40 Burst results for "nato"

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

00:56 min | 20 min ago

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Its border with Ukraine, A small Florida community works toward energy independence with a massive array of solar panels. A new biography underlines the influence of former first lady Nancy Reagan, plus much more. Thistles, the PBS news hour from W. E. TA Studios in Washington and in the West from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. After months of simmering conflict, thousands of Russian troops have massed on the border of Ukraine. It is the largest build up of troops since Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014. Alma is back Now with that. Russia backed separatists have been fighting against Ukrainian forces since 2014. But this year Ukraine says Russia's gathered nearly 80,000 troops at its border. Russia's deployed troops in Russian annex Crimea in the south and along the border with Ukraine's Donbass region in the east of the Russian government says it's a reaction to what it claimed our NATO plans to push troops closer to Russia's borders. During a meeting with his Ukrainian counterpart Today, Secretary of State Antony Blinken voiced his support. United States stands firmly behind the sovereignty and turns moral integrity of Ukraine on, uh I'm here to reaffirm that with the foreign minister's A. That's particularly important at the time when We're seeing. Unfortunately,.

Nato 2014 Crimea Ukraine Today Washington Florida Walter Cronkite School Of Jour PBS W. E. Ta Studios This Year Antony Blinken Nancy Reagan Thousands Arizona State University First Lady Russian Secretary Of State Ukrainian Nearly 80,000 Troops
Supreme Court says California cannot restrict religious household gatherings

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

Supreme Court says California cannot restrict religious household gatherings

"The supreme court rules in favor of religious worship. I'm ham who sell fox news. The high court tells california it can't impose cova contain restrictions on home based religious gatherings. The state had indoor social gatherings to no more than three households but the majority on the court said the state was treating secular activities like grocery shopping more favorably than at home religious meetings. Liberal justice elena kagan wrote the majority on. The court was hurting the state's ability to address a public health. Emergency fox's gel nato. The court's ruling is essentially moot though because california plans to loosen restrictions on. Indoor gatherings on april

Cova Fox News Supreme Court California Elena Kagan Nato FOX
Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Terry Meiners

Terry Meiners

01:21 min | 46 min ago

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Terry Meiners

"Vaccine That is basically 100% on questionable for every single solitary America. The U. S. Has paused. Johnson and Johnson vaccinations over rare blood clot problems. State and health officials are seeking to calm fears about the J and J Vaccine pause. Here's Paul Miles. Governor Bashir back after announcing the state is pausing distribution of the J and J vaccine to Kentucky and Sue received. Johnson and Johnson vaccine. You gonna be okay? We're going to be okay. There have been no reports of blood clots related to the vaccine in Kentucky. Same for Indiana, says Chief medical officer Dr Lindsay Weaver. For people who have received the Johnson and Johnson vaccine recently, I think that they could be rest assured that the six seems to be extremely rare. At least state and health officials are concerned that J and J pause will only increase the amount of vaccine hesitancy. Whole miles news radio 8 40 w. H. A s governor. Bashir will give his next covert briefing on Thursday. He released the latest numbers this afternoon reporting 799 new cases. The positivity rate is at 3.20% up slightly. From Monday, he reported three new deaths and one new audit death for a current covert related death toll in Kentucky of 6261. The governor reported more than 1.5 million Kentucky and have received at least one covert 19 vaccine does so far after 20 years of U. S troops in Afghanistan, President Biden will reportedly announced the U. S. Will withdraw all of them. The war has cost more than 2000 U. S service members their lives. President Biden will withdraw all American troops from Afghanistan over the next coming months, ABC News has learned. The plan is to complete the military exit by the 20th anniversary of the September 11th attacks in 2001 that first drew the United States into our nation's Longest war. The decision, which Biden is expected to formally announce Wednesday, will keep thousands of U. S forces in the country beyond the May 1st exit deadline The Trump administration negotiated last year with the Taliban, then a phased out total withdraw between now and September. Andrew Dember ABC NEWS Washington Senator Mitch McConnell doesn't think much of the move. Reckless pulled back like this would abandon our Afghan regional and our NATO partners in a shared fight against terrorists that we've not yet won. The Taliban has threatened more violence of the US keeps troops there beyond May, 1st. 2021 threat assessment released by the United States. 18 intelligence agencies warns of a variety of threats facing the country due to a continuing battle with the covert 19 pandemic, transnational crime, cyber attacks, foreign actors and domestic extremists. Reporter Olivia gossips explains more on Russia and North Korea pose threats to the U. S. The report said. Russia was using the tools it could Continue undermining US interests, including through election interference, and cyberespionage. North Korea, the report said, would continue to pose a nuclear and cyber threat. Leaders from intelligence agencies will testify on the report in front of congressional committees Wednesday and Thursday. It's the first hearing since 2019 What's for dinner in Wyoming. It may be road kill more from Peter King. If you come across, say, a deer, elk or moose carcass, or maybe something smaller on the road. A new law in Wyoming says it's yours to a degree, The law says Not all roadkill is fair game. Grizzly bears, bighorn sheep and mountain goats, for example or not, nor are wolves in northwest Wyoming, where they're considered a trophy game. Animal. Endangered species around the forbidden list is well. Wyoming's Transportation Department says they record about 3000 animal strikes a year, but there are likely many more than that. Peter King. CBS News Your Next update is at 6 30. I'm Suzanne Duval News radio 8 40 wh A Yes Use radio. Wait. 40 w.

Andrew Dember Monday Biden Thursday September 3.20% Nato Paul Miles Wednesday 799 New Cases Wyoming Lindsay Weaver Olivia Peter King SUE Mitch Mcconnell Abc News Afghanistan 100% Taliban
Capitol Police officer rammed by car died of blunt force head injuries

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:34 sec | 4 d ago

Capitol Police officer rammed by car died of blunt force head injuries

"Findings from the D. C medical examiner's office on the Capitol Hill Police officer killed last week. Jill NATO reports from Washington Little police officer Billy Evans died as a result of multiple blunt force injuries to the head. The D C medical examiner said the manner of death was homicide. Evans was killed on another officer injured when a man brand his car into a Capitol Hill barricade on good Friday that driver jumped out of the car with a knife and was shot dead by other officers. Evans will lie and honor in the Capitol Rotunda next week. Evans leaves behind two

Capitol Hill Police Jill Nato Washington Little Police Billy Evans Evans Capitol Rotunda
Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Investors Edge

Investors Edge

01:53 min | 47 min ago

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Investors Edge

"Behind the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. That's particularly important at a time when We're seeing. Unfortunately, Russia take very provocative actions. When it comes to Ukraine. We're now seeing Largest concentration of Russian forces on Ukraine's borders since 2014 That was when fighting between pro Russian separatists and Ukrainian troops first erupted in Ukraine's east more than 14,000. People have since died in that conflict, which is yet to be resolved. In response to Russia's latest moves, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said the military alliance with standby Ukraine We have also increased presence in the Black Sea region in the Black Sea, with Maura Naval presence and more ships, more port visits on We're constantly looking into how we can continue to Step up on provide more practical support to Ukraine to help them defend themselves. Ukraine's foreign minister said the offer of help was urgently needed. We need measures Which will deter you Russia and which will contain its aggressive intentions. This could be As secretary general mentioned. A new round off sanctions, which would raise the price off Russian aggression. Later on Tuesday, Moscow hit back saying it's appointments were due to NATO's actions. Given in response to the alliance's military activities that threaten Russia. We took appropriate measures with Moscow, sending more troops and equipment to its Western borders, Ukraine and its allies that also pushing for a diplomatic solution. Accusations of blame on both sides looks set to continue. For more Now I'm joined by Sergei Assume Lady. He is the head of the key of regional office for the 100 Bull Foundation. That's a German think tank that promotes human rights and stability across the globe. It's good to have you on the program. It's just, um let me let me ask you will the talks that were held today? Brussels will are they going to make any difference whatsoever in the tensions that we're seeing right now in eastern Ukraine? Good evening. Thank you. I think yes, I think it is very important step for Ukrainian diplomacy, Direct dial direct bilateral talks without invitation off Circle Third party, which is off course Conflict party, Russia. As like, normally what the European diplomacy offered, Ukraine is over is always talks with Russia. As Eve Russia would be a moderator or Rem Essen, jer, but.

Black Sea 100 Bull Foundation Rem Essen Nato EVE Today 2014 Tuesday Eastern Ukraine Moscow Russia Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg Ukrainian More Than 14,000 First Brussels Both Sides European German
U.S. alarmed by Russia's escalating aggression in Ukraine

WNYC Programming

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

U.S. alarmed by Russia's escalating aggression in Ukraine

"US is becoming worried over what it views is escalating Russian aggression in eastern Ukraine. That's according to White House press Secretary Jen Psaki, who said today the U. S. Is discussing recent troop movements in the region with its NATO allies. The United States is increasingly concerned by recent escalating Russian aggressions in eastern Ukraine, including Russian troop movements on Ukraine's border. Russia now has more troops on the border through crane than any time since 24 14 5. Ukrainian soldiers have been killed this week alone. Thies air all deeply concerning signs Russian build up there just the latest point of contention between Moscow and the Biden administration, adding to disputes already ongoing concerning arms control, human rights and other issues. Biden last week professed unwavering support for Ukraine in its confrontation with Russia, which in 2014 annexed

Ukraine Jen Psaki United States U. White House Nato Thies Biden Administration Moscow Biden
Fresh "nato" from Richard Eeds

Richard Eeds

02:39 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "nato" from Richard Eeds

"Has performed locally at Eldorado Fall Festival. Lives in all Eldorado. Rock, the arts and line, and during the A pandemic did a ghost light session on stage at the lensing. Congratulations to the Assad Yakult Tico. Worthy, Melissa Ingle Strong Youth Arts or so those are the winners of the mayor's 29th annual mayor's word for excellence in the arts. Mentioned National International News. It isn 42 minutes after one o'clock. Go by and announced today. Well, he will excuse me. He will announce tomorrow. President will announce tomorrow that all troops will be withdrawn from Afghanistan. By September. The 11th 2021 Actually, 20 years after the attack. World Trade Center, the Pentagon. September the first in 2001 to me September 11 2001 so the president will use that date. As a symbol Olic, I guess is symbolic withdrawal of all troops. From Afghanistan now. Donald Trump President Trump Said that all troops would be out by the end of this month. And that's the deadline that the Taliban has said they will start attacking again if all troops are not out by May, the first So unknown at this point where the Taliban will say Okay, we're cool. September the 11th. There are still 2500 U. S troops in Afghanistan. Fluctuates. Right now. Officially, there's 2500 right now. About more than 1000 more than 2500. Also additional 7000 foreign forces. The coalition in Afghanistan. Majority of those from NATO. So the bite administration reviewed Your options in Afghanistan. And He's talks that have taken place in Afghanistan. And a person familiar with the deliberations have said. This is the immediate practical reality that our policy review discovered. If we break the May 1st deadline, negotiate with previous administration with no clear plan exit, we will be back at war with the Taliban. Not something the president Biden believed was in the national interest. So we're going to zero troops by September. The 11th. Hopefully, the Taliban will say OK, we agree. Also the president announcing today that He is seeking a summit. With President Vladimir Putin. That would be great as well. Well with the Escalating tensions, obviously at the border with Russia and Ukraine. President Biden saying, Well, why don't we have a summit? See, we can work this out before it becomes another extended, larger live war. 45 minutes after one o'clock Anything on your mind and find with me When I talk about.

Donald Trump September 11 2001 Taliban Today Tomorrow 2500 MAY May 1St September President Trump Afghanistan 2001 Eldorado Fall Festival Nato Eldorado September The 11Th Melissa Ingle 29Th Annual
Southwest pilot accused of indecent exposure during flight

Michael Berry

00:20 sec | Last week

Southwest pilot accused of indecent exposure during flight

"Till NATO Fox News and a former airline pilots accused of lewd in flight behavior. Michael Hawk is accused of exposing himself during a Southwest flight from Philadelphia to Orlando last August. That's according to a federal court filing in Maryland. Southwest spokeswoman says the incident was not win this by any passengers and that pilots were the

Michael Hawk Nato Philadelphia Orlando Maryland Southwest
Fresh update on "nato" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"And bills are transformed into law the old fashioned way with ink pens. In a signing ceremony, Maryland governor Larry Hogan, a Republican, said, But Queen Senate President Bill Ferguson and House Speaker Adrienne Jones Democratic leaders in the Legislature Governor Hogan. I mean, we're all sending a strong and clear message that we can. We may have disagreements on certain issues we can work together and House Speaker Jones I believe this session is one that every Marylander can be proud of. There were bills on issues related to mental health access creation of an office on statewide broadband and tax credit programs. 66 bills were signed into law Tuesday morning. More than 800 bills were passed during the legislative session. Kate Ryan w T o p New Reese 42 President Biden has spoken with Russian President Vladimir Putin today about concerns over the Russian military build up on Ukraine's border. The White House says the president told Putin the U. S would act firmly in defense of its national interests regarding Russian cyber intrusions and the election interference. For Biden also proposed a summit meeting in a third country in the coming months to talk about the full range of US Russia issues. This call comes amid a surge of ceasefire violations in eastern Ukraine, where Russia backed separatists and Ukrainian forces have been locked in a conflict since Moscow's 2014 annexation of the Crimean peninsula. What is Russia, saying about this massive military build up? The defense minister says it's part of readiness drills amid what he described his threats from NATO. The defense minister says the maneuvers in western Russia that have worried neighboring Ukraine and brought warnings from NATO would last another couple of weeks, he says the Russian military has deployed two armies and three airborne formations to Western regions over the past three weeks, he says, is a response to the alliance's military activities threatening Russia and some concern now in Iran in Iranian nuclear negotiator says Tehran will begin enriching you rainy I am up to 60% purity after an attack on its Natanz nuclear facility. That's a higher level than the program has enriched before but remain shorts of weapons grade. Today's announcement marks a significant escalation after the sabotage. Suspected to have been carried out by Israel. Could result in further action by Israel, whose Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has vowed to never allow Tehran to obtain a nuclear weapon. In first further race tensions across the Mideast Iran's foreign minister earlier warned that the weekend assault could hurt on going talks over its tattered atomic deal with world powers. The capital's tried to win with the new guy on the ice and the Nationals. Try to win a couple in a row. 3 44 You hear that? That's the sound of a family of.

Putin Kate Ryan Tuesday Morning 66 Bills Nato Today Republican More Than 800 Bills Eastern Ukraine White House Democratic Larry Hogan Israel Ukraine Crimean Peninsula Iranian Two Armies Prime Minister Tehran
April the Giraffe, Who Became an Internet Sensation in 2017, Dies

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:43 sec | Last week

April the Giraffe, Who Became an Internet Sensation in 2017, Dies

"An animal that became a viral star has died. Fox's jill nato reports remember april the taraf back in twenty seventeen. She was an internet sensation as she was getting ready to give birth at animal adventure park in upstate. New york. Her giraffe cam became one of the most watch live streams in youtube history april had to be euthanized at the age of twenty friday. She was suffering from mayo. Th rightous and had mobility problems. Her caretakers tried to ease her pain with joint supplements and meds. They even padded the flooring in her pen but she was declining. The park issued. A statement saying our hearts are hurting. April's impact on animal conservation and appreciation is both immeasurable and

Jill Nato Animal Adventure Park FOX Upstate Mayo Youtube New York
Viral Star, April The Giraffe Dies, Upstate New York

Retirement & Income Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Viral Star, April The Giraffe Dies, Upstate New York

"A viral star has died. Functions. Jill NATO reports. Remember April the giraffe Back in 2017. She was an Internet sensation as she was getting ready to give birth and animal adventure. Park in upstate New York. Her giraffe Cam became one of the most watched live streams and YouTube history. April had to be euthanized at the age of 20. Friday, she was suffering from osteoarthritis and had mobility problems. Her caretakers tried to ease her pain with joint supplements and meds. They even padded the flooring in her pin, but she was declining. The park issued a statement saying. Our hearts are hurting. April's impact on animal conservation and appreciation is both immeasurable. And last thing Jill NATO

Jill Nato Osteoarthritis Youtube New York
April the giraffe is dead

KPRC 950 AM Programming

00:43 sec | Last week

April the giraffe is dead

"Remember April the giraffe Back in 2017. She was an Internet sensation as she was getting ready to give birth of animal adventure Park in upstate New York. Her giraffe Cam became one of the most watched live streams and YouTube history. April had to be euthanized at the age of 20 Friday. She was suffering from osteoarthritis and had mobility problems. Her caretakers tried to ease her pain with joint supplements and meds. They even patted the flooring in her pen, but she was declining. The park issued a statement saying. Our hearts are hurting. April's impact on animal conservation and appreciation is both immeasurable and last thing Boxes. Jill NATO I'm Pam, who's held Fox News.

Osteoarthritis Youtube New York Jill Nato PAM Fox News
April, the giraffe that became an online star, dies

KPRC 950 AM Programming

00:43 sec | Last week

April, the giraffe that became an online star, dies

"Remember April the giraffe Back in 2017. She was an Internet sensation as she was getting ready to give birth of animal adventure Park in upstate New York. Her giraffe Cam became one of the most watched live streams and YouTube history. April had to be euthanized at the age of 20 Friday. She was suffering from osteoarthritis and had mobility problems. Her caretakers tried to ease her pain with joint supplements and meds. They even patted the flooring in her pen, but she was declining. The park issued a statement saying. Our hearts are hurting. April's impact on animal conservation and appreciation is both immeasurable and last thing Boxes. Jill NATO I'm Pam, who's held Fox News.

Osteoarthritis Youtube New York Jill Nato PAM Fox News
Nato intercepts Russian planes '10 times in a day'

Red Eye Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Nato intercepts Russian planes '10 times in a day'

"Apparently probing European defenses, NATO jets were scrambled 10 times all over Europe on Monday to intercept Russian planes as they flew over the North Sea, the Baltic and the Black Sea. Alliance called it an unusual peak of Russian flight activity. The Russian plane stayed in international airspace, but NATO points out that the flights composed potential safety risks. That's because the Russian crews don't put on their transponders, file flight plans or talk to civilian air traffic controllers. Martinez. ABC NEWS Washington

Nato North Sea Black Sea Baltic Europe Martinez ABC Washington
Disturbing Testimony in Trial of Ex-Cop Who Killed George Floyd

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Disturbing Testimony in Trial of Ex-Cop Who Killed George Floyd

"Two of the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin will get underway later this morning. He's facing murder charges in the death of George Floyd after video showed him with his neon Floyd snack. Correspondent Jill NATO reports on day one of trial more testimony's expected today from witness Donald Williams, who told jurors during the first day of the trial Monday What he heard from George Floyd as show Vin and Pin Floyd to the ground. My stomach er I can't breathe. My head hurts, I want my mom said that Floyd soon after faded away. But defense attorney Eric Nilsson said use of force is not attractive. But it is being necessary component of policing. The defense also said drugs found in Floyd system may have been a factor in his death

George Floyd Derrick Show Vin Jill Nato Donald Williams Pin Floyd Minneapolis Eric Nilsson VIN Floyd
White House Cancels In-Person Easter Egg Roll in Washington DC

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

White House Cancels In-Person Easter Egg Roll in Washington DC

"The annual easter celebration at the white house is cancelled by the pandemic usually draws thousands of kids to sixteen hundred pennsylvania avenue at the white house. Historical association says the annual white house. Easter egg roll has been canceled over cova concerns. But they've set up some virtual egg roll related activities. How white house. History dot org. There's a digital jigsaw puzzle coloring pages and a virtual scavenger hunt which will take you on a tour of the executive mansion and the association says it still selling traditional souvenir wooden eggs. This year they feature the likenesses of president. Biden's dogs champion. Major fox jill nato. I'm mary for study. And this is fox news.

White House Historical Association Pennsylvania Jill Nato Biden Fox News
No Washington DC White House Easter Egg Roll for second straight year due to pandemic

WBAP Morning News

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

No Washington DC White House Easter Egg Roll for second straight year due to pandemic

"Easter egg roll at the White House has been canceled by the pandemic usually draws thousands of kids to 1600, Pennsylvania Avenue. But the White House Historical Association says The annual White House. Easter Egg roll has been canceled over Covic concerns, but they've set up some virtual egg roll related activities have White House history that organ There's a digital jigsaw puzzle coloring pages and a virtual scavenger hunt, which will take you on a tour of the executive mansion, and the association says it's still selling traditional souvenir wooden eggs. This year. They feature the likenesses of President Biden's dogs champion Major in Washington. Jill NATO Fox News.

White House Historical Associa White House Covic President Biden Jill Nato Washington Fox News
Former Coach Nolan Richardson on This Season's College Basketball League

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:18 min | Last month

Former Coach Nolan Richardson on This Season's College Basketball League

"Coach. Let me ask you about a topic that we had here. Most of yesterday and running even until today and that was about kentucky this year with john calvin perria an unusual amount of criticism which comes with the territory when you when you lose sixteen games but what. What did you see this year when when you saw kentucky play well you know thing about kentucky. They've got they've got some pretty good talent. But so have the other teams you know. They're not playing a bunch of guys a lot of teams that are chopped liver. They're playing teams that have some good players also and because of the time that the things are today. There's a lot of players a lot of key is that you don't know us. They're pretty good. And if you put him a you're to put them in a kentucky uniform at and make a lot of difference in the world because the tradition win a lot of ball games to We've gaels team you know. He's been very fortunate to be able to track some of the top players in the country. i'm not sure he's got those kind of players on this year's basketball team so let's get to the top of the heap right now in the i mean there's two new coaches nato arkan at alabama and eric muslim at arkansas. Who have really surprise a lot of folks. These were these were schools that were picked to finish. I think in an eighth or ninth and they have exceeded expectations starting with alabama. What what are you. What are you see when you watch our coach team. Very good very well. You know that they play. They played pretty quick. ballgame It speak to exactly what i said. You got two new coaches that are leading Leading and are winning ball games with basically new teams you players we would say that's why said that. The players today in the teams today are so balanced. Is it you know. I wouldn't be surprised if a if a team that Seated number fourteen when the national championship surprised me. Because i it's you you're not you know the the the the regular name teams are not there anymore. You know the the north carolina's ucla's kentucky's mean you used to just turn on turn on your set and that's those are the only team here you would hear about. Now you got gonzaga a a super bowl club. And i think alabama is right up there with that bunch and i'd also arkansas's it is that is ranked up there with that bunch. In terms of the national scene everyone keeps talking about gonzaga as as being the absolute lock. And i know you just what you just said about a fourteen seed. Do you think they are head and shoulders above the field or do you think it can tighten dramatically once tournament. But i love the coach. There at gonzaga i think he is phenomenal. Phenomenal job but it's you know. Every game has his own merits and and to win. Stab believe is six. You've got to win six to win at all Is going to be a challenge. Simply because of the fact that there's going to be a team out there that you have no clue of being close to win. That could upset them who they would might meet. You just never know every ball game so important. You know every single ballgame. It's so important so You know when teams run around and try to get scouting reports at this later date. I think it's all with if you if you if you're not ready to play then if gonzaga's not really ready to play it can be beaten but if they're ready to play their chances of winning all

Kentucky John Calvin Perria Alabama Gonzaga Arkansas Nato Basketball Eric Ucla North Carolina
Kentucky's 'Cocaine Bear' reportedly will be subject of Universal Pictures movie with Elizabeth Banks

Z Morning Zoo

01:58 min | Last month

Kentucky's 'Cocaine Bear' reportedly will be subject of Universal Pictures movie with Elizabeth Banks

"There's a movie coming out called Cocaine Bear. And if the title sounds bizarre, it's nothing compared to what the story is actually about. So you might know who Elizabeth Banks is. She was in the hunger games, and she's been in a bunch of other movies, too. She is directing this movie called Cocaine Bear. Now, if you heard of a movie called Cooking there, you probably think it's on SciFi Channel alongside shark, NATO or movies like that Cocaine bear is actually a true story. It's a thriller based on back in 1985, a drug smuggler named Andrew Thornton. Dropped a duffel bag filled with £70 of Coke from his plane over Georgia on the way back from a drug run to Colombia. So he went down. Got the drugs. He's flying back. He found out that this plane was flying too heavy, so he had to push the cocaine off the flight. And when he did it landed in the woods. And I guess ah Bear found it much and ate the cocaine. No and died. Oh, no, but it's even weirder. So he was a former narcotics cop who started smuggling so he went to the dark side and the run that is in the movie is took place on September 11th Weird 1985. He dropped because it was too heavy for the plane. Some time after the Georgia dump. This guy tried to jump out of the plane as well. But as he was trying to jump out of the plane, he got caught in his parachute and fell like a stone landing in some guy's driveway and Knoxville, Tennessee. He died on impact. The plane crashed 60 miles away in North Carolina when his body was discovered he was wearing a bulletproof vest. Gucci loafers, night vision goggles. He had 15 million worth of Coke, 4500 and cash, gold, Krugerrands knives and two pistols. Wow. Holy crap. The body of the Bear was discovered three months later, along with 40 open plastic containers and cocaine residue. They think the bear ate the cocaine. And there's the end of the bear. And that's your

Scifi Channel Andrew Thornton Elizabeth Banks Georgia Nato Colombia Knoxville Tennessee North Carolina Gucci Coke
Homeless encampment to set up behind Bellevue temple in Seattle area next month

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:38 min | Last month

Homeless encampment to set up behind Bellevue temple in Seattle area next month

"Homeless encampments. Bellevue is getting ready to host one next month more from co most Jonathan Show. This is the well manicured lawn behind Temple, but NATO or on the Crossroads neighborhood. We do this because it's our mission starting next month. The temple is paying $3000 for a fem thing, Rabbi Sydney Danziger says up to 40 homeless men and women will be allowed to set up right here. These are just Good working folks who are looking for a stopgap. This will be the latest stop for 10 City for an encampment that moves around from one community to another. This time around the Jewish Temple, the city of Bellevue and homeless advocacy group share wheels are partnering to make this happen. We have a code of conduct we go by. We can't camp approvals that we enforce. Organizers say there will be regular covert testing, strict security idea and background checks, No drugs or any type of illegal activity will be tolerated. And Bellevue PD says the encampment doesn't necessarily attract more crime. But even with the assurances, the possibility is there and I would like to see it. Tightened up some neighbors like Karen Morrison Chandler Dang still have concerns. I like the city, too. Do a better job informing us. The city says it's working on that with mailers and updates to its Web site. It's not a perfect science, but they keep trying to let people know And there's actually already an ordinance allowing this arrangement, But it's been nearly five years since 10 City for use the Temple's lawn. Rabbi Danziger hopes others get more involved. I hope that more and more faith based organizations start using the rights that they have to host these tent encampments on their land for Bellevue Jobs and Shoko Monix. In the first case of its

Bellevue Jonathan Show Rabbi Sydney Danziger Jewish Temple Nato Karen Morrison Chandler Dang Rabbi Danziger Bellevue Jobs Shoko Monix
On the front lines of Victoria's vaccine rollout

Coronacast

03:19 min | Last month

On the front lines of Victoria's vaccine rollout

"I'm health reported teigen tayla opposition and journalists ultra. Norman swan is tuesday. The second of march and of course we know the vaccine rolette is happening all across australia and to give us a bit of an insight of how it's going in melbourne. We have a special guest today. Welcoming back professor marian kinda who's head of infectious diseases at western health. Thanks for making time. For us marian. Good morning so marian. Just give us a sense of what you've had to do and what you're covering and and the challenge at western health. We are responsible for the tolerant. Airports border on staff including flight crew as well as the hospitals in our catchment area. So that is. The pack will campus as well as western health and some other hospitals as well. You talk them at the time. Precious that have been anew with just mobilizing for these vaccine. Rollout lots of people in our organization have described as doing six months of work in three weeks. A lot of people put in a lot of effort to get this up and running. And i'm just so proud of what we have been able to achieve. Now we've heard a lot about training. How different is dealing with this pfizer. Vaccine from pooping call for measles australia. One of the major things which is different is one. This is an ultra. Low temperature require the cold chain requirements at different and in addition we have to use multi. Does files and in australia. Multi smiles have not been used much at all and this is a very very precious product and so we want to make sure that we maximise the number of doses that we can get out of a multi file so for the fis vaccine. That is that we aim to take out six doses out of fat multi file which is a challenge because we constantly do not have what a cold low dead space needles overloaded space syringes. That are family style absolutely great and they are able to reliably get sixty six out of multidex files. Solo did space. Needle is nato where. There's not a bit of a minimum amount of vaccine. That's left in it after it's been completely delib is correct correct and so we want to make sure with. Everybody gets exactly the dose that they need. And if you don't have a low dead space being you have vaccine that is lifting the end. The person does not get the full amount or you cannot get the full dose of the vaccine pulled out of the multi vile and you've got to go to w. correct so. This is a complex process. So i'll pharmacy staff. They spent one week specifically training for this to make sure that they abide by be cold chain requirements which has significant in addition to make sure that they use the proper aseptic technique. So that they don't have any contamination of vile that occurs and then they practiced and practiced and practiced to make sure with dummy vials to make sure that they could get the appropriate number of doses. Out of that multi vile.

Teigen Tayla Norman Swan Rolette Marian Kinda Marian Australia Melbourne Pfizer FIS Nato
Lady Gaga's dogs returned to Los Angeles police station unharmed

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:42 sec | Last month

Lady Gaga's dogs returned to Los Angeles police station unharmed

"Angeles police say a woman brought Lady gaga as dogs Koji and Gustav to a community Police station and they were unharmed. The dogs were stolen by thieves who shot and wounded the dog, Walker, this singer so upset and determined to get her dog's back. She offered a half million dollar reward for their safe return. The cops say the woman who returned the dogs appears to be uninvolved with the shooting and theft. No word yet on what's to become of that reward, Fox says. Jail NATO the dog Walker, who was hailed a hero by Lady Gaga on Instagram is out of intensive care and expected to make a full recovery. The dog nappers from Maine at large. I'm Camp Russo and this is Fox

Angeles Police Lady Gaga Koji Gustav Walker Nato FOX Instagram Camp Russo Maine
Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:35 min | Last month

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

"At a rally yesterday the prime minister of armenia nicole passion. Yon warned of an attempted military coup. He told crowds. It was the army's job to defend the country. It was up to the people to decide whether or not he should step down. Y'all guy even hats manhattan borough. She mr young has faced protests since a peace deal struck in november. In which is our by. John gained territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave. Mr john has protests since a peace deal was struck in november in which is by john games territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave clashes over the region had erupted repeatedly since nineteen ninety-four drawing in russia which stood behind armenia and turkey which back oscar by john but in the end it was russian president vladimir putin and his turkish counterpart rany tight air to one who put it all to rest. Brokering a peace deal. That's just one sign of remarkable political alliance. It's picking away at the post cold war geopolitical order so i think it helps to go back to the really low point of relationship which was in two thousand fifteen. Daniel franklin is our diplomatic editor. Turkey shot down a russian warplane which had been flying over syria. Entered it's ass base and this happened. After repeated warnings to the russian pilot in the warnings became increasing urgent they were ignored and turkish f sixteen fighters that were patrolling shot. The plane down remember turkey is a nato member and had engaged with russia militarily. That's not something that happens. Often and russia responded quite vigorously by imposing sanctions on turkish products and a bombed ethnic tuchman fighters in northern syria that allies of the turks so that was Towards the end of two thousand fifteen and into the beginning of two thousand sixteen but it was a dramatic shift. If you remember in the summer of two thousand sixteen there was an attempted coup jet sopa head. The world watched in shock as a military coup and in turkey eight. Us ally a major strategic partner in the fight against isis putin was quick to call president of and commiserate show solidarity is some suspicion in turkey. Anyway that gave some advance warning to add one that his life was in danger helped move him out of the area where he might have been bombed and from that point onwards things have changed dramatically in the two men developed this kind of own tone this brotherhood of hard power. And what is it. That had changed between the downing of the bomber and this evan beginning of a friendship they first of all recognize in one another leaders who know how to use power in a full full way but there are other similarities between them in terms of that authoritarian style of leadership at home. And there's a common set of grievances against the west in turkey's case decades of not being properly accepted wanting at one stage to join the european union but being put on hold. And i think one of the reasons why the attempted coup was such a turning point for adwan is that he came under attack from his own planes and he felt that nato had improperly come to support nato countries were slow to express solidarity so he started to think that maybe putin was someone could depend upon for his own survival where he couldn't necessarily depend on nato partners and how the relationship between these two men evolved since then it's developed in some very concrete ways add one has bought from russia s four hundred air defense system. So it's a nato country. Remember that is buying russian. Ed defense system that does not delighted his nato partners. It's meant that it's been kicked out of the f thirty five fighter jet program that Nato has its face sanctions from america and despite all that it's gone ahead and on the ground in particularly serious led to kind of accommodation even though they're on opposite sides they've managed to accommodate each other's objectives in particular turkey vis-a-vis the kurds and most recently they've accommodate each other in the south caucasus. Where again they support opposite sides. The russia has played its role as a mediator. Turkey supported azerbaijan. And they've managed to end up with a result that suits them both well. Russia has peacekeeping troops on the ground. Turkey has an economic opportunity and the air that causes missed out has got nothing out of this is the west. You mentioned the word accommodating in the sense that that perhaps they're just essentially keeping out from under each other's feet or is there more to it than that. There is more to it than that because a particularly developed closer ties economically. The two economies have been struggling so they can do all the support they can get and although russia has a big surplus with turkey. Turkish contractors get a lot of business from russia. So there's the economic aspects of the relationship is particularly important and putin to have turkey as awkward member of nato driving a wedge within nato. That's a huge attraction for him and for to and sometimes to be able to play off the west and russia that's also helpful so that they play the power game very effectively by using each other and given all of that. Would you call this alliance proper and if so what should the west make of it well. It's a remarkable development given the long history between the two countries going back centuries. It's remarkable when you think of the more recent history of of the to literally coming to blows as recently as two thousand fifteen but it's far from being an alliance turkey is still a nato member that's valuable to it and it's also bristled it's fragile. Remember they are on opposite sides even where they're accommodating each other in places like syria in libya they have differences over ukraine over georgia as well so there are many places where this could deteriorate rapidly. It's rather brittle its recent depends too much on personalities with big egos so does mean that. There's absolutely no guarantee that this is going to last or even develop further so in that sense. You think the west doesn't need to worry because the alliance will eventually fall apart from. It's the concern for the west. It's certainly a challenge. One of the things that will be on the radar screen of the biden administration. It's a worry that there is this increasingly close relationship between her big important nato member and russia and although it's bristol although it could blow up in various ways it's a serious concern and worry that a nato member like turkey could drift further away from its moorings

Turkey Nagorno Nato Russia Karabakh Nicole Passion Manhattan Borough Mr John Armenia Daniel Franklin Syria Isis Putin Mr Young Adwan YON Tuchman Vladimir Putin John Putin Oscar
"nato" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today. Nato defense ministers will conclude their meetings in Brussels ahead of a security summit that starts in Eunuch tomorrow. The two day summit comes as the defense alliance is increasingly under the spotlight president. Donald Trump has long complained that European governments aren't pulling their weight. When it comes to spending and troop deployments they are really sort of letting down in that one respect and we don't want people taking advantage of the United States he wants NATO to take a more leading role in the Middle East and Response Ministers have agreed in principle to take over some of the training in Iraq. That's currently being carried out by a US led coalition against Islamic state. It's not clear whether more NATO troops will be deployed or whether more NATO partners will be drafted into Iraq. What is clear is that the alliance is bending to international pressure. Nato in the past two three years. It's pretty difficult time of it partly because of Donald Trump's pressures on us in the from the White House He's been pushing very hard harder than perhaps any previous president for NATO members to be spending more money to carry their fair share of the burden as he would put. Daniel Franklin is the economists diplomatic editor but also there have been other criticisms not recently president macro France and interview with the Economist. Talk to NATO experiencing brain death so there's been a lot of questions about NATO's future so NATO came in for this kind of criticism. Even before the trump era the before donald trump came to the White House. Nato was under pressure because of external reasons more than internal ones it was under pressure because of Russia's actions in Ukraine in particular so there was always a bit of a disconnect between the level of activity of NATO in response to the increased pressure felt from Russia and the criticism. It was getting from the White House in particular when Donald Trump came to power. Broadly the perception is of of a NATO. His struggling yes. I think that's right. But the have been changes of late which I think are more encouraging for NATO first of all Donald Trump himself has been changing his tone somewhat. He's been keen to trumpet. Nato's increase spending promises as a as a triumph for for his pressure saying that no other president has achieved what he's achieved he's turned into something of a NATO booster or booster Rodman the NATO Bashar and a new big survey of attitudes to NATO countries by Pew Research Center is reasonably encouraging. I think for the organization in in what way well The Pew survey suggests that support for NATO among populations in among the NATO members states is reasonably strong. Fifty three percent say they have a favorable attitude towards NATO only twenty seven percent. Have an unfavorable Ju- if it was an organization that was struggling with a perception problem. Now it doesn't seem to be what's different when I think there are still perception problems. If you delve deeper into the piece of there are some also some less good signs Vanessa. In certain countries support over a ten year horizon has dropped quite sharply and France for example. There's been a twenty one point a drop over that over that period in Germany to quite a sizeable drop even in the United States Although the level of support for NATO favorability rating of just over half is about the average over the period from two thousand and nine to two thousand sixteen. It's quite a sharp drop from the past couple of years where support had spite and there are a couple of NATO member states where unfavorable attitudes to the to the alliance remain very strong and that's Greece and Turkey. So it's it's very much of a mixed picture but I do think there has been a revival in NATO's fortunes partly because the political sense of pressures from America have eased somewhat in recent times. So how much do you think these troop deployment promises and spending changes are down to pressure from the likes of President Trump and macron? Well NATO was going to be increasing. Its spending anyway but the problem was that it was not living up to the promises that itself had made the pledge that a NATO members had had made back off to the Russian move into Ukraine and The annexation of Crimea was to spend the minimum two percent of GDP on defense and only a few countries. We're doing that. The promise was to do this by two thousand twenty four. Some countries in particular Germany were not going to achieve that America was complaining as indeed. American presidents have done repeatedly down the decades. But the difference this time was Donald. Trump did it with a vehemence assistance. And I think a sense of threat even to the point of threatening to pull out of NATO allies didn't shape that was a degree of pressure that NATO would not face before and I think perhaps to some extent has accounted for at least some of the increase spending. Mr Trump's complaints seems wholly focused on everyone paying their own fair. Share about about money concerns. If there are more than that yes I think there is more than this I think. President trump has also started to see that. Nato can be useful to him in a number of ways. One way is by spending more. It's something that he can chalk up as a success for him and he mentioned it in his State of the Union Address. We're also getting our allies. Finally to help pay their fair share. I have raised contributions from other NATO by more than four hundred billion dollars. So it's not. Just what's fair and equitable. He's looking for NATO members to relieve pressure on America's forces in the wake of the killing in January of Casino Damani talk rainy in general He actually asked. Nato said that he wanted NATO to do more in the Middle East. So far fron NATO being something that was the the the whose existence was under threat. He wanted to step up. And come and do more says Edison's then NATO itself has been busily looking at what it could do in Iraq in particular But now defense ministers are meeting this week and they're going to be looking at proposals to increase the NATO training operation In Iran pass quite substantially and as those defense ministers meet today. What else will they be trying to hammer out? Well there's a lot on the agenda for defense ministers as the question of Afghanistan the intention the trump administration's intention is to draw down America's presence in Afghanistan. President trump would like to get those those troops home and that affects NATO which also has a mission in Afghanistan. There's the broader question of how to respond to Russia's buildup of new weaponry ninety nine Putin has been busily investing in his arsenal and in particular with with the ending the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty the treaty There are lingering constraints about what he can put into place of really come off and NATO's having to think not just about the IMF implications but also the broader response to to the Russian buildup. So there's plenty for defense types to get their heads around not only at the meeting of ministers in Brussels now but also when the broader gathering at the Munich security conference starts on Friday. Daniel thank you very much for joining us. Thank you in Japan. Many forms of gambling are illegal. There are exceptions among them. The Arcade Game Kinko and in two thousand eighteen casinos were legalized. The decision hasn't gone down well with many Japanese people who worry about gambling addiction and the influence of organized crime that unease worsened in December. When a cabinet minister was arrested over allegations of taking bribes from companies. I in casino projects in the country in spite of growing public concern. The Japanese government still seems to think it's worth a roll.

NATO President trump donald trump president America United States Iraq Middle East Brussels White House Germany Daniel Franklin Russia president macro France Ukraine Vanessa France Japanese government Afghanistan
"nato" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on Worldly

"The only time article five was ever invoked was in the United States is case after the nine eleven attacks. NATO allies came to America's defense. So it's kind of messed up for the even at this point right like waiver on that and this is why this kind of lack of faith that us that the US would defend fended. These countries part of that is why countries like Poland are actively trying to get more and more. US troops literally in the country. So you have Poland trying to basically basically entice trump to send even more. US troops by say we'll build you a base and we'll even call it for trump now. Most people I talked to think that this is never going to happen. That it's rhetoric on both besides but the point is that you know by having US troops physically in these countries that the US if they were attacked the US would therefore not only one beat. They're ready but would be on the front lines right. So if you accidentally hit Americans there now in the war regardless of whether NATO you know they're holding onto article five or not. So that's why you see you know this desire to have more NATO troops more. US troops in these countries. which again to me is fascinating going from the Middle East for like everyone's like Americans get the hell out? We don't want your troops. Everyone there is like please give us more American troops in. That's why because even if article five is fake and it fails then you know. At least we'll have troops still here. No it's it's a problem that is not just limits. The United States this issue of NATO credibility we talk about the US because it's the most important country the The largest contributor terms of military firepower but neto is also dealing with serious internal divisions starting with A contradiction with something. Something I said earlier actually about countries in NATO focusing on their democratic transitions from former authoritarian rule. Well now you actually have at least three member states going in the wrong counteraction. We're talking about Poland which we've been which has been discussed as this really friendly pro. US aid but also is GonNa need serious authoritarian direction. In the past few years with a major major democratic go Russians and then Hungary and Turkey both of which are now thoroughly described. I think most unbiased observers as Teheran states not Russia style authoritarian but but a kind of soft at least sliding towards authoritarianism pretty heavily. Yeah and when you have that that kind of change inside of alliance that's supposed to be founded on the defensive democracy and shared values then you have countries inside the alliances that start to have different interests stress different senses of what is important to preserve about their country and what they can do or should do as members of the alliance to protect protect themselves. Some of this geostrategic has nothing to do with democracy. Turkey is a special case because it's really a Middle Eastern country in its strategic orientation and so it cares cares a lot about Syria for example and that causes a type of different relationship with Russia than basically everybody else in NATO but hungry polander creating different kinds of challenges. Even even as Poland's tells every American who's listening we want NATO. We Love America. Please please please please. They're moving the direction opposite. From what every American except for maybe trump wants it. We should send you to Hungary's act in order to do some reporting on this and this is actually a problem with you. Know when we talked about NATO expansion. This is an issue that I'm I'm worried about out quite a bit. There are twenty nine members of NATO. Now and a lot of what you what NATO can accomplish as an alliance requires unanimity right unanimity in decision-making and the morale as as you're adding the harder it's going to make that happen like you're going to need you know the US and Poland and Hungary and Turkey and all these countries to agree on stuff and now they're hoping to add a thirtieth and thirty first the thirty second and with each expansion. Yes you can make the case that it's good for those individual countries it might strengthen the alliance in on the margins but you're also making the political critical aspect of this alliance much harder to manage and we've seen this already. The the more allies NATO brings in the heart of the decision making process has been which again goes back to my clearly love affair that I didn't know I had with Jens Stoltenberg which is like the fact that he's kept this alliance sort of running smoothly despite more allies despite trump's disturbance the that they're able leaving. Come up with these platitudes. I actually find to be quite remarkable. It's why he's GonNa. He seems to. He was probably going to be in the position for the longest amount of any secretary-general. I will say that I think just to wrap about that. It was pretty promising to see that trump. Even if it's mostly from flattery like you said we are again stands Stoltenberg stands. I don't know You know even if it is mostly flattery and even if you know these NATO countries did start spending more Before trump actually came into office he has a I think. Nobody can quibble with the fact that he has been very vocal and very clear about wanting these countries to spend more of their the defense budget and pushing very hard and so I think seeing him this week at this NATO summit actually saying like NATO's doing great NATO stronger like NATO's Oh you know what are the most important in the lions is is actually really positive in the sense of you know when he first came into office in the campaign trail like people were very concerned that this could be the end of NATO and I think you know we're now three plus I guess three years into his exactly three years into his term most and it seems like things are kind of going. Okay Okay like their challenges that we just enumerated but it seems like at least as of right now. Things are kind of going in a pretty positive direction which like all things considered at. That's pretty good sign. I'd say which you know this show. We don't tend to leave you with a lot of. Hey welcome everyone can destroy. I can't believe it. Enjoy the happiness wall. Okay for now. I want to thank our engineer or producer Jackson Beerfeltz. And I want to encourage all of you folks to rate and subscribe and review worldly wherever your podcasts.

NATO United States Poland trump Hungary Turkey America Middle East Teheran Russia Stoltenberg Jens Stoltenberg Syria neto Jackson Beerfeltz lions
"nato" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on The Current

"I think it may be a number of things. I think. There's a sense that a lot of people have is that the world organizations and they're on political organizations haven't serve them well and that helped feel populism. I mean there are people who feel they've been marginalized or left out and it's not just economic. What I think seems to becoming increasingly clear is the people who support populist parties? Many of the people supported Brexit in a continuing to support Brexit in the. UK really felt that they won't listen to they felt there was. They lead snob somewhere doing in what they wanted and they were being told to shut up and do what they were told. And it's a question of dignity I think but I think what is also happening is the number of the multilateral institutions is an out quite old I mean the UN they show the World Bank the IMF International Monetary Fund. All of these organizations was set up at the end of the Second World War. And I think what's happening with the passage of time is we are forgetting why we needed them. You know we knew we needed them after. Nineteen forty-five because we could look around the world. People could look around the world and see the devastation that a major major state to state conflict had had created state to state conflicts and created. And I think we've forgotten just how important it is to have ways of working together multilaterally literally and I think that's dangerous because Florida's these organizations are and you know we can certainly all criticize them. We need them particularly now when we are facing not just strategic problems competition between states who are also facing the major challenge of climate change more than ever. We need to work together. So the let's bring it back to NATO. How does that alliance seem relevant? How does it make itself seem relevant? Well my own prescription. But I'm you know who knows I mean there's so many arguments about what NATO my own view is it should go back to focusing on what it does. It should stop trying to out of Europe out of North Atlantic ventures. I think I mean there are all sorts of arguments for that but I don't think the good ones and I think the Europeans and Canada the partners in NATO partner states are really going to have to step up and do more and that's very difficult in peace time because public don't I don't see the point in paying for expensive military equipment and expensive military's but I think we really need to think seriously and I think this question for our political leadership. Can they explain lane to the rest of his life. Tax Dollars need to go on this stuff and I think they've really got to make a start on that and it was a historian. You're you're more accustomed. I'm to looking backwards but allow me to put a crystal ball in front of you and say as these leaders meet now. Do you think ten years from now they will be meeting at something called the NATO. Oh I think they will A lot depends on what happens. I mean a lot depends on how permanent defective of president trump and his policies are going to be on American American politics. I mean what is interesting at the moment is it in Congress in the. US is still very strong. Support for NATO and whether that will outlast president trump whether he has has one or two terms is a big question I think for the European powers they really I think a beginning to realize what it would mean not to have a nasal not to have some form of military every corporation in some form of of military planning and so perhaps they will try and come together. I'M GONNA be an optimist and say ten years NATO will steal still be here. Maybe maybe we'll have it self and be refocused and really know what it's about you know one thing that's curious and just to shift gears here slightly when you look at the the photo of all of those leaders in that room. Of course Turkey's president is there and this comes at a time that Turkey has unilaterally Gone in to Syria And created created even more emotion in that region. What what are the challenges that Turkey's incursion into Syria its relationship with Russia? What are the challenges that that poses for the Alliance of course being a NATO combination? Yeah it's a major challenge to I mean if you look at the original NATO treaty it is about bringing together countries who have common values who care about democracy who care about a world in which people cooperate who actually want to make. According to treat. He wanted to make a world free from MM conflict. I mean NATO is very much a defensive alliance. It's not about going out and taking over other countries and I think the behavior of Turkey is extremely worrying and the question of the NATO is. How much can it let you get away with it? tacky is buying military equipment for Russia which NATO is going to compromise NATO security and I think this is a real problem. And how far Kentucky go and doing things like this. And how far can it go in an intervention though Syria. Now I think it's a huge problem for Asia and I think they're going they have to come to terms with it. But how do you do that. I mean Turkey keeps pushing the envelope in pushing the envelope and more and more and more and there has been no no apparent censure. Yeah Yeah No. I've been wondering about this. I mean in the Cold War Turkey was was very important for the NATO alliance and I think people tend to overlook some of some of the Lestat that democratic things Tokyo was doing because of Turkey's proximity across the Black Sea to the Soviet Union. But I think you could argue now that Russia's much weaker that Turkey is less important than I think. Perhaps this needs to be brought home to take that. It's not as important as it was that it's causing trouble for NATO and quite frankly NATO may reach a point where it says is it just doesn't need Turkey and Turkey may need to think about where it is in the world. It doesn't live in a good neighbourhood. That may not at the moment it's on friendly terms with Russia but Turkish Russian relations have gone up and down on over the last century and they've often been at odds with each other. It doesn't have a good relationship with Iran. There's a lot of resentment in in Middle Eastern countries about what Turkey's being doing. Toki doesn't have a good relationship with Greece. And so maybe maybe just took he needs to think about where it's going to be kicked out of NATO. What what are the odds of that happening? I don't know I think it will depend very much. On what sort of leadership. I think macron has been very critical and he's also very critical of the United States role role in suddenly pulling out of Syria so whether macron will be able to bring his NATO partners with partners along with him whether Toki we'll be censured and whether it will be given some sort of ultimatum. You don't know I mean it really depends on. The internal dynamics of trouble is of course at the moment the United States although it's concerned about Turkey buying Russian equipment President Putin president trump seems to think he has a good relationship with president. I hadn't really recently to the White House so very difficult to tell again. The United States is going to be so important because it is is the big partner in NATO to let me finish off with that thought then what does Donald Trump and his presence and his presidency mean for NATO right now I think ain't nothing much good. I mean the the tar was Donald Trump is. Sometimes I think he he hits on things that are important to American policy I think is confrontation with China. Probably was overdue. You in a way. I think I think the Chinese had been pushing the bounds of what was reasonable behavior in for example intellectual property theft. But I think he's a rash IQ and that's very worrying. I mean if you're trying to develop alliance fuel trying to do planning if you're trying to think of where the future is if you don't think you can count on the leader of the main power in that relationship. Then I think it makes you very uneasy and I and I think what I what strikes me most about president trump is it. His foreign policy is very erratic and worryingly. I think he has fewer advises around him whom he's prepared to listen to and that's concerning whereas the continuity in American foreign strategic policy. It's certainly not in the president's office Margaret McMillan. Thank you very much for sharing these thoughts with us. Thank you very nice conversation. Margaret Macmillan is professor of history at the University of Toronto and Professor America of International History at the University of Oxford. You may well know her from her books including Paris. Nineteen nineteen and the the uses and abuses of history we reached Margaret Macmillan in Oxford England..

NATO Turkey Russia Syria Donald Trump UK Margaret Macmillan Brexit UN Toki Florida President Putin Margaret McMillan Europe World Bank
"nato" Discussed on AP News

AP News

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on AP News

"The strength of NATO is that despite these differences we have always been able to unite the wrong court costs to protect and defend the shoulder and it is the responsibility of all of us to make sure that we do this also today because we live in the more unpredictable I'm uncertain rolled

NATO
"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

And Now The Hard Part

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

"But particularly after the Berlin Wall fell a lot of countries that have been maintaining two percent of their national budgets for defense began to cut down to one point seven one point five one point four one point three in the case of of Germany at one point and that just means that the US is carrying an outsized burden and you don't have that sense of family all contributing to the shared budget if you will so that gave President trump talking horse but frankly President Obama and all five presidents that I worked for also routinely beat the drum to get NATO allies to pay more they began paying more after the invasion of Crimea because all of a sudden there was a physical security threat coming towards NATO territory. the question I think when president trump comes in is whether you do better as the United States trying to encourage more spending with sugar or with vinegar and we I've had a lot of vinegar in this conversation so that's one set of issues the other set of issues is the value set where I think we began to see with Viktor ORB on in Hungary first and then in Poland and then in Turkey throughout the period from two thousand twelve onward increasing autocratic behaviour increasing populace behavior using democratic majority ladies to make judiciaries less independent to make media more state run and less truly the fourth estate watched logging checking and balancing government power to squeeze out opponents to harass them and this goes to the fundamental compact values among allies I think we were speaking out quite a strongly about these things in the Obama Administration we were working with the European Union Commission I don't think that president trump cares about this and in fact he holds up a mirror and sees a lot of similarities with a guy like or bonner guy like and Shannon has been very welcoming them Victoria has done a tremendous job in so many different ways highly respect that just else for further fraying of the fundamental platform on which this is built so that's what's happening within the Western community but what about the threat side the external threat side the dangers coming from Russia do you think that this current escalation if it's fair to call it that started with Ukraine or does it go even further back in and I should say by the way you were on the front lines as assistant secretary of State for European Eurasian Affairs from two thousand thirteen to twenty seventeen I think that Russia made its first serious military probes into new space with the Georgia in war in two thousand in new and scary that we haven't seen before you know I think in the in the Georgian context they stopped short of pudding oh military power the Russians did but I do think it was a learning experience for Putin and his military in terms of how they do it next time including with more deniability they were extremely well rehearsed when they went into Crimea so you get the feeling that they had been practicing and that's so we we're fast forwarding from two thousand eight to what in two thousand and fourteen in the winter is when they go into Crimea and then they go into the eastern parts of Ukraine the Donbas columns of suspected Russian Allah have been reported moving through east Ukraine mid phase of a new Russian Galatian unverified video you're seeing a much more sophisticated Russian operation this time sophisticated as a complicated word let's say deniable stealthy well rehearsed with these bizarre overlays of democratic veneer you know you remember that after the Russian forces supported the Crimean independence they felt the need to have a national referendum among the population tat about ten minutes to think about it and many of whom had left and the rest of whom owed their pensions and their livelihood to the aggressor and now you are arguably a victim of this newly subtle and we won't say sophisticated but more deniable but in some ways more Texas Louis and tactically adept Russian approach when in what has become I think we have to admit one of the most famous comments of your career has said the comments were totally unacceptable David Sanger the New York Times reporter has called you patient zero in this new era of weaponising surveillance information not disinformation in this case but actual information can you tell us about that experience and and what you learn from it so we were in the middle of the my don protests in Ukraine in the winter of two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen.

Berlin Wall ten minutes two percent
"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

And Now The Hard Part

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

"From foreign policy and the Brookings Institution we bring you and now the hard part I'm Jonathan temperament on each episode we examined one vexing mm-hmm trace its origin and offer a way forward today what to do about the framing of the NATO alliance should never happen again and they will also determined to stand up to the expansion of the Soviet Union in the Cold War it was routine Russian means buzzing the airspace of NATO members in Western Europe the report details the extent to which Moscow has revived the tactic member ship in NATO obligates the members to defend any other member that's tacked why should my son go to Montenegro to defend it from attack in which you say I've asked the same question in his joint address to Congress on Tuesday president trump took credit for getting NATO allies spend more money on defense NATO's obsolete it's old it's fat it's loppy NATO has been good for Europe but NATO has also been good for the United States our guest is Victoria newland Tori the nonresident senior fellow at Brookings and former assistant secretary of state she's also served as US ambassador to NATO and a quick note this episode includes some explicitly winch Toria welcome let's start with the problem does it work to frame it this way the eight alliances fraying for variety of reasons at the very moment that the threat posed by outside forces especially Russia is surging how do you feel about that I would say in every generation of NATO's life and NATO now older than seventy there have been problems that challenged the resilience and applicability of the alliance but there's only one reason that the NATO alliance is in difficulty right now which is that the current president of the United States continues to cast into doubt whether our founding promise to each other mutual self defense will be honored you know the United States was the founding member of the NATO alliance we wrote and signed the treaty in in Washington so the problem is this underlying seed of doubt that's been sown and the fact that we could be reinventing NATO yet again for some of the challenges it's not yet dealing with and is it fair to say that the threat is growing because of course as you were pointing out with the possible exception of the period after the end of the Cold War NATO has always faced grave and existential threats and yet there does seem to be something particular about this moment in terms of the danger here's that are looming on virtually all sides you know having studied NATO I and then worked at NATO through various iterations I think when you're in it it always feels like the existential moment certainly felt existential when we invoked Article Five on September Twelfth Two Thousand and one of the mutual off defense language in NATO's article right correct the day after the twin towers went down in New York all NATO members committed to help the United States defend itself against whomever had hit us and at that time we didn't even know who it was that on attack against one or more of the allies in Europe or in North America shall be considered an attack against them all so that moment certainly felt existential particularly when we went to vote in NATO and if everybody had not agreed would have wrecked the alliance right there but to be back in the place of NATO's founding which is that we we have to worry about territorial incursions onto NATO landmasses in countries is a little bit back to the future and it does is feel scary I think that there are plenty of other threats that or also GonNa Challenge our kids and next generations at NATO format provides a great place for the great nations of the transatlantic space to talk about these things and to set some policies together and we're just not it using NATO for that and when we talk about NATO or the transatlantic alliance when we talk about it fraying what are you most worried about so I think that there are a number of things here the first thing is is our security commitment to each other still solid as we discussed the second thing was the economic commitment that we have to each other in the transatlantic space that begins to break down when the United States puts tariffs on its own allies and uses tariffs as as a weapon of coercion equally against its allies and its competitor still France did that I told them I said don't do it because if you do it I'm going to tax your wine we tarum in the third pieces all of this is based on commitment to free societies democracies that include elections alternation of power free media independent judiciaries transparency of public finance all these things and again you have a United States that is not only not preaching those values and extending and expanding them the way we always have were not necessarily always practicing in them at home either trump has raised a lot of questions and made people very anxious with some of the things that he said his reluctance to embrace article five for example before eventually doing it but beyond the rhetoric had things actually gotten worse in a more sort of concrete material way in NATO I think NATO is performing the fundamental security tasks said it needs to perform including keeping lots of forces of many nations out on the eastern edge to deter the Russians continuing to train in Afghanistan continuing to modernize the way the alliance works and frankly continuing to get more money in the Bank for defense from all these countries which by the way started in two thousand fourteen after the Crimea threat my concern is simply that if we ever had a catastrophic moment or a security crisis do the rest of the members of NATO feel secure enough in the way the United States supports them that they would support us if we needed them and what do you think the answer to that question is I think it depends on what the circumstances were ends on how long this seating of doubt about our own reliability continues is that really what you're most worried about the danger of a massive attack for example or is the real threat today from these forms of asymmetric warfare that Russia has gotten so good at waging all of these things it does short of actual major war whether it's election interference or air incursions through NATO airspace Britain's scrambled jets to except Russian aircraft on twenty one I don't think any of these threats posed by Russia right now are insurmountable or even the most dangerous security threats that we face my concern is that we're doing so little to coordinate our effort against them that we're providing an open greenfield for rush to run roughshod and in particular vis-a-vis Russia it's always been the case ever since the founding that the United States generally leads alliance policy towards Russia so when you have an America that with a president that has one view of Russia and the cabinet and Congressman have a different view it's very hard to provide coherent leadership particularly on New Challenges Congress pass legislation it believed that Russia should be sanctioned and the president signed it signed electon late last summer and then hasn't decided not to implement bright so we have an America that seems less committed to the alliance itself as well as to the shared values the core of the transatlantic community for so long that the same time that all of these old threats are raising their heads again and new threat Sir appearing. Now that we've we've talked about with the problem is let's step back and talk for a few minutes about how we got here is it twenty thirteen two thousand fourteen I think part of it if you WanNa look at the origins of president trump's prejudices about NATO Goto the fact that we all took too big a peace dividend after the Cold War ended the war once divided east from West now on its way to becoming an artifact of history you know we did pretty well although it was always an issue in NATO to ensure burden-sharing you know sufficient budgeting for security sufficient contributions military contributions to NATO a NATO mission.

NATO Brookings Institution president Jonathan trump
"nato" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Netflix series, Russian doll and many more. Listen this Friday. This is on point. I Magnin Chuck Ricciardi NATO turns seventy this month in this hour. We're talking with Barry posing, he's the director of the security studies program at MIT, and he wrote a recent column in the New York Times, headlined, Trump aside, what is the US role in NATO. And he's asking the important question about whether or not the United States to rethink what its role is in the North Atlantic Treaty organization. And of course, the president President Donald Trump has been very vocal about this. Here's what the president or I should say. Then candidate Trump said in two thousand sixteen about his view of NATO. He was doing a phone interview with Jonathan Karl on ABC's this week. What I'm saying is NATO's obsolete. Nato is is at it's extremely expensive to the United States disproportionately so and we should readjust NATO, and it's going to have to be either readjusted to take care of terrorism. Or we're going to have to set up a new a new coalition. I knew group of of of. Countries to handle terrorism because terrorism is out of control that was then candidate Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen on the other hand, we have a comment here from NATO secretary. General yen's Stoltenberg's speaking with CNBC at the MU Munich security conference in February of this year. He says NATO remains relevant needs is a strategy to deal with uncertainty to be prepared for surprises because they will come on the woman portent elemental such subsidies to have strong international institutions like for instance, Nathan that's the NATO secretary. General yen's Stoltenberg, Barry Posen, let me ask you. I mean about this question of relevance versus the certainty that that Stoltenberg says NATO provides there are people who might who relevance was a low bar. Well, but but on, but I'm not point. There are people who might hear your argument and say, actually. Vladimir Putin has proven that NATO is has never been more relevant than it is today because he's already showing his willingness to project Russian power of to your point a shadow of Soviet power. But he's willing to project it in Ukraine in Georgia and not having NATO there or a strong NATO would only further embolden him. I'm not going to say that Russia wouldn't wouldn't think more carefully about coursing other countries or attacking them? Those countries are in the North Atlantic Treaty organization and the Americans are continuing their guaranteed within the North Atlantic Treaty organization. I'm asking how much this matters to the United States national security matter. That's the question. I'm asking a masking what the cost benefit calculation is for the United States in NATO. Now, the fact that the Russians have sharp elbows on their own periphery should not come. As a surprise to anyone who studies? Great powers. We have sharp Bill on our periphery..

Chuck Ricciardi NATO North Atlantic Treaty organiza President Donald Trump United States Stoltenberg Russia Netflix secretary president Barry Posen Vladimir Putin New York Times Jonathan Karl MIT ABC director Ukraine CNBC Nathan MU Munich
"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"But because of the existence of red telephones between the Soviet Union and the United States because of arms control agreements because. Because of successive disarmament efforts in the seventies at least leading up to nineteen Eighty-nine and events of that year. There was a feeling in Europe. And indeed in Germany, the this might somehow be defined right now, we're looking at an environment that has become darker that has become more tense. And where if anything are something has to be the things are going the other way round you want to comment on that. And I have after that question for each you before we sort of broaden the periscope to the future. I think concerns is really put this. Well, my worry about the environment today with regard to NATO, isn't that we won't fighter can't fight. It is if you will the vertical connectivity between the liberal democracies. The North Atlantic Council the capacity for rapid decision making their that decision making being tied to. Relevant credible NATO nuclear deterrent, then to the conventional capability, I worry about firebreaks in their exactly. And as we find ourselves potentially more politically fragmented within the context of the members of NATO, which also the members of the EU in many respects, I worry once again as I said before the the capacity for an alliance to truly deter is its credibility and the demonstrated capacity to fight. But also, it's the appearance of its willingness to be determined to make the right decision with the rate speed to defend ourselves. And I worry that there has been as Constanza has properly said and used the right word a degradation in the continuity from the moment of the need to make the decision to our capacity to implement at the speeds necessary for those speeds in an. Of themselves to be the deterrent factor, not counting tanks, counting aircraft. But the speed of our capacity to react as an alliance is a deterring dimension in and of itself, and where we have become disconnected or where we have become a bit rusty because we haven't had to think in those terms we should put a lot of effort at the seventy th birthday of NATO into thinking about in every way possible. How we increase the connectivity between our democracies as a group our commitment to the alliance as a whole and our capacity to decide with the kinds of speed necessary to create the credibility and the deterrence necessary to defend NATO secretary general has said many times, many secretaries general have said this NATO isn't against anyone but NATO is for the defense of Europe. And we need to think in those terms, and when you think in those terms the absolute imperative and the necessity for interoperability. To sustain that. And every possible way we can but to create that vertical tempo of decision. Making and force commitment is absolutely essential to the future. We don't see the Russian the Soviet hordes lined up on the border again. But there are threats in the aggregate, which I think can break down the political unity of NATO, and 'cause the president of the United States to wonder whether NATO's even worth it anymore. And that I think is in some respects the existential threat to NATO, it's not a thermonuclear threat. It's the incapacity of the members to show sufficient unity to justify the reason for the alliance. And thank you, you set up a question, I'm gonna post to Constanza in just a minute about how NATO is doing halfway through this term of President Donald Trump in the United States, but I would ask to sort of more almost casual question, but you know, it's a serious topic. When you commanded NATO forces in the field. What was it like, what's the sort of striking takeaway at a personal level? Obviously..

NATO United States Europe Soviet Union Constanza Donald Trump North Atlantic Council EU Germany president
"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"And hypersonic defense. But as a body that can work together at twenty nine members. How do you find strength today? Well, I think in some respects Constanza said what NATO has done for us as it's provided us a level of stability in an environment. Where ill liberalism is creeping into some of the democratic states of NATO. And at regard the commonality that we all enjoy when the ambassadors of NATO said at the North Atlantic Council, the commonality that we enjoy as result of the leadership of the supreme allied commander of Europe with all of our Twenty-nine partners. That is a stabilising factor in a world that has become very unstable in many respects NATO faces. I think the challenge that it has today NATO faces a challenge of app tation? And where before the threat was generally known to us, the threat was generally planned for and the resources were accumulated to deal with that threat, particularly. During Soviet era. The challenges that we face today is the challenge of a revanche just Russia with multiple capabilities both conventional modernized capabilities plus operations in the cyber domain not just targeted upon the edge of the NATO frontier. But of course, targeted in many respects through Strategic Influence campaign. Deep into the democracies of Dato it self NATO has to adapt to the challenge of modernized. Russia NATO has to adapt to climate change, for example, which is coming. I think with a real vengeance. And in particular, how NATO deals with the far north in conjunction with the potential for competition with Russia and China, actually as the northeast passage may. Well, in fact, the opening up within the generation NATO has to deal I think with a continued presence of unstable Middle East and the potential for a destabilized North Africa. Which can of course, produce the kinds of either. Economic or conflict migration into Europe that can fundamentally change not just the demographics of the European population..

NATO Europe Russia supreme allied commander Middle East Constanza North Africa North Atlantic Council China
"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Seventeen years that nato has been and the international community has been involved in afghanistan so which one of those is better one meets the two percent target the other one doesn't but if you look at the output the pictures quite different another good example is france france spends one point eight percent of its gdp on defense francis a nuclear power it is it has a global presence including in the asia pacific it is active in the suhel and in north africa and in the middle east and is a close partner of the united states it's pretty hard for washington to say france isn't pulling its weight for transatlantic security but that's the conclusion you have to reach if you if you adopt two percent as your as your principal criterion and so i think that part of it is that two percents a good metric like you said it's a good talking point so as nato kind of just failing to sell itself well there's there's a little bit more behind that two percent also because in two thousand fourteen when nato agreed on that guideline they also agreed that countries should be spending twenty percent of their defense budgets on a major and on research and development now that's a pretty that's that's a better measure of whether you're actually contributing military capabilities than just the raw two percent because you can spend two percent and have most of it go to personnel costs but if you're spending twenty percent on equipment then that is an indicator of the capabilities you'll have in the future that you can put at the service of of our shared security interests and so we also think that that twenty percent needs to get a whole lot more attention then then this this two percent and that would be a lot more constructive i wanna talk about something that i think maybe prenine eleven or or maybe even even more recent than that was a more common topic conversation but it was more about the future of nato like what does nato do or what should nato do are we closer on on a kind of a universal agreement on on what is well over the last few years the european members of nato and the members of the european union have come back to this idea of stronger european defense and and so what they've been doing lately is agreeing to to coordinate among themselves in the european union through what they call permanent struck cooperation mainly focused on acquiring capabilities and doing that jointly so that there's less duplication more efficiency europe spends about two hundred billion dollars on defense per year that's a lot of money they get less for it than than they should so so this is an effort to do that but there's a there's a deeper question that you started with a does does europe need to develop greater autonomy and and i think the conclusion many allies have been drawing in the last few months and especially this week is yes the question is whether they can they can put in place the political structures to create and use european forces and can they do that in a way that hedges against an uncertain future and uncertain future us orientation toward european security without rejecting the atlantic alliance because let's face it europe is dependent on.

nato afghanistan two percent twenty percent two hundred billion dollars Seventeen years eight percent
"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"That i was worried about yesterday and he has a series of inaccurate or semi accurate comments but suddenly we got the best relationship with nato we've ever had they love me and our relationship with germany is terrific and it was it was absolutely a classic example of how he operates come in turn up all the furniture over and then both about has been in you know people picking up the mess that you created i do think that when he talks about going to meet with vladimir putin from a stamp a strengthened nato he is not listening to the voices of nato leaders they are genuinely anxious about america's one term commitment to their security no matter what he said this morning and i think that's the biggest takeaway from this very fractious summit that it's not the press conference at the end all the things he said along the way which which bird which people will will will remember as one german newspaper said this is not a crisis this is a catastrophe that was their reaction to to what was being being said yeah yesterday i think another important point in news was one sector state mike pompeo talked about the status of negotiations with the koreans who reporting the kim drug on any he said that they're on the road toward working out a denuclearization of formula language that the us was a little bit vague he said they intend to do nuclear rise they're going to accomplish it i didn't hear any specific time line i didn't hear the kind of hard commitments that we've been looking for and so it's obvious that pump peyot is in a process of exploring how overtime north korea's gonna meet this what sounded like such a firm commitment at the singapore summit yeah actually say firm commitment which this past week when it was repeated made the north koreans call us gangsters so david i think it's very interesting you underline the disunity there the president said quote we are more unified than ever before i know you make it your practice it is your job to talk to ambassadors leaders across not only europe but the globe give us give us their reactions to what they've seen over the past several days and whether this whether nato was as the president said quote more unified than ever before well i think the reactions to the initial drop the bomb phase yesterday reactions were very negative people used sharp language and responding to to president trump the reaction to the to the nato summit is a whole may be okay this is how he doesn't he is very disruptive beginning and then we pretty much go by the script and he claims credit for a win so what the sum total of this is is going to be as is hard to predict and i think it'll depend in large part on whether he does things in his summit meeting with putin that that european leaders find threatening to their security interests president president trump has to be very careful he's bargaining there securities he talks about ukraine he's bargaining the security of the whole of the middle east wing talks about syria so we'll we'll all be watching very carefully for the commitments he makes he he wants these things to be successes so he can claim a win brussels to be a success that he just told us how wonderful it was square the language with what he said before he'll want the helsinki summit with putin to be a win but we'll have to look very carefully what did he give up to get that aura of success the president also it's worth noting beka ignored to questions about the kurds who have done the marketable work in iraq and syria in helping us in our efforts to push back into feed isis he also noted question on whether georgia could a country that fled putin invaded back in two thousand eight whether georgia could expect to receive nato membership and also ignored a question on whether he would recognize the invasion of crimea and the annexation that definitely sidestep dad and brought mike pompeo to the microphone to talk about north korea and that was fascinating there were a few times also it was kind of clear the president really didn't know the answer to the question or didn't understand the terminology being us about hard brexit he says i just want everyone to be happy joining us now pulitzer prize winning author and presidential historian doris kearns goodwin she's the author of the.

nato
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To russian so we started by talking about these three countries the us russia and germany as being the three countries that explain the beginnings of nato and i'm struck that the news out of the nato summit today was that trump was going after germany saying that it was under the control of russia germany is totally controlled russian because they will get it from sixty to seventy percent of their energy from russia at a new pipeline even what was that about that seems like the ultimate insult to deliver at a nato summit it was the old insult and it may have had more to do with his differences with angela merkel the chancellor germany than it did with any true belief but the core of the argument was germany gets an overwhelming amount of its natural gas the fuel that keeps it warm in the winter from russia and it's now building a new pipeline that will bring it in directly from russia and his basic argument is how can you argue that you're standing up against russia when you are funding russia because russia's overly dependent on its energy exports and when you're vulnerable to the russians who can simply turn off the valve and what was the reaction from germany it led many to question whether or not president trump fundamentally believes in the nato mission and that's a big question and i was at a conference of europeans last weekend where i'd never before heard people question whether or not they should go full forward thinking that the united states would be the core of a future nato and for the first time i heard them debating could we continue with a nato that didn't have the us at the center and one in which the united states wasn't the dominant voice in defence policy putin and trump artem meet in helsinki finland on july sixteen just days after the president attends the nato summit with america's closest allies the president for dictum that meeting putin quote maybe the easiest of all the down he has scheduled on his trip david i want to ask you about what's happening right after this nato meeting ends which seems particularly curious given the history that you've just outlined for us right after this meeting ends in brussels president trump is going to russia to meet with putin what do you make of this timing the problem isn't the meeting michael the problem their mind is donald trump's message if he was leaving nato to stand up to putin and say we're not going to tolerate the meddling elections and we're not going to tolerate the continued occupation of crimea and the harassment of ukraine if that was his message i think they'd be fine with the meeting happening right entered nato their problem is they don't actually believe that donald trump is going to stand up to putin and they're somewhat horrified at the imagery of him beating up publicly on television against his allies and then embracing an autocrat who has put distances and reporters to death and is increasingly cracking down on his own country so it seems like we find ourselves in a really interesting place where the country that nato was formed to protect against is at its most aggressive in decades and the country that created nato is seemingly the least committed it's ever been it's a pretty rich ironing that at the moment that we weren't that the cold war may not be over that it may just be entering different kind of face that the united states is questioning the very premise on which it created nato and that the russians have been successful in sewing more and more discord throughout europe and helping exaggerate each of these schisms but no one's exaggerated those schisms more than president trump himself not by questioning whether the nato nations are contributing enough that's a perfectly legitimate question to raise but questioning whether or not he would even stick with the alliance and that's the central issue david thank you very much thank you.

us russia germany seventy percent
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"It is not like nato has struggled to find anything to do since the soviet union collapsed in the early nineteen ninety s and nato found itself absorbing almost all of the nations of the hitherto hostile warsaw pact in the mid to late nineteen ninety s nato intervened in the wars of the former yugoslavia three former parts of which are now members of the alliance in two thousand and one it invoked article five it's famous collective defense clause for the first time after al qaeda attacked the united states nato took charge of intervention forces in afghanistan in two thousand and three in two thousand and eleven nato oversaw an intervention in libya it has also run other operations around the world in response to piracy migration and natural disasters among many other things we'll joining me now to discuss the day to day management of a busy agenda is breeze puffier now chief strategic officer at rest modern global but before that between ten and twenty sixteen head of policy planning for to nato secretary general and as aggressive muslim and the incumbent jens stoltenberg first of all i just wanted to get a sense of what actually goes on at nato you ahead of policy planning in the office of the secretarygeneral added sort of day in day out level what did that actually involve well it involves thinking about what's next so thinking about the next big summit about where the alliance but especially the secretary on need to push the policy nido so it's kind of forward thinking work but it needs to be grounded in the day to the reality of an alliance of twenty nine nations well that lines up nicely the next question i wanted to ask which is how easy it is to maintain a consistency of strategy among those twentynine members of nato are there twenty nine different ideas of what nato supposed to be four yes i would say twenty nine different angles of what nato should be doing the key is whether all these species kind of adopt together and that he can form kind of consistent whole or as we see now as we have seen in the past you do have problems of the peace is not fitting together and having such tensions of visions between the different members of nato that it becomes hard to reconsider so i think that's the consent work of the secretary general is to try to find the the point of balance between all these views that's why often the secretarygeneral speeches can be pretty boring because they are about kind of trying to touch on everybody's interest but in terms of crisis i think the real question is what's the leadership inside the alliance and the leadership is not just secretary journal it's the main members by main members i say those were spending most on defense and on the nato's patrick's so it's what we call traditionally the quad so it's the uk us france and germany but among those members and among those different ideas that the secretarygeneral has cape on track is there a commonly understood hierarchy of importance based on relative power especially military power that individual members have menu mentioned there the quality who four of the key members of nato iset understood that what the us the uk and france in particular one two three nuclear armed powers is going to matter more than what say stonier or greece might want i would say yes for the us when the us does want something a one to take the alliance the certain direction this will become kind of at least central point of discussion among the alliance's members that doesn't mean the us is going to get its way but often it's what shapes the edge and the other is different because france is in a particular place with nato francis you know as we join nato military structure but francis never been fully into nato at least into the nato thinking i think france still has conflicted feelings towards the alliance that are historic and that are also part of the inertia of some of its diplomats and frontal so wants to see a stronger european capacity that is not always synonymous with a stronger nato germany is interesting because they are very committed to nato this is really in their constitutional is core to their security but germany's not prone to want to send troops abroad and to go into a difficult operations so germany's usually key but not necessarily leading from the front is there any concern within nights has got two big the twentynine members is too many especially to respond with what might be the.

nato soviet union
"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"This week nato's heads of state and government will convene in brussels though this is supposed to be a meeting of twenty nine countries which all on the same side it may not be straightforwardly convivial the alliance's most powerful member the united states is now led by president unconvinced of the benefits of cooperation its second largest military turkeys is now commanded by a president who would be acting little differently if he were an adverse serie nato's original antagonised and still primary reason for being russia has evolved into an amorphous fo not merely playing by different rules but playing an entirely different game what in two thousand eighteen is nato four how might our postwar world have been different without it and would we miss it if it wasn't there this is the foreign desk every country has a certain amount of national pride become from small country like i do it's not such a huge deal because you know you're not important in the world but if you are important involved like the soviet union and now russia you do feel that you have to respond somehow whether that threats or active aggression is imagined or real that's what we're seeing now and have seen throughout post world war two european history the notion that because there are too many you allies than the allies becomes politically and militarily too complicated to manoeuver is actually not validated by facts it's the other way wrong is the big member states because they have big interest strong opinions who sometimes break consensus or want to take the direction with the other stall onto follow they did consider wrapping up nato and the reason why didn't it is the awful owed maximum why does naito exist to keep the germans style the russians and the american still in europe funny enough the wiki as part of that is keeping americans hello and welcome to the foreign desk i'm andrew mullet my guest today are elizabeth bro and robert fox elizabeth bra is a nonresident senior fellow at the atlantic council robert fox is defence editor at the evening standard both join me here in the studio in london welcome both in the first part of the discussion i wanted to talk about an imaginary world in which nato as we know it had not been constituted back when it was constituted and robert l ask you i if we go back to the late nineteen forties when nato was i put together was inevitable i think yes for two reasons the way the war ended in berlin and the paranoia about the soviet hoards it wasn't enormous ministry effort at nobody knew quite what they choose from very effective german propaganda that this was the real element had to be fought and it was known that particularly the european army such that they were but particularly the brits were exhausted also vents in the un as the budgeting european community struggled with the military arm that had to be a military arm and particularly given the posture of style and it would be a defensive hard pa military lights nato i mean elizabeth is it you'll sense that when it was founded they was the idea that it would gradually expand or or is that just being one of those things that there is that inevitable momentum of most bureaucracies very few organizations in human history of door point where someone in charges go and actually i think this will do that's right and that's what we've seen with the u it started something in that we have something completely different but going back to nato i think the expansion over the years shows the extraordinary agility of geopolitics started as as one thing then when the cold war ended it became something different and now it's going back to that initial mission the territorial defence of europe but when it started as robert pointed out earlier it was really just a very pragmatic response to realities on the ground and the fact that there was no way of emerging allies keeping together in an informal alliance which really will were to had been and so they needed proper framework to work together and especially to keep the german border safe rubber the soviet union of course begins collapsing in the late eighties finally does away with it self in the early nineteen nineties and there's a certain amount of conversation around that time as to what nato is now actually four because it had been constituted as elizabeth pointed out earlier for the territorial defensive europe and really there was only one entity from which it was seeking to defend europe's territory had nato plans at all.

nato brussels
"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Part of that mobility is to make sure that nato works very closely with the european union because this is using highways and civilian structure and getting parliament to approve when troops have to go across borders so i actually i know it sounds very very nitty gritty and detailed if you can't move forces rapidly to get to an emergency you can't adequately assure collective defense so they're working on that nato is also going to talk a bit about the east but also about the south so nato will offer an iraqi training mission seminar what it did actually about a decade ago but obviously with the when isis came out of you know out of nowhere then took such significant portions of iraq and syria how do we retrain those forces to be able to handle these types of counter insurgency efforts and there will be a focus on sort of thinking about the south you know the baltic states poland central europe they're very concerned about the russia challenge as northern europe for those nato countries in the south spain italy turkey they're worried about the threats that opposed from the south so it's making sure we have that balance so it's been very carefully to it is a successful summit clearly burdensharing which is nato nato members spending more money will be what the president we'll talk about non stop there is a lot of good news europe europe nato allies have substantially increased their defense spending but what's got into the president's mind is two percent is everything and now it's being turned into a battering ram against allies there was reportedly a letter sent by president trump to the nato leaders who are not at two percent only five members currently spend two percent or above of their gross domestic product on defense spending again you have to be a place where you're pushing because we need to push your to do more in europe needs to do more or you overdo it and then you start developing antibodies that now governments are resisting because of the way you are asking them to increase their spending so this is what's the most controversial about the president's behavior if he really goes off on a public and private rant on the two percent if he links that in some way which he has in his twitter feed to the tariff so if you want tariff relief you better give me two percent those start being linked this could be very difficult summit so we don't know it could be perfectly successful it's poised for success it just depends if at the president will take the victory lap and he should because some of this is at his urging of the direction of the agenda or if he'll just walk all over it on this two percent beat and then we'll have a nato summit that will look an awfully like the conclusion of the seven summit earlier this month and part of the nato someone is is to figure this this readiness ready for what i suppose the question what is the state of tensions with russia so you know right now i think nato has addressed certainly the land component with these four nato battalions making sure they're rotating and exercising but what we've seen over the last few days and i think this is in part grows from the uncertainty of the us russia summit we've seen a very big spike in deaths in ukraine on the line of contact in the done boss that is not a subdued conflict that is a hot conflict there are you know per week perhaps two to three killed in action and that problem hasn't been resolved so the tensions are there the hybrid challenges are still there influence operations against a nato member states we just saw snap exercise last week in the arctic that russia did not notify tell anybody about that leads to sort of misunderstandings potentially so we do need to talk we need to get better transparency and deconflict militarily but it's it's very uncertain as i said you will not know if the nato summit is successful until after the russia us summit in helsinki because nato the gender may be fine but if president trump suggests that you know ukraine that's yours russia or georgia or he makes these spear of influence he seeds that you have really destroyed or undercut.

european union nato two percent