17 Burst results for "national youth theatre"

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

Giles Coren Has No Idea

07:58 min | Last month

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

"Holiday show. I did wish you were here. The travel show. But not nine hundred seventy when you were four or five you. Okay look and it's not true. There was no episode tag with you. Niro boy it says it really. This is because the reason. I have my friends on to bother research. I tell you. I think there was. There is a director called graham who again. i think i've been incorrectly linked to people who said oh my graham leaks and son and i think graham exton might have directed attack and that might have been with can we. Can you make sure we get the right thing. And i really. I was really punting for and and quickly shoots out. There is nothing to do with you know well. My my father was claimed to be some connected in some way. There is a place called thick ston in your show which is next to masoom where the becomes wrong. And i don't believe there is any connection intriguing. I did a charity bike ride last year. Where we where we cycled from scotland. Just give away. What really happened when you where we drive i mean and on the way through psyche yorkshire. And it's not a part. The world very familiar with and i saw the sign. This week's massive is a couple of miles away. I need to pop in. And so we had a film crew following asuka. This'll be a nice moment. They could not be less interested. When i told embrace the prodigal son returning imagined for fifty years up six. We'll come through our village so there'll be quite nice if you stand behind the bomb. We'll get a picture of you behind the bar in the brewery. And i was just sort of getting away and they paid quite happy. They were heading for graphics. Taggart's so so. Like i said the national youth that is true you. Will you choose. So when i was about fourteen i think fourteen or fifteen. I had a geography teacher. Mr beverage who who was very supportive of my acting at school and he suggested that i should apply to the national youth theatre and i was fortunate to get in and so we would put we do plays just down the road from where we are now on your way in the very beginning youth as it was just behind in pine king's cross station on your way. Then it moves to the holloway road so a this again. This part of the world was quite familiar for me that and then later which is now still the national office. Yes and then. Not far from raleigh north unimportant exactly. That's still that's still have dreams if my children getting into northland and plenty but they're not intellectuals who you you asked for space dust. Yeah now you remember. Space gap -solutely exit was a sort of black pack with stars in the orange flavor. And scroll favor. And i got this. These are pushed. Dippers all up well. This is technically a chevy did depth. That was yeah. This is candace popping up in canada. But you still have never had it before. I went to the shop. Ben couldn't find intense. Go any of the shop tiny. So i went into the convenience store with the nine year olds. Go to get that w. k. d. Yeah and sure enough. They had it. So i haven't had popping candy center. I'm gonna say ryan thinking that. It's sort of us now by heston. Some imaginative chefs to use these in the pudding. Something you do get popping. Candy in restaurants jamie's using the lally to dip in. That's how it works. Can you hear that knowledge. Mouthful of popping candy. It doesn't pop as much as it did in my you know because i have to downgrade. They didn't take this off. Uric acid out of the stuff that we had as kid like weapons-grade popping handy so yeah they've downgraded it quite significantly. But i seem to remember there was sort of it was it was there was sort of it was because of the name i thought they thought it was like angel. Dust space dastardly. They had various sounded. Like i thought that. I felt that was put not such a good idea because of those times the other thing was that we also had kids had cigarettes. Do you remember what was strange. Encourage children twenty of them with karen tips on the end and it was a my parents smoked and my dad would come by forty ruffles. One eight one package of for you. Someone you get a nice to revisit the space dust according to this is the kind of thing you in daniel craig adding this. Oh we were literally ripped to the tits spiced based us back in those days daniel craig because you get it for one hundred million film you a lot of space you get a lot of space to us and you want a big actors alike. So yeah he sort of went onto become james bond. Get up for. Everyone bright fisher. I don't know where things went wrong. But our pas deviated around about the age of seventeen nothing lease your breakfast. Show is on the bond film industry defer. Do you like watching him and bundled you now. I think he's the best. But i also can't help thinking that bond does essentially sort of is what brought cinema to it's knees the fact they keep putting it off means that no one can go see the film the horrible thing where it's bondage to be selfless and roic and in the end the most bond life thing to do would be to carry on carry on and give let yes not make quite as much money may be as you would have done but say some cinemas. Now you gotta worry about that. No we don't talk. We didn't fall out. We keep in touch. Did you just call him short on we did. We did a production of merit saad in the national youth theatre which is quite brutal. The marquis decide when you're sort of fourteen fifteen was quite on. Yeah that's was good. It was quite a radical theater group. And you want to be a serious actor. I just wanted to just was something that i've always wanted to do and i always felt like i was. I was fortunate i did. I did a play in the west end which was described by. The standards of the worst thing of that one was owned. Yes right yeah. I able to recognize it from the description. But i was that your poster. I do not agree. I had a great evening. That was with strong ratings. Has done not in krispy. My my brother-in-law and it was great. Fun so i was lucky i did. We did a couple of plays on a couple of things on tv. We should never really. And it was something that i saw. I thought of thought that. That was what i would end up doing. And i never really did which was always a bit of a shame. Because of that ship has sailed i think. Now you and then university or polytechnic. And then christie's i want to get too far from the week. Crunchies come up. Next childhood is well no not so much the bacon we crunchies. I feel why people say well. It's the greatest crisp and for me. There is only one often. it's a question only ever debated on this graphic. Okay on your show. I know that people argue about what is the greatest flavor. Chris and i've heard your show the four. No one's gone for wheat. Crunchies court correct that winds up cocktail a lot of a lot of skips cocktails people.

Chris canada scotland daniel craig forty ruffles fifty years fourteen four last year one hundred million five twenty Niro nine year graham One This week fifteen six james bond
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Lemar Show

The Lemar Show

05:35 min | 4 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Lemar Show

"Concert as young teenager. School stuff i was. I loved drama school and one of my teachers school in secondary school at that point kind of really now is the was quite you know excelling and she took me and i joined different youth citizens and stuff like that and even ended up in the national youth theatre and that. Yeah but confident kid. I wouldn't call myself confident. I just knew the Sometimes when you see someone do something you can do that. You're right on our can do it better. I just had that thing me. It wasn't confidence. He just thought. I could do mean so also is doing the acting thing and this is we're talking like mid late eighties now. Prince came along. It's an is and man. I don't know if you remember that time. It was like a you either one of two camps. Either in the michael michael for the prince camp. I was kind of nice. The right in the middle say to slightly leaning towards prince because he played. Because i used to love. Let the my my brother bill. Quite a few..

mid late eighties one two camps michael michael teachers
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

03:43 min | 5 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

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There's graduates <Speech_Male> to the <Silence> jiffy arrogant. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's up to every organization <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Big <Speech_Male> big or small <Speech_Male> to try and identify <Speech_Male> a single voice <Speech_Male> or one hundred voices <Speech_Male> or a thousand voices <Speech_Male> that have missed <Speech_Male> out on the past twelve <Speech_Male> months and give <Speech_Male> them that platform <Speech_Male> on that support <Speech_Male> through engagement. <Speech_Male> And hopefully <Speech_Male> through employment <Speech_Male> we just employed <Speech_Male> over three hundred <Speech_Male> freelances in the <Speech_Male> past twelve months <Speech_Male> and in nurse will wait <Speech_Male> because the cultural recovery <Speech_Male> ground. That's <Speech_Male> being that full <Speech_Male> that reason <Speech_Male> but it's up to organizations <Speech_Male> to filter <Speech_Male> and find <Speech_Male> talent <Speech_Male> that so <SpeakerChange> desperately <Speech_Male> needs it a. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> i i think. I think <Speech_Male> it's going to be a big policy. <Speech_Male> I think people are gonna feel really <Speech_Male> relieved out <Speech_Male> like a wild great halsey <Speech_Male> is gonna go. <Speech_Male> Boom flights <Speech_Male> holidays. Boom <Speech_Male> said to coach <Speech_Male> experience boom. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> there's going to be a <Speech_Male> hangover <Speech_Male> and then the reality sinks <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> that's what we need to <Speech_Male> protect against. <Speech_Male> That's the problem. <Speech_Male> Is the lumberton <Speech_Male> thinking the longer <Speech_Male> term damage. <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> is there unafraid. <Speech_Male> For <SpeakerChange> old attention <Speech_Male> he see <Speech_Male> potentially yes <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> can we <Speech_Male> just for the end of the <Speech_Male> show. Here <Speech_Male> have a thing <Speech_Male> about what <Speech_Male> it's gonna be <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> all that opening <Speech_Male> ninety <Speech_Male> game when <Speech_Male> those theatres <Speech_Male> have opened <Speech_Male> up when the crowds <Speech_Male> have come <Speech_Male> back when you'll <Speech_Male> able <Speech_Male> to look out <Speech_Male> across <Speech_Male> an audience and <Speech_Male> go. Yes <Speech_Male> we're back <Speech_Male> now. <SpeakerChange> How <Speech_Male> is that <Speech_Male> going to feel <Speech_Male> for. You isn't <Speech_Male> going to be almost <Speech_Male> as good as the first <Speech_Male> time you ever <Speech_Male> set foot on <Speech_Male> stage. <Speech_Male> Look <SpeakerChange> at <Speech_Male> audience <Speech_Male> Yeah i think. He <Speech_Male> tends to emotion <Speech_Male> which is what we <Speech_Male> trade on what it <Speech_Male> says. What stories are it's <Speech_Male> all about emerging <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> i mean just <Speech_Male> took you back down getting <Speech_Male> jingles <Speech_Male> and that is without guarantees <Speech_Male> the ball which <Speech_Male> coast closed. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> So i <Speech_Male> absolutely habsi <Speech_Male> feel that tingling <Speech_Male> sensation being <Speech_Male> liable auditory <Speech_Male> with light performance. <Speech_Male> I mean the other <Speech_Male> day ahead of sunlight. <Speech_Male> What was on the south bank. <Speech_Male> And there was one <Speech_Male> so busca <Speech_Male> and she <Silence> was brilliant <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> normally. We're <Speech_Male> whippet numb <Speech_Male> to that. <Speech_Male> In london regalia <Speech_Music_Male> yet another <Speech_Male> in the way. Oh <Speech_Male> you wanna walk faster <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you guys at the mission. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> we stop <Speech_Male> and we hear <Speech_Male> and we observe <Speech_Male> in a <Speech_Male> fumble <Speech_Male> appreciative <Speech_Male> way <Speech_Male> own go. There's <Speech_Male> somebody singing in the streets. <Speech_Male> That will she's <Speech_Male> wonderful. Get <Speech_Male> give up <Speech_Male> gillan absolute contract. <Speech_Male> She was brilliant. <Speech_Male> And i think <Speech_Male> we're we're ready <Speech_Male> for that first <Speech_Male> night experience <Speech_Male> to just <Speech_Male> sit back <Speech_Male> and enjoy <Speech_Male> the joy on <Speech_Male> state. I <Speech_Male> hope that is joined on <Speech_Male> stage as well. I mean <Speech_Male> i think it's the gypsy <Speech_Male> of lots of bitter <Speech_Male> juices <Speech_Male> commissioners <Speech_Male> organizations to <Speech_Male> emission. <Speech_Male> Happy stuff <Speech_Male> as well. <Speech_Male> You picked on my <Speech_Male> pessimism. I <Speech_Male> think it's a note yourself <Speech_Male> is that we should commission <Speech_Male> more joy <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> well and i think you'll <Speech_Male> reggie's some comedy <Speech_Male> is music for <Speech_Male> laughter. Listen <Speech_Male> live interaction <Speech_Male> and the first night will <Speech_Male> be something to remember <Speech_Male> to show. I <Speech_Male> can't conway actually <Speech_Male> on the <Speech_Male> about on. <Speech_Male> I will miss weapons of <Speech_Music_Male> just thinking about.

london sixty ninety one hundred voices over three hundred first Speech_Music_Male past twelve months single voice twelve thousand voices a Speech_Male lumberton
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

"Up let's it. Let's do a quick labral now. Please do that subscribe button. So you never miss our interviews features news and analysis every day at four pm after the break more from paul and the future of theater. Thanks for coming back now. Paul impart one of the. You were talking about the phya getting passion back for theater. One thing that's really impressed me is not just the talent that applied for the future theatre fund but the numbers a huge numbers of people that genuinely truly dream of performing of creating theater again here in london and across the uk. You've already said that we're the best in the wild this clearly. We have the up and coming talent to remain. So don't we. I mean it. It starts ends with being on stage. Oh or or actually building in designing and creating a show off stage is just as important about authentic talent technical talent expert. You think some people think if you're a stage manager for instance or step design if fish. You can only do that that that's not. The case does a statue a set as debit is just crazy. A the uk pervading debar. Divide expo twenty one. Twenty two incident meant achievement technical achievement united states designers stage-managed is gonna end up running stadiums designing shows an outdoor venues in arenas across the globe and lighting as well and sound creation audio design a so so inventively wonderful to be apostles as a member of the audience is director Then then the voices of the future The images of the future and so actually being on stage as an actor is to be honest with easiest. Paul that job No friends competing oscillate In a way you know that's the easy bit the rest is actually creating building it around them and we will fit to make his now so to be fat traps as well. They invent as what was very impressive. is the skills came across. Not just one type of skill so inactive might think that is natural in thirty years ago. That's what you want to do is what you were now. Everybody's decision maker. You know that. Create what they do. Spoken word is well. They're designed they play instruments. Crite soundscape They they're the full package Said the invention on the agility of young talent is clear for everybody however i can hear parents guardians across the land going wide. You want to take part in this now. Because isn't the industry at risk and that's what worries me is that we're going to miss a generation of talent right now we've got it. If trained you an fallen off that cliff with no opportunity to and what she full. It takes a lot more effort and money to pick yourself up. If you trick okay you fool that's dodgy that's really hard that's hitting in so many ways So this fund is there to detect a future full as well as those who have fallen already in the twelve months. And that's what's been so one for russia. Yeah i do. I do worry about those who graduated in the summer of last year and there was nothing there for them. I genuinely just nothing there for them. can we get. Can we reach those people. Can we pick them back up again. Can we say. I know it's been hard but it just sustain will be. We'll come back. well. I mean with with yes. There are initiatives outlets to kickstart program for instance..

Paul london twelve months thirty years ago paul twenty one four pm uk Twenty two incident one type russia One thing one last year summer of skill united states
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

"Honor. It's absolute privilege and it's a privilege that everybody should be able to have the opportunities to explore an experience that's in the auditorium as well as on stage and back stage. It shouldn't be elitist zone. And i think at times. It's been criticized. Today's actually a is the most real vibrant center for culture. And i hope in this recovery. The certainly fish runners and producers independent produces an organization which is necessarily will continue to invent ways of channelling opportunities for new talent on stage in the heart of london's west end. I'm very lucky. I live not far from the orlands and it is a ghost town. We know the west end is dead end without the west end. The central london is and that kind of brings us really nicely to the future theatre when she's being involved with paul so we're trying to the evening standard help talent breakthrough in all kinds of areas of theater. You've been chairing the panel for the judges. What's best you about what you've seen. Well i thank you for the opportunity while. Thank you evening standard. Thank you ticked up. I mean it's been an absolute game changer. Those those twelve names and more Was really over. Prestigious is the ability to spy oldest cultural financial physical barriers. The participants in the future to fund of experience very clearly is that talent fail to communicate who they are why deserving of this race cash award of ten thousand pounds. It's one thing to have talent and to feel very protected by Feel proud of it but it's another thing to explore it and to actually exchange it and set it on. I've talked in the past about the idea of how young people need to promote that talent to a wider audience and this digital renaissance said we've all been experiencing whether we like it or not It is that has really shop and some of that talent base developed to communicate in really clear way. it's an equalizer is very democratic. Everybody's had to do this..

london ten thousand pounds Today paul twelve names one thing central london
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Leader

"From the evening standard in london. I'm david malls land. And this is the leader Wednesday leagues i. It's going to be a bit of a landmark dave the arts in the uk. Let's start with what the evening standard itself is doing which is no small thing on wednesday. The first recipients of the future theatre fund will be revealed. That's twelve 'up-and-coming stage talents. Each receiving ten thousand pounds. The fund was set up an association with tiktok and in partnership with the national youth theatre in response to the pandemic which shut down theaters. And of course took with the opportunities for the next generation. Not only that. But the chancellor is expected to announce a four hundred million pound boost for the arts in his budget. He's putting three hundred million into the culture recovery fund which already has more than one point five billion in it and there's another one hundred million going to museums and cultural to keep them afloat until they can reopen on may seventeenth. Well joined by. Paul v his the chief executive of the national youth theatre and also chaired the judging panel for the future theatre fund paulette. Start with at four hundred million in that. Classic question isn't enough well. It's always nice to be asked. That question is four hundred million enough and of goes one simple word out. There is no. It's never enough when you're dating was such a catastrophic whole a gap in a coach old landscape however h is another great lifeline. Jesus if aside many beverage feel. There is a fundamental support from google government to say. We recognize the value of culture. I mean let's not make any pretends about the situation actual struggle and technically posted pandemic. the struggles will continue. You know this should be at the heart of this recovery. We talked about green recovery. We should talk about more about a cultural because because coccia is at the heart of the recovery because coach is at the heart of everything we all in this country. And i think that johnson is definitely going somewhere to recognizing that so credit where credit is due but of course we also on credit. So please don't taxi out to pay for Time Will do well we'll survive. We'll thri thanks to support. Well that's quite jazzing intellectual question here because it's possible. The income tax might go up and self employed people might have to pay higher taxes. Is it worth paying a little bit more in tax to save our theaters to save culture. You see. I think the questions the wrong way round for one. We shouldn't be in which it shouldn't be an either or should it. It shouldn't be. How do we save them. It should be that we appreciate the possibility we are out of our national identity. There is no question that they will be saved. It should be how so you'll saying taxes. Of course not were wise enough and you'll know on old enough sadly to know how the fiscal arrangements work in this country. If we're broke somebody has to pay for it. I think. I think that what shifted on. I hope is remains is. There is such a thing as a kind economy so if this new shift in fiscal policy around the kind thinking than absolutely sits a arts life us live arts should get a host of that kind of konami and there are many organizations. The unsure would love to pay the extra extra tax many of have benefited from the essence on the structure of In this country many global organizations entertainment organizations have done extremely well out of british theatre coach at talented has risen from it on stage and backstage so if they want to pay a bit more than On show at be delighted to because they're reinvesting in talent that absolutely gives them numerous amounts of profit margins To come so. I think that's an interesting one to look at individual taxes if you can afford it yet actually..

london may seventeenth ten thousand pounds Paul uk four hundred million one hundred million wednesday three hundred million paulette Each tiktok four hundred million pound johnson Jesus five billion british google government one simple word more than one point
"national youth theatre" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:48 min | 11 months ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Conversations

"I? Well, I wasn't able to conduct. You is Zipper my. Drama teacher mentioned always. For, Helen IT'S SO I. I've never seen since. She was taking my nose of help because she helped me put my makeup on. She said, I've never said this to any of my. People's before with his stinking rotten business often you should be an act. Later to try and SPA really my desire to join the army really sensitive theatrical which I got my system. It's much better to have that experience of Wolfe's in the film's I'd be thinking quite a few so. One of my first jobs on said he was playing a soldier so that took care of that one. But I had. Dined got rid of the damn. y'All thing. So obviously, this is somewhere the line God knows. knows. Something's in a in you. Let me supplying ton and lowry. How did your mom and dad feel about you going into theater and acting as a profession? Well, they were both incredibly supportive They knew it was tenuous and difficult for. My Mom. And Dad was at the semi to Mike and I can you do as long as you find happiness? You know attorneys changed much. You just want to know what your kids want to. If they have a quest wherever is very been active. Through. chippy or counting Weber long as I've got a plan. Also. Don't forget those days. It was much easier to get grants. So rotter is the big drama school or. Dramatic you went along Terada and. Teen. Was it a complete culture shock coordinated feel. I. Expected it. I had this. Inverted snobbery of people born during around in velvet smoking jackets. That's no true I'm afraid. No but just a bunch and other disaffected. But signed me I mean with people from all backgrounds and some of them still my dearest friend. But The thing is it was run by a brilliant man could heal. Who you didn't have to have any qualifications I mean I filed Oh my audibles. Ironically, the only thing I took got was I level, which is is when you do at school and I'll go. Now so but he's useless on its own you know. So. Dishes Rod was the first one Roy dramatic aw narrow three or four brilliant months, but I'll go in there. So I joined the National Youth Theatre, which is some school which takes in kids from all over everywhere Lana provinces everywhere they come together and night do professional standard productions in theaters but. Often by professional directors. So. By the some I was seventeen I played full staff in a full version have not really nine I was doing about. A learned quick. and then I played rod or I played the lead role in the player about dreadful Scotsman which I'm so fashion alcon site a name you an idea. I was people. End Up Well Freeman EPA nor his wife and then. Fellow. So by the time I was twenty odd at this practical undone check off. Beaumont Shea. Donald as Gawky I. Mean it was an amazing practical and all fro the application of it. Not, true imbibing it having to do it..

Rod Helen IT Wolfe Terada Beaumont Shea army Weber EPA Mike National Youth Theatre Donald
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

08:57 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Because just. Conversations afterwards were. Everybody. He seems so shot. And it was. Quite good actually. I was who? Expecting go no, I mean it's it's. It's it's professional and I was I is. Trying to do, and so there was a slight. Different. Me They kind of loosened the reins on me a bit drama school and let me go often. Do the old GIG here and there even before I left dramas go. So they kind of allowed me to navigate. Things outside of drums, goose I already. And from that play. I I only ever meet ahead heard of or met one pro quo agent who was The agent to a friend of mine and and he was always saying you know when you're ready and you're looking for an agent just let me know so. I invited him to my. Fergie second year shows you know the kind of. I just you know said I'm you know coming to the end of my? Second Jay go needs my third year you say to get in contact with you and if I was When I was ready to look an agent and say dumb, I'll be waiting for you to get in contact with and not being to see three of your shows already come in and have a chat with me. So I went in and out of chat with him and a lady out would do and what was there and signed up we would I was with him for ten years. So you know those? Those big moments in this. Game in. Your trajectory towards being an actor I'm. From me. A. I I came out of most of them relatively unscathed I think. And I was very. Conscious of that point at that point of. Because you had to be really I was very conscious of stuff I would do and stuff I wouldn't do. And I've Ryan stopped. It was policy the reason. I remember there was a Speaking father figures there was An actor when I was at National Youth Theatre. enact to the I knew was doing play. A prison play. American prison play at the man in the Moon in Chelsea. It was kind of fringed it's a he was doing that and he had to drop out because I think he got big telly Gig any go out he got drop out and they were looking for someone to take his place and they pick a out of the National Youth Theatre. So went from the national youth to my I love it was profit share, but it was first gear and it was all proper in professional actors and actors in the. In the. In the company was Gyco Wolf Saxon, who was is an American actor who I think it moved to. England. Drama School and just stayed on afterwards and they both American the other one was a guy call, Guy Gregory. who was kind of flamboyant African. American. Actor and and both of them kind of took me under their wing and looked out for me and gave me kind of. Strong, advice than guy was very good to me about your responsibilities as a black actor the things are going to be Austin view the questions that you need to ask yourself. The choices that you need to make sure to be lucky enough to be to have choices And I'm and one of the one they won. They knew when they knew. Ralph who said it's made a winning new, the I was. A writer under AIA Brittany said, right as much as you can because that will offer you some kind of protection and the stock your right will be different to what anybody else is writing. So I left drama, school. And Soon after I. Left drama school I started writing for the bill. And I thought I would probably end up. Certainly. In the early times doing more writing than I was GonNa do acting, but it just didn't go that way the acting took off. Did. You feel that because you were. A black actor or that were they was drummed into here that you felt about I'll just do the Ryan. no, it was because. When I came out, drama school is a good time to be a black acting if in all honesty because you know people were turning their attention to that and. And I was part of a generation that were that was coming out of drama school. The kind of first big generation that was coming out of drama school and I worked I could work all the time. You know my my family. and. were. Responsible and conscious. Black people and. and. I grew up. And very much around. The sound off black people watching television seeing black people on television when. A lot of times we didn't but when we did. One of the things that was said he's saying about. The Rep the the person we were seeing on television whether they like to or not. Was a representation of us. They will they they responded they were saying. Something about black people that reflect tate on us and. And it was just And so that phrase what that saying was. Always, right on the front of my head in the. Game in the choices I I made and I was lucky enough that I could say to people out. Loud. I'm not playing any stereotypical role rose or Roy the would become stereotypical. I. Had to one of the reasons I think, I stay with my agent as long as possible because he understood it wasn't is saying I wasn't gonNA play bad people it was just that if I was going to play. You. Know someone who was criminal or something like that. He had to be a hold character in it couldn't just be going to lay on. Many, walk on and see me it's like, Oh, you're you're the black criminal so Even, though I was writing for the bill, I was never in the bill. You feel a sense of responsibility. To T to. To try to make a change of are certainly. Within yourself. A gain. I was always, really good. At. Listening to advice. You know. So when I go out of Drama School Quite early on I got this fantastic job in the West indies. It was a full potter for. Channel, four and it was called the Orchid House and it was based on a big a novel that was set in Dominika during the first World War and the Second World War and told the story of this. White West, Indian? White ex PAT family. In the West indies and the the story of three daughters and mother father three daughters and all the things that they got up to in the journey between the war and I was a lovely I was offered with this kind of student revolutionary who spot the art who was thought the islands fight for independence I was playing a real a real person and it was lovely and it was Francis Baba and offering Elizabeth Hurley and Nigel, Terry and Diana quick and common to Seoul Toy madge sinclair, and it was an amazing car Indra Ovais it was an amazing cast and it was. Fantastic passer about seven women and I had a really lovely lovely par in and it was directed by Horace Ova and also a is was is He's the grandfather of black filmmaking in the UK any from Trinidad he's from my family's island and.

Drama School Ryan West indies Chelsea National Youth Theatre Fergie Gyco Wolf Saxon National Youth Theatre. Jay madge sinclair AIA Brittany Horace Ova writer Guy Gregory. Ralph England Austin Seoul Orchid House
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

09:27 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Couple of mates when I left home when. Jim May Andy. Who In my? Year. Dramas And we moved to a really damp flat in Tulse Hill but we love and we kind of we looked after each other and And helped out to out to get through. The was it towards the end of the first year that you you found the bill yourself up a bit mall. Or take a bit longer into gun. It was weird because I was I was still part of the theater company that the Youth Data Company that was run by Lucia young. At the. Lyric Hammersmith and and I was writing for them by that point and. Is that is that when he started writing then I'm Writing when I was right after I did my first play when I did my father's play. When I was like I said fifteen sixteen yeah, and and. Hanging out with all the. Kids who WANNA be actors or want to work in theater we ended up talking about. About plays and I don't know how the compensation. Remember, but it came up to you could write a play and I said, I could riot play and one of the guys set up but you can't and I went up I could. So I went and wrote a play and. And wrote in Longhand upstairs in my bedroom and my foster families house. I wrote in long hand up in my bedroom. Then I went to the south London press newspaper in the classified to find someone who would talk it up for me and then I go. Then I found someone who talked it up. She was a bit lost on some of the colloquialisms but she talked it up for me and And then I entered into the National Youth Theatre playwright in competition and it won. A. One I didn't know that and then. I was I was kind of a one on one. The award I shared it with another writer who's now with director could Ed camp and we were jointly Awarded the prize of most promising playwright under twenty one for nineteen, eighty, three or something like that and then. So then I was I on expose I. I can write place now and And then. I remember being home and getting a phone call from a lady from Faber and Faber who said, I'm just reached. I'm just contacting you for your buy at the back of the book and I said the what now and when we would just like. We've got a bit of a biography about you. We just wondered whether or not this. You're okay with this and I went what is this? Four. And she says, no one told you and I went no. No, what what what is it and she said we're publishing your play and. said. Say Yes fe grew favor. Publishing your in an anthology of new and up and coming playwrights and your place being included and when did I And share when we I am surprised no one's kind of and literally no one told me until she found out about this bioch-, and at and as it turned out one of the judges on the for the National Youth Theatre was the. Critic, for the finite fatal critic for the Financial Times and he was asked by favorite faber to recommend new and up and coming playwrights and a decidedly to to kind of pick me and it was for that period of time. It was it was it was crazy. So I. I. For, my I. Ever, play I got it, and then I wrote my. Play and it won the competition and then it got published and because it won the competition and I was one of the few winners from London I went on capital radio to on their kind of often drive time show to talk about being a south. London caters just one this play in competition and I talked to them about it, and then when I was leaving the producer stopped me and when she go to the theater much and I go do yeah because my are doing plays and things go she offerings theater critic and. Sorry, and they said we'll pay ten quid a minute of every time the for when you're on the radio. But yes yes. I've. Literally, and then all of a sudden for about. Must have been about a year. or so. Once, a month I would go in on this same show and I was capital Radio's fringe theatre critic for for a little bit. I was seventeen years old my God is value saying was like this is all right. And So I mean I mean not obviously. Helped with my shyness and I am and my confidence just because you know it was good and then you know I think it was auditioning to drama school with that kind of put an end to. Be Nice to be on the radio and all of that really, and also on the ever going to see my made some plays and given them great reviews. Critic. Best friend Gabby people would like. So Yeah I did that for a bit and and then you know kind of went to drama school gonNA each and. and kind of working from. The moment I left school. Really. You you touched upon That there was. Very few you sort of. Black people in your year or the year above and who your mix with. What about teachers was that predominantly white? That? All of them I'm trying to think. If just told you a lie. Now think about. Thirty sometimes, when guests direct has come in second guess people comment I was just wondering if anybody came in. Know what we have is. A Malik. Yeah lovely on. Matic. who was massive kind of hop throw at that time I, think he had done passage to India by so processed patterns German the crown jewel in the crown yes that was it and. He was a fine looking men and Oh, and he came in to give us a kind of seminar on acting on camera the end. And I remember I remember he was. He was really interesting, but that was as close. As about as close as it got. One of the things that the guild whole allowed you to do. was. Very few people is that they? Again when I was at drama school i. Because we I was of the lyric theatre. There was a period where the lyrics. studio space. Just because of when a show was finishing and when a new show was coming up. They were going to be dog have nothing in there for a month or something and. And they offered the spice to us. Right I just say if you WANNA do in that, you can. You can do something so. So A couple of wrote plays and I. wrote a play. For for that time in the in the youth, this change it up being the play. That me and my missus got together doing she was part of the Youth Theatre. I wrote a play about someone like me going out with someone who looked like. And we ended up doing the to hand to play together and then first time we did it. We weren't together second time we did it. We were together on pretty much been together ever since. And and then. They offer. Another space. And I wrote and wrote and directed. A play that was on the. The. Lyric in one of the talk periods and and of people from drama school came down to see I must have been in my second year. Point and everybody argues I was using to actors three actors in the play that were. In by year at drama school and I was using the The main actor was one of my mates from the. The Youth Theatre, which wasn't a youth data anymore by that point, we've become a kind of. Defacto fears company. So So I wrote this play this forehand and is three people from drama school mom who who wasn't so low two from drama school came down and I. Don't know what it was that they were expecting but I know they weren't expecting a soul.

National Youth Theatre Faber Youth Theatre capital Radio London Youth Data Company Lyric Hammersmith Tulse Hill Jim Lucia young south London press Financial Times Gabby writer director producer India Matic.
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Have a lawyer. In each of the first off yes it's Friday Friday. I was GONNA. Say it feels weird. Saying is Friday on the book one it's been so long since we've actually spoken in two. Days of the week. Or do they mean that the my one? Not Too much but let us crack on. If you haven't listened to part one I urge you go back list Powell won't before you do this otherwise. would join the DOTS and failing miserably at Ludd things won't make sense and the first part was in credible because he's lenny and he's A So. Eloquent and passionate. And intelligent, and is really really good company. So let's get back to it. This is part two. Of the two podcast with Lennie James Enjoy and you'll see you in a bit. Someone was asking me the other day What with Pandemic and always how hard is prior to all this? Twenty this year. That's nonsense. For Drama Students Anyway. But then I was thinking about old. The young guns graduate and Now Ya. And Civilisation How I said I have no idea. I have no idea because I know how hard it is. The Best of times alone now. I. Mean It's I was speaking to a mayhem on the other day use Cape was at a drama school that had to. Look at stop and go viral and stuff and they. Didn't get back inside for kind of graduation. So even all of the stages. You know they get an aging. Daniel. First job kind of I mean, what is This year's crop of drama students GonNa do now looking can I've never forget there's no way you can to units no way you can teach drama on zoom it just. It just there's no way you can. You can solve their a showcase. Ridiculous I mean it's I mean I'm I'm really very. Glad I went to drama school but Jesus Christ. It was hauled particularly the first year I. I. I was just a I went to the Guildhall. if you don't know the guilt whole, it's brought in it was I think it still is actually is sin the Balkan right next door to in the richest square mile for a star is in the richest square mile in the entire country. It's right bang in the middle of middle of the city. It's the home was behind the ROTC I don't know if they're still there. And And I. Remember having a A. Heated discussion. With Lucy who is a director who ran the youth to the I was appalled of who brand lyric theatre and I remember I had said I wanted to go to drama school and she was adamant I shouldn't that they would. Take away all the things that would make me me and all the things that were different in that they would have you speaking differently lenny and and you know turn you out as you know a off. Speaking kind of. WanNa be arrested actor and I was adamant that that no one was going to do that and I wouldn't allow that. Happen. But also I was. Again lean kind of having the conversation I was forced to come up with the reasons why I wanted to go to school, and it was because I just was. Particularly when I was at the The National Youth Theatre and. You would doing the cost work that you that you dating Kinda groups. Everybody had these points of reference the I had no idea about. I had no. Knowledge. Of Strindberg or oil, you know not a passing knowledge of Shakespeare but you know nothing I my knowledge, all these things that they talk about or that they would references everybody knows that I didn't know. So I was very clear about the fact that I was going to drama school to learn I was going to drama school. It was about education absolutely about education. It was the knowledge on it was one of the things A. Was Important to my foster family because I needed to be if I was going to go and do this, take this risk. I needed to do it properly. And make sure that it wasn't seen as jolly that it wasn't seen as me just wasting my time prancing around pretending to be a streaky. Bacon and. And so I had to I. You know I when it like. When it like it was kind of serious and which you know which you gain going into a new environment. I just kind of. Clare's Dan shutdown closed in shutdown. Yeah. Just walked out just be you know the guy kind of watching everything and? then. kind of speed but didn't didn't feel comfortable. That are although I was one of. Three. Three people in my year. A Year of how many what? Twenty, five, twenty, twenty, five, twenty, six, times two, and then it'd be. It was two of us and then became three and there were other black guys and goes in the the other. Two years above us when I first got there. But it wasn't particularly working class it wasn't. It wasn't anybody. It went too many people that I could kind of. Feel kind of comfortable. With an around the NFL exposed because that's kind of walked drama school is asking you to be and didn't feel like I had. There was anybody watching my back, but luckily, it was It was the whole school of Music and drama. And And they were. They were guys there who were part of the reggae philharmonic they were guys there who were of Courtney Pines fan to run the jazz calls Omar. was there as well. Steve Awesome was was there as well so I tended to grab. gravitate study in the first year I gravitate basically. To where the black vote were and just kind of an went up onto my current corridor. as little as possible, and I didn't know the rules of engagement either really. So if they were, you know particularly in the year above me they were. The guys who? The big personalities of the year they're thing was about taking the pace out of everybody and And I played rugby. Can went to an all boys school So I was used to people taking the side. Yeah. But taking the piss out of but a felt like when I would come back at them in the way that you would do in the south London school felt really threatened. Be Intimidating. And Warm just joking just like you you know when I threatened to. Break your neck I'm just kidding. Equals like that. But it it was that kind of sense the. They will make you an assumptions about me that one about me and and that just felt uncomfortable for me I grew into it and and like I said, I'm very very glad that I went to Drama School Burnett's first year of. Of just how out of my depth I felt. took a took a while to kind of get used to luckily I ended up with A. Couple of mates when I left home when. Jim May Andy. Who In my? Year. Dramas.

Lennie James south London school Powell lenny Cape Daniel Courtney Pines Burnett Lucy Bacon Jim Shakespeare director Steve Awesome rugby NFL Clare The National Youth Theatre Omar. Dan
"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"And I think just as I grew up I kind of. My first instinct even to now. Is Is. That is the first thing I have to get over my shyness, the first thing I have to get. I. We'd leave for the job I do. Kind of. First Time walking into a room. I I hate it I am. I am. Over read throughs. Scare that the hell out of me meeting anybody for the first time sometimes phone calls I just find that with people I don't know I just I find it. Really difficult. But if I'm. With friends and even from a kid, I didn't. I didn't need a huge amount of friends. I always seem to run with you know I needed three or four friends and my brother and I was fine. And and it's pretty much to a certain extent like that. He's kind of now but when I got group of. Friends, and the where I feel. Safe I suppose I'm not. Shy I can I can. Join in I can be kind of Pau of it and. And I think. When I did. My first play which was. which was I went out and did it I found A. That kind of. Sense of yourself that you get. When you I mean at the time it was too. So when you're doing face, it was just being around. Those so many actors aw. Insecure confident people. I understand because you didn't we didn't with. A Plethora of different personalities, some people are very, very strong, confident and insecure at the same time an exactly the same moment and and I don't know I just I just off. Somewhere my. My spirit must have just kinda. Gone. He's all right. You know and I'm. Also because I went to an all boys skull saying this to someone the other day. I went to an all boys school that was kind of. Kind of fifty, five, sixty percent non white. So there's a lot of black kids their love. cates kids from the Asian subcontinent who were there As well, at the Indian subcontinent who were there as well and So, we had religion. which will eat now didn't unify US kind of cultural background didn't unify US what unified my school of two and a half thousand boys was sport and and it was a school where we played. Any sport you that you could name we had a school team. Any sport. You can name we add. Lacrosse we had judo we had swimming. We had diving we had karate we had football we bought we had everything sword sword fighting and fencing everything if you if if it was a sport, you can play a my school. So the the. The identity or the position that you held in school was whether or not. You might the team what the? UN. The UN first team second team third team. You know who sports are you playing you're playing football or rugby or what? What is it? All our assemblies were how the sports teams did at the weekend. It was sports mad my school and and I played in. The rugby team and played in. In one of the football teams as well and played a bit possible play volleyball but. The mindset was. If you were told them my school that you are good enough to being the team, you could want the swagger, right? And when I went to the cockpit theaters, I play a musical just good friends. Out Spending my whole summer holiday made a bunch of really Good friends who are still friends to this day I was fifteen sixteen. So it was just after I was. Fostered, I. Went to Live with my foster family and did my I play all in the same year and At the end of the the run of the play I was walking across the road. Or One night while we were performing, I was walking across the road to the pub though I didn't drink and when was going my way across the road to the public because that's where everybody congregates after replay and the. Choreographer for the for the play stopped me halfway across the road and Lenny. You're GonNa do this again I was not wake very south. London. Then I was gone I mean I'm not doing my offering I might just you know look at somebody else really go go university because that's important and she said. The only reason I'm asking because I think if you decided to do this, it could be very worthwhile and it was like she was saying you're good enough to be on the team and I remember very clearly major standing up a little bit. which made and going I think you could. You could be good at this lenny I think you could. You could. You could make a career out of this even maybe but I think you should you should try and it was it I heard you could enough to be on the team mate you're good enough to play and. And that just changed my. Mind focus on on fair tone I. Didn't I went back there a the the next year and then. Going with may two and followed them what they were doing next. So audition for the lyric theatre got into the lyric eve fates audition for the National Youth Theatre going to the National Youth Theatre. Then everybody was talking about drama schools and. I was I, right? So I should probably auditions for drama schools then. Saved up addition for three drama schools going to the went to go. It's fascinating because. When I talked to actors and it comes up time and time again he's just one person. That says one thing or open to certain dog and the light comes on and you got a a right okay. Well, it's like you're saying. I'm going to take my on the table. Or you've heard me or you've seen may in some sort of way yeah. The the. Little boost. Yeah I. Mean There's no way I could have I'll take. A In that way when it was kind of happening but I do remember the moment really really really of looking a name was. Collin Collin. Cumberland's name she used to teach at central and. And I'm just remember her could it because also it was a grownup a grownup. GROWNUPS kind of saying and we knew that she was proper that you know. It was a grown up kind of going I, think you can. You can do this and she you she would know and. Yeah it was. Yeah, it most certainly made a.

UN football US National Youth Theatre Collin Collin rugby Lacrosse Cumberland Lenny volleyball London
"national youth theatre" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"A Teachers Training College. Where are you going to be a teacher? Okay? Yeah, yeah, yeah, but I was hoped. His teacher I, was so hopeless useless. Do you want to be a mother going to be a teacher? It's good you know you're. Great Organization called the National Youth Theatre in Britain. Allowed, kids who didn't come from financially supportive background. Could go in and in your summer holidays you went and did theater. and. That was that sort of launched me. I did KIP ultra in anti poucher with that organization and. And it you know. The the press would come. That was a great thing that you. The critics from the newspapers right so so they. They gave me a good press on from that moment on I as soon as I left college, I went I became a. I went to the Royal Shakespeare Company and so that's where you actually trained. Because you just had net. You got a knack for. It is at at what you would say. You know it's like can each? It's like a lot of jobs, isn't it? Really you can't really train. What you can do is practice. Training and you can practice and guided in your practice. I'm sure that's the same with music. Painting right so the essential, so the idea is of of practice then are. How do I connect you? Know this text to who I am or to? What's necessary? Yeah? Convincing it. And I was like he was being innocent. Be paid not. But being paid to practice into love with Russia's company, but I was kind of in the deep end I started boom at quite a high level. Why is that because you just had you because you were? You had a natural gift, I guess. I guess yes, I do. And the drive and the gift is one thing. The drive is the most important, isn't it? Don't you think mark in life? You know you see incredibly gifted people. Wasting their gifts because they don't have the drive, and then you see less gifted people with incredible drive, and they do that a lot of times. The the gifted people who don't have the drive is just that they have it. It's just going into them. They're driving yes, so. Yes, or the wall of their their heart. Yes, no, no, absolutely an and it's tragic when you see that happening. It is. On the other hand, you see another kid, you know who just it, the inner their imagination has been engaged by something. They are just absolutely driven right to do this. And I. You know that's that's that's what is it? It's the drive right, but it's not like it's interesting. Because now leo ambition and drive can be applied to different things, but they drive. You're talking about is is not. It's not a career drive it's it's a passion. To create right all right. A passion to to to be fully immersed in the thing is the granted. At? So who who are the people you were working with? What I know contemporaries. died..

Great Organization Royal Shakespeare Company National Youth Theatre Russia Britain
"national youth theatre" Discussed on Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

"Apparently when they return to England he attended the Montgomery of love Lemon secondary school now King School which was a UH? Apparently at the time was a was a little tough for him he was the target of bullying apparently to counter the bullying. He adopted the local. Working Class. Hampshire accent copied iskoe lack of interest in schoolwork okay At the age of fourteen. He decided he was going to be an actor Having attended drama workshops from the age of ten he was not a very academically inclined planes but at the At parallel six college in Eastleigh. He says he found a love of English literature. from the teacher he said that though those two years at that school where the to happiest years of his life He moved to London. Joined the National Youth Theatre and from there. He went onto study at the Drama Centre Church of London apparently in the eighties and early nineties. He was.

King School Drama Centre Church of London Lemon secondary school Eastleigh National Youth Theatre London England
"national youth theatre" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"Hello and welcome back to another episode of Control Delayed. I'm so thrilled build that. Today's guest is the amazing Susan were coma. She is someone I've wanted to get on the podcast for a long time and I finally managed to pin her down on. I just know that you're gonNA. I love this episode. Susan macomer is an actress comedian and a writer. She is best known or at least maybe recognized her. TV roles in the evil Netflix show a crazy head and also playing the very entertaining Cynthia in chewing gum. She was listed as one of Europe's thirty under thirty in the Forbes list in two thousand seventeen and she's he's also be named a BAFTA breakthrough Brit. She made her first television debut. At just aged fourteen. She has also been a member of the National Youth Theatre and she trained Ronda. She has had many onscreen appearances and I would be all day if I listed the mole but she's been in some incredible things like crashing the film adaptation of Hoffa off of a yellow Sun and the in between two Hatha work is extremely wide ranging as well and she's been in many productions at the Royal Court the Almeida Theatre and the Royal National Theatre in June and July of this year she played bottom in a adaptation of midsummer night's dream at Regent's park the very iconic open air theater in London to glowing reviews the Telegraph said of her performance all terrific and Susan what Karma is ship Bliss delivering one of the most endearing and effortlessly funny bottoms I've ever seen in this episode we talk about acting stand up her career journey and how she uses social show media and why it's okay to admit you love what you do. I hope you enjoyed this episode. I really love talking to Susan. I feel like we covered a lot of ground and if you enjoyed -joyed pleased a tweet US leave a review on I. Chains and I'll see for next week's episode. Thanks again for listening and.

Susan macomer National Youth Theatre Cynthia Royal National Theatre Almeida Theatre Netflix Royal Court Hoffa Europe writer London Telegraph
"national youth theatre" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"For parents to take you with them. And when you got many siblings, I don't think I would have spent so much time backstage if I'd had most bling, it's easy to slip one in under the radar. And when did you actually sort of begin to pursue it beyond what. Kids normally do with grade school player, whatever. I think I was very certain that that's what I wanted to do is not from very, very early on, like. Four or five. And I just found ways I do it used to play the cello and whatever else to I would do anything. I could just put the instrument down and tell the story will say Apoel something instead. And then when I was at, I went to a boarding school in in Bristol in England and. I should've found a way round the system by joining the Bristol which meant I could get access allied leave, and I could go off and do this club every couple of tons a week, and then I moved to the national usage. Well, that's gonna ask you, how did that happen? That's a pretty big deal. Right. It was. It's a wonderful that national usage and I thank them for my whole career. I didn't know that the time I don't know four, five thousand kids additional year forty places or something, and that's on onto courses which they run a new. Do the kind of what you do to drama school in new first year games, Tross games, foetal work and improve lots of lots of different dance styles, fight training. And then after you've done the course you eligible to play in the shows and the subsequent use knighted one experimental piece that was a kind of device show. And then I was lucky enough to play remun- Julius. I was actually not the first person to because I was actually the substitute at. I've never minded being this upset. I think it's actually good things came from being subsitute. We'll talk about that though, because so you're saying you addition out of the bristle theater program to accept that at the national youth theatre you did your coursework, which major eligible for Romeo and Juliet. Right? And then you get Juliette, which I'm sure you lot of people were very envious about, and in fact, I've read in preparing for this, you said some people were not particularly kind of out that when you were getting ready to play this pretty major part. Why remember somebody saying to me must have held as I eighteen somebody saying I'd never really had a serious relationship at that point. And remember somebody saying, well, you can't play Juliet if you've never been in love. And I thought that I've dreamt of being in love my whole life. It's really that Juliet had never been in love and she fell in love with Romeo and I think that's exactly the time you should do it. You know, it's, it's like doing those Jane Allston novels dilated in my career. It's it's all about those people. Young people experiencing those big feelings for the first time and your performance in that was really a launch Pat. Right? I mean, who happened to be in the audience? Well, my my agent, my age and it'd be my agent for twenty years now was in the audience. Unbeknownst to me, I think it was actually because he represented Kate Winslet and it was Kate Winslet. Younger sister who was originally Kosta student really. So he'd heard about it and he thought oversee, we'll see this play when it happens anyway. And I think the Winslet little sister was already had an agent, and I think she got to television job and that's why she pulled out of the show until I was plucked from the office in which I was temping getting my summer job earning. Whatever it was per hour, receptionist, and it was the best phone call of my life probably. Right because you have the agent, which means he or she is gonna look for work for you thereafter, but you didn't stop you from going off to Oxford, right? I mean, or did you have a little gap year?.

Juliet Kate Winslet Romeo Bristol Jane Allston Juliette England Oxford twenty years
"national youth theatre" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In a chair giving final notes to eighteen young actors who make up the cast of the play wherever i lay my head then let's go to the run positions the actors are on a small makeshift stage in an auditorium in london city hall behind them is a wall of class windows several stories high beyond you can see the thames and london skyscrapers this glorious view of london contrast with the subject matter of the play the struggles of young migrants who come to the uk it's a joint production of the national youth theatre and the children's charity corum anna draper is a child psychologist with koram and she's also the place technical adviser back in two thousand fifteen draper was hired by the national health service to work with young migrants arriving in england so my job was to come in to just meet with young people to talk to them to make a sense of what was going on and then to think about what our response needed to be of the children were telling us about their inability to sleep the fact that they'd i'm traveled on at night they were in a routine of sleeping during the day after months of traveling at night these kids had something like chronic jetlag there were also haunted by nightmares of the past and about the future and the sleepless nights made it hard for them to attend classes think clearly and properly integrate the interviews that draper conducted with young migrants were the source material for the script when i had to play it kind of feels like him in the room with these young people again there are maintenance and i think i need that voice i need as whites i knew what's being sad and i can see the face of the child he spoke at the line seem even more powerful because some of them are spoken by young migrants some of whom came to the uk as unaccompanied minors the cast includes five people from quorums young citizens a youth group for people from migrant and refugee backgrounds like omar al he's eighteen just over a year ago he moved from syria to the uk to join family and pursue his studies this my brother's mccamley because they spent a year in france to come to london they walk from turkish to france by walking by faith this leave hungary they speak without covering omar says that even though he didn't undergo the same tough journey to the uk he found life in england a lot harder than imagined the through three months today's it was really hard to sleep i have no friends here again i have one i just i want to go back to you but i realized i am here so i have to be in this country after will go on sale here since then he's thrown himself into life in the uk he signed up for lots of activities and his massive grinches how much he's enjoying his first stab at acting it's amazing to find people who support you you even if i'm over fishing it's just fifteen minutes until showtime and another omar twenty two year old omar diallo is taking a peek at the auditorium which is starting to fill up see people working in the rooms almost full and big people people from somewhere people from all over the place i'm just getting so scared and this is scary invaders taking pitches almost like to see what's going on omar diallo plays the poet the narrator of the show this is almost like someone who's been who's been experienced the journeys that these young people been facing so i when i read it was almost like what am i gonna do but edison excited because he's like a challenge me omar who says he came to the uk from italy is a former member of the core young citizens group and a few months ago he was accepted into the national youth theatre company it's his first big show with them on yes let's get done let's get down backstage is a frenzy of young people warming up omar delo is walking in circles next to an elevator running lines another kid has his legs up on the wall stretching finally it gets quiet and the show begins the play uses a chorus to tell the stories of three young migrants semi yusra and mohammed hoof we award torn country.

fifteen minutes twenty two year three months
"national youth theatre" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"national youth theatre" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Way you put it that way alike any side really acting at sixteen i was obsessed with moines thai boxing i did some stunts and things when i was younger when i was fourteen fifteen poverty stunt team but that was just you know i i jog rather work in mcdonalds i was i was getting catching handle the sword fighting johnston host rising up sale and but i i never went to i started in the national youth theatre about sixteen years old but a lot of kids i went to drama school where they've been acting were five or six years old and i never had any experience with i don't come from a dramatic family or anything like that i just it was the first thing i found on my own in when you as a parent and you kind of kids karate or piano lessons and things like that it's often the parents choice an acting for me was the first thing in my life where i found it completely away from m my parents will family or friends who became something i and i often think of the old days i wasn't around you weren't around when the actors were hired and they had to learn how to ride a horse and they had a no how to play in johnston all this other stuff in that era of your career as a part of a professional stunt team reminded me of the old movie system but definitely yeah and and i think it's just it's one of those things where i've i've never been able to settle i mean i i i remember getting taught by richard briers and he's passed away now is very brilliant british actor a lot of the royal shakespeare i'm working and wasn't a brilliant comedy show in in england code the good life he there's one thing that always stuck with me which is if you really really really really really really or any any don't know meaning if it's the only thing you can think about the only thing you got to bed at night and you think about it and you'll see i don't get with axes very often i'm not a big fan of the deavere actors because i was a i was a data twenty two and i got three kids and i'm married when that very different i have a very different needs than the reactor i work with but but i.

mcdonalds johnston richard briers england sixteen years six years