36 Burst results for "new york times"

Could Biden Enforce a COVID-19 Vaccine Federal Mandate?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:38 min | 2 d ago

Could Biden Enforce a COVID-19 Vaccine Federal Mandate?

"Trying to navigate what what vaccine mandates might look like. If they happen. I think they will. We're all trying to navigate the mixed messages and the contradictions and the flipflops from the cdc role. Trying to understand what this country is gonna look like in the days and weeks and months. Maybe even years to come and we're seeing this shift. It seems like there has been a resistance even from the biden administration to do to to make vaccines mandatory but was reading something for the new york times this morning that the tide is turning. And there's more and more demand for vaccine requirements and. Maybe it's fueled by people like geraldo yesterday. On the five he got into it with the rest of the panel. He's often the the token liberal on the panel. Kind of i guess. Replacing taking the taking up the the juan williams mantle but here was geraldo pushing back against katie pavlovich and jesse waters and talking about what he would do if anybody came into his the home of his grandchildren. It was quite remarkable. A quite a display of a tough guy and he. I don't doubt that he's a pretty tough guy. Geraldo has been through a lot. You know he didn't he get his nose broken once on stage. So many threw a chair at him in a big. You know highly publicized. tv show. He was hosting years ago. He's a scrappy guy was a new york city reporter kind of morphed into this national correspondent for fox news. And he believes the you better not go anywhere near his grandchildren. If you're not vaccinated. I think less of people who are not vaccinated. I think that it is an arrogant selfish. Reckless act and i have five grandchildren all under the age of twelve. Who are susceptible to someone sneezing on them. I think it is absolutely so selfish. Netted is appalling sometimes. Government has to tell not ask god government to tell right now. I want people to have to show. When i go to the bar i want to know everybody's

Biden Administration Geraldo Katie Pavlovich Jesse Waters CDC Juan Williams New York Times Fox News New York City
Fresh update on "new york times" discussed on Buck Sexton

Buck Sexton

01:17 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "new york times" discussed on Buck Sexton

"It's not just a warning about dear close quote, By the way, you all know that, um Bovine pox and smallpox. Um, but that the human Populations that had natural immunity to that were exposed to it because we domesticated megafauna, right? We oxen, et cetera in in the original cradle. Mankind between Mesopotamia between the Tigers and Euphrates. In all likelihood that people said See that thing over there. I'm gonna I'm gonna first of all on an invent rope that I'm gonna lasso it. And then I'm going to pull on those things and whatever comes out, I'm drinking it. No. No kidding. Um, hold my ale or whatever the mead. What if they drank? I don't know. And by the way beer originated in Iraq that as far as anthropologists now And Sony. Just just because I don't you you shouldn't all be thinking. Oh, no, It's jumping from humans to deer, and it'll mutate and jump from deer to humans, and there will be no immunity or whatever. No, this is What? What? What The deer are undergoing his literal Herd immunity. This is how populations Of mammals with a lymphatic system with with an immune system, absorb a new disease and survive it. It's as I say, Oh, I'm going to reference 1918. 1918 1919 that pandemic. Which were signed, most scientists agree probably originated in Kansas again. This segment brought to you by China. China Delicious have it with noodles and so The the current pandemic, which, of course, did not in any way, shape or form. Region in China, probably from the seafood from Norway. Um is, of course, infecting. Are you ready? Ferrets, primates, tigers and zoos and that in all likelihood, dogs, domestic cats, gorillas and other animals. Farmed mink caught the virus naturally from humans. The virus mutated and spread back to humans. In a few cases, farmed mink are now being vaccinated with an experimental vaccine as Rizu animals North American bat species showed no evidence of infection. So far, I don't know what the New York Times obsessed with that that that implies that This was incorrectly implies that this was a leak from some Chinese virology lab or something. Which it was not. I mean, obviously because Because China says so and you should just shut up. Anyway, Dr Goldberg said. If one deer became infected, it might well. In fact, you're exposed other deer the virus, um and which is literally herd immunity. Um, And so the the comparison to 1918 1919 has a couple different. Analog with today, but the number one comparison is credibility of public health officials. Um, and part of that is not their fault. Part of it is because Many of them I was really blown away by this many, many public health people aren't really articulate about the last Great worldwide pandemic. And that that kind of blows me away. It's like, Shouldn't you be able to, you know, cite chapter and verse about the dates and the high tides and the daily deaths and total, you know, World Death count. Because if you don't know this, it It still stands today. As somewhere between 50 and 100 Million. That's kind of a big ass range, isn't it? That's well, um, Yeah, it's somewhere between they're having their being in England and not our re UK. I should say or, or yes, um, in 1918 1919. The world lost basically Scandinavia. And throw in the Baltic states and half of Germany, and that's probably the death rate. And so a lot of public health officials don't don't know this one big difference in 1918. Was that so? So, by the way, the reason I'm saying this is because if any Public health officials in your city County state wherever you may be ever says unprecedented throw something at the TV screen. We invented a thing in the nineties. For all of US followers and and and alumni alumnus of the Washington State University called the Cougar Brick. It was a red foam brick. And any time the Cougars did something, like blow a huge lead or whatever you through the cougar brick at the TV. So any time we have a public health officials say, unprecedented, It means they're unaware of what's similar. What's different from 1918? With a number number one similarity. Is The immediate measures that were that were taken. And that meant closing down crowded places. Schools theaters, You know things like that. The number one difference was that most people in 1918 had a living memory. Of everything from smallpox outbreaks. To monkey pox, too, You know you name it, but most most people Had a Personal experience or memory of that we have been so successful in in wiping out things like smallpox, which you don't know this But it used to be what scientists call a very, very bad seen it one out of 10. People in an outbreak would die and it took Children overwhelmingly took Children. But what was crazy about it was there was there were certain populations that had a natural immunity and this had to do with their exposure to domesticated. Cows. Which are basically oxen. And and how did people get get natural immunity? So the fact that in 2021 More specifically last year in 2020, the fact that most public health officials never thought To address us as adults and say You may have slept through history. But this has happened before, and we're here, right? Okay. We the last known Smallpox death was In 1978. And it was A lab leak. It was A, uh, a English person who worked at a medical research lab in Britain. That's the last known smallpox death because we wiped it out. Um, And and so you understand. That was a lab leak in in England. Because this virus and again the segment is brought you by China. Um, whatever it did. It didn't leak from the lab that was researching virus Exactly like this, Um, again, in all likelihood. Because this is from the World Health Organization. So therefore it must be credible. It may have been frozen seafood from Norway. So China has paid me to pass that on to you, all of you. And more mask hypocrisy. Now coming from the federal level, um and more stuff and coming up. I will not have an opinion about Simone Biles whatsoever. And even if I did, I wouldn't express it on the radio because I'm I'm fresh out events about about these Olympics by the way in general, all right, back in a second. It is Brian suits their at dark secret place on the Twitter machine. Um, and if you want to get on board my show it is at the dark secret place.

World Health Organization Britain Simone Biles Iraq Brian Kansas Goldberg Norway 1978 2021 England Washington State University Today Scandinavia Olympics Last Year UK New York Times Mesopotamia 1918
Critical Race Theory Is the Death of Common Ground

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 d ago

Critical Race Theory Is the Death of Common Ground

"This idea of objectivity is one of the agreed upon attributes of western society. We have now seen this this theme of my truth james. You don't know what it's like to be a black lesbian woman. Therefore i must have a lot of power and you must sit down and shut up talk about the death of objectivity and how this all ties together. So it's beyond even the death of objectivity but we'll talk about that. It's the death of having things in common. It's the death of being able to find common ground or common sensibility with which we can communicate with one another. The point of an objective view of the world is you may not agree with me about some facts about the world but we agree about how we're going to go investigate it. We agree that there are methods that work better than others. Okay and so with math. Math is objective. It is absolutely it's literally logically true it is. There's no question about whether or not it's true. There's nothing to argue about. It is objectively the case. For example the two plus two equals four. That is the case. I know this is a controversial statement. In fact i made it a controversial last year. I by trolling nicole. Hannah jones of new york times into making fun of me for saying to four and then it blew up and then you had the t h chen school public health at harvard. Tweeting to five in the middle of a pandemic. We're half the country's afraid they're over counting. How about that. So the goal is to break down our ability to talk to one another and understand one another in the reason is because if we can't understand one another and a common language we can be controlled by the people who get to set this objective standards the new subjective standard that new sensibility. That's replacing a common. Sensibility is called intersection. -ality which means in short we can talk about what it means in the theory blah blah blah but insured. It means you have to think about who you are and how systemic power dynamics influence whether what you said matters are not always in everything. It's think about who you are and be divided against one another

Hannah Jones Chen School Public Health James Nicole New York Times Harvard
Babylon Bee Attacked in ‘False and Defamatory’ Claim That It Pretends to Be Satire

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:40 min | 5 d ago

Babylon Bee Attacked in ‘False and Defamatory’ Claim That It Pretends to Be Satire

"Now we're gonna have to get serious for a moment. Okay this long enough and okay. Now we do have to get serious because you this is. This is really serious. But it's also hilarious. You guys at the babylon be doing intensely. Larry obvious comedy have been attacked by. I don't know the new york times snoops saying that you're putting out false information so please explain because i'm not even joking. That's the world we. We're allowed living in so talk about that. Yeah yeah so. Yeah i mentioned. There's you know. The left is killing comedy by spike choking it. But they're also trying to censor it and what they're trying to censor specifically is comedy like ours. Where their target of it you know. They cannot to be laughed at. They can't bear to have their ideas mocked so instead of just laughing it off a or responding to it with their own jokes They've gone down this route where they've actually tried to smear us as being source of misinformation and the. There's a reason they're doing that so this is to me facebook twitter. You know all the all the social networks were really trying to crack down on misinformation and block it and keep it off their platforms. the left took advantage of that and thought to themselves. Okay well maybe that's how we get rid of the babylon be lump them in world news right and so they started writing all these news articles. The most recent one was the new york times saying that we're far right misinformation site that sometimes traffics and misinformation. I'm quoting them. That's what they said. We had to send them a demand letter and tell them to to remove that from their piece because it was defamatory. It was going to get us band on social networks thing you know. Our wikipedia page is going to say that we're not really a satire sight. Where where we pretend to be. We can mislead

New York Times Larry Twitter Facebook
From a Book With No Words to a Book About Words with Author Michael Knowles

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | 5 d ago

From a Book With No Words to a Book About Words with Author Michael Knowles

"What led you to write this book. Speechless controlling words controlling minds. Well before i had any of the podcasts daily wire with senator cruz or prager anything. Before i had the book with words it all began. Because i had a book without any words which was called reasons to vote for democrats a comprehensive guide. Two hundred fifty blank pages and unexpectedly. I only wrote it. Or i didn't write anything but only published it irritate my democrat friends and relatives but it became a number one bestseller on amazon. So now this is so crazy. I just want to say. I'm a writer. I'm an author. I've written a lot of books. I think i have five new york times. Bestsellers the idea that you wrote. A book had no words and it became a bestseller hard for me to like you michael knowles. It's a good thing. I love you as as my brother in the faith because the idea. I mean it's hilarious but this is true. When did that come out. So that book came out in twenty seventeen and very shortly thereafter. I had a publishing companies. Say okay we want you to write another book. And i said hold on the word. Another is a little strange using that word a little liberally. Nothing about what. I've done should give you any indication that i could write a book with words but i thought it would be ironic for my first book with words to make it about words themselves and also because i think that the manipulation of language to redefine reality is the primary tool by which leftist radicals have up ended society more than by immigration more than by various sorts of economic policies for instance the manipulation of language. Does it because if you can control the speech then as good old uncle aristotle tells us you're controlling politics particularly in a self-governing republic so it's good for book sales that this issue of censorship in free speech is the number one issue right now. It's very bad for the country. But it's good for book

Senator Cruz Michael Knowles Prager New York Times Amazon
Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | 5 d ago

Maureen Dowd Manufactures Fear Over Global Warming

"I told you. I read comments to articles not just comments on my own. Columns columns have comments usually and i love reading them. 'cause that's the face of the of the world that reads that website right so the new york times has its readers and they are virtually to a person cardboard cutouts of leftist and is a fascinating thing through the comments. Maureen dowd columnist new york. Times had a hysterical piece on global warming. It's over it's just over death and mayhem. A greenland is disappearing. Antarctic is disappearing life on earth as we know it is disappearing been. I've been hearing this since nineteen ninety. It's now thirty years that everything is horrible. In the meantime by the way. I should just not to you a fact but facts. Don't bother these people and that fact is noted by bjorn. Lomborg the dane who writes about these matters. Fewer and fewer people die from climate related natural disasters. This is even true. Twenty twenty one despite breathless climate reporting over the past hundred years annual climate related deaths have declined by more than ninety six percent in the nineteen twenties. The death count from climate related. Disasters was four hundred. Eighty five thousand on average every year in the last full decade. It was eighteen thousand three hundred to ninety six percent lower. But this doesn't matter to to maureen down none of this matters.

Maureen Dowd The New York Times Greenland Antarctic Lomborg Bjorn New York Maureen
'American Marxism' Exceeds Half a Million Copies Sold in Less Than Two Weeks

Mark Levin

01:45 min | Last week

'American Marxism' Exceeds Half a Million Copies Sold in Less Than Two Weeks

"Or Sometimes you think that People are just giving up. The word is gaining. Uh, remember, I told you I was hoping America Marxism would be the equivalent to some extent. Of a Thomas Paine's pamphlet like the American Crisis. That the written word is crucial now, since we have to get around big media and big tech And since they control and own Most of television media, all of network media. By this time, I'll be honest with you the numbers I'm seeing now. This book has already exceeded half a million in sales. Half a million. In all platforms. About 400 some 1000 hardcover. And any book an audio over half a million in less than two weeks. The word is spreading. And you're spreading it. As I said the other day, that's without any Positive support or support of any kind. From a single network television show. From a single Article in the New York Times of the Washington But of course they all despise me and use. I'm not expecting anything but I'm just making a point. Without any Without any links from me on Facebook or Twitter. Well at any bulk purchases. This is all bottom up. This is all you Patriots live in

Thomas Paine America The New York Times Washington Facebook Twitter Patriots
'American Marxism' Tops Over 400,000 Copies Sold in First Week

Mark Levin

01:14 min | Last week

'American Marxism' Tops Over 400,000 Copies Sold in First Week

"And again. I want to thank you folks. You are absolutely, uh, fantastic, tremendous patriots who care about the survival of this country? And I want you to know that, uh, as I did point out yesterday were not only number one on the New York Times, hardcover nonfiction New York Times hardcover and E book combined nonfiction. The final numbers for the first week came in. Hardcover books, 330,000 E books and audio. Another 70,000. So all told all format 400,000 copies. American Marxism were sold. Because of you. Purchasing it for yourself. Other people, family members and so forth. And this week. The numbers are also significant as best as I can see. And so I believe this movement is for real. I believe this movement is growing. I believe the Americans who are patriotic who love this country, and we far outnumber the others. Want to understand exactly what's taking place. Who's doing it to us where this comes from, and Some ideas many ideas from what we should do about it.

New York Times Patriots
Japan's Population Problem

Why It Matters

01:45 min | Last week

Japan's Population Problem

"The world's attention is going to be turning to japan soon because the olympic games are going to be ending. Is there a simple way to describe what life is like. Their japan is kind of the lifestyle superpower of the world. It's a very easy place to live at least on the surface. This is miyoko rich. She's the tokyo bureau chief for the new york times. And then i think it's when you did just a little bit blow. You see that there are a lot of problems. Some of them looming in the future on some of them very much there today and that makes it a place of somewhat cognitive business. Maybe like all societies. But i think japan because it looks so beautiful and so efficient and so fun especially in a place like tokyo or osaka okeyo on the surface. I think people don't realize what might be lurking beneath rate. So let's talk about one of those issues. Can you tell me a little bit about japan's demographic problems well the predominant issue is that it is rapidly aging. It's currently considered the oldest country in the world in terms of the proportion of the population. That's already over sixty five. It's approaching about thirty percents and it will be more than that in about ten years and the population has also been declining for the last decade. So there are a lot of old people and fewer and fewer young people. So it's just actually kind of hard for me to imagine life in a country where everyone is so old. I was kinda hoping that you can help me. Imagine it so. Let's say i'm a young woman. In japan maybe in the countryside or maybe in a city can you take me sort of on a walk. Like what do i do. I feel this happening around me. Well if you're a young woman in the countryside you're alone.

Japan Tokyo Olympic Games The New York Times Osaka
Leftists Finally Admit, They Want You to Give up Air Conditioning

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:06 min | Last week

Leftists Finally Admit, They Want You to Give up Air Conditioning

"Here. It is the july twentieth addition of the new york times book review a book titled after cooling on the free armed global warming and the terrible cost of comfort. You understand it's a religion leftism and they're fanatics. These people are fanatical as the most fanatical muslim. Most fanatical christian presumably most fanatical you. They'll there were too few of them to produce any fanatics so the fanatics that we know from history. That's what they are. These are fanatics. But of course if you've been brainwashed you only think there were religious fanatics. No secular fanatics. Isn't that amazing. Ask your kid off their religious fanatics and here she will say of course then ask other secular fanatics good one day. Something worth asking your kid who thinks that they know something because their college to battle climate change. Begin with your air conditioner threat. They're coming after your air conditioners. This is not a made up thing. This is in the new york times. That's right the guy who wrote it is crackpot. Aaron eric dean. wilson. Wilson is fanatic. Yes oh my god. The quotes from his book. Listen to this. I needed to become more intimate with climate violent. The use of the word violence has also been raped. They rape language on the left like the word rape they raped. They raped the word rape.

New York Times Aaron Eric Dean Wilson
'American Marxism' Tops New York Times Book Lists

Mark Levin

01:26 min | Last week

'American Marxism' Tops New York Times Book Lists

"We just got the New York Times information for The book lists that they put out Perfection, nonfiction, hardcover and e books. And a nonfiction hardcover and nonfiction E book. American Marxism was number one wasn't even close. We'll have numbers tomorrow and I will give them to you. You want to know why this is you? When I started talking about this three months ago, and it seems like three years ago I told you if we can get pre orders up to 100,000. I felt confident that there was a movement afoot. A budding movement. We far exceeded that we doubled it. And slightly more. And I'm gonna tell you why. Because you're not going to give up on this country. You want your kids to learn science and math. Literature. In English. You want your kids? To be prepared for the future. Not little fanatical revolutionaries brainwashed against their family against their faith and against their country. And you're not going to put up with it anymore.

New York Times
Our New Post-racial Myth

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:00 min | Last week

Our New Post-racial Myth

"So it's all laid out in this piece in the atlantic which constantly publishes left-wing pieces that have a veneer of intellectuality that that is the way i would define the atlantic the new york times Opinion writers are are more street fighters. The atlantic has this patina of intellectuality. So the abram x. can be pieces worth analyzing. He is their foremost spokesman for america being a racist society so this article just published is their way of explaining it and it sounds very effective to his students. I am sure at boston university and tool your kids who go. Oh my god black baby style twice the rate of white babies that proves that there's racism in america. We don't care about black babies dying. No evidence ncis is given for how exactly. Racism produces this a fifth of native americans. And latino americans are medically uninsured. Does he include illegal. Immigrants in the latino americans. What if he does. Do you think it's an honest. Condemnation of the united states almost triple the rate of white americans in asian-americans native people see he switches when he can't find the data for blacks so he goes to native americans

Atlantic United States New York Times Boston University
Report Directly Links Joe Biden to Hunter Biden's International Dealings

Mark Levin

01:55 min | Last week

Report Directly Links Joe Biden to Hunter Biden's International Dealings

"The Obama years to send information he was getting from the State Department is vice president. To his globetrotting foreign dealmaking son Hunter by now, If the Republicans control the house of the Senate, they'd be able to look into this. The Democrat Party is going to cover it up. CNN and MSNBC cover it up. The New York Times Washington Post. Don't give it. You know what? Neither do the networks. This corrupt Don't think poisonous American destroying administration. Messages sometimes signed Dad from the email account. Robin wear 456 at gmail dot com were found on Hunter Biden's laptops seized by the FBI in December, 2019. From a Delaware computer shop owner. Hey, don't touch Twitter. Don't tell Facebook. They don't want to hear it. Don't tell Joy Reid don't tell the view and the Yenta is there. They don't want to hear it. How about you, Jake? Fake tapper if you tapped out Yes, you have You know it. And what about angry and bitter, angry, and Mitchell went angry and make him Jeremy Bar where? Jeremy Bar, Mr Bodies. We heard from Jeremy Bar lately. Some questions. I would like this. Shut up, you pimple faced little puke. Where were we? Some of the messages from the vice president to his son obtained by jest. The news We're deeply personal. Others were political in nature. And still others clearly address business matters often fording information coming from senior officials in the White House, the State Department and other government agencies. Okay, is the U. S attorney's office who indicted Mr Barack Today. Are they now going to issue indictments against the Biden family? How about you chicks? Are you going to do it or not?

Jeremy Bar The New York Times Washington Hunter Biden Joy Reid State Department Democrat Party Msnbc Mr Bodies Hunter CNN Senate Barack Obama Robin FBI Delaware Jake Twitter Facebook Mitchell Mr Barack
Author Andrew Klaven Isn't Surprised Crime Is on the Rise

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:31 min | Last week

Author Andrew Klaven Isn't Surprised Crime Is on the Rise

"I feel in my heart almost every day. There is an voice saying what did you expect when you defend the police and then have to run. Think pieces in the new york times wondering why crime is on the rise when you d- To take away. The processes of the police used to take guns away from criminals and instead replaced them with attempts to take guns away from honest citizens and gun. Crime goes up and you blame the guns. What did you expect. It happens again and again and again. We have these arguments now about children being taught as racist a critical race theory. And the left defends this endlessly when more than fifty percent of americans don't read well and don't do math well and by the way those who those kids were going to public schools. Those aren't white kids. Those aren't privileged. Kids those are the poor kids and the minority kids and they're not being educated and they're being left to fend for themselves and then again you say well. What did you expect when they can't find jobs when they're not employable when they turn to gangs for care instead of two parents when their families have fallen apart again and again. the left. Tilts against reality donkey quixote tilting against windmills and reality always wins and the thing about the right sometimes the conservatives come across as being hard guys you know we come across as being uncaring because we keep going back to the facts of life that if you don't have police on the streets crime will rise that if you don't arrest criminals crime will rise that if you don't put people in prison pending bail crime arise and we sound like we're being harsh because the only people that the left ever pays attention to are the criminals. They take down statues of george washington and build statues of george floyd. Think about that for a minute. I mean george washington one of the most virtuous men who ever lived a man who ended back continent when he could have been king and they tear down his statue instead. Ereck statues to a guy who was a federal addict in a career criminal of stuck a gun in the belly of a pregnant woman while his friends ransacked her house. That's who they build statutes so when you not only up in physical more physical reality but you upend moral reality. What do you expect. But the killing of these children. Desertion of these children the destruction of families and the imprisonment of boys who have no fathers. It's just. They just will not concede that their theories are not true. And it's just heartbreaking to watch it

New York Times George Floyd George Washington Ereck
Interview with Crime Writer Clay Stafford: S. 7, Ep. 2 - burst 5

The Crime Cafe

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Crime Writer Clay Stafford: S. 7, Ep. 2 - burst 5

"If you've you haven't been to cure nashville you should. You should should good because it is a. It is a family supportive people. Not that other conferences aren't but that is what we're geared for that family support people and looking looking at my background. You've you may have looked into it. I'm appalachian kid. I grew up in the middle of nowhere with railroad tracks. And i knew those railroad tracks went somewhere but no idea where but i dreamed about going beyond that and there was absolutely no reason that i should ever have found myself in new york in los angeles in miami coming from the region that i came from the circumstances that i came from except for people helping me reaching down and saying you know this guy. He's really trying. You've got a absolute. You've got a little bit of talent. I'll help him out. I give him a chance to see if he can prove himself. And people have been so kind to me over the year years. And that is the impetus for creating cure nashville. So when everybody comes together the whole idea is leave your ego at the door because you are there to help other people what we do is if you come to cure nashville your gonna be a speaker there from law enforcement to guess honor to regular attendees you have to be willing to give your business card to everybody there to build that relationship so that people have a network in support to be able to go to the next level. Now if you've looked at who at how the schedule is laid out. We've got things for beginning writers people who go and i'm second really beginning. Writers people who go i have an idea but i'm not sure how to write a book. Starting there all the way through to people who are already new york times bestsellers who show up. Not because their guests of honors they show up as attendees because they want to take our marketing classes and our publicity sessions to be able to see. How do we go to that next level. How do we use the new technology. And so we've got this wide range of people who were there and when you have that mix of those newbies versus really really good veterans. You've got such a wealth of networking a wealth of opportunity of information. If you just take advantage of it in that one thing and we we. We go to the embassy suites hotel in cool springs which is right outside of historic franklin in about twenty fifteen. Twenty minutes from downtown broadway nashville. So you can get you know you can go down to the broadway and have on if you want to or you can go to the civil war harper river rafting. Whatever you'd like to do here in the historic side so that a lot of people come here with bringing their family and do a vacation but You bring all of those people together and then we have just you know sharing so it's with the covert to answer your question the covert. I think we're cool. This year really disrupted and broke my heart last year but for our area where we live. it's not the issue that it was but again encouraging people. If you have some sort of issue health issue whatever you feel more comfortable wearing a mask at the hotel in some of their situations requires maybe some people who wear a mask. If there's there's an thing but once you get into the rooms it's up to you So you know it's I think we're we're coming back to some degree of norm which i am so happy

Nashville Miami Los Angeles New York New York Times Harper River Cool Springs Franklin
Social Media Was Designed to Give Us Access That Biden's Now Censoring

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Social Media Was Designed to Give Us Access That Biden's Now Censoring

"Social media was set up in the mid 19 nineties with protection for the big oligarchs. So that these platforms would be an open Communication avenue. For all of us. It's not the same thing as a news network. Or a newspaper. And so this is absurd. And what he's saying is what we're saying. What everybody is saying is except on the left, of course, is wait a minute. You're censoring people. People who previously And relatively free access. And can provide their opinions. They're not Klansmen. They're not Palestinian terrorists. They're not the Taliban. They're American citizens, Some of them who are experts in the field of infectious diseases and vaccines who want to provide different opinions. Look how wrong the media have been before. Look how wrong the Biden administration look how wrong our government has been. The whole point. Have a representative Republic with the Constitution and the bill of rights and free speech. Is to be able to do exactly this. So we don't have access to the New York Times and the Washington Post and those platforms, But we do or did to Facebook and Twitter and all the rest of it. What has nothing to do with the other. You know, we're always trying to provide information in the media. That's why we hate the media because they're a mouthpiece for you Creeps. We got that. But the new media is supposed to be different, and that's why they're protected differently than the old media. And yet they think they have a great talking. But you know, we're always trying to influence range of media outlet it as in a matter of influencing a range of media outlets. You're trying to band people who have access to this platform, including a former president, the United States and I'm now of the opinion that Democrats were involved in that decision.

Biden Administration Taliban Washington Post New York Times Facebook Twitter United States
How Do You Stop Robocalls?

Kottke Ride Home

02:03 min | 2 weeks ago

How Do You Stop Robocalls?

"We all hate robo calling. Those are the automated unsolicited calls made in the billions that ring our cell phones and ever declining home lines. That tried to defraud us by selling us. Crap claiming the irs or getting our credentials or personal information. They're also mostly illegal by nature even if a small percentage of them offering legitimate service or product illegal to autodial it's illegal to use a computerized or pre recorded voice. It's illegal to call before eight. Am or after nine pm in your time zone. If you stuck your number on the national do not call registry. it's illegal for commercial firms to call you even if they're legitimate businesses. Some ocean has taken place on this front. As of june thirtieth twenty twenty one all companies that handle voice calls from smallest to largest had to register in the robocall mitigation database. Starting september twenty second any company that hasn't registered will be blocked by all other telephone carriers. The new york times published a useful facts about this a couple of days ago. But i think it's pretty obscure to most people the changes imposed by the. Fcc have a chance of dramatically reducing the over fifty billion robocalls placed each year by essentially locking out the companies taking advantage of lax oversight. And what has been a fairly clunky system that was never updated for the digital era. The basis of this change are two protocols neatly named stir and shaken together they create a sort of end to end encryption verification path vaguely resembling secure website connections between browser and server. Did you know that caller. Id isn't verified. Any number can appear on your phone which is why it seems like random. Residential numbers are calling you or the prefix scam. You'll get one or more calls from numbers that start with your area code and the next three digits known as the prefix from the older days of analog phone switching with stir shaken all carriers will using encryption based approach that will create a verified chain from the calls initiating carrier to the carrier sending a call to its own

IRS The New York Times FCC
Forbes' Alison Durkee Tries Spinning 'American Marxism' Success

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Forbes' Alison Durkee Tries Spinning 'American Marxism' Success

"That she would comment on that? This book has had Several hundreds of thousands of pre order self. Isn't that the the story, Mr Producer But she doesn't say a word about the story. Not a word about you. American Marxism, running a spot on the Amazon chart before its official release appears to be rare. The book is one of only two on the Amazon notification charts who sells are based on preorders alone, along with Michael Pollen's This Is your Mind on plants? I don't know what the hell that looks about. The Vince book won't appear on The New York Times list or other book lists until next week, since with the exception of Amazon preorders are typically reported as part of a books. First Week. Sales and books do not appear on the bestseller list until the official release fine. Here we go. The waters and Lavin's books and their critical takes on the left. May soon be overtaken by books that instead look at the right with a critical eye. Michael Wolff's landslide the final days of the Trump presidency, and Carol Enoch and filled Rutgers, I alone can fix it. Donald J. Trump's catastrophic final year. Which featured politically damaging looks at the end of the Trump presidency are now ranked by Waters Book on Amazon's top 100 books Ranking, which is updated hourly. As of Thursday afternoon, Lennox and Rockers book was ranked number one on Amazon's list ahead of its official release on January. 20 and Wolff's book, which was released on Tuesday, was ranked number three. Levin's book was now number two on the list, while waters have dropped the number five

Mr Producer Amazon Michael Pollen Carol Enoch Donald J. Trump Vince Lavin Michael Wolff The New York Times Rutgers Lennox Rockers Wolff Levin
Black Women Photographers Are "Intentional With This Community"

B&H Photography Podcast

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Black Women Photographers Are "Intentional With This Community"

"Today. We're going to be talking about building community and finding jobs in the world's photography and media and to do that we welcome journalist editor and photographer. Poly ringo poly works is in editor for wnyc. Here in town and a photograph published in buzzfeed bbc news. Cnn refinery twenty nine and okay player but polly is here with us. As the founder of black women photographers which is a global community and online database of black women and nonbinary photography's we also welcome photographer join banji. Dawn is a portrait. Photography art is based in virginia and through black women photography. She was hired for an assignment by the new york times. We're going to be speaking with doing about a photography and how be. Wpa has helped her find work and community. Welcome polly welcome dawn. And congratulations. Paulie up black in the photography's celebrating. Its first year anniversary this month. Thank you so much for that interim. Oh hey that's why they pay the big bucks. Okay thank you anyway. Let's it's been years. Let's talk about that Truly been a year it has been how have your thoughts and perceptions concerning a black photographers shifted costs over the past year of. Because this hasn't exactly been just another year right Now that's a great question. I mean for me. I really didn't know what to expect. You know everything that's happening. It's not what i had in mind like it's just been amazing to watch it unfold In it's happening like you said in the midst of this pandemic amidst of just crazy year I don't have to unpack for everyone listening and so it really has been able to. You know want for me at least personally. Just give me some sense of joy. Because i think it's so hard to find that join these times in Ah load is work to keep running. I mean it has been Really just joyous experience for me.

Poly Ringo Poly Polly Wnyc CNN BBC WPA Paulie Dawn The New York Times Virginia
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:56 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Think maybe i mean. Even if except a group of editors were to leave the times and either start individual substance or a competing organization. I still don't think it would be the time is now. Some of that. is maybe branding. But even dislike the process of creating the paper that once was a physical paper and now is continuously updated digital masthead every day or as they would call at the daily report. Yup i think there may be some process power interesting harden without looking under the hood. But i think it's a reasonable reasonable. Guess i mean. I can certainly say from when i worked at the journal and i worked on the quote unquote business side. Not on the not on the edit side. But i will tell you. There was absolutely a machine that had lake. It was a miracle that an and i think anybody who works in the news. Business will tell you this data lease rates about it the book. It's a miracle that the paper happens every day and the website updates every day and nobody. Who's part of it can kind of fully explain it but like somehow everybody comes to work every day and like stories get published and edited and like it happened. I felt that way about when i was at microsoft shipping office every three years like there was such an unbelievable process to get through people to all lock their code and a a bug freeway and get it out the door once every three years. I i completely see how it's possible for someone not to understand how the entire system works themselves. Okay cool all right. Think there any others now. I think this is pretty clear. Cut all right into playbook. Well the very top one for me is something we've talked about already in this episode but is just this is the ultimate articulation of it. And that is the barbell media landscape that exists on the internet where you have this distribution with a very very small amount of scale players and a very long tail of niche players with incredibly low cost structures and nothing in the middle worked anymore and the new york times went from being at the they were at the sort of head of the distribution but sort of behaved like a loss middle person until they decided that what their strategy was was to be the ones scale player. And sort of if you're going to publish on the internet you need to escape to one side or the other you need to either have a dramatically dramatically lower cost structure. Or you need to be the big guy and there's just not that much room in the middle. It's really reminiscent of the bob. Eiger disney strategy. I think craig like total world. Where youtube exists. You need like the winning strategy for disney was. Go hard into hyper high. Quality expensive provisional up and the time has their own version of the bob eiger three point plan of what was that original content internationalization and then embracing the digital strategy. And i you know you. You could make an argument that the times is kind of doing the same thing. It's the best original content in the news world. It's you know it's the highest quality journalism they have a very real international. They're opening more international bureaus than anyone else. They are frequently having dual english and chinese bylines. John they are. I think right now..

youtube John microsoft chinese disney english every three years bob new york times bob eiger once every three years one side three point playbook Eiger one barbell
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:19 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Plus another one point six million to the standalone products digital revenue surpasses print revenue for the first time ever. They've retired all the debt. They buy back their headquarters. They have no debt on their balance sheet at twenty nineteen completely debt. Free completely debt free. They have all of this. Incredibly high margin subscription digital subscription revenue. That no other deuce organization in the world has they have multiples more subscribers than the wall street journal which is when you say that no other organization in the world has so that the new york times i think the today i think it's seven and a half million new subscribers. V closest one is the washington post was somewhere like two and then after that it drops real far the l. a. times has like a half million or less and like it goes on and on down from there and when you look at the number of subscribers that they ever had in print like ever in two thousand and two they had i think one point one million. The new york times was the number one print circulation newspaper at least in america only a million subscribers to the print edition so like they figured it out and just at the right time and then had this frigging unbelievable tailwind happen with with the trump presidency. Yeah and in the meantime like you alluded to in the hook at the beginning of the show they're hiring like all the best journalistic talent in the world to come right at the times and they're paying them more than anyone else because they can afford to because they've got essentially a netflix. Like business model at this point. Did you know that new york times average salary for a journalist is over twice that of the industry average. Yup i think the i think the average starting salary is over one hundred thousand dollars. It's like who thought in ten years ago that a news media a newspaper would be paying over one hundred thousand dollars starting salaries to journalists. Yeah it's definitely be to be congratulated before we dive into today and then get into the of this episode. Which my gosh. How are we not. We've brought a lot of analysis forward we want to think vouch..

america trump two thousand netflix today ten years ago one point new york twenty nineteen first time six million one million over one hundred thousand doll two a million subscribers seven and a half million new s times half million over twice number one print circulation
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:19 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Then flip it and start All the carriage debates and whatnot and you know. Hey we're gonna fox news from dido comcast if you don't write in and tell them veto upset you're going to be cetera. So this isn't credible. I i i knew this from working at news corp like that fox news was a great business. It is an incredible business so by two thousand two. So that's eight years after launch. Fis news is the number. One news. Work network on tv becomes number one passes. Cnn it remains number one every single week from then for literally nineteen th straight years until january of this year after the capital riots when they lost a lot of years like literally nineteen hundred eight years. It is the most watched news network ought american television. That is unbelievable. Yeah so whatever you think of fox news as an organization like for we're not here to judge one way or the other it brings in so this is fox's total cable network segment of fox. News is by far the lion share in twenty nineteen generated. Five point four billion dollars in revenue and two and a half billion dollars of so. That's like a fifty percent fifty percent ebitda margin. That's facebook good. Yeah i just found this so interesting lake in so many ways now. People think of the new york times on one end and fox news on the other end like even the new york times would absolutely assert. We are in the center and we are in in on no end totally but this is like an espn level business. That the times would have built something different. But i think they got into broadcast television. They're getting into the internet missing. The boat on the opportunity for cable news was huge. Here yeah it's interesting. I never if you would if you hadn't told me about all the diversification that new york times had done and you knew of it today just the way they are sort of single brand single pseudo. Single product company and said should the new york times. go into cable or should they have gone into cable. I'd be like no. That's not what they do. Is their core competency like barely do video on their website and their mobile app. Well they definitely shouldn't do that but clearly they were trying stuff and they were willing to do stuff like this and just it yup. Yup they frankly just missed it and d- did they miss it like one question i have is the times. Doesn't have it in to do something. Outwardly an intentionally partisan and so maybe they saw the opportunity but didn't believe that it was there for a centrist that good existed in does very well So i think it could have been different and it would. I think be very unlikely that the times would have said okay great. We're gonna make a cable network but we're gonna target liberals specifically right so it's certainly complicated but i just like i wanted to go dive into.

fifty percent fox facebook dido comcast today two thousand four billion dollars twenty nineteen two and a half billion dollars Cnn january of this year one question Fis news nineteen hundred eight years new york nineteen th straight One news one way single brand Five point
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Set it up this way that each of the three of them had a vote because he wanted if a gene he wanted to essentially make sure that arthur was a good husband to her because she had the deciding vote between him and crozon to be a publisher which is like really weird and sexist and kind of strange but also like super crafty style building up of ox. we've done. This is not the only time throughout history but it will be the first sort of part of the new york times history where you sort of have to look at it with a squinty eye and go. Ooh that's a little bit of a black mark. Yeah so if it's so. She went to barnard and was college-educated. See double majored in economics and history. She was super super smart. As you would expect of like the only child of adolph ochs and it's hard to tell exactly what she wanted but some accounts say she did want to take over the times and become the publisher. Unfortunately that wasn't in the cards but she remained on the board of the company for pretty much her whole life. She lived to be ninety eight years old. She didn't die until eighteen ninety. And there's some debate on this people might know Audience does sort of nickname of the times is the gray lady. And there's multiple sorta origin stories of degree lady. Nickname wanted meat. Did it later become the good gray lady or where does good come in. Maybe that's part of it So i think the origin is the bank of england was called the good lady or something like that and so it's sorta borrowed from that. Some people say the gray came from like looking at the patriots. Bunch of gray data. Do sprayed it's a great paper. Became the gray lady. Alternatively if gene is the gray lady she was a presence on the board and sort of the link to ox and the Moral fiber if you will of the company for ninety years until nineteen ninety. It's crazy and this is really introducing the very first of many not necessarily outwardly contentious but inwardly contentious succession decisions. That happened the new york magazine quote continues from earlier. If gene being the deciding vote supported her husband thus cleaning a fault line in the family that was never repaired and that you can imagine generations. Go by this thing really starts to compound because there starts to be massive numbers of cousins. Who are you know the same way related to adolf that the people who ended up sort of succeeding adolf and you know five generations later. They're sort of the same amount related but there's not sort of the chosen bloodline to pass down the paper through and it has always been a male air that has become the publisher now to five generations. Even though there are plenty of daughters in the family so ox crafty lake. He is he sort of his. so gay. Talese the great writer from the fifty sixty s seventy s who actually worked as a reporter at the new york times for a while. He wrote sort of the definitive Book about the new york times in in i think he came out in nineteen sixty nine called the kingdom and the power which. I don't think the family loved like this one. I was reading the the trust from about right around year. Two thousand refers to the kingdom of the power. And i think he was always after we released. That kept it a little bit of arms length. Yeah so he writes about this. He says how long the times would survive would depend largely on. How will oxy's airs got along in the decades ahead..

ninety years five generations crozon each adolf arthur Two thousand ninety eight years old new york fifty sixty s seventy s nineteen ninety first first sort five generations later nineteen sixty eighteen ninety barnard three adolph Bunch of gray
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"The time until this. I'd apparently i did find this. The trask and the rest of the committee that was dealing with the bankruptcy of the times was in favor of a different plan to merge it like to basically unload the assets merged into a different paper. Wipe their hands clean and say look we got something for it and instead adolph's walking in here with like a whole different plan of like i am going to figure out how to revive this thing and make it great and of course. There is some wicked financial engineering. That he promises a that he really has to make the case of like you. Don't just it's not a cash by here like you're going to have to believe in in order to make this work. Yup so cleveland writes back with like a letter of endorsement and he walks in there with a letter of endorsement from the president of the united states. Incredible so the bankruptcy committee accepts his plan. He pays seventy five thousand dollars up front to the creditors which he also scraped together with borrow money because remember he owes one hundred thousand dollars right. This is the craziest thing. This guy buys the new york times he will eventually have a controlling interest in it and as it says in the trust. This is my passage. The yoko from tennessee had accomplished the impossible. He had bought the new york times using none of his own money. Amazing this the minnow swallows wail from when cap cities body bc hundred percent. So how does it work exactly. There's like seventy five k. that he quotes puts up. Actually he goes in like gets people in tennessee to put an upright. He'd like rounded up the money from some people in new york. Some people in tennessee. I think he waved around the letter. From cleveland to a bunch of people so that was a small part of the consideration. The other part is he uses salaries notes again of six hundred thousand dollars in debt to owed back to the creditors that they will pay off over some number of the coming years from prophets. He'll generate by running this paper. That has nine thousand subscribers in his bleeding. I think on the order of about half a million dollars a year at this point in losses. You can see why if you're trask or the existing bankruptcy committee. You're like i think we'll take the merger like this doesn't sound like any kind of guarantee this guy that no one's ever heard of. He's coming in from tennessee. Like you gotta sympathize with the original plan. Yeah totally but somehow he gets it done so he emerges with the new york times and he has just like one problem which is okay. How are you gonna are. You gonna turn this thing around okay. So what's the plan. What what's the play on..

one hundred thousand dollars seventy five thousand dollars adolph new york six hundred thousand dollars tennessee nine thousand subscribers hundred percent one problem about half a million dollars a seventy five k. cleveland president united states
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:48 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Chattanooga times but he needs one hundred k. Like faster than four years. He's not gonna cut it. He does know he can turn around newspapers though so he starts putting out some feelers traveling around the country looking for another newspaper that he could buy and take over just like he did with the chattanooga times and we should say a key component to the success of him turning around the chattanooga times comes from the fact that chattanooga was this sort of melting pot of north and south and adolf really believed in that and he really believed in the chattanooga times as unbiased paper of the people representing a balanced view of the world and chattanooga was sort of the perfect place to pull that idea from totally very very very much. So that's when he hears he gets wind of the bankruptcy proceedings going on in new york for the new york times. And i he's like supposedly he's like. That's too big. Like i can't go. You know adolph ochs from chattanooga tennessee. I can't go like take over the new york times and at that point even though it was in dire trouble the brand of the new york times it was the best newspaper brand of the country. Still it was total definitely thought of as like the the paper but some mentors convince him that that he can do this so in eighteen ninety six. He packed up his bags. Hops on the train goes up to new york. Leaves his family behind running the chattanooga times and he scrapes together so the times in bankruptcy proceedings. He scraped together a plan to the creditors and to the receivers bankruptcy to take the paper out of bankruptcy and take it over. This is incredible. So he's like this this. I think he was late. Thirties at the time from tennessee shows up in new york. Kinda walks into the bankruptcy court has like believe me. I can do this and two convenient the thing about the the interbank transfer who no i. Don't he convinced a chattanooga bank to wire money to a new york bank so that if in new york people check to see like. Are you wealthy. He had a bank account with money in his name and to the chattanooga bank who he knew well he wrote them a personal check and said look. I'm good for it. I promise wire the money. I i don't intend to use it. That's a vase it's like there's incredible huckster stuff going on that he. He's sort of pulls got entrepreneurial. Hustle so did you find. Did you read about the other thing. He did to convinced the creditors of his legitimacy. You know this is amazing. so president. Grover cleveland the time like you as president had come through chattanooga. I think on his while he was campaigning. And as the leading newspaper publisher of the chattanooga times ox was on the welcoming committee so he got to meet grover. Cleveland was campaigning at you. Know he he kept his address at sixteen hundred pennsylvania avenue where to find him so he writes to the president while he's going to new york and he says he writes cleveland. He says i am negotiating for controlling interest in the new york times and have fair prospects of success. I write to respectfully ask that you address by return. mail a letter to mr spencer. Trask chairman of the new york times publishing company giving your opinion of my qualifications. Newspaper publisher general personal character. My views on public questions judged by of course the chattanooga times in other words say what you can have me as an honest industrious and capable newspaper publisher this incredible and he needed that support..

new york spencer grover adolph ochs Grover cleveland adolf one hundred k. Thirties four years chattanooga eighteen ninety six chattanooga bank two convenient tennessee times ox pennsylvania avenue sixteen hundred new york times Trask cleveland
"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:37 min | 5 months ago

"new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"C could reach a whole new mass market so here we are in september of that year of eighteen fifty one the well-known new york journalist and politician henry jarvis raymond and his friend and former Banker and merchant. George jones embark on a new venture new newspaper venture in this brave new landscape and they published the first edition on september eighteenth. Eighteen fifty one of the new hyphen york. New york daily. All right rosenthal. You've made your point hyphen with hyphen. So who are these guys. so jones. As we said was a former banker he had also though worked as business manager at horace. Greeley's new york tribune which was then sort of premier paper in new york and that was where he had met raymond. Jones had family money and lots of connections about town from his wife's family. Do you know his wife's father's name. Ben you're not gonna get this. But i had to put it in here. His wife's father's no. I have no idea. Benjamin gilbert the well no. New york's really yeah really. I saw that it was got got. Include this here this research this so he puts up twenty five thousand dollars of his own family. Money to to finance this new venture they want to get to one hundred thousand dollars so he goes and he raises the other seventy five thousand dollars. This is a lot of money in eighteen fifty one from just you know some like casual family connections. He has like you. Know several members of the morgan family and up financing this like j j. Pierpont morgan yeah exactly. Wow as you do this shows up in like all these old stories like. I feel like everyone somehow was getting financed by j. p. morgan and these days totally so that's jones. He sort of the the business guy. He brings brings the capital. But it's really raymond. Who's the real force behind this. So who is who was henry. Raymond he was quite the interesting character as we mentioned he had worked at the tribune with your own switched where they met and that was the premiere sort of respectable penny paper out there as they were known for the one sent papers He had also been very involved in politics. And when i say very involved. I mean very very involved. Ben do you know what other organization henry. Raymond is well known for co founding. Besides what would become the new york. Times i feel like i should remember this from ap us history. But i do not. A little organization called the republican party of which he was a founder. What five founding members kind of incredible like this is this blue mind doing the research literally. He's known as the godfather of the republican party is also the founder of the new york times and all of this was happening concurrently. So what's it like a mouthpiece for the republican party in the early days well not quite okay. So before he jones decided to start the times raymond had actually left the newspaper business and he was a politician. He was a member of the new york state legislature where he was a member of the whig party at the time the precursor to the republican party. But he'd step down and then he decides to start with jones to start the times which they do but then shortly after raymond is running the times he is managing editor. He's the publisher like jones. The money but raymond is really running it While he's still running it. He goes back into politics leading up. To abraham lincoln's presidential campaign. And that's when he. Along with lincoln and also along with horace greeley from the tribune they in a couple of the people. Start the republican party and of course is abolitionism and the abolition of slavery in the united states..

raymond George jones Benjamin gilbert Raymond september eighteenth j. p. morgan one hundred thousand dollars twenty five thousand dollars Jones lincoln seventy five thousand dollars abraham lincoln new york Ben Eighteen New york first edition york united states five founding members
"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"It's been asserted by the Attorney General of. Of the United States and others in the US government, but as an assertion in an op Ed, it does not strike me as it hasn't been debunked, either and I was gonna say as an assertion in an op, ed. It doesn't strike me as really much beyond what you could read in. OP EDS in the New York. Times across the board every day by their columnists and others, there are assertions made I mean as you read the cotton piece, let's take away the headline. The crudity of the in jarring nature of the headline did you find it objectionable on its face and something? You would not have run if you were in James. Bennett shoes such a good question. I would I you know. Here's what I'd say I I tend towards wanting to ventilate arguments. People are able to knock down his arguments by reading it closely I. DO think that you know the Times mistakes. Itself thinks that good news coverage of something setting it out fairly, but also setting out legal and moral than other objections, and and challenges to. It doesn't accomplish the. The job as well I did note some Michael. Powell not known as a reactionary commentator for the times, and not a right winger at now laboring in Sports, previously a columnist in the new side, you know, he said this was an embarrassing retreat from principal when the Times effectively apologized, and regretted the publication that said CJ shivers a former war correspondent for the Times A. I guess currently an investigative reporter for time. Who's himself a veteran of the US? Marine Corps said the decision to publish. This was wrong on its face and talked about what he's seen abroad when protesters face not domestic police, but military forces, trying to keep control of circumstances, and how that heightens tension, and you know he to talked about what journalists have faced. You know reported on fairly extensively as well the kinds of hostility and violence that journalists faced at the hands of police officers and law enforcement officials across the country in these recent weeks. Well beyond the Pale you know in the US It's often considered beyond the Pale to include for example, people from Hamas or leaders from Hamas in talking about what how you would deal with trying to come up with some sort of long-term peace surrounding Israel Palestine and the middle. East right in Israel. Newspapers are much more likely to publish those things. Yeah, that's within the accepted bounds of discourse. You know so I think these things are very fluid. What we saw as? was in some ways as a result of market forces, it was useful for newspapers as the number of newspapers dwindled in major cities across the country to appeal not too strong niches like cable news does now, but more blandly to a broader part of the population. So that's how impartiality was embraced by newspapers and became a journalistic ethic. It became a matter of principle, but it was really driven by market forces. You don't. Don't have to be a Marxist to see that right, so you know the things that we take as points of absolute morality and principal in our profession often evolve overtime forces that are actually apart from that so i. think that whether or not you think what Bennett was right, the clearly was strong reaction from their readership, but in this case the readership that that undermined him. What's inside the newsroom across the way? At a on the news side of the divide there, and that was a problem for Sulzberger and I think that right now. Journalists are raw and I think that they are. It's more like the seventies to me. You know people are talked about this being sixty eight, but it feels to me like the seventies where people are like, are we inventing new forms narrative or inventing new forms of what ethics mean what it needs to be an ethical journalist, and sometimes that can lead very positive results, and sometimes it can lead to chaos because. It's not clear where the lines are drawn right now and I think he's in that. You know like The Washington Post where Ben Smith, had a great column in The Times about how Marty Baron perhaps the best newspaper in the country right now nonetheless has a sort of rigid control over what's appropriate for people to say on social media it drives out some of their very talented people, and it also caused great confusion, because the editors don't always know what principles they're applying other than trying to shut people up, you know, David. You mentioned Israel. I had been thinking the same thing I was based. There was always struck by the. The vigorous debate in the newspapers and the kind of you know basically a battle of ideas, and it seems to me I guess one of the questions coming out of this episode at The Times and the other ones is that there's a danger of a chilling effect that these op. Ed Pages ought to be forums for vigorous debate in our society and I remember years ago as a young journalist, I worked for the Washington Post editorial page for the late great. Meg Greenfield and I think one of the things that she used to do. With part of the problem. is you run a piece like the cotton piece? There's no context. All you have is a piece. That's very provocative, and that is very prominent. It's the op-ed page of the New York Times. She used to run kind of point counterpoint when there was a more provocative piece of that sort, so I kind of wonder like. Because I think it would be kind of a sad thing, if opinion editors were no longer willing to run provocative pieces, so what are the kind of prescriptive things that you can do to continue running those kinds of pieces, but avoid some of the pitfalls that has you know led to? Bennett's being pushed out and I. Guess The question is. Are you worried about a? A chilling effect as a result of these kinds of decisions, Bari Weiss, who's a conservative something of a contrarian at the Times was hired as an editor, and soon became a writer on under her own name, is basically characterized this as tensions between the woke young `uns, and the more, classically liberal, forty and fifty. Something's at times, and she tributes this kind of Smothering correctness that she attributes to college campuses now I can tell you having been a former higher education, reporter, college, campuses, or clamorous paces, player, people, debate and outrage each other all the time. There may well be a left of center ISM, but it's you know they're a lot of conservative voices. They're to you in a lot of lot of clashes there. You know it's really question how times conceives of itself is. For Liberal America. Is it for all America? You know back in the day they used to have basically one conservative voice and William Safire Right, and I thought he was enormously engaging in reading with the morning lists was great, but you know he was pretty alone there for a long time and under Bennett they've tried to increase that to be honest under his predecessor. They tried to increase that, but there's always been this sort of wink till Abramson. Once said to me, you know we're not a liberal paper, but were a cosmopolitan paper. That understands the sensibility of the upper west side, and you know so. They wanted elite. They wanted bankers advertising type people, and they also wanted people who aspired to the kind of life reflected in the pages of the New York Times and the issues interested in the issues written there and so there's this kind of wink and. As I think it's easier than ever you know. The Times I think stumbles over itself not to be too explicit in going after president trump in characterizing it I think Washington Post Times harder hitting, and it's things about calling things racist calling things lives rather than evasions and yet in terms of social media. It is much more rigid about what it lets people do, and how voiced it lets people be. And you're just two different models of of an approach there each with its own problems i. do think that you know good news. Organizations allow the ventilation of a lot of different kinds of ideas from a lot of different perspectives. I do think under Fred Hi. Meg Greenfield, successor at the Washington Post I, think that is very careful, centrist editorial stance, but also by and large a fairly establishment..

The Times Bennett United States New York Times Meg Greenfield OP EDS Times Israel principal New York Attorney James Washington editor Hamas Marine Corps ISM Michael Israel Palestine
"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"We're saying we want somebody with bayonets, putting down anything that strays over the line and lawlessness by the way sometimes involves mass protests without permits. Permits in public streets, but David, I mean you talk about readers more than ever being in the driver's seat, but I think you could also argue to some extent. Reporters inside the newsroom more than ever are in the driver's seat. If you look at this particular case and others out there and you know I think it is the case that social change is often driven by younger people and driven by generational changes, and I wonder if. If in this particular case, you know what it reflects about what's going on more generally in newsrooms out there and had a new generation of reporters kind of fueled and liberated by Social Media You have the excesses of course of the trump administration, and in some ways a rethinking or even discarding of kind of traditional standards and conventions that we've all relied on journalism, you know striving for kind of pure objectivity balance reflecting both sides both. Both side ISM becoming a bad word these days in favor of different kind of notion of truth, which is closer to the idea of taking moral stances in some cases, so is this something that you're seeing in newsrooms around the country, and is this kind of reckoning? That is taking place right now. rummy disentangle some of the important things that you're talking about here because I. Think you're onto something. I would characterize it a little differently. I would say. We moved from this notion of impartiality of objectivity. And progressive notion of about a century ago right to one I wouldn't call it to truth. I would call it to fairness, and the idea is to be fair to your readers to be fair to you. Particularly the people in subjects writing about the communities your rooted in and also to the facts and the truth, and that was the idea of fairness was a way of getting out of the pit of saying well, you know we said candidate X., said this, we said candidate. That candidate X. was actually making slanderous claims that are ungrounded fact unsupported by evidence, but we presented both sides. That is actually a journalistic failing. That is both lazy, and not you. What is the point of what we're doing? I always feel like the point of what we're doing ultimately is to enable people to act not just as consumers of news, but as citizens that they have the. I don't need to tell somebody what to vote or how to vote or what to think, but I want to tell somebody happy information the context that they can make up their own minds about what's going to best serve them their families, their communities, their nation, right and I think fairness was way of getting at that now there is I think among some journalists particularly, but not only younger journalists and idea. Even that is A. A fool's game when you were reporting an asymmetrical age, the symmetric calorie has a lot to do, but not only to do with partisan politics that is the Republican Party and the Democratic Party play by different rules. When it comes to journalism, it comes to facts and it comes to. The respected doesn't afford journalists in the role. They play in the political cycle. They're certainly extreme figures in an unscrupulous figures on the left as well. And Online, but there's a way in which people are saying, you know. Let's just get to the truth. Let's just get to what is moral, and what is true, and what is moral, and what is professionally ethical eric kind of different. And you know you can be amoral and still ethical. You can tell the story without saying this is wrong, but you can present the facts in a way that allow people to get there. And there's attention you know. I Value Opinion Journalism. It can be done well from the right and the left, but it's got to be fair to the back there. Other people who say you know we have to be clear on morality here and there are people you know. Newsroom editorial pages genuinely are run separately from newsrooms from the reporting wing of newsrooms as you guys both know in conventional legacy news outlets, and yet people at the times and people at the Philadelphia Inquirer say this is representing my brand. This is representing who I am publicly, and it's not in keeping with where I'm at. Yes, there should be dissonant voices. Yes, there should be con-. Pro and con, yes, there should be a vast rate things debated, but certain things shouldn't be amplified by the New York, times and giving credence and credibility they should be covered in the news pages, but as the. Clear violation of civil liberties that they represent whatever they have again. I think that. There's a real case to be made for what Bennett did. She has mean he has harbored the aspiration for his time at at the new. York Times of ultimately taking over for team Buckeye as the editor in chief, called the executive editor there and leading the newsroom, and he is seriously mis read the news from a number of Cajun what whatever the merits of his decisions. You have to be able to lead in those positions. Maybe bring people along to a place. They didn't initially want to go and he has failed on a number of cases to do that PG, Bird. The publishers backed him a couple of times. He just say you know finally, said you know. There was a lapse in editorial decision making here, and not for the first time I think the souls. Burgers have spent a little too much time explaining why what James Bennett did was right. To their own staffers. To the point where they ultimately felt this was a liability. Well I wasn't it wasn't helpful to his cause I don't think that he did not read the piece which he ultimately acknowledged and an editor of a section that produces a large amount of copy may not read every piece, but it is his or her responsibility to make sure that those pieces that are going to be very provocative and controversial. They read sure and look you know again. I kind of admired some of the things Bennett was doing. I think that. That it was a more dissonant, more interesting editorial page than the one he inherited by in this moment I think you're seeing in real time playing out in front of US journalist, hashing out what's accepted and what's interesting in part because social media affords more junior reporters and more rank and file, journalists, the ability to speak out publicly and to commune and share with one another where they're coming from simply because somebody has said this is the right decision doesn't even that's accepted in the same way at once was. Even reluctantly and I think that means that that it's more like almost like college faculty at Times. Let's talk about what actually happened at the time because. I, think you alluded to this before Sulzberger the publisher at first defended Bennett and defended the decision to run the op-ed, and then there's this extraordinary blowback from the news room and reporters and editors are complaining and. Raising their objections to it and Sulzberger reverses himself. I mean it seems a little like a mutiny of a of a sword, in which you know, the rank and file got to dictate to the brass what they should do and I'm just you know your first and foremost a reporter on these things give us insight into how that reversal by Seoul's Burger came about. My understanding is that he didn't know originally that Bennett hadn't read it. And that ultimately he concluded or said he concluded that the process to get it on wine was a little flap dash. This was initially scheduled to run in the Sunday paper you know. The Review Section is published in advance of Sunday, but. They didn't have to get it up Wednesday at the time they did. They could have taken a little more time with that, too. that it out. The fact that some of his assertions were challenged on a factual basis by reporters enabled grapple hold for critics to try to tear it down. Let me just say this I thought. Rich lowry had very interesting piece in the back and forth, and we've allred columns in the New York Times elsewhere that make bold assertions that are perfectly or even ordeal agree well backed up facts so yeah. I was just going to say I. Mean You know one of the factual assertions that the editor's note that they appended to it challenged. Was that Khadr as of left wing? Radicals like Antifa were contributing to the violence. Now that has not been substantiated..

James Bennett reporter editor ISM David Philadelphia Inquirer New York Times New York Sulzberger Rich lowry Khadr Republican Party Antifa York Times US Seoul Burgers allred
"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"No secret that our worlds has been interrupted. World. Interrupted is a daily podcast telling stories of coronavirus and its impact on the economy. We want to cover the issues in the macro global economics, the stock market and our political climate also cover the micro stories. Maybe the ones you don't hear as much about in the news or the media. We hope you'll listen and be a part of the journey subscribed today on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. We now have with US David Folkenflik. The media correspondent for NPR and the host of on point in NPR, show on the media David, welcome to skulduggery a great to join you guys again so quite a few days in the media world, the resignation of James Bennett The New York, times, editorial page, editor and Stan wish now ski the executive editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer both basically forced out. It seems because of controversial headlines, and in Mr Bennett Gaze at the New York Times and OP. Ed that ran under one of those headlines from Tom Cotton the Republican senator. Senator of Arkansas this seems to US pretty extraordinary. I can't remember too high level resignations coming back to back over pretty similar issues. What do you make them yet? Quite a week tour having accusing it's it's quite a year. We're having this week. It does seem like a moment. It's a moment where these prominent us rooms are grappling in a different way with some of the same issues that we're seeing. Play out at so many of these protested cities and communities across the country are black lives are black sensibilities, being taken as seriously as those of their white counterparts. Rethinking intently about the choices we're making editorial he as journalists, and about not only the good and use that they can have in serve, but the harm that they can do. These are the kinds of questions I'm hearing from African American journalist, those newsrooms and others including my own I think that what you're seeing is a journalistic judgments being called into question. Not, simply about whether or not, they were the right calls, but whether they reflect a blindness or deafness to the way, life is lived for people who aren't white and aren't at the top echelons, the top elite positions running these institutions and I think you know there's been a kind of resentment burgling for a while for for decades, probably as long as there have been African Americans in newsrooms, but about. About issues very closely related to the ones we see, play out, and some of them have to do with who gets to decide what gets covered and who gets to decide how the things that do get covered, get covered, and that may seem well journalism, and that's true James Bennett ran this piece called. Send in the troops by Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton, you know a guy with sort of A. I think it's fair to say a bit of an authoritarian streak when it comes to what he would characterize as law and order, he wanted the president to invoke a little, known and little used statute to send in military troops, even if over the objection of governors and mayors to quell civil unrest, he framed it as going after looters, and seemingly drawing distinctions between leaders and protesters, but as we know sometimes mass protests, episodes of violence occurred that don't involve the vast majority of protesters and yet if you're militarizing those interactions between protesters and and looters and law enforcement, those distinctions are. Are GonNA. Get Lost but David, isn't it? This is the editorial page of the new. York Times, and isn't it one mission of editorial pages to reflect a diversity of viewpoints, not just ones that stroke the sensibilities of the majority of readers, but viewpoints that challenge them, and it seems to me. That's what basically the Times was doing here running a piece by a sitting united. States senator that reflected a viewpoint of many in the White House many at the highest levels of the US government, and you know we shouldn't. Readers want to be exposed and understand what that viewpoint is. Something very interesting I don't think anything I've said necessarily means that there isn't a rationale to running it. But I'm describing what journalists themselves are. Feeling and their reaction to it, I think part of it is generational, I think people under the age of forty under the age of thirty eight field bit differently than people who have been in newsrooms for decades I think some of it reflects you know a racial divide in terms of experience of how life is lived. That is not uniform in either direction and I do think that you know part of the original mandate of the Times opinion page, which really helped introduce phenomenon to American print journalism was look. We have aditorial that reflect the opinion. Opinion of our owners, or at least as reflected by people, they designate to write an official editorial position by the newspaper, but we are going to expand the range of opinions presented to our readers as a way of fostering debate, embracing the marketplace of ideas, which doesn't say that idea just dominates. It says that ideas are tested by often country, thinking and the Times editorial answered self is very much against the idea of militarising the law enforcement response to figuring out how to handle this this wave of protests, and at times eruption of violence in looting. And vandalism and and writing, but all of this is true, and James Bennett was an interesting and sometimes controversial figure he came to the from the Atlantic four years ago to the times and I think did an impressive job of expanding the range of opinions presented by The Times both on the right, and on the left with some really disparate interesting thinkers, as they broadly expanded the number of folks who they published online, but you hit on a really interesting point you said. Shouldn't readers want this well? Readers are now much more than in the driver's seat at the New York Times and this is increasingly true at other publications as advertising withers right. Paying subscribers are increasingly important to newspapers. I can't underscore this enough and digital subscriptions for the Times approve stratospheric. They've never had despite what hear from. The president never had more subscribers in existence since eighteen fifty one times was founded and digital subscriptions has really propelled that it is the way to add readers at very minimal cost, and what the readership expect is increasingly important to what people who are running the news reports and the editorial sections decide to do because if you lose those digital subscribers, you lose the ability to keep adding journalists I mean they now have like seventeen hundred journalists more than ever before at the Times at a time when newspapers generally are. Watching their finances go down the drain, so the readers are actually very important expectation of what the time is, maybe a little different than what you've said. Tom Cotton is not just conservative Tom Cotton, saying the PE- your sons and daughters, your friends and neighbors, you people who paid or read us..

The Times Senator Tom Cotton New York Times James Bennett David Folkenflik US senator Arkansas York Times president NPR Mr Bennett Senator coronavirus New York Apple
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"Okay. We just say anything actually say anything. Peril the failing New York Times. That's true. Here we are inaccurate fans of big Al. It all comes out wash, Eric, when MAC first game on your radar, how did he seem to you as compared not just who he had been lumped in with, but also the John has a whole. I'm max same age. So when he was being dubbed as this frat rapper, I was, you know, in college going to parties hearing him, you know? And that was definitely how I paid him initially and a, you know, as a lot of kind of pretentious college age kids can be, I was, you know, I was spurning that so so when I was I hearing him, you know, I was kinda, I definitely did not listen as intensively as I should have been at that time because I did lump Amon and think of him in the stereotypical way. And in that I think I would MIR a lot of listeners in that way that that that that followed him in that listeners, a lot of people took a while to kind of warm up to what he was doing artistically. I think one of the things about that era, you know, when you think of that, that set of rappers, you think of. You know, there's certain aesthetic. There's a, there's a presentation. There's on the sort of the the selling of access. And what I was found curious about MAC Miller in that moment was how small he seemed, and I mean that physically, but also he was so interested in how words went together and that to me when I first heard that I was like, okay, this kid is engaged in a different kind of project. He's not engaged in the same. He may maybe the, they play at the same parties. You know, maybe they perform in the same places, but his project is different than that. You can definitely hear that fascination with words, even back in those early projects, you can hear him working towards trying to become the rapper that he would be later on. And that, in essence, is the most important thing that true love of the craft and wanting to be a better MC and working towards becoming that EMS and how fascinating that young man from Pittsburgh would would see that as his way out now. Let me do a pop hit that will get me out of here in a second. Let me let me do the music that I love. Let me wrap on Lord, finesse beats. Let me travel to work with travel and then take the train to go work with static Selecta in New York, right? And earn my way up on an indie label rather than what kids can do now, which is just like throw something out there. Hope it gets big and get signed by major. There's this thing that happens. I remember writing about this a bunch of years ago, and I think that's happened specifically with white rappers a lot, and maybe not in the current internet era, when kind of everything is all the old rules are out the window, but I always felt that white rappers had to display a certain degree of fealty. You wanted to come into the game the right way for sure. And that could have been demonstrating historical knowledge that could have been rhyming in a way that that could been wrapping on Lord, finesse beats, as you say, and MAC, Miller to me was very much in that mold. Now, the other guys in that era maybe were slightly less than that mold. And now I think that stuff just basically all been washed out the visit, we're two guys who totally understands the. I've been thinking about this a lot lately. Why? Because he's so much younger than us. He doesn't come from the same background as us. We had very different experiences growing up. We came into the game differently, but why did we get along so well as as human beings? And I think part of it was we. We all understood the three of us what it was like two to play by the rules and to be accepted and to be celebrated. Yeah. And so MAC did it the right way, and there is something about that. There is something about playing by the rules paying your dues and and saluting your own, jeez, and then earning your way into a place where people cruciate your work, and then getting a lawsuit from. Who among. Also don't. We all kind of cosmetically, oh, Lord, finesse, like ten bucks. Probably. Vanessa's cash. Seriously I would. I would hit. Let's all if you're listening to this hit Lord, finance the cash app with the hit him with a five spot in it, a ten. He's earned it. And that's exactly right. Even like even fat boy, slim, slim, sampled, Lord, finesse. I don't think that sample was actually cleared if I remember the story correctly, and I don't know if this is a story that is in a publication or if it's in my brain, but with camera. Also did job. I think he basically just gave Lord finance like a check for like fifty thousand or Andre thousand just because that was an unofficial sample and there was that's what you did back in the day. You're like, oh, how do I make this right? Do you wanna play the Lord finesse sample. The learning process. Let's listen to the fat boy slim song that's apples, Lord, finesse that maybe hopefully Lord for that, Scott had big check for which is called the Rockville gang, which was a big hit when I lived in London. In some point in the late nineties. This

Amon Miller MAC Lord Eric New York Times MAC Miller Pittsburgh Vanessa New York Scott Andre London
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"The New York Times is led the charge in exposing the obstacles. Women face in the workplace from factory floors to Hollywood sets. Women have bravely shared their stories helping to raise urgent questions about gender power and policy. Now is the time to find solutions this September. The times we'll convene leaders for the inaugural new rule summit whereby -ticipant will explore the new rules of leadership for a new era, learn more at WWW that new rule summit dot com. Walking to the New York Times podcast, your divine feminine of music news and criticism. I'm your host Trumpcare Monica. Hits the work on. I Mona, Lisa racket. Craftsy. Killing up like a day. Olympic life pretty similar to yours. Go school, hang reprints. Every single summer take a trip to this show, and that was all great me. But. Never seen a young like one can't believe. Still got my training wheels in the groove Roz. I ain't gonna need those. So. Pretty well for myself. Couple trophies on the shelves to what else could I warn that a dole have yet will more cash in my own fast jet, so wack and go anywhere anywhere. Kelly board notice plenty about the be. Ause everywhere, but not yet. They can't understand my concept. I've been climbing up. The great wall habit had yet. Got it. No one more next clean conscience. Good Samaritan company semi close on wherever that you didn't know. Well. Everything keys, cooling, frozen pizza off of MAC, Miller's kids, mixed tape as I'm sure many of, you know, MAC Miller died last week. He was twenty six years old on died in an apparent drug. Overdose. Been really tragic and toxic to care about hip hop in the care about young rappers. And I wanted to make sure that we did right by MAC. And so this episode, I've got a bunch of folks in the studio who have thought hard about max career, and we're friends with them also and wanna go back over the ark of the last seven or eight years, and really kind of not just talk about his music in an isolated way, but also talk about a lot of the larger trends and movements that were happening in the John RIA that his music either set off or intersected with. So starting off, it's the real Eric, Jeff Rosenthal. Hey guys, hey, Oregon, Jeff, are about sketch comedians there those the podcast, a waste of time with it's the real. They the authors of a book called rhyme book that just came out and they also crucially appeared on MAC, Miller's TV show. He did MAC Miller and the most family appeared on MTV two in two thousand thirteen. Yeah. Yeah. Thanks guys to my left Sheldon Pierce low world Sheldon's back second time on podcast Sheldon's or contributing writer pitchfork and wrote about max career recently and to my right first time. Hello. Eric Reiner, Braun Eric's a freelance writer, Entertainment, Weekly vulture, Rolling Stone, and so on. Also row quite well about McNamara's career. So look, we're going to start chronologically and we'll kind of work our way forward. We started podcast with cooling, frozen pizza, and that is off the kids aka kickin, incredibly dope mix tape be. Thousands of I MAC Miller, Nick say, but it was maybe the one that drew the most attention. And actually something I think came up in your piece Sheldon that I felt like we should get on the table early is something that I was never one hundred percent comfortable, but was a discourse around MAC which was like frat rep. And now this was a moment where that was a real thing shouts all my real Cam. Megan's ED's. You know where you're at? Probably binge drinking or doing something really unfortunate what that was a real moment. There was a moment where if you're white rapper away that attention you that was a quasi sub genre, I personally never felt that MAC totally neatly fit into that, but I feel you mentioned it in your piece specifically in regards this era them, and I wonder if you can talk first of all about what the music was like in this moment in max careers, own nine, maybe into tap into ten yet. I think the kids came out the summer of twenty ten. This was like post Asha RAV I love college. And so over the next. Over the course of that next year, there were a bunch of rappers who came out in that same vein wrapping specifically to college kids specifically to white college kids who were sort of using this music to soundtrack frat parties. And so the term Froude no. Never set foot in a frat, not no.

MAC Miller MAC The New York Times Sheldon Pierce Braun Eric Trumpcare Monica Jeff Rosenthal Lisa writer John RIA Eric Reiner McNamara Oregon Megan MTV Nick one hundred percent twenty six years eight years
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"So in the seventies, Chris cow is helping to sort of define the sound of village voice, music criticism. And then the late seventies someone comes along who I know is very familiar to podcast listeners and friends of the New York Times, and that is John paralysis. Our chief pop music critic with update fee. What up. So JP people who read you in the times may not know that before you were here starting in eighty two, you're the voice. You start writing at the voice mainly seventies a newer, the music editor for a minute. In the early eighties. Tell me about the voice as a reader before you even show up when d I encounter it and what's your take on it? What does it make you think? Well, I got to New York in seventy seven. I was aware of the voice before that as a music fan, but I got there in seventy seven and it was it it in the SoHo, weekly news? Yeah, r I p were the only thing in town and the voice was. It was. I pardon the expression, the pitchfork of its era. It was the beacon of integrity. It was the, we get the cool stuff. I, it was really smart writing. Crisci was a task master. Crisco did not publish anything that was not really well thought out and well written and had excellent prose, but also had a real argument to make. He really set the standard high, and he would work really hard with anybody. He edited to make sure it met that standard. If that meant like five rewrites, if that meant a three hour comma by comment fitting session, he would do that. Of course. He didn't have to do that with me because my copy just like zooms into print, obviously, obviously to this day to day now. Nary a red Mark on your proofs. Yep, no blue pencils for me heavy, but. But you learned from an edit with crisco. About how to construct an argument, how to write a piece where you needed an example where you needed to, you know, make a bold statement. It was always an education. So I give it up to Bob and people were doing that. I mean, rock criticism was was still in its infancy pretty much, you know, I guess it kind of had started a decade earlier, but still it was. It was people figuring out as they went along. Put the other thing by rock criticism at the time was it was so different in the era before total access to music. It wasn't like, oh, you know, what does captain beef heart sound like I'll go to Spotify. There was no Spotify. You probably couldn't find a captain beef heart record in your record store unless you in a big city. There was this an entirely different relationship with music, and people looked to the press is certainly did to find out what I should listen to. You know the top forty was one thing MTV came along in. Eighty eighty one. But you know, when I started being a rock critic, it was the record you could get in the records you heard in the records, you know somebody told you about a new wet on bought. I also just in what you're saying reminds me something something I actually heard Bob, say, once in a talk or a moderate conversation or something he he made the case that I thought was pretty convincing that certainly in that era, maybe slightly less so now. But in that era, that criticism, especially as practice in the New York culture. Scene was news because criticism, it's sort of separates the wheat from the chaff. It kind of tells you what's worth paying attention to what's not worth paying attention to. Obviously a lot of these young artists are necessarily be profiled certainly not in that era, but that critics were sort of doing this kind of functional sorting of what you should pay attention to what you should be aware of. That resonated for me, it will absolutely. And you know, there was top forty radio in New York. You were lucky enough to have some good college radio stations, but that was. The outlet in you would have club booker's of the era that would bring the bands to you. There's this little place called CBGB's effort of, I think you're referring to the John Murphy store, but I don't know. It was a really different era for access to music and critics were kind of sensual. And Bob brought a real sense of mission to the gig. You know, it wasn't just consumer advice filtering. It was, how do we listen to this? How do we approach this? What is this mean to the wider culture? I mean, all of the things that separate criticism from reviewing and the voice really set that standard. I mean, I, I couldn't believe that I could get in to the voice when I finally got my first assignment was a big deal. It was such a big deal. Yeah, it was the coup he'd gold standard and I was still just a nerd. So it was a really great thing. You told me on Email or on tax. I can't remember of the circumstances of your first assignment. You want to go to tell the people not really. You're not gonna mention your man's name note. Okay. I'm not a mom. Suffice it to say that they'd bid. Somebody had not compete with an assignment and Bob knew that I knew about the band and he called me and had me to the store. I mean, I've been in New York for a couple of years. I was actually working as an editor crawdads so I wasn't in over the transom manuscript. People knew was, but it was still such an honor to be in the voice, the voice, you know, you go back to Norman Mailer, go back to all of the great critics. They were in there j Hoberman all these incredible minds working for the voice and into be a byline in that nice, fat type.

New York Bob Crisco editor New York Times Spotify Chris cow John paralysis Norman Mailer j Hoberman Crisci SoHo MTV John Murphy booker three hour
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"The. Wadham to the New York Times podcast. My beautiful grandchild of music news and criticism. I'm your host, John, Kerry Monica. Sleeping for too long. Now it's the heart stopped beating. Breeden. Even scared to break down. No more. Wanna find myself. No. Two. Over back. We weren't gone. That's true. That's true. I think it's pretty likely that most podcast listeners probably know ideal on we played at the beginning of this week's podcast. So let me lay it out that is, Mattie poppy POP for all the reporters in the room, who is the winner of the new season of American idol. And that is her debut single called going going gone. Which smart listeners will probably have already intuited was written by Jillian Michaels. I'm here with Karen Ganz. The only person perhaps on the planet who I could persuade is in the room with me, talk about American idol for somewhere between thirty and forty five minutes. I Garrett happy to be here John. Jared, how many times that I do to make sure that you fully got up on American idol in the past few days, many times John, I was quite busy the past few days, but you know what I did I made time. I appreciate that. That's what makes Karen great. Bought music editor and also maybe not in very well slept and not a good friend to me very. So so caring American idol ended this week poppy one American idol. That was the outcome. I was hoping for John's. You know what I think about that John. I don't think you like Matty poppy a trash out comb. What who did you wanna win? Let's get to it. He meet of the actual finalists or of the whole, okay. Let's do both actual finalists. And then all your options of the three of the file three, I think I probably would have enjoyed Caleb winning, but I expected Gaby to win. Three now of the twelve Michael j. or Katie Turner. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No, I love them both. Yes, yes. Those two to me at once blitz. Let's talk about a problem that is I will say a long running American idol problem, which is number one, blanding tend to win shos Chelsea. Boy, Chris Allen. All the Chris Allen fans who were heated at me on Twitter on emails for all for that whole year. That was that was the most agree GIS of all idol. I, I can places because Adam Lambert is truly a breakout star in his way from American idol. Listen. For the next twenty minutes. I enjoy Adam Lambert. Sure. Conceptually I'll take Adam Lambert over course Allen, but I would probably whoever came in third that season, I would probably remember who that was not the David Archie lettuce season. No, that was David Cook. Yes, to David's from David, David. Okay. So all three American idol finalists this year. Yeah, we're blonde. Yes. The white blonde singers? Yes. Country or country adjacent? Yep. Singers. This is a persistent issue for American idol has been in the past. There was a long stretch where all the winners were white guitar Bros. the Kris Allen, David Cook filling Phillips. Y'all. Go shouts, filled Phillips, man. We're Phillips that song is still going banger. Yeah, so bang or some people covered it pretty effectively this actually, but this sort of like, I think if you look at who got cut just before the top three, you have Michael j. Woodard. Should we play something Michael j. wooded saying, can we please do my favorite of his performances? The one from cabaret. Oh, my God. Yeah. Let's listen to maybe this time, which is one of the Earlier, Michael j. water.

American idol John Adam Lambert Michael j. Phillips David Cook Karen Ganz New York Times Chris Allen Kris Allen Matty poppy David Michael j. Woodard Breeden Michael j. wooded Jillian Michaels David Archie Kerry Monica Twitter editor
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"According to a new york times podcast your yes i have to admit i'm a failed music critic and dole isn't a jazz nearly as much as i should and this is my annual come up ends of news accusing criticism i'm your host junqueira monica two too i'm your humbled host this week is the end of 2017 we'll probably grabs the at the beginning of 2018 when you're hearing this and we argue let's talk this week about the year that just passed in jazz music both sonic lee and also politically and this is a great opportunity for me to shut up and not talk very much because i have to be honest and say that i don't pay nearly enough attention to this as i should however i am blessed to be joined by two people who i know pay a lot of attention and who i trust implicitly sitting across from me coverage jazz in the new york times it's jiri smell was up to my right natalie wigner who worship lead to report but still isn't you're jazz imposed a you lanes i do what i can gio natalie are here i would like i i don't want to to be so selfcentred and say but hoped to educate me and by turn educate a bunch of our listeners about what's been going on this year i can only assume has dedicated podcast listeners that you guys are reading their work however if you haven't this is a great opportunity to catch up we opened with much higher mcraven now of the records i listen to this year i really really enjoyed this one jio can you tell us a little about this album and also the city from which it comes mci a mcraven is a drummer is from chicago which is the font of like a whole wave of new and interesting expression when it comes improvised music and sort of sense of free rein given to the musicians in.

new york times mcraven chicago dole natalie
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"Instinctive nature to bring the anguish englishlanguage with the scheme you want him to the new york times podcast your school leede not your spoon eg of music news and criticism i'm your host jon karroll monitored yeah as fibonacci brainstorm guided by dow climbing cowger bryant bow the spicer sounds the blind your battle no downside around john insides of mouth go foot what it's like when the lights out because his heritage of it's to play it you'll ever next the next wait with these lyrics weapons expert every sentence extra cliffs and his death and death of the week disturbing as alleged in a paris gets a switch ranked rain hoodie black should be stressed whatever stretch of electric swear eh predicted each drink so high in sohag an era betcha sense split up parametric presser switch twins tim in less than with these genetic tests dispensed go ahead speaks to close h i'll match a thought by klaus then you'll gosh drepung fuca us with glad smooth piece i wrote his awesome yes yes i'll match of boredom drilling reckless rapidly it sounds like a volunteer you yeah it's that kind of week that was a song by a young rapper named eminem younger rapper name fresher that is core septic off the new record by eminem which is called revival at the end of an incredibly traumatising exhausting 2017 here we are with a traumatising and exhausting album and discuss eminem there is no person i'd rather have in the room then craig jenkins what's up greg what's up crazies critic of new york magazine and crucially for this particular adventure i feel at least from watching you're writing over the years and on twitter i feel like you may be more than others have been willing to engage with m seriously as opposed to kind of as a punchline in his later career i feel like a lot of eminem criticism of the last say yelled the twenty ends as mostly just been.

jon karroll paris klaus eminem new york magazine new york times craig jenkins
"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

New York Times - Popcast

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"new york times" Discussed on New York Times - Popcast

"One to a new york times bob gasio saturday night emergency were visit amused who's been criticism i'm your host drunk armada dumb like your lay till games don't like your seal tits stage the role you may me play the fool now at don't lie q i don i four perfect crime how he'll flavor oh no i you said dead gone members mind his crew though at dawn i queue i am there are those of any rivalry and a list of names in euros is in on a ticket ones than as you age and size oh look what you need to do what seems to me to what sued theme he duly flew to defame you all of what you need to look but to me to what should fame me to look what should just m'aiment do would regime made all of us do it stage time tuning into part one of a twopart extravaganza this is the taylor pregame so everybody at aol gate everybody gets tall boys i'd also your short boys in your media my boys because taylor swift is back it's over convening the gang whole lot of gang things going on and bob kathy could say it's a squad john well well we're odd over i was 2014 garin sorry so squad okay youyour squad member the rest of us will be gang a number on swifty to my left its karen ganz he's gather in new york times hydrolyzed by the tell you that you're looking fit is a daydream that's true that's actually a pure factual specs as a booty would say i've got bombings reporter for the new york times joke us carelli yup 1988 and that's lunch joe is your smattering you you're wearing a waffle nitz water disaster okay so it's one let people now.

your media taylor swift john reporter the new york times joe bob gasio aol bob kathy