've done and so it might be easier to forgive a child but if you delve deeper into the experiences the lived experience of an adult I think it makes it easier to forgive them once. You understand what it is that they've been through The prism through which they view life and sort of. What's happened to them?

Nigeria Delia Muna United States Assault Sierra Leone Shonda Armstrong Harvard Delia Luna Hudson River London Washington New York Louis Armstrong Leshan Deputy Director Principal Attorney Professor
Africa deaths above 1,000, including Nigerian chief of staff

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Africa deaths above 1,000, including Nigerian chief of staff

"The Nigerian president's chief of staff Andy Kennedy has died after contracting the coronavirus was Kerry was in his seventies he tested positive for cave eight nineteen in March and been receiving treatment Nigeria has nearly five hundred confirmed cases of the corona virus seventeen people have died it's actually reports from Abuja the let chief of staff to the Nigerian president most about Carrie was given to the most powerful presentation eight in Nigeria he was instrumental in running the affairs of the country initial press statement in the early hours of Saturday the Nigerian presidency says it regrets to announce the death of Mister Carey the statement says he died on Friday it's not clear whether he had underlying health conditions president Muhammadu Buhari had tested negative to coronavirus despite his closeness to his chief

President Trump Andy Kennedy Kerry Nigeria Carrie Mister Carey Muhammadu Buhari Chief Of Staff
"nigeria" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

14:14 min | 2 months ago

"nigeria" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Haram a terrorist group that has killed tens of thousands of people in Nigeria displaced millions. An infamously kidnapped nearly three hundred schoolgirls in two thousand fourteen. Many of whom remain missing. The name Boko Haram translates literally as Western. Education is forbidden and this episode author of a new paper on Boko Haram talks about her research findings on this dangerous militant group Medina. Astle David M Rubenstein Fellow in foreign policy at Brookings is the author of from quote. Western education is forbidden unquote to the world's deadliest terrorist group education and Boko Haram in Nigeria. She's interviewed by Michael O'Hanlon Senior Fellow and director of research and foreign policy at Brookings. You can follow the Brookings podcasts at wreck on twitter at policy podcasts deed information about links to all of our shows including dollar and cents. Brookings Trade podcast current and our events podcast and now on with the interview. Here's Mike O'Hanlon Medina Aso. Thanks Fred and the DEA salad my good friend. It's really a pleasure and privilege to be talking with you today about Nigeria. So thanks for the opportunity to you so I want to get into the paper. Obviously and we'll do that and a little bit more detail in a second. I maybe if you could just summarize the big ideas of paper and then I WANNA help listeners. Understand a little bit about your background and your expertise and how you've got some of the ideas for this research from field work you had done in Pakistan which of course is closer to your original field of expertise and what you wrote your great recent books. So before we get into some of that background about you and methodologies you've developed over the years aren't you just give us a sentence or to summarize the topic and the main finding of the Work Nigeria that. We're focusing on today. Sure so the main topic is looking at the link between education and Boko Haram in Nigeria. And the top line. Finding if you will is that education is fundamental to book around ideology. I mean book around literally translates to Western education is forbidden and it was delete fundamentals. Were how they recruited how appeal to the population and designer. Boko Haram was not in a vacuum. It's really exploited grievances that already existed in Nigeria north which is mostly Muslim which is poor has really poor educational outcomes especially relative to without the defenses. Were already there. And they were against the Nigerian state. The postcolonial federally-imposed Westernized system of education and book around capitalized on grievances that already existed and use them to then recruit and to appeal to the population in which it operated and became such poor and this is mostly northeast. Nigeria right not just north in general but the northeastern particular at the Reaching you studied and also did you're researching. Yeah so I did my fuel research actually able to bring people from the North East gown to meet with me. It is actually just not feasible. Even at this point in time to go to the northeast for many researchers just because of security concerns by Boko Haram certainly did operate Niger Northeast. The grievances are fundamental to the northern region. If a role in the northeast at least partly because the founder was from the northeast Mohammed USA. He lived in Borno State and Bachelor established his base and the town that abolition bathing is called. Great we'll come back to use and Boko Haram in a few minutes but first I want her to give listeners a chance to know a little bit more about you and also the way in which you got into this line of work so your background is about Pakistan from Pakistan because you just say a word about that and then say a word about the main findings of your excellent book on Pakistan which came out. I think about three years ago now. Oh I am originally from Pakistan. I love manly there though. A little bit all over so grew up in Canada and in the US as well and my both of my post he likes if you will were spent doing research on the roof extremism in Pakistan essentially. I'm an economist by training so I was doing research at the intersection off political economy and Development in South Asia. Jobs mainly in pockets on a little bit in India as well and this was right about the time where it became impossible to ignore the rise of terrorism and extremism in Pakistan around. Two thousand seven is when I was finishing up my sheets at the very cusp of me. Going out on the Job Market. One major event happens which made me realize that. This is what I needed to focus on. And that was the assassination of interview put you in December of two thousand and seven and she was killed by the Taliban and essentially because terrorism. Became a problem inescapable. You know my energies from then on. We're focused on trying to understand. What the root of terrorism and extremism work and I focused initially on looking at the question quantitatively using survey that looking at public opinion surveys understand people's attitudes towards extremism and terrorism and how they related to things that economists were interested in right. So education income social demographics and they soon it became apparent that the relationship that I was observing between education and extremism in the data needed a deeper explanation and that had to come from what our students studying in school. What do their textbooks teach them? What is the method of schooling? So then I set up a research program. I did a lot of field work in schools and universities in Pakistan. This is around the two thousand and thirteen fourteen. Fifteen and honestly. When I was doing research at that time you would go out and interview students and sit in on classes and a skill in a couple of eight and a half and you would hear that. There had been a terrorist attack. A bomb had gone off in the neighborhood adjacent to where we were. In the city of law things have changed in terms of the terrorism problem since then but but. That's one of the time where I was doing the research and then my book came out in twenty two and I'm happy to talk about. Is there Pakistan under siege right? I don't want to spend too much time on Pakistan because of course enough people WanNa talk and you WanNa talk about Nigeria but correct me if I'm wrong and taking away too big essence from the Pakistan book which I think then set you up for the Nigeria. Work and one very interesting. Finding was that Pakistanis are not really pro extremism in general anymore. And perhaps it's partly because extremism has specially five eight ten years ago taking such a toll on Pakistani society itself with the Pakistani Taliban and other groups really causing not only violence and mayhem and carnage but even a threat to the basics. Stability of the state so that was from an American point of view despite the sadness and tragedy that produce that change that was a welcome change in Pakistani thinking and that sort of the good news but the bad news is that more education did not necessarily make people less interested in extremism. And you saw a little. Bit of a worrisome. Almost like a second phase of corona virus so a little bit of a worrisome budding of greater sympathy for extremism among some of the more educated people who perhaps had maybe learned through their studies some of the injustices that have been perpetrated against Pakistan by India in their interpretation or by the United States in their interpretation and also may have fell frustration about a lack of opportunity despite all the academic achievements that they had attained and so ironically perhaps for an American trying to make sense of this. There was a greater receptivity to extremism among somewhat. More educated Pakistanis than among somewhat less. Educated are those two general findings more or less correct what you want to modify or correct me or embellishing before we moved back to Nigeria. Sure those are two really important point that you brought up. I think one is backed me that their views on extremism and their levels of extremism essentially decreased as a big experienced more terrorism and so they turned against it overall. If you look at the data people don't appear to have a lot of sympathy for terrorists Kooks but then you start to look at their narrative. Things start getting very worse and that's why it's really important to look beyond the data at narrative. So that's the first major finding highlight in terms of education absolutely so while Henry. You don't see education unambiguously improve US or make people less extremists and especially to around the secondary school level. You see that education worth and views on some aspects especially towards the United States capability for the Polygon and goes up a little bit and my explanation for those having food work and interviews impacted by schools as well as having read the text books. Is that the textbooks. Essentially set up a framework of the world. Which is biased and one-sided they're expected to be memorized by rote and these students then when they look at terrorist propaganda or when they encountered propaganda. Find it very hard to counter it. And that's why they have more sympathy for terrorist for that point in time moving beyond that though the university level improve views. So there's some good news even education that you have to move past the home if you will Secondary schooling interesting so now. Why don't we transition back to Nigeria? And maybe to the extent that you can explain how much of what you found about Boko Haram is similar to what you found about Pakistan. And how much is different? I just really like I appreciate in value. That comparison given your expertise. These are also both very important countries. Each about two hundred million people both tops. Six or seven in the world and population both really the bellwether in many ways for a lot of what's going on in their broader regions and obviously in the case of Pakistan nuclear armed as well but in the case of Nigeria by far and away Africa's most populous country. And also the place where Christianity and Islam really intersect more vivid way almost than anywhere else on the African continent. So I'm intrigued. By which parallels you withdraw and where you see sharp differences now moving the narrative back to Nigeria. Yes absolutely I think one of She'll be than that. I moved Niger from Pakistan. Is that beyond finding work. Pockets on the relationship between education and extremism is not something that we can. Just generalize across different context. I think she generalize about finding problem. Ipod on work is that you really need to look at the context of the education system and extremism to understand the relationship between education extremism in different contexts. And especially if you look at Nigeria. It is so compelling to look at the education system and how it relates to Boko Haram because it is in the very title of Boko Haram the name says Western Education Is Forbidden. So it's almost by definition something that needs to be studied and as you pointed out very eloquently. I mean I think the size of these countries and the metal the violence. I think it's one thing about around. And the continuing levels of violence even as as a couple of weeks ago. Background Soldiers Killed Ninety million soldiers and so the extent of the violence just really makes it a compelling question and place to study the relationship coming to the actual comparison of the education extremism result if one looks at the quantitative results. You can actually see some day. They similar patterns and talk about why they emerge but the first thing I did when I looked at this work was actually do the quantitative analysis just as we're coming up and the views of Boko around the questions that I got in the public opinion surveys simple save ability questions you have favorable views towards the Oklahoma or not essentially and what I was finding. Is that the favorability given almost entirely by Nigeria northern geopolitical zone for the North East North West and north central region. And within those. If you start breaking up views by education level again you see some of the same those things which are that at the junior secondary school level. We're just great seventy-nine Nigeria very similar. To the second roussy level and pocket punch the junior secondary school levels you actually increase favorability for Boko Haram relative to the other levels of education so again that kind of inverted view. There's evidence of that and my argument and I came up with that conclusion but my argument is that there is some experience with the education having gone into the education system that makes people in Nigeria Nigeria's north in particular heightened their grievances against that education system. And that's why the ideology book then appealed specifically to them. So if I remember correctly from your paper and I think I do because I just reviewed it again and it's an excellent paper very readable. So congratulations some of the reasons have to do with first of all the sense that the north has been in. Its own perception not as favored by the Nigerian state whether during colonial times or in the half century sense and the south and the more Christian areas have benefited more from classic education..

Nigeria Pakistan United States Brookings Medina Mike O'Hanlon Medina Aso Michael O'Hanlon India Niger Northeast South Asia Fred Taliban David M Rubenstein Oklahoma Pakistani Taliban junior secondary school Senior Fellow Canada
"nigeria" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"nigeria" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"And. Went after after that does a committee. is in charge of maintaining the quality of seat, but this has nothing to do with. It is a biotech on not any seed whatsoever. The National Highway Traffic Council in Nigeria would regulated to make sure that's what gets to the famous as satisfied seats. That will give them maximum benefits. So. then. Does that the literally expense? And it is quite straightforward, so those regulations are from the biosafety regulation. Apply to every seat. where if he's GM by exceeds all conventional suits. You from white, explaining this does by tech products majorly controlled by the government's by the government Disa- companies relived by the government. Adere like international company, also that play a role in. wits by next seats to former. Let me let me man this correction. Suits are not leslie controlled by the government. WHAT THE GOVERNMENT DOES! King every country in adapted you just regular leads. And regularly to ensure that the quality is is. A short, so that's the role of the government. It's many privacy sector. The International. Large Corporations also in Nigeria. But they do which mall. Like? In May's willing cotton as a colony cotton as well so they released select any other company. And sell their seats, producers seats in nature that. Like any other company you know the Niger does not allow you to bring seats. I said it makes you. You just have to even if it technology that is develops Tom where you have to two seasons of either. In Nigeria and then integrated with the with the. National Research Systems. Who will now go through the Buddha seats that you have had the. The Soup Compli now will take it from there to produce a founder show seat. dissatified seat in Asia, so that are some. BIG IT companies in Nigeria. Swell who? Designed but the. Produce echoed into their loss of Nigeria on just bring seats and district goods. Ria still talking with Mr. Francis Catching wrong. He's a program officer at the African Agricultural Technology Foundation ATF. I won't be back in just a moment. In trying times, that's all hands on. Deck to fight the scourge of misinformation. Journalists Cameron English and scientists. Kevin Fulda bisect critical stories in the news on the science, facts and fallacies bog Kaus. Paul real are the covid nineteen therapies. We'll continue trough for good information. What's happening now when the world genetic engineering? These topics and more scuffed every week on the science facts and fallacies podcast over on the genetic literacy project website and on Apple podcasts. It's informative, entertaining and guaranteed to help you become more conversant in the current issue. In Agriculture Medicine and technology. That science, facts and fallacies with Cameron English and Kevin Volvo. Everyone say via the genetic literacy project. Back to this week on care..

Nigeria GOVERNMENT National Highway Traffic Counc Cameron English Mr. Francis Catching GM African Agricultural Technolog Kevin Fulda Agriculture Medicine leslie Apple National Research Systems Tom Kevin Volvo white founder Asia Ria Paul
Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:21 min | 3 months ago

Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

"If anything kills over ten million people in the next few decades it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war not missiles but microbes Microsoft founder Bill Gates five years ago. In two thousand fifteen. He gave a popular Ted talk where he warned that. The greatest risk of a global catastrophe wouldn't come from nuclear war it would come from a highly infectious virus. I spoke to Bill Gates on Thursday night during CNN. Townhall on the corona virus together with my friend and colleague Anderson Cooper Bill Gates and his wife. Melinda have already given hundred million dollars toward global efforts to control Kovic nineteen through their bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Today I wanNA share with you some of the highlights from our conversation. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Bill Gates has called for more investment in epidemic preparedness around the world and he started on Thursday night by telling us that the United States has not done nearly enough to prepare for the situation. We're in now when you don't know the problem will come around. Sometimes people prepare like we prepare for war with war games and putting lots of money into that but sadly we'd gone long enough without a disease here in the United States that even though we had a bowl and Zeka SARS not much happened the countries that really were affected by SARS actually are the ones that have done the best in this epidemic because they acted when the number of cases were still very very small. So so bill when you when you give a talk like he didn't two thousand fifteen. You see what's happening now I mean. Could you have foreseen the rest of this sort of response? The lack of infrastructure the lack of resources no apparent strategy really out of the gate has that part of it. Surprise you given that. I mean you were sounding the alarm five years ago. One one of the things I call for. Isn't that the same way we do? War Games on a regular basis. And we say okay. We're not ready to deal with Surprises I called for us to do germ games and look at okay. Who would talk to the private sector? Who would make sure that testing capacity was raised? Who would make sure that the right people are being rested in or not somebody without symptoms getting tested daily rather medical personnel. Who have symptoms? Who really need to know. And so I wouldn't have predicted exactly how slow and how somewhat chaotic. The response has been. But if we'd done those simulations we would have seen some of these laws in the system and you know behaved a little bit like the countries that have have done the best on this one. What stage do you think? The pandemic is in right now in the United States and globally and I guess what people are Home WanNa know. How close are we to a peak here in the US? Well the good news. Is that China? Did there Shut down and they did it in a very serious way and after a six week period of a shutdown that it's more extreme than even the best states in the United States are likely to do they were able to start opening up again and the total number of cases there is very very small. So that's very good news. We're entering a tough period. That if we do it right will only have to do it once per six to ten weeks but we have to do it has to be the whole country we have to raise the level of testing the prioritization of that testing quite dramatically in order to make sure we go through one shutdown so that we take the medical problem and really stop it before. There's a large number of deaths. We do then get an economic problem. Which is why you want to minimize the amount of time and having states go at different things or thinking you can do it county by County. That will not work. The cases will be exponentially growing anywhere. You don't have a serious shutdown in many states there. There's less than than two hundred cases right now. You're saying even in those states the same kind of shutdown needs to occur. Well let's say you have one hundred cases and let's say you don't do a shutdown. Then it grows thirty three percent per day. If you take one hundred thousand and get ten thousand it's exponential growth. If you're not stopping the sooner you in engage in the shutdown the easier it is to get to that peak we have. We have not peaked. The parts of the country. That aren't shut down by the in late April. We should start to see the numbers peak. There they'll still be to hide. Open UP SEAL. Probably have to go another month to really get those numbers down but any part of the country that has cases and truthfully because of our problems with testing because we're not prioritizing testing the right way that a lot of those places actually do have cases but even if they have one hundred that will grow and people do. Cross county boundaries and so basically the whole country needs to do what was done in the part of China where they had these infections. I don't WANNA be political in any way but just in terms of for folks who are out there you know and looking forward. I always think it's better to know. Just factually what's coming down the Pike Than You know then. It's good to have hopes and aspirations. But it's good to know what's actually coming down the pike for people who are believing or imagining that in middle of April or early April people are able to gather together and churches for celebrate for Easter celebrations. Or go back to work in a regular way. It sounds like you're saying you don't believe that's realistic. No it's not realistic. The numbers are still going up. That only happens after the numbers have Pekan are going down a lot and getting down when absolute level. You know there are some good things happening. The work on a vaccine although that probably will take eighteen months out it's going full speed ahead. Our Foundation is funding. That we're looking at getting back scenes to everyone in the world so in the in the long run that is the key thing. We had a really positive result. That people were wondering. Did you have to have a medical person swab you in this way that they stuck it deep in your nose? We were able to prove which on on Monday the FDA made official that if you do a self test where you don't have to have the medical work with personal protection equipment. That self test is accurate as the one where the medical worker gift set. So that means that by self swabbing. We'll be able to get a lot more test on and only limited by the back end capacity. So there's you know there's good news coming one of the therapeutics although none of them are proven out. But they're quite a few. We have a things that foundation created called therapeutics accelerator to really look at thousands of compounds and make sure we focused the human trials on the ones that have the most promise so you know innovation which some of which we could have done in advance but innovation really is happening. But you know when you look at those numbers the US now. With the most cases there is state that has gotten to the point where their numbers are flat and are going down and the testing capacity is means. We're quite blind to a lot of these cases right now so it it. It can be done but we're not. The light is not at the end of the tunnel. In terms of a mid April reopening with this you know Dr Fouled. Things have been very clear that this is a year eighteen months. Whatever that it will take before people could actually get this vaccine are there are there and I and I and I I know that he's he's right about that. But I'm just wondering from a technological standpoint. Are there ways to speed this up using genetically modified virus or anything to to expedite the process? Well for the next pandemic we should be able to make diagnostics very quickly like hundreds of millions within two months we should be able to scale up antiviral drugs from a much bigger library within like six months and by beam ready with. This aren't a platform we should be able to make vaccines and more like a year than a year and a half and so we can and I think governments this time probably will pay attention. to Making those investments or the next one you know. The one of the biggest open questions is therapeutics. Can we very quickly Find antiviral drug. That really means number people. Go on the respirator is much lower and cuts that death rate. Quite a bit. It's tough enough in the US with the put a lot of money into our health system. If you think about this is you get to India. Nigeria and the the even poor countries in Africa. Just imagine what the overloads can look like. They're and yet they won't be able to do the that isolation and so you know we we is. We've gotten the disease down with a low infection rate. We'll have to be not letting people go to those countries or come from those countries hardly at all. It'll be very strict in terms of how that testing is done. So the sooner we solve this on a global basis the sooner we can go back to the world economy. That actually was very

United States Bill Gates China CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Melinda Gates Foundation Microsoft Anderson Cooper Melinda TED Kovic Founder Nigeria India Africa FDA Dr Fouled Pekan
Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

Toure Show

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

"Malcom gladwin is a stone cold genius who loves A grade sports argument. I went onto bill. Simmons podcast and I had this totally ludicrous thing that I want to talk about. Which was I was like? Could a basketball team made up of Nigerians? An all time basketball team made up of Nigerians be the greatest basketball time and then I ended it. I amended until as I said all right I have to corollaries one is. I'm going to add west Indians because almost Indians not all mostly I'm Jamaican. Where am I what am I people from? We're from originally like I'm Ibo right most Jamaicans cable so I add the Caribbean and then I said and just refund. That's also add the rest of Southern Africa and then I construct the students. Tony Ridiculous Caribbean so busy. I say out can Africa and the Caribbean put together an all time team. It's better than an african-american team a euro team at a white American team. It's the third one. Maybe not. The answer is yes. We don't have time to do this but I will convince you. I can't convince you to Africa and the Caribbean in basketball. All Time team and also your co you qualify by or Nigeria. Will I started? I start with all of ethnic did not all? I'm only adding. I added Southern Africa. 'cause I WANNA have Steve Nash and Joel Embiid on my team. Wade Steve Nash. Born in Johannesburg. He's Canadian. No my rule is that you. Are you qualify? Virtue of your parents. Place a birth. So get all of Steve. Nash Who Play Thompson. Really? He's Bamyan are are are taking. Tim. Duncan Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Akeem Joel Embiid Yoenis Clay Andre iggy Dow Victor Depot Drink Igwe Dolla. Where's he from Nigeria okay? He's full on your deal and Steve. Nash I got a back court of Nash and Thomson. I got a frontcourt of Dunkin embiid. Jaanus Patrick Ewing forward a okay. Right right right right from the islands. This really is in the island. This team is insane when Patrick's coming off the bench. But how just doesn't matter but Kim Jaanus and but sure but but the other team has Lebron Kobe. Japan Michael I know. Just for starters and Steph curry just restarting Potanin Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell. Just just try go ahead. That's the African American teachers. Try Playing Lebron Jordan. Notice what we doing that thing ooh together. Thomas can't come in and Magic Johnson coming in. Can I read this out rushing your your appetite? Engineer Crushes Team Sport Play. You cannot Jordan Jordan and abroad and Kobe on the court at the same time out of your mind. You have all centers you have one forward you have you have guards and a bunch of centers. You got a problem with that because the modern game nobody in the known you already. Janis on Lebron an WHO's covering Jordan who's covering stats got covering step. I got clay and Andrea Diallo. Who in their day or two of the greatest lockdown defenders of the last twenty five years in the NBA? I got a clay and national or two of the pure as shooters and I have argued with the greatest defensive front court in the history of basketball. I Have Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick embiid. I mean I have wilt Bill Russell Shack. It's close by. Queen is not close if I had if I was restricted to white Americans. Then maybe may point so I do it as long ludicrous. It's ludicrous ludicrous. And you're right I'm wrong but so what is it that there are people took offense. How on Earth? What is they were like? Oh you know you Kim like first of all all the things to get worked up about in two thousand eighteen in America about race. This is the thing you have said about

Steve Nash Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Basketball Southern Africa Nigeria Caribbean Lebron Kobe Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick Emb Jordan Jordan Malcom Gladwin Patrick Ewing Joel Embiid Bill Russell Shack Simmons Johannesburg Kim Jaanus Jordan Tony Ridiculous Bill Russell NBA
Searching for Treatments

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:43 min | 3 months ago

Searching for Treatments

"First let's talk about how our government officials are describing a drug called chloroquine. This has been something that's been around for many years. Been phenomenon strong powerful drug for malaria. But we think it might work on. This chloroquine is used to treat malaria and has been around for decades but it has not been approved as a treatment for the corona virus. Here's C. N. N.'s medical analysts and infectious disease specialist. Dr Selene Gander. This is not a slam dunk. This is early promising research. But that doesn't mean this is GonNa work. The president also tweeted over the weekend. That a related drug hydroxy chloroquine in combination with an antibiotic commonly known as Z pack. Could become game changers. This is largely based on a small study in France that excluded some people who either left the hospital stopped taking the drug due to side effects or got worse including one person who died. We still don't have enough evidence that these drugs are effective in humans. That's why in some states. They are beginning to experiment. Hydroxy chloroquine which the president speaks about his optimistic about and we hope for optimistic results. Also were actually starting back today. That's New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. He recently announced that the state had procured thousands of doses of chloroquine hydroxy chloroquine and would begin trials. Starting Tuesday the state will begin testing another experimental treatment using the plasma of people who have recovered. It's called convalescent. Serum what it does is it takes the plasma from a person who has been infected with the virus processes the plasma and injects the antibodies into a person who is sick. The other drug name being floated around is an antiviral called. Ramda's Aveer it's already been tested on adults diagnosed with the krona virus in the United States and China director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr Robert Redfield discuss trimmed reservoir in congressional testimony earlier this month. We're GONNA know probably by April whether that drug works or not and that's important because that's a drug that can save lives if it works. Gilead Sciences which manufacturers Davir is pulling back on emergency requests for the drug due to overwhelming demand. The company is instead focusing. Its efforts on giving out the drug in clinical trials hoping to prove its effectiveness against Kovic. Nineteen I want to reiterate that we don't know how effective any of these treatments will be while a number of patients have already received drugs like chloroquine and Rim desert. It's too early to know how much of an impact the drugs actually had. That's why doctors are conducting studies in the United States China. And all over the world to better understand what happens when you give these drugs to a covert patient. Getting the results could take months. And in the meantime we have to be careful about creating false hope. A man in Arizona has died. After ingesting. Chloroquine phosphate believing that it would prevent him from contracting virus. Banner Health a company that operates acute care. Hospitals released a statement on Monday confirming that a man in Arizona had died. After taking a form of chloroquine used to clean aquariums. His wife is currently in critical care. Nbc News spoke to the wife who said they learned of the drugs connection to corona virus during a news conference on TV in Nigeria. Health officials issued a warning about chloroquine saying three people overdosed on the drug after hearing it described as a possible treatment. I can't stress enough. How vital it is that you don't use or consume anything unless specifically recommended by your doctor. You are likely to soon hear other drug names mentioned as well Nevin Creggan. A senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Data Science and Biotechnology in San Francisco worked on a study published last weekend that identified sixty nine existing drugs that could be tested against the corona virus in total. We identified three hundred thirty two proteins talking to or connected to the corner viral proteins and we identified a sixty nine different drugs and compounds that are known to target at least one of these three hundred thirty two a proteins and this corresponds to twenty seven different. Fda approved drugs and the remaining are in clinical or preclinical. Trials Croghan said testing out drugs. That are already. Fda approved could drastically speed up the process of finding a treatment that is safe and effective for humans. And then there's the prospect of a vaccine experts. Say One wouldn't be ready this year. Vaccine Trials take months or years in order to be proven safe and effective for humans and there are multiple stages of those trials but Grogan is optimistic that the global response from scientists now will set a precedent for getting to a solution faster in the future for me. I would argue. That will be seen as a new carradine of how to do science. And I hope we're setting up an infrastructure here that could be beneficial not just for covert nineteen but for the future for covert twenty two Kobe. Twenty four or whatever virus comes online over the next several years and they will be coming our best protection for now social distancing washing our hands looking out for ourselves and our loved ones trying to help out wherever we can and behaving like we might have the virus.

Chloroquine Malaria President Trump Dr Selene Gander United States Us Centers For Disease Control Dr Robert Redfield Arizona China Governor Andrew Cuomo C. N. N. Banner Health Gilead Sciences Gladstone Institute Of Data Sc Nevin Creggan Grogan France Kobe Kovic Rim Desert
What's Your Opinion?

The Sustainable Futures Report

05:12 min | 3 months ago

What's Your Opinion?

"What's your opinion? Hello this is Anthony J with an early sustainable futures report. It's Tuesday the twenty Munch Code Nineteen the current virus is in everybody's minds and increasingly affecting everybody's lives is the sustainable futures report relevant in these times. I need to know what you think. My opinion is that it is relevant because the climate crisis will still be with us after this viruses being defeated. Maybe Mao Tse. Maybe yes but one thing is certain on that is that we will have to rebuild our world when all this is over you may argue that how we rebuild it is a political issue and deny that both the corona virus and the climate emergency issues can be addressed and defeated only by international cooperation between governments last political someone once described the sustainable futures report as green but increasingly red. Let's not put labels on people's opinions. Let's look for pragmatic solutions to where we are. If you're not like what you perceive my politics you don't have to listen but I much prefer if you shed your views. Either in comments to the blog go direct to me at mail at Antony Dash Day. Don't come all we can discuss this online. Many of US forty feel powerless. Because the most we can do is simply to sit at home. What he is or indeed sitting at home without work on new experiences for many is going to be stressful. Thank goodness we have the Internet Social Media Web conferencing to give us some social interaction. I went to four meetings. Las Week without leaving my desk. I chatted with people in Germany South Africa on as well as in the UK. I'm sending out a conference invitation to all my patrons to take place this next Friday. The twenty seventh of March. Given that your in different time zones. I may propose to separate sessions. Surely this is an opportunity to get together. Decide what we can do together even if you can't take pot but a sitting with little to do take the opportunity to reflect on how the world will change once this is over and how you would like it to change on how we can achieve about change and so to this week's topic. This is what I intended to do. But it needs a lot more work so for the moment. This is just an overview. I said last time that the sustainable futures report has been too tightly focused on the wealthy west and so this time I was going to look at Africa. That's probably my biggest mistake. You could almost say that is no such place as Africa yeah. There is a continent called Africa. The world's second largest and second most populous continent offer Asia. We appear reveals that had extends to about thirteen point three million square kilometers which is pumped seven million square miles when it's midsummer in the north. It's midwinter in the south. It contains fifty four fully recognized sovereign states or countries eight territories and to de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. The continent is believed to hold ninety percent of the world's Kobylt ninety percent of its platinum fifty percent of its gold ninety eight percent of its chromium seventy percent of its tantalite. Sixty four percent of its manganese on one third of its uranium. The Democratic Republic of Congo has seventy percent of the world's Coltan a mineral used in the production of tons of 'em capacities addict devices. Such as cell phones the DRC also has more than thirty percents of the world's diamond reserves. Guinea is the world's largest exporter of bauxite and yet Africa's turtle knowing will gd pay remains behind that of the United States. China Japan Germany. The United Kingdom India and France as the growth in Africa has been driven mainly by services and not manufacturing or agriculture is being growth without jobs and without reduction in poverty levels in fact the food security crisis of two thousand and eight which took place on the heels of the global financial crisis pushed a hundred million people into food insecurity identity. Get sensible to ask. How does Climate Change Affect Africa? Africa is so diverse. I'M GONNA start with one country in follow up with others later. Nigeria which has the biggest population of any nation in Africa will be my first choice. But I'm going to defer that until after online discussion after we've agreed where. The sustainable futures report should go from here.

South Africa United States Africa Germany Mao Tse Anthony J Nigeria Antony Dash Democratic Republic Of Congo Asia Kobylt UK Guinea Coltan China India
Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

Science Friction

09:45 min | 3 months ago

Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

"Living on the time of the Cova epidemic or corona virus. I just read something that made me laugh because someone said something like the Covet Nineteen virus which came out of China's an intelligent. It's not like he bowl which is rather dumb virus now. Obviously bullet comes out of the continent of Africa just like just think about that framework and that construct and what has been printed in a major magazine virus from Africa dumb virus virus from China. Smart virus you know. I say this about the corona virus like virus had emerged in the Netherlands. Just think about the way it would have been reported from the outset. Think about what would have happened. If it had merged in on the continent of Africa and the American President Donald Trump has been gratuitously coaling sods cove to the virus behind the current covet non epidemic the Chinese virus. Let's be clear your respective of what species and what place a virus might have been forced to take the dean pandemics. Have NO ETHNICITY. Science tells us that medical history tells us that but as we're about to explore xenophobic conclusions drawn from scientific observations can have an enormous impact on the course of history and on people's lives while is a novelist. He's a doctor a filmmaker and a whole lot more in his early twenty while still in college studying literature. He wrote the critically acclaimed novel baseds of Nine Nation which tells the extraordinary story of a child soldier. A little boy recruited given again and sent to wage a war in two thousand fifteen. That book was turned into a film. Don't like really look into my eyes since my nose picking is because I can't be explaining myself and leaving a damn not like be I am leg. Oldman try to talk to me about movies variances. I saw this an idea there would is. It would seem that some sort of this on Devon all this. I also having us I was really lucky to have the opportunity to write that novel diving. Into the stories of child. Soldiers around the world but mostly specifically in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia which had just kind of come out of their own internal conflicts at the time and then of course going back and talking with relatives. My parents my grandparents aunts and uncles great aunts and uncles about their time during the Nigerian civil war from nineteen sixty six really sixty seven three thousand nine hundred seventy and trying to understand not just what it's like to experience that kind of turmoil from the perspective of a child but also what. It's like to have everything that you thought. You knew that you understood blown open tournament and and unfortunately that's an all too common and all to universal subject after painting beasts of no nation Dima went on to train as a doctor right more books including speak no evil and Al kind of people. He worked for a time as well in health policy in Africa and today he's of the Africa Center in New York City. A storm speak at last year's will conference of Science. Journalists Center. Really wanted you to have the opportunity to he him too. So he joins us from the radio art studios in the heart of New York. You had such an interesting childhood. Born in Washington to Nigerian parents mother a former finance minister of Nigeria. And growing up. I get the sense that you very much spent time on on both continents and I'm curious to know. Have that shaped your sense of self as a as a boy and a young adult. My parents took it upon themselves to make sure that we could always get back to Nigeria. That this was to be so much a part of who we were growing up and it really did actually provide us with a really interesting way of seeing the world. You're not from one place near not from another place. You're from both places. It's kind of a glorious thing to be able to grow up knowing that there are multiple perspectives on everything in the world. What someone sees for example in the village that my grandparents grew up in is necessarily going to be from what somebody sees in suburban Washington? Dc things might be a little bit more difficult in Nigeria. But at the same time everybody is still living. I think that's something that a lot of people who only grow up saying in industrialized if we WANNA use that term or you know United States type or western context don't have and therefore very afraid of the wider world beyond. We just grew up not being afraid because of exposure and I think that's so important. Oh that's such a potent comment about FIA holding back so much dialogue and possibility in the world. Why a medical degree trying to be a doctor? Why did you save that time in your life as a part of any decision? I think there are multiple reasons for why you do something and not all of them are the most. I will freely admit that I did medicine because my dad's a doctor and you can kind of see okay. This is what a doctor does. You see the stethoscope. You see the medicines. It's already very concrete. You know in the little kids mind and as as the kid of African immigrants. There's this thing where you do. The practical like you become a doctor. You become a lawyer and then you think that the way that you have impact is through those practical professions. I think of course. There's this idea that doctors save people and that you can have a profound impact on on a person's life and so you know with all of that. It seemed like a natural choice. I think it became clear to me that one of the things that was missing was for me in full form. Was that creative output that flow and that ability to render the world as I saw an as sort of my talent allowed me to and I think one person can have an impact in multiple ways. Interestingly in many ways you work and your books have connected with how history in politics and in Dade Science and medicine in Western societies read and interpret and Judge View African bodies. If we think of the base of nomination also your your book. Our kind of people sharing stories from people living with HIV is in in Nigeria. That lenses interested you. It strikes me in house and I. I think you can't grow up in a black body and you can't occupy the space as an African person. Occupies space in this world is offering person or as a black person without thinking about the gains that is upon you because in in many ways that gains does and has adversely affected the lives that we all live both again in a very individual way and also on the macro level and so understanding. How black bodies move through space are interpreted? I think is something that's really important to me. And I say that not just from the Games of the other but also from the the way that we look at ourselves and this is where you presented last year at the World Conference of Science Journalists in Europe and gave extraordinary address on racism at the heart of modern science and medicine. What did you want that audience of journalists and scientists and? I was one of them in that room to think about to interrogate. I think oftentimes we just assume that the structures we operate within our for one solid and somehow especially when it comes to signs that they're they're vetted and true and one of the things that became increasingly clear to me. As I wrote the book I wrote on HIV AIDS was just how much quote unquote scientific. Ideas were grounded in people's biases and prejudices about black bodies and how that impacted the quote unquote science or signs. At least that initially was dedicated to trying to stop the epidemic and in some cases may have done more harm than good. Initially I think back to a lot of the articles that when I was writing my book I read about HIV AIDS academic articles about sort of the linking of the spread of HIV AIDS and promiscuity. And the idea that Africans were having sex like monkeys where promiscuous like monkeys like which came up in published scientific papers and then is it makes its way into the journalistic mainstream this idea of like African promiscuity as it relates to the spread of this disease you know things about like Africanness and and being unable to quote unquote keep the time why early. Hiv treatments which required like large. Regimens of pills like wouldn't work for people. And that was you know story that made it into major publications impacted policy that impacted the way the epidemic was dealt with you know these are things that are important and people need to be responsible for the way these stories are told and need to think about the frameworks in which the stories are

Nigeria Africa China Washington Aids HIV Donald Trump Cova The Netherlands World Conference Of Science Jo Oldman Journalists Center Sierra Leone Liberia President Trump Africa Center United States Dima
Explosion in Lagos kills at least 15, Nigerians probe cause

Black and Gold Sunday with Rob Pratte

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Explosion in Lagos kills at least 15, Nigerians probe cause

"An explosion hit Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos early Sunday killing at least fifteen people as rescue efforts continue to save people still trapped in collapsed buildings a national emergency officials said at least two people had been rescued alive the explosion was heard several kilometers away and destroyed more than fifty buildings and ignited fires that were heading to nearby oil pipelines Nigerian officials were not yet able to identify the cause of the massive explosion but a naval base is located near the

Nigeria Lagos
Where to buy hand sanitiser as coronavirus spreads

Derek Hunter

07:35 min | 4 months ago

Where to buy hand sanitiser as coronavirus spreads

"Worldwide because of coronavirus in Maryland at least five people have tested positive and one Washington DC visitor from Nigeria has been treated in a Maryland hospital blah blah goes on and on and on there's no vaccine since December when the outbreak of the disease began in China began to spread to other countries including the United States which has resulted in area retailers reporting a surge in sales of hand sanitizer cleaning agents and other items Grohl's market in Ruxton has had trouble keeping hand sanitizer Clorox wipes and with bleach and cans of milk in the stock quote I've never seen anything like it said assistant store manager Jeff major who has worked for the company for eighteen years Wednesday the store brought in two cases of beer L. hand sanitizer they sold out that day quote I think rubbing alcohol will be the next thing to go said general manager Tom Gilbert as he motioned towards a shelf missing the first two rows of merchandise fingers crossed we'll have hand sanitizer by March fifteenth he said are you noticing these sorts of things in your neighborhood are you noticing have you stocked up told you I went to buy toilet paper last week and there was no toilet paper at Costco none I went to a grocery store and they had toilet paper that wouldn't say they were fully stocked there about half stocked should have bought the whole thing eBay has banned the sale of hand sanitizer not because they don't want people to have hand sanitizer but because people are charging an arm and a leg I told you about how you can buy like a one of those small little pocket models for like twelve to seventeen dollars so there's opportunism capitalism always finds a way what are you noticing any of this stuff I'm just curious if it's how widespread it is because there was on social media over the weekend there were videos from Australia of all places of people literally fighting over toilet paper there's one mother daughter team fighting with another woman because the mother daughter team had a a shopping cart literally filled with toilet paper like overflowing we filled with toilet paper in fact in one area of the country they have put a limit on how much toilet paper you can buy because people were hoarding toilet paper is this just paranoid do you feel like you know the better safe than sorry Monaco is the way to go back to the sun story sandy Pierce spent the better part of Sunday searching for disinfectants preferably her trusty Lysol or Clorox her journey from big lots in Lutherville the CVS in harbor east in all she went to nine stores before calling it quits quote I wasn't going any further all this for a damn can of Lysol end quote piers said she hit the jackpot at Walgreens on York road in Timonium where she found a twelve ounce can of Lysol spray it was eighty dollars she exclaimed the private school teacher in realtor said she usually shops on Amazon but she said the supply shortages and price gouging forced her to embark upon her weekend quest I have noticed this I have seen it like even Amazon which stocks everything is out of hand sanitizer and they are selling second hand because you people don't know this but you can go online and sign up on Amazon and sell whatever you got on Amazon doesn't seem particularly useful for certain things most people don't go to Amazon for things that they usually go to eBay for so you're probably better off going to eBay but in general you can sell whatever you want and if you notice because my dad likes Hydroxycut keys I don't know why I don't know what the differences between the hydroxyzine oreo but he says the the oreos are no good and hydroxy loves hydroxide is always love hydroxyzine kid you just can't find it so I I found a money bag now if you're not looking if you don't shop around because you can pay the normal price for a package of cookies on Amazon you can also pay the exorbitant price for a pack of cookies on Amazon you just have to look at who's selling it and how much each you know how much it is per package and the size of package and all that sort of stuff the same is true for every product in there you can start your own company or just sell it out of your own house and decide to do you're going to charge fifty Bucks for a pack of toilet paper now if you're in the market for Sharman and you're not paying attention you just see all the search results there Sherman okay good I'm gonna click the Sherman added to my cart let's go check out I recommend you pay attention to what you click on online but people don't and it has happened mistakes have been made and you're screwed you bought it you lose the deal so you see all these things I went looking and I just out of curiosity I was looking for hand sanitizer and the hand sanitizer on Amazon was no different than the hand sanitizer on under eBay it was exorbitantly priced shall we say an eBay did not have or Amazon did not have any of their own you know like in stock sold by Amazon I'm looking at it right now let's see germ X. hand sanitizer regional travel size one point five ounces seven dollars twenty five cents that's what you're dealing with here so the paranoia the fear stoked by the media by people who don't know any better is having an impact will it have an impact on politics I don't know but it's definitely having an impact on people's behaviors there are people all over the world who are scared to death when the evidence to this point has shown not to be worth it not to be worthy of being scared to death being cautious absolutely being aware being alert yes no question about it washing your hands how disturbing is it that so many people need to be told to wash their hands in order for them to wash their hands the unit makes you want to never eat in a restaurant ever again if you need to be told to wash your hands it's just scary scary stuff says that the bank to the sun interview article hand sanitizer sales in the U. S. more than doubled in the four weeks ending February twenty nine compared to the same period a year ago according to market research firm Nielsen sales of thermometers spike spike fifty two point three percent during the same period sales of dried beans spiked nearly eighteen percent according to the Associated Press the disease is weighing on the minds of consumers at Grohl's market major re called and that an elderly customer require inquired earlier this week about the health of the stores Instacart

Maryland Nigeria Washington
Trump not concerned about coronavirus after confirmed case connected to Washington D.C.

Dr. Tom Roselle Live

01:05 min | 4 months ago

Trump not concerned about coronavirus after confirmed case connected to Washington D.C.

"She said another man from Nigeria who had passed through Washington has tested positive for the virus in Maryland president trump says he isn't concerned at all about the corona virus getting closer to the White House and the city's department of health says someone with corona virus went to Christ Church in Georgetown the city's working on figuring out who was there when the infected person wise and will be reaching out to those people Maryland has three confirmed cases in Montgomery County and New Jersey resident who went to see pack last week headed to the White House says he doesn't believe that person had contact with president Donald Trump or vice president Mike pence the White House is downplaying concerns about the fact that one attendee who went to this conference a little more than a week ago has since tested positive for the virus health officials say the patient was exposed to corona viruses before he or she attended the conference vice president Mike pence president trump several cabinet officials and even now former acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney all spoke on that stage at C. pack correspondent Sarah

Vice President Chief Of Staff White House Cabinet Department Of Health President Trump Sarah Mick Mulvaney Mike Pence Nigeria Donald Trump New Jersey Montgomery County Maryland Christ Church Washington
Africa has been spared so far from coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:05 min | 4 months ago

Africa has been spared so far from coronavirus

"The Australian farmers may have receded but coronavirus has surged yet again just like we feared it might when we talked about the rise in global cases last week it's on all continents except Antarctica which hardly counts but still Africa is being only touched slightly but that he's with the world health experts fear the impacts could be the greatest if the virus does take hold because of the many health challenges already facing the continent Saudi organ solo helped establish a pan African infection prevention network after the ibotta outbreaks of twenty fourteen and fifteen and she's a professor of clinical microbiology at the university of lake house since a bola all the twenty nine Lavery trees across the country have the capability this last case we tested the two this was done at my university the it's been a lot of training in terms of collecting samples we've done that with a single patient we have a word presently monitoring the suspect and the contact over the station you mentioned V. po la not forgotten until I read your article the a bona had reached Nigeria nexus because you were able to handle it quite quickly which must be encouraging to you the fear of the boiler allowed us to do a lot of things in a way it also helped us to evaluate the structures we had in place which had not been tested but these structures are not evenly spread out across the country one of the reasons we were successful was because he came to legal state our legal state hi good public health infrastructure and so it was not difficult to scale all and at that time the other thing that happened was that we were able to come together so you had public sector private sector everybody works together all from different political parties with their parties aside the people in the U. epidemiologist posing with incumbent in the university is works together so there were a lot of feet on the ground and I was part of this response and it was I mean it was quite heavy for us to wake up in the morning you go to the emergency operations center which we have around the country's now and have all been activated because of this virus present we've had the NCDC that's the Nigeria centre for disease control has been empowered how does this work has been in the tracking of Lassa fever right now I agree to warranty is Lassa fever we having an epidemic of last a few which is more deadly than the coronavirus for us the death rates are worse and so when running actually at this present time working on Twitter that makes at the same time when I listen to the World Health Organization press conferences that comes across to me as one of that worries that it's the additional strain that may be put on Africans health services as opposed to the just the coronavirus the fact that there are other issues and the sort of the strength in depth of some services may be tested we will be tested definitely some countries for short like South Africa will be quite ready and have a lot more systems in place I'm some countries of war and I suspect some of the west African country is a work ID hit by a bullet this is how we can healthcare systems so they're less prepared we trained people from Ethiopia Namibia Malawi I think the G. five countries and we're going to go up on next week to train another twenty three countries so how ready every countries I can't tell you show a lot of countries are still young in the area of preparedness and notes are not as strong and as

"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

"To pay money. You have to follow the sensors idea. One time I was performing in the rehearsal room for five people from the Culture Department and certainly want people. Stand up and shout on me. Who allow you to win victories? Who allowed you to wear the dress you're wearing while you're performing for you. Keep wearing Detroit's I will ban you from singing in public forever. I can do that. They can ban me if I say something back. So what happens now? I mean you've basically refused to submit your songs to the Vietnamese sensors correct since two thousand sit-in until now. I just released my song on Internet and I don't ask for the permission. I organized my private concert in the private studio without asking permission and the police came to rate my shows to time so if you continue to sing and write songs without passing them through the sensors in Vietnam. What risks do you face? They insulate me from the community. The national media. Stop talking about me. No one day to book me to sing so they cut the way. I'm earned the leaving and is very difficult for me to get my audience. Nab because even the Internet they control the Internet right now. How do you work then as an artist in the circumstances do you? Would you have to leave Vietnam? I mean you're here in New York right now but you're not here for very long. Write a few months. I feel very difficult to release my new songs but I still doing that. I'm still lucky because I can still travel around the world to sing my songs to tell my story the in Vietnam I cannot do that. So you're kind of backed into a corner about where you can perform in what you can do. How does it make you feel as an artist? An artist with something to say when art is Con- perform hurt so much but is make you want to create more tonight. If you're in New York City you can hear for yourself. How that political pressure has amplified mycoy creativity? She's performing Joe's pub in a show. She calls just be patient. That phrase is my takeaway from meeting. President Obama in Hanoi in two thousand sixteen. We have a very popular artists here. Who IS Speaking out on behalf of freedom of speech and expression and artists throughout Vietnam. Mike was seated just to Obama's left when he made those comments and she wondered what the future would hold for her and her country when she heard this ultimately. It's up to the Vietnamese people To determine how society functions And the nature of their government. Michael and other Vietnamese artists are still wondering when things will change right now. She's not sure she can return Vietnam and openly be the musician she wants.

Vietnam Obama Culture Department New York New York City Detroit Hanoi Michael Mike President Joe
"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

13:38 min | 4 months ago

"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Marco Werman you're with the world. We're CO PRODUCTION OF THE BBC World Service W. Gbh NPR X. Afghanistan has been locked in a cycle of war for so long now that it's hard to imagine investigating all of the atrocities and war crimes. That may have taken place there. But that is essentially. What a court in. The Hague says it is going to do. The International Criminal Court today announced that it's going to examine allegations of war crimes committed by three groups the Taliban Afghan national security forces and the US military regardless of the fact that the United States is not a signatory to the international court the world's oil berry reports from London. This is the first ruling by the International Criminal Court involved in the US military. The I C. C has focused on the actions of smaller countries in the past in many cases African nations and avoided major world players but today it ruled that allegations that American forces had committed acts of torture and Afghanistan must be investigated the court said allegations of war crimes that CIA facilities in Poland. Romania and Lithuania should also be examined. Human rights advocates welcomed the decision breath. Gopalan is with reprieve a UK based human rights group. It was the right thing to do on on all account and because the US has taken on such a hostile campaign against the IC. I think there was a residual doubt that this would be the decision. But of course now is and we're delighted about that. The International Court in The Hague also called for war crimes investigation into the Taliban and the Afghan security forces between two thousand and three and two thousand fourteen. The Afghan government didn't respond to today's announcement. Right away Dow design me from the BBC's Pashtu Language Service said the authorities probably very mixed feelings will love on government scheme that is you see investigates alleged crimes by members of the Taliban but when it comes to alleged crimes by members of security forces or other government officials. They say that we are a legitimate government. This is our job our duty to protect citizens. The Afghan government is unlikely to cooperate with a Nice e C. investigation and it's not alone secretary of state. Mike pompeo today dismissed the ICC's very reason for existence. This is a truly breathtaking action by an unaccountable political institution masquerading as a legal body. Pompeo criticized the timing of the decision as well is all the more reckless for this ruling to come just days after the United States signed a historic peace deal on Afghanistan which is the best chance for peace in a generation indeed the Afghan government itself pleaded with the ACC not to take this course but human rights groups say there might be a way forward without US cooperation. Catherine Gallaher is an attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights. Issue represents two men who say they were tortured and secret. Cia PRISONS IN AFGHANISTAN. Gallaher says the US may not be a signatory to the icy sea but many of the countries are. Let's see who might end up being indicted and where those people may travel because one hundred twenty three member states around the world have an obligation to arrest in turn over to the ICC those who are indicted by the court for some. Today's decision is deeply personal. Akkhmed Rabbani has spent fifteen years in Guantanamo prison without charge or trial. He was working as a taxi driver in Pakistan when he was detained in two thousand and two and sent to Afghanistan breath ago. Pollen says he never should have been detained in the first place he was mistaken for someone quite high ranking a terrorist organization. He was transported or rendered from Pakistan to several secret detention facilities in Afghanistan. He was tortured as severely and then eventually in two thousand and four. Armored was transferred to Guantanamo Bay Kgo. Pollen says she talked with Rabbani about today's ruling the ICC. He said all he wants from the. Us government is an apology and he said you know even if the government had offered him compensation a million pounds for everyday he has spent in detention. That wouldn't be enough. All he wanted with two words with sorry for the world. I'm Barry in London. Royal Rodney is Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States. We asked her whether her government would block the icy. See if it tried to bring an American service member before the court for alleged warcrimes in Afghanistan. We have not Decided on our position as of yet so I cannot comment so madam ambassador the UN report that came out last year that concluded that US and Afghan forces had killed more civilians than the Taliban did during the war ultimately. How can families of those victims seek justice? We are right now at the cusp of and opportunity seeking a peace process as we go through the process People are reconciled. I believe that The question of how to bring to justice and how the families will find. Justice would be also one of those issues set of concern to be discussed. Well let's discuss. Those prospects for peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban are slated for March tenth. The Afghan government was not part of the first round of talks between the Taliban the US one possible. Point of compromise says Been this release of prisoners prisoner swap although it's also a point of friction between the US and Afghan governments. Here's secretary state. Mike Pompeo speaking today all the parties. Understand that it's time for prisoner. Exchanges to take place a number of the president's being held to serve their full sentences when we need to move that process forward It will be political besides think they have leverage but what. We have urged all the parties to do is stop posturing. It's time to move forward. Is Secretary Pompeo sending a message there to Afghanistan's government to just move more quickly to release Taliban prisoners? It's a process that they have been working together. it's There is work under process. And of course we have taken lots of measures in terms of Preparing for the talks and there is more work and the way. Just listening to Pompeo. There did that sound to you. Like the voice of someone who is fully behind the Afghan government We have been reassured time and again by our. Us partners by the people in the administration that the United States is continuing to back the Afghan forces the people of of honest on the gains that we have had. And that's also something that Secretary of State Secretary Pompeo in his remarks today in the same conversation that you have been playing and president trump and announcing the agreement. This weekend's seem to suggest that going for the Taliban would be eliminating terrorists in Afghanistan. Here's what he said. I'll be meeting personally with Taliban leaders in the not too distant future and will be very much hoping that they will be doing what they say they're going to be doing. They will be killing terrorists. They will be killing some very bad people. It will keep that. Fight going ambassador. Trump also said that if the fight doesn't work out you can always go back. What do you make of that? The agreement that is between the Taliban and United States is a conditional one this is something that the US administration has always spoken about. President trump and every statements. He has always made. He has used the word. F F. We Succeed F. We get to an agreement so he is continuously pointing an emphasizing the conditionality off the obligations that has laid out and the agreement and what he is saying again is in the same line they have to abide by what we agree and this is my understanding that the president trump is referring to finally ambassador. The Taliban is we all know they've not placed women in positions of authority. Can you imagine the Taliban negotiating across the table from you or other women? It is imperative that they agree to that. Because this is the new of on if they were to ignore fifty percent of the population piece would be absolutely an impossibility to reach and is having women at the negotiating table. Something that you personally are going to insist on. Absolutely I have been assured by our government that they will ensure representation on the negotiation table. But not only that they will make sure that women are not presented in the negotiation table as an issue as a topic but as representatives of the Afghan government of the people of Afghanistan of our nation. So they will have full agency on the outcome would not compromise the rights of women in Afghanistan. Royer Rukmini is Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you for having me the. Us Justice Department tried to keep it quiet but their announcements still set off alarm bells. A new office has been established that will comb through files to try and find people who may have misrepresented themselves while going through the citizenship process. Critics worried that it's an attempt by the trump administration to strip new Americans of their citizenship. Here's the world's Rupa Shenoy John Bash the US attorney for the western district of Texas says. The new unit will find cases where immigrants lied in the process of becoming US citizens and get a judge to strip them of that status. And we've been doing that. We step that up two hundred percent in the last three years. But it's getting to the point. We're get enough referrals that it's time to stand up a standalone unit and so we have twenty to thirty lawyers dedicated to bringing justice to victims of travel at station to victims of terrorism war crimes. And so this was bash in an interview on Laura Ingraham's Fox News show. She read a misstatement from the ACLU that says the new unit reveals President Trump's systematic campaign against people of Color. Is that really? What's going on here John? You just willy. Nilly going after people of color and just stripping them of their citizenship for no reason I mean that is an outrageous statement that really. Impune the integrity of all the career attorneys. Doj that work on these issues but examining the records of naturalized citizens to look for fraud wasn't a government priority until the trump administration hundreds of thousands of immigrants become US citizens every year in all their twenty million naturalized Americans and very few have been stripped of citizenship. During the Obama administration officials investigated on average about fifty immigrants. A year for possible denaturalization. Cassandra Robertson says those cases came up as thousands of old immigration. Records were digitized and reviewed for the First Time Robertson directs. The Center for Professional Ethics at Case Western Reserve Law. School in Ohio. Digitisation made it easier to go back and look at the older records and see if there were errors or problems earlier immigration files under the Obama Administration. The purpose of that was to look for national security threats but the projects I successful case announced in two thousand eighteen was against an Indian immigrant without a criminal record. A judge revoked. Bell Gender Sings citizenship because Singh used a different name when he first entered the country three decades ago still last year. The trump administration sought to expand the project. It asked for two hundred million dollars to investigate roughly nine hundred American citizens and digitize and review another seven hundred thousand old immigration files. The people that they've been going after really don't seem to have any connection to prior war-crimes or terrorism or threats to national security in New York Attorney Matthew Kokin says he's seen an influx of about two dozen panicked naturalized citizens who've been notified of proceedings against them by the government an old immigration document newly digitised shows. They changed some detail. They told officials long ago and never disclosed doing so so they're charged with fraud and fraud is grounds for being stripped of citizenship. Realistically almost every single. Imigran who ever applied for status with the United States as at one point or another failed to disclose something that's material culkin's been able to keep all his clients in the country legally but he warns immigrants who want to apply for citizenship. That now is not the best time. Despite that and the announcement of a new Department of Justice Unit focused on naturalizations Los Angeles Resident Stephanie Lopez is still urging her mother to go through the process to become a citizen having that naturalization you're fully American.

United States Taliban Afghanistan Afghan government Secretary Pompeo President Trump Taliban Afghan ICC president International Criminal Court International Court CIA Mike pompeo Marco Werman London Pollen Akkhmed Rabbani
"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

08:29 min | 4 months ago

"nigeria" Discussed on PRI's The World

"For example. The word on the street was that the Director of Nigeria Center for Disease Control. Dr Chee quit. Quavo had been quarantined because he might have corona virus. I called it a quasi up to see if that were true. Beverly Well of how three tests just to be sure. And I'll be walking him on four seats here. Causa was a not quarantined. He was in south isolation just to be safe. He's leading by example. Because Nigerian health officials recommend that people travelling from China Italy and other countries with high rates of community infection self isolate for fourteen days and case symptoms develop he causa recently returned from a trip to China. He had gone with the World Health Organization to learn from China's experience for the literally as soon as the outbreak broke and others really paid off for us in terms of we've wrapped up our diagnostic capacity. We now have five molecular labs where we can make the diagnosis. We HEAR CAUSING SAYS COUNTERING. Misinformation is also part of the effort to fight krona virus because misinformation can be deadly dependent during the super outbreak. We had an incident where a fictitious cure was. Secondly that time on the Asian did not respond as quickly as we kind of the number of big without fm for it says the Nigeria Center for Disease Control has set up a crisis communication team to provide accurate information to the public and to counter the misinformation. But he says it can take time away from the rest of their work. So in the meantime they're relying organizations like Africa. Check to help them do the job and their advice verify before you share for the world. I'm Halima get condie. Getting the right information is a problem everywhere. In some countries it's made worse if the government does not have the public trust. Dr Ezekiel Emanuel was a health policy advisor in the Obama White House and is now a vice provost at the University of Pennsylvania when I speak with people around the world about covert nineteen. I get a range of reactions from fear and panic to a blase. Oh it's nothing kind of attitude. What is the correct response? Depends the our public health expert worrying about the overall public health? Or you're an individual trying to figure out the individual situation so if you think about it from an individual standpoint the risks are low. We know that the numbers were seeing everywhere in the world are probably significant underestimates. Because there's a lot of either eysenck dramatic or mildly symptomatic people who we haven't tested but nonetheless from any individual standpoint you know it's kind of like having the flu around you don't really change your life that much because of the flu on the other hand. If you're a public health expert there are lots of things to worry about. What is the correct response if you're a public health official? What's the difference well? Public Health officials are looking at the whole population. And if you look at flu the United States that's like fifty five thousand deaths And we know that. This corona virus infection probably has a slightly higher death rate. Although we can't be sure of but if this virus spreads to millions of people bad adds up and we may need more respirators we may need more infrastructure than we have at the moment so from a public health standpoint. This is a serious emergency from an individual standpoint. Should change your behavior in a good way. You should wash your hands more. Keep your hands out of your face more but whether it should change your behavior. Assuming you're relatively healthy excetera That I think is a separate question. Why is public? Trust in public officials So important at a moment like this. Well they're going to have to guide you as to what the right behaviors are like. Don't put those masks on. Don't buy those masks and you have to trust them that they're giving you valid information you know if they're closing down the school you have to trust them that that's okay if they reopened the school and say it's safe you have to trust them that that's okay to send their kids to school so. I think having the public follow what they're being told to do. Is I think very very important. And not the panic. I mean we've you know we have already seen some of the economic consequences people boycotting Chinese restaurants. If you know this viruses you know hanging out in Chinese restaurants which is totally false yet can have devastating consequences for people without any factual basis. So I think understanding what's actually happening and being able to rely on your public officials is important. Ya Don't panic That's a tough one to kind of have realized. How do you build public trust? Like what experiences did you have in the Obama Administration with sort of thing first of all? You have to acknowledge it's GonNa get worse before it's GonNa get better because of more casting we're going to see a big increase. In the number of cases we may see a big increase in the number of. That's unfortunately so you just have to acknowledge. The people here are the data. Here's why it's happening. Second you have to give people were on top of this. Here are the five things were doing. You know we are going to make sure there's no drug shortages so we're working with the drug companies to get the raw materials. We are going to make sure. There's no shortage of personal protective equipment. We're GONNA make sure that you know. We have hospital surge capacity in the areas that we have. We're going to let you know what we're doing and give you reliable information And we're not going to sugar coat things because in the long run which may be just the week you know people are GonNa find out. There's a lot more cases of corona virus and they weren't telling the truth and hard to regain trust. Once you created that disinformation for people How important is data from China on this disease and the results had in their containment and treatment efforts? How much you trust. It's hard to know how much to trust it. I think some of this pride. Some of this is uncertainty. And not wanting you know necessarily bad information out there. The contrast is say with Singapore which has been fantastically transparent. All the data's available and you have a lot of fake that You know exactly what's happening in that city state. And that's the sort of model. We all ought to adopt. But we do use the data. You know what people regularly say well eighty percent of people. It's a very mild case. Even eysenck thematic well. That's based on data from China. We don't know you know how reliable that is and second of all that might be slightly different than the United States. They have a very high smoking rate for example in China especially among men and that may be skewing. They may have more serious cases than we're likely to see are we might see in the United States On the other hand we have more obese people and that may skew it so that we have more serious and complicated cases. I you know. It's just hard to know out. Extrapolate that data former health policy advisor in the Obama White House. Doctor Ezekiel Emanuel now vice. Provost of global initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania. Thank you very much good to speak with you. Take care across the globe pharmacies or running short on some key supplies needed to combat the corona virus. That is partly our fault. Many people are in panic mode fearing the worst scooping up more than they need. It's understandable still. It's creating shortages as the World Sarah Birnbaum reports. There's one critical item. That's now hard to find in many places. Maybe you've been hearing advice like this. The Department of Homeland Security stock up on medicines for yourself and your children like pain relievers cough and cold medicines. Chicken Broth soups. All that antibacterial soap and wipes tissues and laundry and dish detergents but there's one item that's often among the first to go toilet paper. Call it one of the mysteries of the human psyche. But in times of crisis human being stockpile teepee that's been the case in China. Singapore Japan Hong Kong a now stores in Australia are completely wiped out. Hundred Ninety. Two thousand rolls up for sale was sold out in thirty minutes. I'm doing a giant shopping because everyone else's and there's no toilet paper Look for.

China United States flu Nigeria Center for Disease Con Doctor Ezekiel Emanuel World Health Organization Obama White House University of Pennsylvania policy advisor Beverly Well official China Italy Dr Chee Quavo Africa Director Department of Homeland Securit Hundred Ninety Obama Administration
"nigeria" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"nigeria" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges face in the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations, this week's topic is Nigeria Africa's most populous country and its largest economy. With me this week to discuss Nigeria and the recent Nigerian presidential election is John Campbell. Can't think of finer person to have a disgust Nigeria with me, John is the Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy. Studies here at the council. John before joining the council was a career foreign service officer among his post, he was US ambassador to Nigeria. John is also the co author along with Matthew page of Nigeria what everyone needs to know. John. Thanks joining me today. It's good to be with you. Join let's begin with the headlines, which is that Nigeria had a presidential election over the weekend. The incumbent President Mr Bahari won reelection lay layout for his what happened in this election. Which is I understand it wasn't held on. It was supposed to be held. It was not the election was postponed for one week, Mustang, simply because of difficulty in delivering the election materials was there a lot of advanced. Notice that the election was going to be postponed. There was five hours five in other words in Nigeria. People normally go to their home village to vote. So that a great many voters had already gone home before the elections were postponed..

Nigeria John Campbell John president Jim Lindsey Mr Bahari Ralph Bunche Africa United States senior fellow director officer Matthew five hours one week
"nigeria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"nigeria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Where everyone is a criminal. Yeah. This is Nigeria repetitions or go to jail. Yeah. This is Nigeria. Everyone is creamy. Voice was in my voice accepts from an interview. Which my dad had granted. My dad is actually femi- no is a human rights activist out here in Nigeria. My mom. Also, a women's rights activist. They happen to be lawyers in the same fem final and follows chambers. And you know, why well known out here and my dad should I say happened to be FILA cooties lawyer while he was alive, and you know, as we know fellow was one of the greatest advocates of human rights in Nigeria. Music. Was a legendary Nigerian artists who was also a human rights activist with his music. She's someone that for the longest period of time majorly in the seventies eighties. I think maybe the sixty s as well continued to preach the gospel of a nation without o'ryan, just his.

Nigeria femi
"nigeria" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"nigeria" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Nigeria. In a landmark decision. Florida state supreme court ruled Thursday. That is police officers can use the state's stand your Ground Self-Defence law. Do you hear what I say? In doing so police will be able to shield themselves from prosecution in instances involving disputed shootings. It is ruling the court determined that police have the same rights as other Florida's citizens who win immunity from prosecution under law. According to the New York Times. Lawyer Eric Schwartz Reich who successfully argued that police shouldn't be excluded from the protections that stand your ground offers. Of course was elated at the news. I'm quoting him. He says, it's a landmark ground marking case, you think. He recently representatives sheriff's deputy who was involved in the fatal shooting of a black man I continue to quote him. He says it's the first time then you ground is used in a state of Florida in reference to police. The implications are wide ranging unquote. Into that. I say, you ain't never lie. Straight up open season on black people in Florida. And don't let me fool myself. Although this whole country. All right. So. The biggest order of Catholic priest is expected to release the names of priests accused of sexually abusing minors today. The mid western Maryland branches of the Jesuits are expected to release their list of abusive priests dating back more than sixty years. So I'm wondering why they're doing that. If they're not going to prosecute them. Understand. So. Sears. Is making more than twenty five million dollars in bonuses. Paying it to their top executives and their high ranking employees. Just months after filing for bankruptcy. A federal is ridiculous. A federal bankruptcy court has approved the company's request to pay twenty five point three million dollars in bonuses. Sia says this will give high level employees financial incentive to stay with retailer as it works to reveal. But what about all the regular people who lost a job while they closed the stores and do their reorganization? This obscene. So.

Florida Eric Schwartz Reich supreme court New York Times Nigeria. Sia Sears Maryland twenty five million dollars three million dollars sixty years
"nigeria" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"nigeria" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Nigeria. In a landmark decision. Florida state supreme court ruled Thursday. That is police officers can use the state's Daniel Ground Self-Defence law. Do you hear what I see? In doing so police will be able to shield themselves from prosecution in instances involving disputed shootings in his ruling the court determined that police have the same rights as other Florida's citizens who win immunity from prosecution under law. According to the New York Times. Lawyer Eric Schwartz Reich who successfully argued that police shouldn't be excluded from the protections that stand your ground offers. Of course was elated at the news. I'm quoting him. He says, it's a landmark ground, Mark. In case, you think. He recently represented a sheriff's deputy who was involved in the fatal shooting of a black man I continue to quote him. He says it's the first time stand your ground is used in the state of Florida in reference to police. Locations are wide ranging unquote. That I say, you ain't never lie. Straight up open season on black people in Florida. Don't let me fool myself. Load this whole country. Right. So. The biggest order of Catholic priest is expected to release the names of priests accused of sexually abusing minors today. The mid western Maryland branches of the Jesuits are expected to release their list of abusive priests dating back more than sixty years. So I'm wondering why they're doing that. If they're not going to prosecute them. Dan. So sears. Is making more than twenty five million dollars in bonuses. Pain it to their top executives and their high ranking employees. Just months after filing for bankruptcy. A federal is ridiculous. A federal bankruptcy court has approved the company's request to pay twenty five point three million dollars in bonuses. Fia says this will give high level employees financial incentive to stay with retailer as it works to reveal. But what about all of the regular people who lost a job while they closed the stores and do their reorganization? Obscene. So.

Florida supreme court Eric Schwartz Reich Daniel Ground New York Times Mark Nigeria. Fia Maryland sears Dan twenty five million dollars three million dollars sixty years
"nigeria" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Just then oh yes strong stuff particularly when the season finished it looked quite give everyone everyone ended this friendly i'm pretty certain getting cake from suspended for two games the champions thing right give us your most controversial prediction for the world cup well so said tweet in this area because he responded he said he said there was a novus one but he didn't see oh oh fade the for experts said john role plays i don't know if this counts necessarily is controversial but argentina don't even get out of the group not is quite controversial group creche osh nigeria nigeria so have you crusher nigeria yeah this is this is i'm not saying this will happen but it's exactly we say team doesn't gal the group you hate you miss it university talking me right now yes because massey algae said hey massive clear round madrid bias yep oh jeez sudden which which one is it today hate argentina and got the lunar fine all those people in twitter winning and portugal said oughta who's gonna win the woke i mean i do think spine very good i think a look of franz in much is i think i've got brilliant plans i'm not convinced i have a particularly good manager of agency tina meeting spain the call or something and the that okay i'm sure we'd be the predictor now get ricardo teas coli from deported he's explained being spain yeah because i just think it's a strange notion.

nigeria argentina franz john massey twitter portugal spain
"nigeria" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on The Science Hour

"I have the disease on being left the for the rest of your life a very severe consequence is there anything you can do for people once they've got it so there is a drug called ribot viron that has been studied although we we think that no more study needs to be done in that's one of the things that are our group is looking up so there's a drug that some studies were done in the in the 80s one of the things as an aside that has been a a barrier to study in lhasa fevers that the areas where it's exit where it exists have been areas of a lot of civil unrest in the civil war in sierra leone and liberia an and nigeria some problems as well but nevertheless rob of iron was studied in 80s to a certain degree looks to be a reasonably good drug to to help people would lhasa fever does not have any impact on that ask but we we still think that they're probably better drugs out there and how hard to distinguish from other faith us it's easy to tell us is what people have got it's very difficult right in the beginning and so again people present with headache and fever and things that we've all had an so distinguishing that the person who has lhasa fever from other very common diseases like malaria and typhoid fever that exist in that part of the world is this quite difficult and in fact we we did a study one time in guinea in west africa ends for three years of looking for varies very severe disease found i think three cases looking in three years and then we said well let's just test everyone with the fever in the next month and we found three cases now and the next month that wouldn't have been picked up of course would have otherwise been diagnosed as malaria or other things how serious this current outbreak in nigeria it is serious it's widespread them there's quite a few cases were still trying to get to the bottom of that and.

sierra leone liberia fever headache malaria nigeria typhoid west africa three years
"nigeria" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello i'm monty chesterton and welcome to the science are from the bbc this is the podcast where we are few the highlights in science health and technology on today's show the outbreak of lassa fever that has affected hundreds of people in nigeria we all squat lhasa is how it spread and how health officials a putting into practice lessons learned from the serious outbreak of a bowler a few years ago that in just a moment what can the genomes of over four hundred neolithic culpa and bronze age europeans tell us about the movements of the beka people foreign a bit thousand years ago and how the alma radio telescopes in the atacama desert is helping to reveal the mysteries of the universe it's amazing what alam unable us to do is a chemical pictures of their birthplaces upon us and that has just been possible before allah and my studio guest today is bbc's science reporter bobila cara and booby you bringing news on how one bird the australian white only base is revealing a lot about its donoso cousins i am hi money will bless the osce wifi this is not the key to spat out there that it might just help is what how the mic t t rex walked and round first to the outbreak of lassa fever in nigeria which has made hundreds ill and killed at least forty three people with symptoms including bleeding from the gums eyes and nose it shows some similarities with the boiler but his less infectious and can be mild it's usually pasta on by a particular breed of rats and more rally from person to person the uk public health rapid support team is preparing to send people over to nigeria if required and they're director professor done bausch told khodeir hammond's that survivors can be left with lifelong death nece drifting we can be even and people who don't have severe diseases and so when they're getting better from the acute as usual fever and things like that they can develop this stuff nece the american in some cases be very severe and and lifelong so you can imagine even if you survey.

monty chesterton bbc nigeria atacama desert bobila cara fever professor bausch khodeir hammond reporter osce uk director thousand years
"nigeria" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Nigeria reading then being clearly to look now dow give how you will i don't gamble by go ahead of danish do given 'bout vouch are hennick damage to do i urge you gotta know man at the second day both thinking that is thing the colin be making the quake as it as ido second date update here timothy i mean real appealed to his advantage gored was the b hills he of every day i wake up celebrate is is that just as the bullet from a crazy proof that the mothers may be raised as we'll put me all natural got me here mainly days in every day that i do is my first naji sabri audience you gotta burberry ena them which really need com is really need how does what occurred restores that from the trilogy and you know this i got a bill that says we're seeing in another one kashmir leo next number takes back don't we do you those well wage you you look back wage i got a message many things are revenue then b which you dillon i'll give how the audience how you look look give us your finish who do have you are anything that can do you have i'll give now giveth the bachelor any benefit to budge badge danish on the beautiful women in a mile attach his knee that was that you went on your radio deputy interior casino win the deep below fifty yap hit a little property on the greater the mark ring month pulled richardson she was a method of this the fremont with a bouquet to four pm but lake hillary rebel am my dental want him in a rental truck a mental late night mostly muslim never some amid the water go home was really hardly a calm with minded john lewis business she infamy for cherishing give nominated dan i'll start with appalachia statue of leaders if the previously undefeated us we must laugh on a break in my mind when you come away with new the wind but by liu liberal with added the victim is just go away you'll those guys go away allowed you love dumb dive june i got imagining things are weather then of b would you those though you how you how you will give us your finish who do how 'bout you are.

colin richardson fremont Nigeria dow hillary john lewis dan i
"nigeria" Discussed on The Laravel Podcast

The Laravel Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on The Laravel Podcast

"He's one of the two founders he's one of the three formal organizers and there's also some loss on the organizers of live on a jury i haven't looked it up all put a linked to a right up that he did in the show notes but you're just seeing hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people once every couple of months come together and teach and learn there's actually a couple of your talks that are online i'm so i'll make sure with a couple of those that i think pushers hosting i'm so you can hear you you can hear him speak in series organizing he's a cto hotels that energy which is a really big tech company out of nigeria and y'all her in late us right yes should not ivan say more of them i've been saying legos like go but then last night i looked it up and they said lei goss not ghosts so at another one during these they also also several times when you're first talking i refer to lake us as if it were only a city not knowing it was both the city and the state so it's kind of like a new york new york thing right like new york as well city and state laos is also a city in a state so now in other things yes so and the tiniest bit of context and i want you to teach me a little more because basically over the last week i'd been wikipedia and all these things is that nigeria's the biggest economy in in africa and then laos is the biggest are the most the sigma significant economy in nigeria and then lake us city is such a significance an economy that it would have been one of the biggest economies in africa just as a city alone and it is the 20th largest economy of any city in the entire world so this is this is a significant thing because i think a lot of folks they understand some general name some general locations some general cultural concepts of various african cities and states and countries but i don't know if they have that much context understanding that this is a huge place so.

tech company nigeria lei goss new york laos wikipedia cto ivan africa
"nigeria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Alqaida you can imagine how the ideas of osama bin laden spreading all over the middle east a chabab has more than seven thousand alqaeda and the slavic mother was finally able to unify all the different branches regardless to tribal and ethnic affiliation under one group alqaeda in yemen it just since the saudi war in yemen went from less than one thousand to more than five thousand this is where alqaeda is today are do the to the various terrorist groups of one's sabaya the ones who in nigeria of the once in iraq and syria to they all have any connection so each other or the well operators suffer unit well i it depends like for example alqaeda and that slum iq mother of alqaeda and the arabian peninsula a chabab they ought affiliated with alqaeda central as they still take some kind of uh the general strategy the daytoday operation is led by the local commanders i mean bin laden a thinks of than you alqaida after nine eleven with its affiliates as as kind of like you know for the lack of better term the mic old eob you know a theory away you can operate you're on local branch the way that you want as long as you have the the the the brand a things to consider you know the the the the overall strategy nigeria's a totally different situation boko haram try to join applied a few times abaci the did not accept them so they finally joined isis when isis came out and there's many reasons why alqaeda did not to joy at did not allow boko haram in and frankly some of it has to do with racism you know a isis was able to take anyone who wanted to to join them but most of the other affiliates fully it said have been in existence for more than a decade those affiliates yano locally they do their own thing but however they operate under the umbrella and the strategy of al qaeda central and they only one error europe's well they take other people who are not the.

chabab yemen nigeria iraq syria alqaeda al qaeda europe alqaeda
"nigeria" Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on CFR On the Record

"So the that uh that it uses wanted to delivering humanitarian relief is going to have to do a military or security dimension to basically no in other words due to a rival of socalled um which is due to all the very large percentage others released in northern nigeria from the nigerian government from government you'll frequently in and not just north of nigeria said in the countries that basically nigeria physical one will stay and that's essentially it is one by so censored emily uh that we can apply oh it's own purposes that you know that it's very much as it did when it was the british home in excess no do we for nigerian as opposed to do so uh we'll see this is a new i sent with why exactly the kinds of things that you just talking about the total in the short there has to be as mentioned in it in order to literally did to some two and that's a real that's is his real uh uh a real problem i mean how do you do it uh because it is is gonna uh um it is when i played winding runways uh in northeastern nigeria you're able to do there and you gotta be b and w two s tiffany says yes things you absolutely john you have led to simulations abilities stressors and what is i do have it um uh would usage is just one being the roleplay and just didn't it doesn't matter the students then obviously has said another coup wanted to um and also it's hard to hear your perspective from both sides of the coin.

nigeria nigerian government
"nigeria" Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"nigeria" Discussed on CFR On the Record

"With the longest and moved in young where we are now at some point in the future i think there has to be i i uh uh more more of a political and so on to mention a to a joint task force does it i see good evidence that it has been securities in northern nigeria and particularly in new orleans that has been a wise up local in other words is a joint force or members to join them so we saw these human rights abuses abusing abusing the local populations absolutely journalist adopted in terms of uh of destroying the that makes sense just sir net and that's where you're supposed to do what message amblin tallies i'm probably that one of the questions that that's about marriott i just ask it we're going to help it by the us administration on what kind of things she should do and you've made it very strong solutions more economic social and political and security um do we need any more and wanted to do it more sitting in northern nigeria supposed to less the most asian eating more more education infrastructure all those things up oklahoma bombers criticizing government who are really wish him with the nigel that the reason that she too showing attempt showing a challenge your approach to both oh there's a long term i think he is the trouble is um shortterm versus longterm got two and a half million internally displaced persons and you've got people who were literally starving.

nigeria new orleans nigel human rights us oklahoma