26 Burst results for "natasha mitchell"

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:38 min | 3 d ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"Our editors were very critical of the atomic arms race and we had an article by Hans. Beta. The physicist explaining with a hydrogen bomb was and it was a really bad idea to be developing this technology and the sensors got so mad that they burn the magazine. I am Rod the during the presidential campaign in two thousand sixteen you did voice concerns about trump even then we did yeah. We came right up to the brink of saying obviously vote for Hillary Clinton by saying that any world leader needs to just have basic respect for evidence and respect for reality, and instead even when he was a candidate in just throughout his public career, trump has been spreading conspiracy. Theories and rejecting evidence and claiming things are hoaxes that are real and so for years ago we said this contempt for science would make somebody unable to perform the duties of the presidency. So we didn't quite say and therefore Hillary Clinton, but it was very clear. We were saying don't vote for him whatever you do. I've been banging on about climate change well for forty years and so my principal concern Preko. Was Trump's dismissal of the science on that issue. Is that a principal concern for you? It is until the pandemic it was top concern a you know he trying to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord trying to pull out of world health. Organization. During pandemic, just his contempt for global scale problems requiring global cooperation in that of course, spreading all kinds of conspiracy theories about how climate change is made up and the science is clear scientists don't know when for forty years it's been really clear. This is just basic physics. What are some of the other actions that trump has done over the last full years to diminish science? It's ridiculous. He wanted to cut the National Cancer Institute funding and and all the rest of the biomedical research that's funded by the US government, and it's just perverse. Everybody knows someone who has a disease or his law someone to a disease. The National Institutes of Health is investing in trying to stop right now even politically, it didn't make sense it was more unreality. It was more just nonsense they doesn't underneath the Supreme Code He also replaces scientists agency advisory boards doesn't he with Industry Heck's These scientists are volunteering their sharing their expertise with the federal government on. Advisory Boards, and he just eliminated them. They only cost enough like for coffee and snacks people were going on their own, just advising things like invasive species or wildfire risk really important things that it's important to understand the science nor helmuth with my revered colleague. Phillip, Adams, she is the new editor of scientific American. Only the ninth in it's one hundred, seventy, five year history and for complete exploration of. The US election and its scientific significance. DULAS DISCI- friction this week with Natasha Mitchell Sunday, at five PM and on your ABC This snap and I noticed that the general nature also has come out for Joe Biden the editorial said and I quote. We cannot stand by and let science be undermined Joe Biden's trust in truth evidence science and democracy. Make him the only choice in the US election. That's nature. Talking of gross for some reason, I'm reminded of the US election and as we heard before leading science journals are coming out against trump. This will be dealt with in depth in science friction this weekend, and here's a taste featuring once more the editor of scientific American and the editor of the journal Science the trump administration even from the very first month's was gutting federal science departments was threatening to cut budgets and to restrict what kind of research can be done. So he's really been a hindrance. To Sci he's prevented people from doing their best work. His travel policies are very Zena phobic, and so they've been interfering with international science collaborations. Think even if the coronavirus pandemic hadn't happened, we still would have endorsed by because trump has been just so catastrophic for every other kind of science as well. But then with the Kobe pan-demic, it was just completely clear. It's one thing to share misinformation conspiracy theories about politics or earth the earth is flat, but he's been sharing so many conspiracy theories and stoking xenophobia and racism about the pandemic. It's literally killing people people are dying because they're listening to him rather than hearing from the health experts that he should be amplifying. I didn't get into Editing Major Big Time Science Journal in order to become a angry liberal columnist. But that is how it ended up playing out because particularly on Kobe, the rhetoric of trump and the actions of the administration have just been so dangerous and so denigrating to science you know now we're seeing this movement where most of our peers are in the conversation to the extent that they can be and in my opinion that's certainly a good thing for now, and it probably is a good thing. Even when we get past all of this because there are a lot of things where science has not spoken out over the years that we're paying the price for now. There's two really smart historians named Turner and Eisenberg who wrote a book called the Republican reversal and they wrote an editorial for us on the fiftieth anniversary of Earth, day just a few months ago. And what those guys lay out is the fact that a lot of our very best environmental and public health regulation was passed during the Nixon administration with strong bipartisan support. The environmental protection. Agency. was created indeed under President Richard Nixon, her Republican House Republicans before one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty were very big on the environment. And then in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty Ronald Reagan started insisting on allowing people to teach creation and public schools and running against the environment and the data unfortunately from polling and political analysis suggested that was a productive strategy and and it was here the full compensation in this week's. Friction with Natasha Mitchell Sunday's five off Fridays. Eleven thirty on our. N Holden Thorp is editor in chief of the science journals and Laura Helmuth is editor in chief of the Scientific American magazine..

Trump trump editor United States Hillary Clinton Natasha Mitchell Laura Helmuth Science Journal Joe Biden editor in chief National Institutes of Health principal President Richard Nixon physicist US government Ronald Reagan Hans
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | Last week

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

06:52 min | Last month

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"They just happened to make money from that. As, we've heard from John Cook conspiracies often exploit existing social divisions and inequities. So perhaps we need to stop there how do we build both out individual and collective resilience? Catherine made an attempt with her friends. Trying to. Send fact checking articles and what reaction do you get from new friends? Myself really considerate some. Will just keep embodying me and just. Send article after article. I try never to attack the papal I want them to treat me with respect so I will always treat them. Respect. But I really feel have to speak up. Because, I, think otherwise it becomes normalized. It's exhausting it's really exhausting and and it's so much easier to just go like block delete I. Don't WanNa Talk to you anymore. But he can't do that because. In on their friends and you should be. Supporting them because otherwise you just confirming. Their theory that you know the whole world is against him and and day right and I'm brainwashed paid a mainstream media. Even Dr John Cook someone whose life's work combating conspiratorial thinking has found it hard. He's dealt with similarly tangled conversations in his own family over climate change. With one of my family members, who is the mice conspiratorial? and the strongest in science the now I've got absolutely no way and it's to the point where we couldn't talk about after a while. As for another family member my dad to be precise. Changed his mind about climate change in and fatty to accept it. Very casually asked my dad, what did change your mind? and He's answer was I've always believed this. So I realized that. Being in denial BAP being it's an iron almost totally logical. It's had I think anyone. Who Denies. Science thinks of themselves as the science tonight or even conspiracy theorists I don't think of themselves conspiracy theories. They see themselves as realists do there is. There is. One of the things that I've been candid reporting on various misinformation around Covid ANTIBAC- stuff is the way that. People feel that they. Rain evidence that they believe they're being extremely scientific actually. So People don't believe we just not scientific enough in fact. Yes. Science than I'll almost always dresses itself with the trappings of. Science. And they tried to brand. Actual Science as I'm sound science unscientific. And so in climate change? The science denies brand themselves as sound science. That's catchphrase they like to use a lot. which is a very old wealthy and fries because they're actually denying the science attacking the scientists. While Cherry picking very carefully selected studies that back up. Their viewpoint while ignoring the vast bulk of research. Contradicts their position. So what are the best techniques to break out of conspiratorial thinking it is possible to change conspiracy theorists minds. But is extremely difficult. and. There are a few strategies that that can at least increase your chances certainly if you appreciate with empathy while not conceding that the conspiracy theories. True. But tried to connect to them with shared values and in particular shade value of critical thinking. Conspiracy theorists save themselves as critical thinkers than knocked gullible they knocked taking by the official account. Is actually critical thinking that can help people see the fallacies in conspiracy theories. Just as we harping for Covid Nineteen Vaccine John Cook says, they might be a way to inoculate against disinformation and conspiracy theories. Can Be, more effective by trying to inoculate the rest of the population, the vast majority of the public who conspiracy theorists, who vulnerable to the misinformation that they generate. If we. Explain to people the techniques used to mislead or the traits of conspiratorial thinking that builds up their resistance. It increases air immediately. When cancer the actual misinformation Thank you influence people believe in all sorts of stuff and I can't tell them. No you have to believe in in science. You know what? What do you do there spreading this information because they believe it's beneficial to other papal. So You can't even go along all but that's an evil person they like. The? Most generous and gorgeous people. I have a feeling. To something that's. GonNa stay. You know because. I think there's Some people out there that have realized that can use it for political gain. We'll just have to find ways. Around it and ways to combat it. You just have to wonder area where this is all taking us. We're in a pandemic US election is on the cards global recession. It's a recipe for misinformation my him hey, totally and I I really think it requires vigilance and I think we need to consider whether building fair more empathetic communities would help keep a lead on the worst of these, Turkey yeah. That's a great point. Big. Thanks to Katherine today for Sharing Her story into renite a wrist, Dr Douglas Silva Rush, and Dr. John. Cook our producer is Jane Lee, series producer, Karl Smith and sound engineer this week Tim Simon's next week in classic series when wellness can make you seek talk to us on twitter at Natasha Mitchell and at Bogle. Bye for now..

John Cook Dr John Cook Catherine producer US Dr Douglas Silva Rush Karl Smith Cherry Katherine official Natasha Mitchell Tim Simon Jane Lee engineer
wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | 4 months ago

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | 4 months ago

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | 4 months ago

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

06:25 min | 5 months ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason gleason and and CREPE CREPE and and climb climb and and snap snap end. end. They They feed feed off off flesh. flesh. Flies Flies Matz Matz any any culinary culinary delight delight by intrepid? by intrepid? Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitchell back back in the in world's the world's hotspot hotspot for for carnivorous carnivorous plants plants or Western or Western Australia Australia last last week. Show week. Show sit sit sane. sane. Well Well today. today. It's a It's tile a tile full full of twists of twists and and tendrils. tendrils. Yes Yes Trust Trust Sarah. Sarah. I can I all can over all the over world. the world. I just bought I just another bought another one. Sorry one. Sorry wearies wearies Navan. Navan. I I have devoted have devoted much much time time to a to class a class of plants of plants that seemed that seemed to have to reversed have reversed regular regular order order of nature of nature and and like avengers like avengers of of Kingdom Kingdom have turned have turned upon upon animals animals incarcerating incarcerating and finally and finally killing killing them them whether whether the plants the plants are really are really hungry hungry and entrapped and entrapped the animals the animals for food for food or whether or whether it is only it is only an example an example of the of wanton the wanton destructiveness destructiveness of nature. of nature. I leave I leave the Rita the Rita to judge. to judge. Mary Mary treat treat eighteen eighteen eighty eighty five five throughout throughout history. history. The great The great botanical botanical artists artists have have often often been been women women but but many many of them of them infect infect scientists scientists to to just just without without the endorsement the endorsement of of the botanical the botanical establishment establishment which which often often shunned shunned or or ignored ignored them. them. The pint The pint brush brush deemed deemed more more appropriate appropriate tool tool for for lady lady than a than microscope. a microscope. I guess I botany guess botany has always has always being being an interesting an interesting one one because because I suppose I suppose that that the study the study of of flowers flowers and plants and plants historically historically was was maybe maybe seen seen in a bit in more a bit more of a of a suitable suitable for for for women for women feminine feminine because because of flowers of flowers and that and sort that of sort thing of thing but still but still it it it was it still was still also also quite quite male dominated. male dominated. I guess I in guess terms in terms of the of the scholars scholars in that in field that field throughout throughout history. history. Well Well one one determined determined woman woman on a farm on a farm in in way way belt Western. belt Western. Australia Australia defied defied the the odds odds and changed and changed the world the world sore. sore. Australia's Australia's incredible incredible carnivorous carnivorous plants plants and and listened listened to artists to artists so so with Laura with Laura Skates Skates botanical botanical scientists scientists doing doing her PhD her PhD on canvas on canvas plants. plants. Right Right now now I am I taking am taking you down. you down. Bush Bush trial trial in in pursuit pursuit of her of story. her story. Oh Oh is that is that it. it. Yup Yup Oh Oh cute cute so this so is this actually is actually one of one the climbing of the climbing ones ones that I was that just I was talking just talking about about so so new new sixty sixty centimeters centimeters long long and it's and just it's just spreading spreading out of out embankment. of embankment. He He and a and lot more a lot of more them of them seem seem to have to caught have caught prey prey on this on one. this I one. think I think it might it be might dresser. be dresser. A Men's A Men's Eli Eli address address or or Krant Krant though. though. Draw Draw ceramic ceramic cram cram throw throw or or the bridal the bridal rainbow rainbow with its with little its little sunlight sunlight sticky sticky leaves leaves hence hence the name. the Sanju name. Sanju it it was a man was a man English English naturalist naturalist and Biologist and Biologist Charles Charles Darwin Darwin nonetheless nonetheless who is who a first is a first credited credited with helping with helping us understand us understand that that coniferous coniferous plants plants lived lived off off flesh. flesh. His His particularly particularly interested interested in in is a is a European European species. species. Coatdress Coatdress ERA ERA TON. Two TON. folio Two folio which which he did he a lot did of a lot his of experiments his experiments on on so he so would he put would different put different things things on the on leaves the leaves like like for example for example he would he put would put a a piece of piece sand of sand orbit orbit of gloss of gloss and not and really not really see see any any reaction reaction but if but you put if you something put something like like little little piece piece of EG of EG or or some some meat meat juices juices suddenly suddenly the plant the plant would have would reaction have reaction to that to that and and the tentacles the tentacles would start would start to wrap to around wrap around so so what he what basically he basically showed. showed. Is that Is these that plants these plants are reacting are reacting to to is that is that have have not not gene or gene protein or protein in in them them so so the plants. the plants. I I almost almost instantaneously. instantaneously. They know They know not. not. That's a That's be the a sand be the sand economy economy that that cheese. cheese. I I eight that eight that yeah yeah exactly exactly so so you know. you They know. don't They don't waste waste any energy any energy wrapping wrapping around around something. something. That's not That's going not to be going nutritious to be nutritious day instead. day instead. Wraparound Wraparound when when it's going it's to be going something to be something that will give that will give them them a good a good boost boost of nitrogen. of nitrogen. I mean I even mean in even my in my PhD PhD thesis. thesis. I I go go back back to to Dahlan's Dahlan's original original studies studies and and some of some his of original his original thoughts thoughts and ideas and ideas things things that that with with testing testing to this to day this day and and so he so really he really liked the liked groundwork the groundwork for for set the set foundation the foundation full full of Verse of Plant Verse Plant Research Research But one But American one American woman woman was on was the on case the case of carnivorous of carnivorous plants. plants. Around Around the same the time same time as Darwin. as Darwin. I will I give will you give my you observations my observations on draw. on draw. Sarah Sarah would would have escaped have escaped the notice the notice of botanists of botanists and she and she struck struck up a up correspondence a correspondence with Darwin with Darwin in a in series a series of letters of letters from from eighteen. eighteen. Seventy Seventy one one four four years years before before he got he to got publishing to publishing his his influential influential on on insect insect diverse diverse plants. plants. I had I two had two or three or three species species of of plants plants growing growing window window ornaments ornaments and soon and soon saw saw the deal the deal on the on folio the folio was a was flytrap a flytrap of considerable. of considerable. Palo Palo when it comes when it to comes to reverse reverse plants plants one of the one best of the women best women that I that I kind kind of came of came across across in my in my studies studies was was Mary Mary trait trait and I and came I across came across her her because because he he in Child in Child Allen's Allen's book book insectivores insectivores plants. plants. There was There a little was a foot little foot art art that talked that talked about about what what Mary Mary Trait Trait had done had done to to contribute contribute to to that particular that particular chapter chapter and I and thought I thought wow. wow. Who's Who's Mrs Mrs Trait? Trait? I WANNA I find WANNA find out more out about more about her her de Madame. de Madame. Your observations Your observations and experiments and experiments on the on sexes the sexes of butterflies. of butterflies. Far Far the best the best as far as far as known as known to me to me which which have have ever ever been been made made said. There's said. a great There's a great letter. letter. Where Where don don thanks? thanks? Mary Mary trait trait for some for some observations observations on dresser. on dresser. I am I glad am glad to hear to hear your observations. your observations. On Dresser On Dresser will will be be published. The unlucky fly a common housefly. Would no sooner be caught by the sticky? Glands of it would've once commenced to fold about its victims. It folded from the apex to the stem of the lake. After the manner of its nation closer and closer it held the poor flying embrace until it ceased its struggles when it soon became partly absorbed by the plant. Professor Gray will give my observations on this planned in his new edition of how plants grow was most respectfully Mrs Mary. Treat New Jersey December. Twenty eight hundred seventy one. I have attended to this subject during several years and have almost manuscript enough to make a volume but have never yet found time to publish. I am very much obliged. You'RE COURTEOUS LEGEND AND REMAIN DIM Adam yours faithfully. Charles Darwin January five eighteen seventy two.

Mary Mary Australia Sarah Sarah Charles Charles Darwin Darwin Dresser On Dresser Mrs Mrs Trait Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitch Charles Darwin Matz Matz Western Australia Australia Sanju Eli Eli Bush Bush Kingdom Kingdom Dahlan Krant Krant Palo Palo
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

05:35 min | 5 months ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason and CREPE and climb and snap end. They feed off flesh. Flies Matz any culinary delight by intrepid? Natasha Mitchell back in the world's hotspot for carnivorous plants or Western Australia last week. Show sit sane. Well today. It's a tile full of twists and tendrils. Yes Trust Sarah. I can all over the world. I just bought another one. Sorry wearies Navan. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seemed to have reversed regular order of nature and like avengers of Kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the Rita to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The great botanical artists have often been women but many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The pint brush deemed more appropriate tool for lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always being an interesting one because I suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen in a bit more of a suitable for for women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it it was still also quite male dominated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in way belt Western. Australia defied the odds and changed the world sore. Australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listened to artists so with Laura Skates botanical scientists doing her PhD on canvas plants. Right now I am taking you down. Bush trial in pursuit of her story. Oh is that it. Yup Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones that I was just talking about so new sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. A Men's Eli address or Krant though. Draw ceramic cram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name. Sanju it was a man English naturalist and Biologist Charles Darwin nonetheless who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. His particularly interested in is a European species. Coatdress ERA TON. Two folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example he would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction but if you put something like little piece of EG or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around so what he basically showed. Is that these plants are reacting to is that have not gene or protein in them so the plants. I almost instantaneously. They know not. That's a be the sand economy that cheese. I eight that yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious day instead. Wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost of nitrogen. I mean even in my PhD thesis. I go back to Dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for set the foundation full of Verse Plant Research But one American woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as Darwin. I will give you my observations on draw. Sarah would have escaped the notice of botanists and she struck up a correspondence with Darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of plants growing window ornaments and soon saw the deal on the folio was a flytrap of considerable. Palo when it comes to reverse plants one of the best women that I kind of came across in my studies was Mary trait and I came across her because he in Child Allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little foot art that talked about what Mary Trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and I thought wow. Who's Mrs Trait? I WANNA find out more about her de Madame. Your observations and experiments on the sexes of butterflies. Far the best as far as known to me which have ever been made said. There's a great letter. Where don thanks? Mary trait for some observations on dresser. I am glad to hear your observations. On Dresser will be

Mary Trait Charles Darwin Australia Sarah Western Australia Natasha Mitchell Gleason Matz Rita Bush ELI DON Dahlan Verse Plant Research Krant Palo Child Allen
The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

Science Friction

06:25 min | 5 months ago

The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

"It's Natasha Mitchell here. With science friction with a question. Are you a two headed guerrilla? Now I ask this question. Because in eighteen seventy nine the founder of social psychology so an important guy right. The scientists gust of Lebron right these influential words in the most intelligent rices. There are a large number of women whose brains are closer in size to those of guerrillas them to the most developed mile. Brian's this inferiority is so obvious that no one can contest it for a moment. Only degree is worth discussion. Without a doubt there exists sump distinguish women very superior to the average man but they are as exceptional as the birth of any monstrosity as for example of a guerrilla with two heads. Consequently we may neglect them entirely. Well that was iding seventy nine but so it is today. Also it seems because cognitive neuroscientist Professor Jane Rippin from Aston University in Birmingham digs into the history of scientists efforts to pin sex differences on the brain in her light is book the Gender Brine the New Science that shatters the myth of the Female Brian. And just before Australia. Waiting to lockdown and boards closed. She join me on stage at the Sydney Opera House for this is all about women festival. Thank you very much everybody. My Life's work has really been looking at what makes brains different any brains different and in fact book started much more about the exploration of how brains to be different because I am an autism researcher. And there's a great thing in the autism community that if you've met one person with autism you've met one person with autism so we really thought we need to understand the variability. Everybody's brain is is different from everybody else's brain and in fact. I WANT TO CALL THE BOOK. Fifty shades of gray matter but publishers thought perhaps air. I needed to kind of tone down the brains of areas I was looking at a bit more Gravitas so the book is called the gendered brain. And it's really about how brains get to be different particularly with respect to whether they're male brains or they're female brains and actually it turns out once I got into the research and really investigating this given. Everybody knows that men's brains different from women's brains and that's why men behave different. Trim women and men are from Mars women from Venus? All of those wonderful sort of tropes that we've all come across so I went back and I had a look at the research. I thought let's really get into where these differences are can get a handle on how brains and different and I saw thinking I think time looking in the wrong place because I really can't find that much evidence and so eventually when I really gone through the research up brains and behavior. I came to the apparently startling conclusion that the differences between the sexes. A much smaller than we ever thought even with respect to brains so the question. Have you got a male brain or have you female brain? My answer was actually. I think a we're looking in the wrong place and be with probably asking the wrong question so I would say actually having come to that conclusion and our will warn you this in case you feel the need to leave. It wasn't universally accepted. I came across this really profound belief that we really have to acknowledge that scientists like me just you know get a life get out into the real world. You really don't know what's going on there. He comes conclusions like that and the kind of discussions. I was getting from the press when I was saying enthusiastically explaining the similarity between brains for example the Telegraph Telegraph in the UK. Quieter conservative newspaper. When Christina? Doni said this theory smacks of feminism with an equality fetish so. I love the idea that if you're interested equality some kind of perverse practice say this is the kind of response. I got to mind futuristic. My finding but this is my favorite full of carp which. I'm assuming this mistake anyway. So if anybody feels the need. This is dangerous information. They're about to hear time to go. But let's just move on this. Of course it is a very old question. Are Male brains different from female brains? But we need to remember that. This didn't used to be a question more than one hundred years ago when this research started when I started to realize that brains were in some some way the source of all the kind of human behavior we were interested in and even human places in society you found that the researchers at the time who strangely enough for male a distinctive view about what they were looking at they looked at the society. They looked to the status quo and they said women have an inferior place in society which they were actually right because they didn't have access to educational financial independence or political of power. So they said what we is. Brain. Scientists need to explain is the fact that women's brains are inferior so this was actually the beginning of what I call the hunt. The Difference Crusade where scientists were saying men's brains different women's brains. Let's why another coach from the two headed gorilla man. Lebron women represent the most inferior forms of human evolution and are closer to children and savages than to an adult civilized man. So if you kind of harbor ideas. This was allies objective scientific campaign to measure differences between two different groups of people lead to bear in mind. Some thoughts bit later on the idea. This complementarity trump being a bit rude saying that women are inferior. What we should say is that they have these wonderful skills. Which will of course complement those of men who are going to be ruling the world so we must start with the realization. That's as much as women want to be good scientists or engineers. They want first and foremost to be womanly companions of men and to be good

Lebron Natasha Mitchell Sydney Opera House Founder Aston University Professor Jane Rippin Australia Birmingham Brian Researcher Doni Christina UK
The Ruins of Science - astoryof misdirected medical power

Science Friction

10:15 min | 6 months ago

The Ruins of Science - astoryof misdirected medical power

"Hello Natasha Mitchell. With you for science friction. Thanks for joining me. I WANNA offer you to. Dive is really moving story from the history of science and medicine. It comes from will. Let's call it. A Scott had recent past where medical power got misused to fuel the social prejudices of the era and I were prejudices that people still live with the scars of today. Let's not forget that my guest host is professor Claire. Reid acclaimed Australian historian and award winning author. She's host of the shooting the past podcast. Okay so the thing is. I'm staring at this photograph and I have absolutely no idea what I'm looking at. And we are starting with a mystery in the form of a photograph. So I'm going to describe it to you. The chances are you'll be just as clueless. The object is made up of what appears to be a plastic medicine bottle on the bottle. It says log actal fifty mega grams. Poison and cascading from the bottom is a long. Khloe a tube the to be saw long. It's coiled around itself like a Pretzel and at the end of the tube is a tiny metal bell. And that's it. That's why I can't stop staring at these fighter. The more I look at it the more curious becomes is the object device for smoking drugs. Tobacco a backyard bomb maybe or homemade hooker or is this a police exhibit. Perhaps the long tube was used to strangle a victim or administer a deadly narcotic. I could reel off possibilities till the cows come home but I suspect I will never guess. I'm going to need to call in the expert. The woman who showed me the photograph in the First Place Historian K Davidson. What it is is a penile. Politics mcgraff a penalities. Mcgraff is a machine that could be used to measure volume changes in the penis and this is a diagnostic tool. It's basically designed to test responses to erotic stimuli. What you see in the photo so we can see the bottle. We can say the rubber feeding on the top. We can see the long plastic tube. The metal fitting on the other end of that tube would go into a machine which is called a transducer and a transducer is a is an electric machine that measures volume change and that transducer would be connected to people might be familiar with the image of a polygraph. So you have a sort of a Pencil. Attached to a lever that that records changes on a piece of paper and the piece of paper moves through the machine. So get at. The end is a nice lawn which indicates win volume has increased and win. It has decreased. This particular pufus mcgraff in this photo was made by Australians. Archivist Neil McCarthy and this particular photo comes from his personal archive so the object in the photo is a penile. Plethora mcgraff something. I've never heard of before. Let Alone Sane K. Davison has the photo because she's researching the work of Dr Neal mcconnachie as part of her PhD into the history of aversion therapy. In Australia. Aversion therapy cared explained to me was a form of treatment for homosexuality. Remember that in the nineteen sixties when mcconnachie was practicing homosexuality was not only classified as a mental disorder but was infected legal to find out more of the story behind this bizarre diagnostic device. I've come to the Sydney of retired archivist Fabian. Lo Schiavo in Nineteen seventy-one Fabian. Was a patient of Dr mcconnachie. Fabian is warm and inviting but I have to admit he's home is one of the most curious places I've ever been. There's a massive wooden church altar next to the bathroom and every inch of wall and surface base is covered in images of Jesus various popes and random sites. Some classical other satirical fabens house is like a gallery of religious iconography. So how did his life intersect with Dr mcconnachie? And the object in this photo this to Fabian. Is the one that love that intimacy off and then the other one that high status and wanted to get rid of my sexuality in pain told it was his doctor who would do that and professor maccormick. He said to me what we are going to do for. You is Gut. We're going to be out of the inhibit your sexuality and that will mean you might be compelled to go and do the things that are upsetting you visit saw Thought might be able to get rid of my sexuality altogether and maybe go back to the seminary late law with these troubling desires. Look innocent enough. Not Young People Hitchhike but sometimes a homosexual who prey on those least able to defend themselves. And it's looking but then during lunch row showed him some pornographic one never knows when the homosexuals about you may appear. Norman may be too late when you discover he is mentally ill so it's very strong message that you're receiving from your family from society from the medical establishment that you have a problem and you can overcome this problem through treatment. Yes yes but they were. Country Voices My biggest and longest friend from third class. He was in a relationship in Melbourne. He begged me to come and visit him. Then he said Hit with his. Papal is now the church across Lawrence said it's not necessary to do this They were country voices but chose not to heal them anyway. I went as strong as the ones that was saying to me. I could start a whole new life now without this. The winning the next thing that exposes me to sadness in Heart. I can sickness to say thing bashed up everything. Tell me what you say when you look at these fodder. We'll see container. Scott Araba stretched over. That is exactly the thing that I had to put. My pain assumed to win. Always having a version therapy when our look at it brings back a certain embarrassment? Because I had to. I'm doing my trousers and pulled down to put that thing on and Felt very uncomfortable embarrassed but most of the time finding myself in another person who was operating the thing in the room but on Asian a group of Medical Students Kinda mean and really felt very distressed embarrassed. So when I look at this photo I know that that's the thing that pay used. And can you describe that treatment tune your they put the wires on your fingers and then put your penis in that thing that is ineffective graph They knew set down and you wanted and sometimes a slide would come up and you get a shock. Sometimes you wouldn't get a shock. Old Saturday was strange. Very strange what we called it. I video I guess of trains coming. In and out of stations and raid spots ingrain spots on screen also very evenly into main shaky looking film of a lot. Nike Guidi toweling in a Nike. Man's hailing and in the tryon would come in again and people be getting on the train and often Redfin station all the all reckless as we cold. Now and then you'd white and in a slide which it you'd selected so he before the treatment are into look at hundreds and hundreds of sides and make a night of the ones who were exciting to look at as exciting or think so but I think I said Erotic very coy and still an adult language. But certainly they were three or four at the most out of hundreds Were really lovely. And were NAS to look at NAS to fantasize With the way say and so does with the Wednesday came up but sometimes go to shock sometimes not and you had to tilde assistant or professor what level of Pine. It was from north to ten. And the whole time. This is happening. You're sitting there with your pants down. Here's hooked up to thing with the the middle end attached to the Shane years or any understood that at the end of ninety vaguely when the assistant showed me the graph an showed that the you said this is the pain response. You say say how. It's going down like that. Now you're doing okay and so I look are locked looking at the stars but they know I didn't because sweated terribly a win I thought when the shock and winning my not going to get the shock. Because she didn't get a shock every time like with the slide up and this happened three times times dive just for the week as I remember. And you're an inpatient during the status Ed. The sock Catholic would

Dr Neal Mcconnachie Fabian Scott Araba Mcgraff Professor Professor Claire Natasha Mitchell Reid Australia Nike Khloe Sydney Lo Schiavo K Davidson Neil Mccarthy Redfin Shane Thought K. Davison
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:18 min | 7 months ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"This ovid nineteen pandemic horrifying as it ease. Ease making us old. Think deeply about what comes afterwards about what out. Society will o'clock about what sort of society we? What's been really incredible? He's seeing how quickly the world can mobilize when it really needs to not quickly enough. Shore and the economic consequences are already devastating about four a behemoth of Planet. We have found a common purpose. Eradicating the pandemic. It's Natasha Mitchell joining you for science fiction and given all that. What could we mobilize around next if there was similar will mitigating climate change? What about the mountains of waste we generate as a species we flush freshwater Dan at Danny's landfill is piling up Arandas? Chana doesn't want out rubbish for recycling anymore and we throw out perfectly. Edible food by the ton make sense. No not really so I want you to meet to revolutionaries who have been well breaking rules to change. The world to me is a reflection of in particular in urban our society. That's not working. The fact that we twelve thousand years ago there was four million people on the planet and you sort of think so we take Melbourne and we better data across the planet and they probably created waste but it was Beautifully by the planet putting on being people on the planet and the same model. We exactly the same model now. It's clearly not an appropriate model anymore. We have a million tons of waste water a day in Melbourne. And what we do is we clean it up enough or we put it in a hole. We'll put it in the air or put it in the sea and we say our hope. The planet just fixes that problem and at some point probably when we hit a bad abi and people the planet's wasn't able to fix that problem anymore and so the model of waste that says that we can just put it out there and the planet will assimilated hall or in the Sea. He's finished so for me. Waste Rip presents a problem that we have to solve. That goes back a very long way. So it's hard to solve. I want you to make precipitated scales a chemical engineer and director of the particulate fluids processing center at University of Melbourne. He's a problem solver an inventor a makeup from water reuse and recycling to enormous batteries powered by your piece. Joost Becker is an environmental activist. Experimental End Artists to in two thousand twelve opened. The world's first zero waste RISTORANTE SILO BY JOOST. And they join me. As part of an event at the science gallery. Millwood's last pop-up exhibition called disposable. I want to talk about what happens when you try to challenge systems as they are to cleverly rethink how we use wise because what. We've got here people who do that and joost. You decided early on that you were going to respond to the the whole West Challenge and goes zero waste and not only that trying to open up a restaurant that was wholly zero waste. So what did that look like what most people do is? They see the waste product and then try and work out what to do with the waste product. I go back and look at the system if the system is generating something that is now used in the system needs to change. And so. That's what I did basically just change the system so the milk I spoke to a dairy fabric supply me and stainless steel cake so we developed like tap system we ground our own flow because we we have our own flower roll around oats. We spoke to winemakers about putting wine in kegs. One on tap might our own data everything that kind of generated waste but an even does myself. Yeah but this is much that has has come from that. I mean that was a forty two square meter cafe and it has caused ripples across the world is stuff going on in New York and in London in China and in South America. That has happened because of that cafe. Today I was sent an image of a Steiner Steel Keg and the farmer has worked for four years with the health department to try and get his keg approved now. Just my little cafe was like you know quarter of a million milk bottles or some crazy amount of milk bottles that we didn't need to buy that. My dairy farmer didn't need to buy that went didn't didn't need to purchase them and then I didn't pay someone to come and collect them and that plastic really copy restocked because he's got a fat coating from this animal fat on it. Which makes it really difficult to recycle it. So you know there's so many things and then in two thousand twelve the year on Harvesting was that was completely illegal but like my main sponsor was the city of Melbourne and had the city of Melbourne. Lago all over it and I thought if I'm going to get a crack at this I'm going to do it now. Okay so you're on harvesting in a commercial restaurant space. What were you doing because you're pushing the boundaries in all sorts of directions in this cap so people will come in and inspect building and go on my God. We had no chemical us. We had so much stuff this allies of things going on that for for people that were you know from the council checking to see you know. I had no plastic chopping boards and I had electrolytes water so water that came from was invented for surgery to clean hands and clean surgical tools in Japan. Twenty five years ago. It's basically water with salt and electric current goes through it and kills bacteria instantly us. Four billion gloves every single day that get thrown away which ended up in landfill which copy recycled and now here nets. No nothing so no bins no rubbish. We had like a little jam jar that showed there may capstone came on the kegs so I had to work to say. I don't want plastic cats on paper caps so they can go into our invisible composter so you can imagine how if you don't have been you've gotta work it out because you end up being left with stuff you know. We ended up having this board. That big of rubber bands because everything on the veggies and stuff in rubber bands but work with we were just talking about a with. Kerama on unlike a twin ball toilet so that Iran could be separated and stuff toilet applies to boys. Talk about in the toilets. Okay so so the so. This is the Iran harvesting story in this cafe. What did you do? And how did you challenge the health authorities big time? This was instilled in me by my dad. Probably account remember how it was maybe three or four years old so we were living in Holland and I used to go with my dad so he's veggie patch and be little like delft. Were little bottles. It'll all these little things coins I'd find one that had all this stuff come here in the solar we miles away from any any city or and he said we'll hundreds of years ago. Farmers would go to cities and shovel the human manure of the trenches to re fertilized their soil. Because you can't just keep pulling from soil so became caught assist with that idea and knowing that you know I don't know what it is some safe. Three percents is seven percent of the world's gases used to create a fertilizer a synthetic fertilizers. And I must say that. That fertilizer isn't even a good fertilizer because it doesn't actually narcisse soil properly. What we're doing is with mining soil. And we're not putting back what we've taken out so for me. It's like logical that we can't solve this problem unless we start looking at putting the nutrients that we've taken out back in. So what did you do with Iran in the restaurant so we use it on grain crops so use it to fertilize mustard crops in thousand and use it as a herbicide that we did all sorts of trials different levels to say what kind of facility was brought back to soil? We ended up with three and a half thousand Litas from a five-week pop-up.

Melbourne Iran University Of Melbourne Joost Becker Steiner Steel Keg Natasha Mitchell Chana Experimental End Artists Japan Millwood South America Director China Holland New York Delft London
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"That would that would show them. You know that'd be really great but on the other Hand like do I really want to have to prove to people you know. Hey you know I have this. Genetic Code like people always find some other reason you know like like people war constantly. Try to find some other way to talk around circles but either way for my personal benefit. I do wish that they would just test it. Because we're here. Basically to what extent do ancestry genetic testing companies have a duty of care here to perhaps only provide ancillary history results when they know their databases are diverse enough to improve the certainty of those results. That's that's actually a tough question. I I actually don't even know how to answer that one on that you have to ask you have to ask the companies themselves. Do you feel that you've got a ged of as a company in terms of deciding what Dr so you choose to include or exclude when you're communicating to someone about their heritage. One of our core values is to keep in mind that behind every data. The point is a a human being is a customer is a real person and that is something that we've had in mind since the very beginning of the company. Typically we would with think about our our mother or grandmother or children who are in the database. And this is someone I care about and I want them to have the good experience as a customer. I guess though if if someone might see themselves as fundamentally connected to one culture say Palestinian or Italian and then only to see that identity ripped away from them with a few updates of the twenty three and may database that can have an impact yet can have having an impact but typically we find that customers absorb this new information into their general thinking and combine it with the information they already have and and put together a story that might be slightly updated but doesn't necessarily completely different from what they had been thinking previously. Syra Tishkov I. I just think people need to be cautious and be aware that they might find something out that is very hard for them too emotionally or psychologically except it may contradict their own idea their own self identity. We've of course heard all these stories about people. Finding out that a parent is not who they not actually their biological parents for example and then there's the fact that these companies make money by selling this data to typically to pharmaceutical companies in things like that and it's also not clear. How prevalent is this data than going to remain in the future? So I just I personally just recommend people go into this with you know is open so to speak. I think that there can be definite positives to the Stena project and also just on a personal level this learning about yourself in this way I see it as a possible step toward just being seen honestly where it's like okay. Are you going to acknowledge. Is this company going to acknowledge the Palestinians actually exist. You know like if if you're going to like again like it's it's the whole idea of going all the way like okay you're gonNA GONNA you're GonNa go through the trouble of listing all of these countries and and testing DNA for all these places. But YOU'RE NOT GONNA test Palestine okay. Cool probably sat here and really really really really think about it. I would think about the negative connotations of doing that but I'm so busy Z.. Thinking about like I want legitimacy. That's where my focuses but that's highly fruit especially if data sits revolving that's true. I mean that's actually a good point like maybe maybe I should cool my jets and wait. Maybe a few years was when they have a more robust data set. And then we'll get there. They're so interesting isn't it. My guests cartoonist and illustrator data Marguerite de by Dr Joanna Mountain from Twenty-three Ama Professor Sara Tishkov from the University of Pennsylvania and thanks to Co Produce Jane Lee Studio Engineer Engineer Ari Gross and the Radio Art Studio in New York. Talk to me on twitter onto Natasha Mitchell. Say you've been listening to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen APP..

Ari Gross Engineer Ama Professor Sara Tishkov Dr Joanna Mountain twitter University of Pennsylvania Natasha Mitchell New York
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"That would that would show them. You know that'd be really great but on the other Hand like do I really want to have to prove to people you know. Hey you know I have this. Genetic Code like people always find some other reason you know like like people war constantly. Try to find some other way to talk around circles but either way for my personal benefit. I do wish that they would just test it. Because we're here. Basically to what extent do ancestry genetic testing companies have a duty of care here to perhaps only provide ancillary history results when they know their databases are diverse enough to improve the certainty of those results. That's that's actually a tough question. I I actually don't even know how to answer that one on that you have to ask you have to ask the companies themselves. Do you feel that you've got a ged of as a company in terms of deciding what Dr so you choose to include or exclude when you're communicating to someone about their heritage. One of our core values is to keep in mind that behind every data. The point is a a human being is a customer is a real person and that is something that we've had in mind since the very beginning of the company. Typically we would with think about our our mother or grandmother or children who are in the database. And this is someone I care about and I want them to have the good experience as a customer. I guess though if if someone might see themselves as fundamentally connected to one culture say Palestinian or Italian and then only to see that identity ripped away from them with a few updates of the twenty three and may database that can have an impact yet can have having an impact but typically we find that customers absorb this new information into their general thinking and combine it with the information they already have and and put together a story that might be slightly updated but doesn't necessarily completely different from what they had been thinking previously. Syra Tishkov I. I just think people need to be cautious and be aware that they might find something out that is very hard for them too emotionally or psychologically except it may contradict their own idea their own self identity. We've of course heard all these stories about people. Finding out that a parent is not who they not actually their biological parents for example and then there's the fact that these companies make money by selling this data to typically to pharmaceutical companies in things like that and it's also not clear. How prevalent is this data than going to remain in the future? So I just I personally just recommend people go into this with you know is open so to speak. I think that there can be definite positives to the Stena project and also just on a personal level this learning about yourself in this way I see it as a possible step toward just being seen honestly where it's like okay. Are you going to acknowledge. Is this company going to acknowledge the Palestinians actually exist. You know like if if you're going to like again like it's it's the whole idea of going all the way like okay you're gonNA GONNA you're GonNa go through the trouble of listing all of these countries and and testing DNA for all these places. But YOU'RE NOT GONNA test Palestine okay. Cool probably sat here and really really really really think about it. I would think about the negative connotations of doing that but I'm so busy Z.. Thinking about like I want legitimacy. That's where my focuses but that's highly fruit especially if data sits revolving that's true. I mean that's actually a good point like maybe maybe I should cool my jets and wait. Maybe a few years was when they have a more robust data set. And then we'll get there. They're so interesting isn't it. My guests cartoonist and illustrator data Marguerite de by Dr Joanna Mountain from Twenty-three Ama Professor Sara Tishkov from the University of Pennsylvania and thanks to Co Produce Jane Lee Studio Engineer Engineer Ari Gross and the Radio Art Studio in New York. Talk to me on twitter onto Natasha Mitchell. Say you've been listening to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen APP..

Ari Gross Engineer Ama Professor Sara Tishkov Dr Joanna Mountain twitter University of Pennsylvania Natasha Mitchell New York
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"That would that would show them. You know that'd be really great but on the other Hand like do I really want to have to prove to people you know. Hey you know I have this. Genetic Code like people always find some other reason you know like like people war constantly. Try to find some other way to talk around circles but either way for my personal benefit. I do wish that they would just test it. Because we're here. Basically to what extent do ancestry genetic testing companies have a duty of care here to perhaps only provide ancillary history results when they know their databases are diverse enough to improve the certainty of those results. That's that's actually a tough question. I I actually don't even know how to answer that one on that you have to ask you have to ask the companies themselves. Do you feel that you've got a ged of as a company in terms of deciding what Dr so you choose to include or exclude when you're communicating to someone about their heritage. One of our core values is to keep in mind that behind every data. The point is a a human being is a customer is a real person and that is something that we've had in mind since the very beginning of the company. Typically we would with think about our our mother or grandmother or children who are in the database. And this is someone I care about and I want them to have the good experience as a customer. I guess though if if someone might see themselves as fundamentally connected to one culture say Palestinian or Italian and then only to see that identity ripped away from them with a few updates of the twenty three and may database that can have an impact yet can have having an impact but typically we find that customers absorb this new information into their general thinking and combine it with the information they already have and and put together a story that might be slightly updated but doesn't necessarily completely different from what they had been thinking previously. Syra Tishkov I. I just think people need to be cautious and be aware that they might find something out that is very hard for them too emotionally or psychologically except it may contradict their own idea their own self identity. We've of course heard all these stories about people. Finding out that a parent is not who they not actually their biological parents for example and then there's the fact that these companies make money by selling this data to typically to pharmaceutical companies in things like that and it's also not clear. How prevalent is this data than going to remain in the future? So I just I personally just recommend people go into this with you know is open so to speak. I think that there can be definite positives to the Stena project and also just on a personal level this learning about yourself in this way I see it as a possible step toward just being seen honestly where it's like okay. Are you going to acknowledge. Is this company going to acknowledge the Palestinians actually exist. You know like if if you're going to like again like it's it's the whole idea of going all the way like okay you're gonNA GONNA you're GonNa go through the trouble of listing all of these countries and and testing DNA for all these places. But YOU'RE NOT GONNA test Palestine okay. Cool probably sat here and really really really really think about it. I would think about the negative connotations of doing that but I'm so busy Z.. Thinking about like I want legitimacy. That's where my focuses but that's highly fruit especially if data sits revolving that's true. I mean that's actually a good point like maybe maybe I should cool my jets and wait. Maybe a few years was when they have a more robust data set. And then we'll get there. They're so interesting isn't it. My guests cartoonist and illustrator data Marguerite de by Dr Joanna Mountain from Twenty-three Ama Professor Sara Tishkov from the University of Pennsylvania and thanks to Co Produce Jane Lee Studio Engineer Engineer Ari Gross and the Radio Art Studio in New York. Talk to me on twitter onto Natasha Mitchell. Say you've been listening to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen APP..

Ari Gross Engineer Ama Professor Sara Tishkov Dr Joanna Mountain twitter University of Pennsylvania Natasha Mitchell New York
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Natasha Mitchell here with you for culture science and spice so now imagine a scientist synthesizes a novel biological organism. It's not something now into nitrates. It's it's synthetic. Human made and their intentions are good really good. Maybe developing a by technology that could wipe out a deadly mosquito borne virus Laura so that's great rush but then that organism unintentionally escapes the lab and does things it isn't meant to now you Michael that bio era it was a mistake no one intended any harm but Wardi if they did so from bio era in the last show to a bio terror in this show one of the risks of biotech becoming a new tool for those with malicious intent and how would we know if I they were plotting something. What signs would we even look out for. This was all considered at a recent NATO peace and security workshop in Switzerland with global leaders in synthetic pedic biology and security. I was the only journalist on the ground and the conversations were very frank so the best anecdote I've heard was the FBI receiving a phone call from a company who had just received an order for toxin. It was below road legal threshold so the order was completely legitimate but the person that a taken the order on the telephone was just not comfortable. There wasn't something quite right. Dr Piers here's millet spent more than a decade working for the UN Biological Weapons Convention. That's the international trade that ban the use of disease and other biological agents talks is weapons the fact actually that most of the people placing an order light they won received over the telephone would be ordering. Maybe one hundred times less the order that was placed limit turns out that individual had been placing similar orders multiple different companies and had stockpiled a horrendous amount of these very very nasty toxins and in fact I believe in this case they were intending to kill their spouse with it but they could have had much more malicious intent. It could have been many more lives. The targets of biological weapons are expanding Dr Phillip Elaine Sauce from King's College London specializes insecurity synthetic fitting biology and biological weapons. Previously it's been all about making people sick possibly to the extent that they died but we are now with the science science able to target say directly the immune system aware able to directly target our genome or we're able to directly target our nervous system or even the microbiome the bacteria in your gut that is really enabling a new kind signed of threat equally. You can also imagine scenarios where some of this technology allows you to create systems damage things that traditionally we haven't broken down so maybe it's electron onyx. Maybe as plastics maybe it's oil you can use biological agents to degrade things that we really want to find useful in other words we could use biological weapons in the sense that they could destroy organisms or systems that we are reliant on absolutely and one of the trends we can see quite clearly around the world is an increasing focus this on biotechnology and the buyer economy to help generate wealth to solve problems. We need to be more worried about how nefarious actors how bad guys and gals could damage biology that we're using animals can also be the target of biological misuse crops and again their whole new capabilities that are developing for how we can deliberately modify and spread viruses to plant community to the animal community that form really significant threats but you know this ability to build technologies that biologically targetted is precisely what make synthetic biology so exciting being in terms of its possible applications and so before we consider the perils. Let's get a glimpse of that. Promise.

UN Biological Weapons Conventi Dr Phillip Elaine Sauce Natasha Mitchell scientist FBI Dr Piers Switzerland NATO Laura Wardi Michael
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"But we begin this sign show with a bit of Brexit as there is to quote Phillip Adams Boris Dancing all over England what about science here Natasha Mitchell talks to the president of the Rose Sake of London and Nobel laureate Professor Vinke Ramakrishnan Krishnan of Cambridge. I think the uncertainty is possibly even worse than any sort of outcome because people are very anxious anxious about what the situation will be after Brexit of happens and what their own situation will be but also what the status of science and the environment will be our attractive Britain will be as destination one concern have as reputation of Britain with a hard brexit it might send a signal to the. The rest of the world that Britain really isn't welcoming and doesn't want to have cooperation with other countries and so it will take a lot of work to reverse that and restore Britain's reputation as an open and welcoming society where second only to the U._S. as an international destination and that reputation I think is very valuable. It's allowed us to attract some of the best people from all of the world whatever happens we would have to take really active steps to convey that Britain is still that way. They have been reports that students already turning away researchers are already turning away from the U._K.. Because of the uncertainty around funding and physicians. Nations have you got evidence to suggest that tapping there is some evidence about students because students from the E._U.. Their subsidies maybe in question after Brexit but actually if you look at Postgraduate Students Post Docs Fox faculty members and working scientists and so on every time I've asked for data rather than anecdotal evidence I haven't found yet a clear signal of the people not coming or if people leaving because of Brexit but the danger is that by the time we can actually see that in the numbers it means that the perceptions already changed and it's almost too late and this is something I've tried to explain to. Politicians that by the time we produce the evidence it may be too late and so you really have to take our word that there is this feeling about Britain. There's this anxiety and you need to do something about it. Now you know by allowing hiring people to move easily within Europe allowing collaborations to be very easy by being able to have large consortium. 's to tackle large problems. All of these things were greatly facilitated by a you you if you look at the arc of history England was lots of little kingdoms you know yet Anglia and Cornwall and Cumbria and all that sort of Kingdoms and they all came together that was England then England Wales we came one and then became one Wisconsin and Germany was lots of countries and then eventually you know with this mark united into Germany and same with Italy and Garibaldi so the arc of history is to bring state entities together for larger entities so in a sense..

Britain Brexit England Professor Vinke Ramakrishnan K Phillip Adams Natasha Mitchell Cambridge Europe president London Germany Wisconsin Garibaldi Cumbria Cornwall Wales Italy
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Radiation, and is able to observe colliding merging black holes billions of light years away. That's that's really remarkable the extent to which understood the universe from from its very beginnings to what's going to happen at trillion years the level of understanding, plus the level of cultural achievement at our best Justice, Donna Shing. And even if there are other intelligence species out there allowing our own species to disappear would be like taken torch to to a Picasso. But for all this talk about the distant distant future, geologist home. Raimondo finds himself, but not at least often dreaming much more about the past odd doing joy, I love back to the I love that whole vision of the future with flying cars and all these other things, but it's all fantasy to me. I guess in some way, maybe that's what it is thinking about the past. It's fantasy. It's happened. It's concrete. It's real in some sense. This is the power of cloak steadily taking us into the future of attain millennia. It helps us project Alam education to a possible future. We need a kind of Anka to help us do that is raw reference. Raimondo some sort of perceptible chime that's they ticking in the back of your mind will in reality actually ticking. There if you can imagine this clock, very very slowly. Making its way through that that series of movements towards the fawn all Cocody coming at ten thousand years into the future. People have often told may people in policies that there's no point in talking about ten thousand years. It's just not real to people. And I'm not really sure that's that's the case to some extent people are focused on the short term. But when you start thinking about a place for your future descendants to live in then the future does become a little bit more real. And some studies do show that when people engage with the notion of their survival of the species as a whole they do begin to care that the effects of humans on climate. And on the environment is essentially irreversible full. M I hopeful, well, despair isn't an option. The reason I'm hopeful is that actually the technology renewables is coming along pretty quickly. We also could do a lot more with next generation of nuclear power than we're doing right now. The problem being that there isn't a real financial incentive to invest in nuclear at a time when natural gas is so cheap. But there are solutions there are technological solutions that don't even involve much of a hit to the world Konami. In fact, probably are boost to the world economy. It's not a situation where we don't actually have solutions. And so if we actually do manage to convince people that these solutions to decarbonisation will make their life better than that will be a game changer. And so I have enough faith in human nature that although we as humans tend to make all mistakes possible. We eventually do the right thing. And he found out more about the ten thousand year clock of her on the science friction website emails from that to or talked me on Twitter at Natasha Mitchell. The show is produced by myself and Maria Teagle and studio engineer, John Jacobs. Knicks time, well, it's an eye opening and rollicking who story from the history of science, and it's a juicy scandal was the good father of climate science. In fact, a woman. You've been listening to an EBay podcast. Discover mole great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the IB say listen up..

Raimondo Donna Shing geologist Natasha Mitchell Knicks Konami Anka Twitter decarbonisation John Jacobs Maria Teagle engineer ten thousand years ten thousand year trillion years
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"And one of the social issues raised in the conversation. He's with exciting new developments in nanomedicine will be shared equitably. We all be able to afford them. We all have access to them in consigned has really avoid these sorts of questions if they want they work to make a real difference. I would try to distinguish ambivalence from anti-science or what clo- war on reason? I think they're very different things. What's really going on clash of different forms of raisin? Ambivalence is actually about having contradiction. Sittings science being on the one hand in these yesterday, but also skeptical questioning or critical and actually holding those two things sivvy's some attention. A classic moment would be the meltdown at which seemed to catalyze for lots of people the sense that science produces these incredible benefits, but also produces nuclear fallout produces acid Ryan is the hall produces climate change. Now that that's that's kind of what we're leaving through this citizens brings with it benefits, but also downsides, and it's really hard to tease the two apart. Matthew suggests people push back against technology when they don't feel their anxieties of being knowledged. There is a set of concerns about the speed of technological change. But also its direction you earned to see who controls. Where's it going? Who's it going to benefit? Now, what we lack in our society is a capacity to really address those concerns. We tend to think about them primarily through the lens of risk is this technology gonna kill you on ought many ways cities happen because we narrow the frame of the relevant questions, and we lack a y of really dealing with the the broader social political and economic context in which those controls these situated. Andrew Maynard agrees and says we exclude too many voices in the making of technology. A lot of it comes down to lack of communication, lack of empathy and understanding and lack of humility. And it's a much broader challenge where people tend to avoid trying to understand things from somebody else's perspective, and they try and maximize their own value while forgetting about trampling on somebody else's value. And he says technologists a more likely to have success in a void controversy if they can cedar other perspectives. It's the difference from being naive scientists who thinks that it's just about the signs and the smart scientist engineer that understands that people in communities and societies involved in even that really small step. I think it will stymie creativity and innovation middle help. People weed out the inventions in the innovations that are truly can help society rouses and just cause problems in this day and age if you don't think like that as an entrepreneur. Entrepreneur an innovator, you're more likely to fail. You have thankfully, the Luddites at the dole stalking. You doing? What you want to do? Well, that's where we leave you on your adventure. With a lot arts think you find the ghost of Ned Ludd lives on. He sure does. And he leaves on inefficient tested cartoon that we've had artists. Sam woman do for you. Check it out on the science fiction website, eighty say dot net dot I use slash Iran slash sites. Friction. It is a cracker. Now carries the nine. Thanks to ABC science jealous and a Soleil co-host today. Talk to me on Twitter at Natasha Mitchell of the hear from you Nick show, the future of six from six box, telly Vildana cts to artificial wombs, and the Lucien of the Spacey's. It's wild by.

dole Ned Ludd Andrew Maynard ABC science Ryan Twitter Matthew Natasha Mitchell Iran stalking Sam Nick scientist engineer one hand
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And finally, what about a GM cane toad one that does not kill a stroll in native animals mocked his odd. Ultimately, we would have to take toads that have had that Jane removed grow them up and then distribute them in the environment and put them at the invasion front. So that the predators that are going counter wild towed will encounter, one of our modified toads I and learn that's a really bad auditory toad. So in the real poisonous toads come through they stay away from them and don't eat them. So that would be step one. So the idea is that you'd release these toads that have been gene edited. So that they toxin is not toxic to ninety predators. But the toad would still taste disgusting. Absolutely. They're not very tasty in the first place, but the pro toxin in the stored in the net gland is marginally toxic. It's not lethal. But it will give an animal a big upset. It will make it feel really lousy. But it will recover. From that. So they'd learn they'd survive the tell the tale stay away from the toads, and they'll get a chance to teach their offspring stay away from the toads because that's something that we know. Eventually does happen animals will teach their offspring was good tweet. And what's not good to eat? But if an animal dies in that first encounter, it doesn't get the chance to teach offspring. If that's successful. Then we would go down a pathway to try and use the gene editing technology to also incapacitate the ability of those toads to reproduce. So that when the invaders come through meet the toads that we've put out in the environment. Those that haven't been eaten by a predator. And that president hasn't died when they meet those toes that remain. They would end up reproducing with them and having infertile offspring in world environment. Again, an interesting angle in this is is that towed that we're releasing a GM towed. Are we going to release a GM animal into the wild environment? Well, if crispy has nine technology when it's used to just create small changes. Is deemed not to be GM. Then we've got an animal that we can release into the environment that isn't a GM organism talking about Cazadores of SRO in Geelong, Victoria with Natasha Mitchell. Another innovation of national importance next week on the sign show Inova a community based energy scheme to give you far cheaper electricity and reduce emissions. How's it doing plus the master of Baillio? College in Oxford. The first woman to head the renowned college in its seven hundred and fifty years the sun show on our in production by David Fisher and Hamish chimera. I'm Robin Williams.

GM Jane Robin Williams Baillio Hamish chimera Oxford David Fisher Geelong president Natasha Mitchell fifty years
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Great need that we have science and mass teachers at the moment, sometimes schools are forced to like tight teachers who just aren't have this passion potatoing. And do you have any suggestions for school students when you have one of those teachers that don't really kit enough? What would you suggest to do? So that the next year level of students having to try and take each other and themselves you'll. What you're saying is so destroying. And so reliable what grind you in your nine? You know, and he non and so you are trying to sort of save the next generation from the very poor experiences that you'll have a tape Isaac late. I think from a really practical sampling something that you can do is to cut lies on the recently have Ranji. So your friends, I think inevitably you can have people who better at one topic and another I think teaching each other is one of the best ways to land. I don't really recommend getting too. I think that sort of defeats the purpose of really learning in a sense. I think the best way to sometimes she read like the first page of the textbook on chapter. That is usually what you find the story. And like, the interesting pots, and then Krugel, whatever you Donna stand. Find each videos like from Mitsubishi chief Khan Academy at an off that trying to challenge yourself to see if he can take it to the next one and the people around you before you go onto exercises because that really reinforces you'll Lenny and in time, you're going to have like those teaches who just aren't gonna really Cal all even feel like they've really investing you'll leading. But that doesn't stop. From being single or landing and doesn't really stop you from China succeed by yourself. I think sometimes when I do find myself in situations where I have teachers I can tell that I probably on that investing. What I will change will have you achieve. That's when I told a step it up actually sort of challenged myself and say, she'll I'm going to overcome these arts to do better than what I have done with a good h Beatty Chung for prime minister. And. Since two reason tape Mike Hutchinson. Ray tickle and Sam engineer Brandon O'Neill talk to me on Twitter at Natasha Mitchell. Love to hear your ideas on this one that wasn't aided vision of a longer of ain't and you can join us at the next science for chin live at the museum on Thursday, November the Fuste no billions. It's the future of six. Lighting ansari. The book data on the science fiction website catching time by.

Krugel chief Khan Academy Mike Hutchinson Ranji Isaac Beatty Chung Brandon O'Neill China prime minister Mitsubishi Ray tickle Twitter Natasha Mitchell Donna engineer Sam
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Galaxy and one hundred dollars galaxies nearby. There are essentially two campus. One says the open minded should make the first approach because the chances are that there are going to be benevolent friendly people, and they're going to respond and help us. And then there's a second comp which says you have no idea what they're going to be like the could not be benevolent that could be quite dangerous. If we send a signal it's our presence than the vents civilization might look at us as easy meat, and that could be dangerous for for humans, and you could have doomed civilization where do you see where do you sit in between those two camps? I tend to in the second camp, not maybe for the same reasons. I've just said I tend to sit in that count. Because I think it'd be embarrassing if we transmit our current state of civilization to advanced one I mean, it's like transmitting pitched if yourself as a teenager to some that you might end up being married to write. They're very embarrassing things. And they're right. I think humans are basically the equivalent of a teenager learning tight you their room. You know, we haven't really figured out how to look after our planet and each other. So if we broadcast ourselves in this current states, I think the humans for the future are not going to like us for it. Because we can't audio room. We keep them getting into fights at school, exactly. What about an actual face to face alien encounter? If you receive news that an early and ship had been detected of earth tomorrow. How would you react you think I think I'd buy a lot of frozen pizza and head for the hills? Personally. Okay. I would spend the first half hour sobbing hysterically in joy and fear and relief and. It would be the best thing ever. Because we've always wanted to know. And that I think there's something about us. That's lonely. I mean, we we are out at night people gaze up at the stars. And they wanna know they want it. They don't want to be alone out there in the vast -ness of space. It makes us feel so small there's so much beauty and majesty out there and think can leave it is it really just us. I like how you only give Hoffa now for that. So you've given you fat very intense half an hour. And then what happened? Oh boy. I mean, it's one thing to pick them up on the radio. Right. There's no danger there. They don't know that you've picked them up on the radio. Right. But if they've actually come here, that's worrying in into ways to begin with why and say, you know, because you don't know whether they're going to be friendly or otherwise. But Secondly, if they're not friendly, whatever they want to do they will be able to do because obviously they have technology far far beyond hours because they were able to come here. So I don't know. I would be rather apprehensive if they actually showed up in the skies above California, we need people to be science literature trite we need people not to interpret the UFO as a diabolical manifestation. Right. We need people to understand science, and we need people to care about science. We fund science. So that our kids understand what what's happening. So that. When we are making choices about how to react, we can do that with some restraint, and some kindness, and some sense of those are other sentient beings out there. How should we treat them? I mean, what kind of people are. We are. We are. We kind hopeful people who are a little bit audacious, and maybe a little bit clumsy, but trying really hard or are. We just mean scared people. Yeah. Skid PayPal dos. Sometimes one to Erica. I really do. Twenty eight such a humanity a Wadey, but I'm gonna hopes genuinely that this might be a situation with humans rise above themselves. Get a little brave and mighty grow up a bit space ever the optimist. Hi, thank you. Eric voles? Joining us on science fiction talk to us on Twitter at Natasha Mitchell and at Erica under school voles. And that's spelt VOD w Ilias and Erica Alaw medicine at the moment. So check out the poll custody IVC, Aaron and loss. Meta's loved having this week stitching next time duty. Two.

Erica Alaw Eric voles Twitter California Hoffa Aaron Natasha Mitchell one hundred dollars
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"The sun show on RN and we have a sister programme presented by Natasha Mitchell called science friction and a few weeks ago. She featured one of my heroes Dame, Jocelyn bell, Burnell discover of pulsars for which he should have received an Abell prize. Here. She isn't MacQuarie university few weeks ago on her current work, tracking, cosmic bodies that move. It's a bit like moving from a still photograph to a movie. You can make a very deep photograph by adding together, lots of frames. But as long as you have the frames separately identified, you'll be able to see things that move or things that change in brightness. It's been developments in CDs in cameras and developments in computing that has opened up this new way of looking at things in the sky. I have to say that there are some branches of astronomy which have been well aware for a long time that things in the sky varied. Clearly, the pulsar astronomy, which is a bit of radio, astronomy where we see objects posting on timescales of second or a fraction of a second and people who've detected x-rays from the sky. Gamma rays from the sky are very well used to things that change their brightness flare up, die away. What has happened? Is it a number of older telescopes have been re purposed and re kitted out to study the sky for things that are transient, the Schmidt telescope, it's owned by the university of Uppsala in Sweden, but it's based in a stray Ilya. Now, some of the bunny for particularly pan Starrs came from the threat of quotes killer asteroids asteroids that move that because they move. We props, don't notice them unless we specifically consider the moving and some come quite close to the earth. Killer is a bit extreme killer is very extreme. But if you want money, you need to point out the threats. But it's okay. You can sleep tonight. Jocelyn bell Burnell this year. And here she is now in twenty eleven on one of her favorite themes space, poetry. He would talking about who wrote the poems, Robert frost and Thomas hardy. We're both amateur astronomers and had their own telescopes, and there's a suspicion that Gerald Manley Hopkins might have had or at least had a close friend who had a telescope and you can see in their poetry that they know what they're talking about. And then there are poets who have family members who are astronomers. There's a contemporary Welsh poet called Gwyneth Lewis. She has a cousin who is a NASA. Astronaut Robinson Jeffers. The US poet had a brother who worked at lick observatory Hilda Doolittle who wrote under the initials HD. Her father was the director of an observatory in. Pennsylvania, and so it goes on. There's quite a few poets who have serious astronaut Michael links, and there are other poets who are just fascinated by things up there in the sky and space, right poems with such themes and you, of course, been fascinated all your life. I talk to many many years ago about your work discovering pulsars. How back was that? Oh, that's over forty years ago now, that's well back and the idea is extremely dense and they're sending a massive signal across a vox of space. Yes, they are extremely dense. The analogy I use is take a thimble a sewing thimble, take the population of the world. Six plus billion people jam though six billion people into the thimble one at a time. And when you've done that, the thimble weighs about the same as it would have if it were filled with this pulsar neutron star. Material credible, isn't it? And the signal is coming usually on a regular basis, especially with the pulsar's how come it's regular. They're behaving a bit like a lighthouse a typical pulsar ways, thousand million million million million tons. And once you get a thousand million million million million tonnes spinning, it keeps spinning and it's actually quite difficult to make it change it spin, and it's sweeping beam of actually radio waves round the sky and each time the beam falls on the earth. We get a pulse, so it is very, like a lighthouse. And you perhaps know that each lighthouse has its own period and its own pattern of flashes. It turns out that each pulsar has its own period and pattern of flashes. So they really are like radio beacons in the sky..

Jocelyn bell Natasha Mitchell Gwyneth Lewis MacQuarie university Gerald Manley Hopkins pan Starrs Robinson Jeffers Burnell lick observatory director Schmidt telescope Hilda Doolittle university of Uppsala Robert frost Sweden US NASA Pennsylvania Thomas hardy
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on All In The Mind

"And so even if for instance, a specialized program lot, my DBT is not available, and lots of people don't necessarily need that, but. Least understanding acknowledging that there's a problem going on going and seeking help can be a great step. So as well as the pictures and the story for children, this book, there's a half a dozen pages of what I call psycho educational material, which addresses directly issues around that. We've been talking about like emotional dysregulation, some information about borderline personality disorder, and some wise gentle wise of pets, staying calm, and also seeking help. So the is to Kate about borderline personality disorder, both for the child, but also for the parent ends fit Williams from Helen mayo house. In Adelaide. She's co, author of meltdown moments with artist, Marie Johnson Harrison. The book is available through the women's and children's hospital foundation, and we'll linked to that on outside. People talk about mental health issues. A lot more there still is a terrible stigma, which is why people don't really want to address any mental health issues. Having sunny don't word as badge of honor, but I'm not ashamed of fact that, yes, I am borderline yourself from depression, but it's so important for people to understand that there is no shame in it. And the only reason why people do have this negative stigma is simply because they are not educated and they don't understand and. They're not really worth it. To be honest, it's more about furthering my children's life and my life. And do you have any reflections or insights into how this condition developed few why? Yes. I grew up in a very abusive home. I ran away when I was nine and I had been in. I care from the age of nine. As an adult, they're different kinds of abuses that continued. I think that's Birtles stemmed from often people that I diagnosed as borderline had difficult pasts. It really is a very big step for you to turn around your history in a way for the sake of your children. Here. It certainly is I coming from my background. There was no chance that I was going to allow my children to have any of those experiences. They didn't choose to be here and they deserve to be loved and live in a safe environment. And as I've decided kiss I, I was actually thinking at one stage of giving didn't think I was going to be able to do it after signing that. I couldn't part with them. It's not my job to ensure that that happens. So I would do anything. It takes to ensure my children have a happy and healthy upbringing. Many things to Sonia end to him for speaking today about their experiences with mental illness and motherhood. Thanks also to make a Nielsen for the ratings. Our producer is dying. Dane and sound engineer is Judy replica unin Malcolm, it's great to have your company till next time. Just before I go. I want to let you know that if you're in Melbourne, check out the science friction, live events at the Melbourne museum. It's a series of hot button conversations about science society and culture. Her stood by Natasha Mitchell. I Nick's first day the sixth of September is hoesch metoo with incredible speakers on sexual harassment and activism in science. It's free. But you have to book look out for science friction on ABC dot net, dot EDU slash Aren.

Marie Johnson Harrison Williams Malcolm Helen mayo house Adelaide Melbourne Melbourne museum Kate harassment Birtles ABC Nielsen Natasha Mitchell producer Dane engineer Judy
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"To erin this lead you to do some pretty bizarre experiments as an archaeologist well so they're not actually that bizarre right so pig kernels real to the rest of us every anybody who's watching crime scene drama on television or mythbusters or something like this is probably seen scientists use pigskin or pig bodies as a stand in as a proxy for the human body that's ancient inc archaeology odd and searching for clues on ancient flesh natasha mitchell now giving you friction on sundays at one pm friday's at eleven thirty am on our in an here on the show mo friction and fiction about henry hoke the stray leeann who invented everything but who's now recognized by nobody such shame motor the driver affect strenuously ultimate test attest to the reliability of vehicle attest ones on so for lines and when things went wrong the price of failure could be that's was born the legend of the push mechanic when it comes to bush mechanics there's a standard around here we all guy boy that's henry hyde the stories about henry hooked bush mechanic a legendary sent that nothing ever stock there were reports that he could repay a flat tires using only cannata andy lx ran out of fuel once when he was up no but he managed to still a few gallons of petrol boy using vigil some tomato sauce and some gum leaves yeah i wasn't they mon jew being told this family were out for a picnic and offered through a creek crossing gay boxes just followed up just gonna nyegezi well comedy like henry used some of his mother's allweather ends at biscuits to shape knauss little work and gable a couple of monkey rips and he had the family home in no time he was dead handed anything like that.

henry hoke henry hyde henry erin mythbusters natasha mitchell andy lx gable
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"Am sequenced by a brisbane yuki based group my crowbar who featured recently on abc catalyst because it's one of the questions i want to ask do i have any mike how do we get them we'll flavonoids ease what they like so flavonoids in what in blueberries t possibly lots of good natural red wind red wine absolutely yeah so you know those foods should help encourage that particular bacteria which would hopefully help protect us from flu viruses as replicating fascinating story good luck with the next couple of books in the kids thanks gregory christie microbiologist on writer adding to our series of our in programs on flu and do catch up with revision and the health report if you haven't heard them already now science friction is about to reemerge from it's christmas sale yes science friction is back and this time i landing weekly natasha mitchell really looking forward to bringing you stories in interviews about science and culture and something we'd never seen before with the spice added and frankly i've never heard of and i'm kicking off with an extraordinary medical mystery hollywood could not script something more tragic i was so moved when i heard of this story and beautiful and it's the story of robbie and the denied detectives he was probably very scared visit anything really he he was different completely one gutsy young guy a genetic lottery cutting edge science and an international quest also coming up turned on the lights and i can't see anything on this skin you literally could not see it with the naked eye we're on a thing i urgent inc the secrets of very very old tattoos my goodness that was a real surprise i jump up and down moment but mostly ignored and so that is an archaeologist really bothered me right because that means we're overlooking this entire category of material culture until now if you think you'll freshly minted tattoo is going to lack lasta a few decades from now imagine what the tets on five thousand year old mummies look like pretty incredible actually but what do they reveal about app past.

mike writer natasha mitchell hollywood robbie brisbane abc gregory christie five thousand year
"natasha mitchell" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"natasha mitchell" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Hi pat i would choose calling i'm natasha mitchell's grandmother i want to explain who natasha is natasha and her husband hired a guy and he's on our sleep yeah johnston home improvements are so jim is jim johnson and hired him to remove specis scraped it off the top us no protection put it in garbage bags through it in a public dumpster told the family they could go back home endangering their lives there was a bunch of contamination is the guy getting arrested or not you know the pa clinton actually dug in in this pretty good ahead clint clint epa has taken it on a guy named curtis over there really dig into the enforcer because we want to get this guy arrested plus he claimed he was owed money so pat what's going on i'm just calling you know oh everything out of their house away it's going to cost them over thirty grand right and i was just wondering if we could get you to help us to maybe get like american furniture some of them to donate some furniture mattress box springs i just bought cube brand new couches from american furniture now they have to be thrown out creators gone tried homeowners insurance because this was done by a perpetrator this is not their fault i'm wondering if there's homeowners insurance might cover this or if he's got any insurance here haven't heard from him is his numbers still operating i wonder why i highly doubt it but his fossil sleaze brigade hey suzanne or somebody go can you go to sleep brigade dot com where would they even put the stuff right now yeah because the place has to.

pat natasha mitchell jim johnson clinton clint clint epa curtis johnston suzanne