40 Burst results for "nasa"

Fresh "nasa" from Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 min | 3 min ago

Fresh "nasa" from Rush Limbaugh

"To get the required two doses each. That's reporter town your powers. Wanna go to the moon? How about Mars? Space? X hopes to someday offer us a ride there, and today they're testing a new rocket. In addition to launching rockets and capsules for NASA, Elon Musk Space X is also working on a large, shiny people carrying rocket for itself. It's called Starship. And it's the vehicle space X one day hopes will go to the moon and to Mars carrying out Musk's idea of a privatized Martian colony. Today's test of the rocket is expected to see the craft reach an altitude of 50,000 ft. Launch will take place not at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida or Vandenberg Air Force Base in California but at a space X facility in Boca Chica, Texas. Have been brown. Fox News, Charlotte police say a man who caused a deadly rack yesterday was drunk. 62 year old Anthony Ebron is now charged with felony death by vehicle in the Raccoon. Reagan Dr 44 year old Malanda cauldron was killed her five year old with her had only minor injuries. Ready for a little football today? Yes, Wednesday NFL action. The Ravens and Steelers of it along week and a half, starting with Baltimore suffering a covert 19 outbreak within their organization last Monday, with running backs JK Dobbins and Mark Ingram testing positive. The NFL moving their game from the Thanksgiving matinee to Sunday afternoon until more coronavirus cases emerged, including for quarterback Lamar Jackson. The reigning N V. P is still on the cove in reserve list. The contest, then pushed to Tuesday evening and now barring any unforeseen circumstances, the Ravens and Steelers will square off at Heinz Field today as Pittsburgh looks remain undefeated on the season kickoff slated for 3 40. PM Eastern Man, Napolitano Fox knew and we've got Basketball Carolina basketball this afternoon here on WB T starting at three. This hour Brought to you by Bo Jangles. It's Bo time. I'm Mark Garrison. W B T News with weather and kids in test count all the WPT MoistureLoc severe Weather Update for up to the minute local coverage. Your emergency situation station..

Ravens NFL Steelers Kennedy Space Center Musk Vandenberg Air Force Base Fox News Reporter Mark Garrison Bo Jangles Boca Chica Nasa Napolitano Fox Anthony Ebron Reagan Dr Charlotte Mark Ingram Heinz Field Jk Dobbins Lamar Jackson
No Speako Espaol

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

05:26 min | 5 hrs ago

No Speako Espaol

"To say who has the right. Who has the final say that says atrushi gano a true latina through. Mcconnell is only someone that could speak spanish. You know and i don't think that's right. Man i mean who who who makes up these rules and and should we follow them. I personally think I don't think languages a pre prerequisite for being latino being chicano Being a brown man. What do you guys think well. That's a good topic to jump into because it's so true it's like the level of your of the your command of the spanish language this should not dictate whether or not near brown right so the big question is does speaking spanish. Make you any more brown than the next person. So i grew up speaking spanish. That was my first language you know and then but the other thing is also like with my father you know. I'm not saying that he's right or you know but It's just the way that it was that he's like Kind of he was one of those people that would hate it when a dark person a didn't speak spanish it and he's like i said i will not pollyanna frontier needs to buy new like it. Would it would. It would hurt them. You know like like lexus. Like one time we went to the beach and then after that that there was this this like these chillers. The man talking In english and everything like that. My dad's like like talking smack about him just because he was talking in english you. That was kind of weird like that. You know as it needs needs to get a He said he needs to get the house by like like. I don't know why you would bother him. Her whatever and then the man just to let my dad know that he didn't spanish. He's all like all a let or something like that. You know like the guy told him not even confrontational sort of put them in check in a night. Yeah exactly and so on. My dad's like not need a colonoscopy de niro and so it kinda like silence my dad now you know. Let let like like he. Did you know it was like that was my experience and i mean i'm not a like even when we're at at at the table like my dad. He didn't like me talking to my my siblings and sp in english in by noel. And it's like he always made us talk in in spanish like everything so that was my my experience I mean like. I said it. That's not how i feel. I mean it's like Because as i start as i started speaking more more english my spanish started You know I started seeing things wrong and stuff like that. You know so. Like so. Even when i went to mexico and i saw some of my cousins and they were like i'll say like a word like spanish or i'd say it wrong and then they'd they'd make fun of me. You know like a skit way. I'll go to assist you. Know he you know yes but you're trying to each other on. Who's the better spanish speaker. That's that's what that's what this episodes about. It's like why do we power trip over that stuff. Yeah man you know. That is a really good question. What what is this about. Power trip know or authenticating. You know you know and why you know why. Why is language such a important part of who we are. you know. Like like maya bringing is little bit different My mother is he. Gonna you know she was born in he comb. My father is gone. He was born in texas. But you know but all our families are from different. Parts of michael and i was born on the border town. You know on a border town so we spoke spanish. We can all speak english but we spoke spanish. That's was the star norm. You know especially right. They're living literally on la la frontera in this five miles away from the fence. And i remember it was like a hard core as a little child by man owes a hard corden nasa student. You know like little four year old five year old you know like totally proud of being brown and everything you know and and only wanting to speak spanish men you know and And because my mind english was such an ugly language you know such a detached language. You know there is no cutting no love in there. you know. And it wasn't until. I went to first grade at the americanization process began. I didn't know it at that time. But that's basically what it is you know. The american is ancient process of denying us. The our our right to speaks spanish.

Atrushi Gano Mcconnell Brown Noel Mexico Maya Texas Michael Nasa
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Five years ago or something. Okay so i got ten bucks each. But they accidentally they accidentally sent me to deeds to deeds two plots of land on the moon. So that when i called them and i said hey accidentally sent me to just keep it so it didn't matter. Yeah like meaning. Keep it weird. This is stuff that i just got in on the ground four. Why why did they agree. I do not have plots i want. You want me to sell you. One got a cool. Yes i bet the priming mark little. Y'all a highway in now jeffey. That's got easy access to so. I'm gonna have to charge extra now. I want to see proof of that to be able to find. You think that. I would take more care of these. I would absolutely want. Yeah now you can build on those right. You could build a house if you want to build charging china rent for dirt off my property. I'll tell you right and by the way you can have as much of that dirt as you want we were. We're fine with it. Just go ahead and take all the dirt back to the us. Maybe you're china back to earth. Yeah maybe your maybe. They haven't talked to me This is a new area there. Apparently off on a place where I don't think anybody's sold any property there So this is why we brought there. I know but the whole the whole darn moon is hours right. Yes and again yes. Check the flag will. It's not it's waiting and there's no wind on the moon which means we're not really there. We didn't really go. We really did that on a on. A studio lot in las vegas. Yeah yeah it's weird weird There's a couple of things the stars there's no stars and And there's the flags blowing in the wind. How that happened on the moon. With no way right. I love it. I love that. Nasa has actually heard that so much that they've actually posted the debunking of each and every one of those talking points. So if you wanna see what about the shadows stuff yeah You can look at the nasa site and check out all of that information or a government website. That's where he's thinking right to believe that i mean an independent fact checkers facebook. you believe. it's already the time magazine person of the year. Timing go and i think we mentioned the other day. The governor cuomo andrew cuomo is up for time magazine person of the year. obviously Anthony xiaojie is up for earth. And here's what i love. Fouled she was saying just a. I don't know month or two ago. How critical it was that. The children not go back to school. That'll be a superspreader event. The jewelry gret for the rest of your life. Now he's saying no. The kids should go back to school. How many how many things does he have to flip flop on before. People say hey. He's got no credibility he doesn't know just like anybody else he doesn't know. Did you hear the latest. He's saying into summer summer. We're gonna be able to get the stadiums back to normal as far as capacity and stuff. You gotta be kidding summer. Twenty twenty one after the vaccine has had a chance to circulate for months throughout the population. Why the end of some. By the end of summer we could be back to normal with stadiums and professional. Actually we're gonna to change that to the end of next year live. I'll bet we will. It'll be it'll be next because it won't be able as a vaccine. The first rounds right the cdc decided yesterday the first round are going to go out to first responders that you knew that. Yeah yeah they'll go out to first responders and then they'll go out to The elderly people most affected by it and then later. If we want one you can get one. They'll probably going to have to wait until the great joe biden gets into office so he could focus on it right. yeah right. Yeah and i thought the masks masks. We're going to be the indo beal. Do we have the chart of of the great impact. That masks have had on our society The difference there is you can see the mask. Mandate states and the no mask mandate states Look the mask. Mandate states have more infections during the no mandate. That's right doesn't matter get the vaccine. Mass doesn't matter that the vaccine where the mask or you want people to die. It's one of the truths things you've ever said it doesn't matter none of the facts in this thing matter. They don't matter act correct. They didn't matter in the presidential election. They don't matter in this covert world. It doesn't matter at all. Don't don't bother me. with facts. The mandate states are doing worse than the non mandate state. That's the fact that matters that facts. Don't matter yes. You'll bug me down with backs. i've been saying it onto the fat for months it is. You know it sounds like a joke. It just isn't isn't today's today's show title will be fact facts. Don't matter i like it by the way once again. We.

Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Anthony Xiaojie Nasa China Time Magazine Las Vegas Facebook United States CDC Joe Biden Time Mass
Mark Kelly to be sworn in as Democratic senator from Arizona

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 7 hrs ago

Mark Kelly to be sworn in as Democratic senator from Arizona

"Later today, Retired NASA astronaut Mark Kelly is to be sworn in as Arizona's newest Democratic senator from member station Cage's easy Ben Giles prepared this report. Kelly defeated Republican Senator Martha McSally in a special election that determined who would finish the term of the late Senator John McCain. Now that the election results in Arizona have been certified Kelly is eligible to be sworn in immediately. Kelly's victory means both of Arizona's U. S. Senators will be Democrats for the first time since the 19 fifties. Democrat Kiersten Cinema also defeated make Sally two years ago. In the race for Arizona's other Senate seat make. Sally was later appointed to the seat Kelly just one Kelly, swearing in also means the Republican majority in the Senate will shrink by one vote.

Ben Giles Kelly Arizona Senator Martha Mcsally Mark Kelly Nasa Senator John Mccain Kiersten Cinema Sally Senate
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Todd and Don

Todd and Don

00:35 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Todd and Don

"Remember the words of this That's great, Ricky. I do not recognize this song. That Zey. Yeah, Everybody got press American, no matter what he's left people. Idiots Street. Thank you Really appreciate that. Thank you. Re in big man. Big finish liberals of the scum of the Earth. Big finish. Got a text message here. Let's see. It says hello, Todd. And don That she would me Okay. And it says sorry to report that the on Lee Arby's in Austin, South Lamar by central market has closed its doors. They have the meats, but now they closed their doors yesterday, and now he's got to go all the way to Buta for a hot roast beef sandwich in that famous horsey sauce are You. Fricking kidding me. I don't think that's the last one. I think there's one on North Lamar. Uh, there may be one on I 35 just north of us. You my partner, Lane. You are okay. Texture don't drive all the way to beautiful that we got it here in North Austin. You're you're met. You don't shut down the last great barbecue restaurant barbecue. The Arby's Arby's with the horse, he says, is that is that authentic Minnesota barbecue? That is, actually Yeah. Absolutely especially upstate. Oh, my goodness. Gracious. Arby's and the horse, he says, Yes, that my friend is barbecue when it is tragic when they close, there's there's an RV Love RB because one on deaths on my right Barbie's I think there is armies I do I do and, you know, call me crazy, but it is what it is, man, and sometimes it just gets it, especially if you're on the road. It's easy to eat behind the wheel. That's what I liked about. It really is you behind the wheel. Listen Road facing questions Will Space X launch a new rocket? Ship of hopes of sending to the moon and Mars. This is pretty interesting. Hang on a second. Here. Let me fix this saying on one second little bit of issues with the computer here. Here we go. In addition to launching rockets and capsules for NASA, Elon Musk Space X is also working on a large, shiny people carrying rocket for itself. It's called Starship and it's the vehicle Space X one day hopes will go to the moon and to Mars carrying out Musk's idea. Of a privatized Martian colony. Today's test of the rocket is expected.

Lee Arby Don That North Lamar Musk Ricky North Austin Todd Nasa Austin Partner Buta Minnesota
NASA & SpaceX Testing Safer ‘Green’ Rocket Fuel In Space Mission

Innovation Now

01:18 min | 13 hrs ago

NASA & SpaceX Testing Safer ‘Green’ Rocket Fuel In Space Mission

"In the year since launch gp im has successfully proven that a never before used propellant and its propulsion system. F- are practical options for future missions. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future while all rocket fuels can be dangerous to handle without the proper safety precautions. The fuel being tested on nasa's green propellant. Infusion mission is easier and safer to store the innovative chemical. Propellant requires fewer handling restrictions compared to the toxic hydrazine. Currently being used to fuel rocket's propellant has a higher density more of it can be stored in containers of the same volume. The fuel also delivers higher thrust and does not require heater power to prevent freezing throughout the mission researchers have conducted orbital maneuvers to demonstrate the propellants performance and the effectiveness of the tanks valves and thrusters used to deliver the fuel and ask the mission nears completion. Gpa im has demonstrated that this propellant can be used for anything from small cubesats to full-size rockets all while being safer for workers on the ground and increasing gas mileage after launch

Nasa
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

00:43 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"I finally got my degree at the university of maryland. But but anyway that was the gift that i got with that particular assignment From there i was sent to germany and another activity like that was so it was staff assignment. Basically but i still had the keep up lifeline. As a matter of fact the the commanding general decided he wanted to see fifty four. Fly him around and he hired an aid that i had checked out in the airplane. Who when he found the year made it a point to include me on a lot of the flights. So i get my flight time in and all of that so i was sort of the backup pilot for the general and In in that regard it was a good assignment for me and managed to get by work by way back in operations. While i was there and when i was transferred back to the states was on a thing called bootstrap which was Program a wonderful program that the air force had established to take people like me who were within striking distance getting their degrees and giving them the whole semester off to where they could go to the university of whichever they've been working with the finish up that turned out to be the university of maryland from me so the policy was to send you to the nearest airbase to that university to happen to be andrews. I didn't want to go to andrew. But anyway that's where i wanted up and that too became a gift because while i was there I was assigned to the air. What was then the research and development command which became the air force systems command. And i had a very interesting steph job under gel shreve. Who is the commander of afc at the time and from there I was transferred to the pentagon and that sort of did it. I wound up in what i the blind career field and decided that the in nineteen sixty five that i would call the shots of my retirement and it just so happened that i was offered a job by nasa at that time so i decided to retire from the air force and go to work for nasa fantastic. We still got a few minutes left in their conversation here. And you're joining nasa in the middle of the sixties which is obviously an extremely exciting time there What roles did you hold their..

University Of Maryland Air Force Germany Andrew AFC Nasa Pentagon
Saved by the Bell Apologizes for Selena Gomez Kidney-Transplant Jokes - Vulture

The Breakfast Club

01:03 min | 22 hrs ago

Saved by the Bell Apologizes for Selena Gomez Kidney-Transplant Jokes - Vulture

"Arina selena gomez. There are some jokes about her. On the new saved. By the bell reboot that's on peacock and they actually referenced. Her kidney transplant. Listen to this for a fact that selena gomez kidney resolved so that i could only what bottles kidney like you. And i were what so you know. Selena gomez did have a kidney transplant. And she was very vocal about it. You know and she talked about her. Best friend giving her Her kidney and it was a huge situation when it happened also in this episode it says does selena gomez even have kidneys that with some graffiti that was written on the wall so a lot of people thought the jokes were disgusting and they said that her life or death. Transplant was nothing to make jokes about so since that happened. That series has scrubbed all references to her kidney transplant and the edited version is streaming nasa. You can't even find it anymore. Lavar nothing it wasn't even the person that donated the kidney. I guess they were just making jokes

Selena Gomez Arina Selena Gomez Lavar Nasa
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on The Greg Hill Show

The Greg Hill Show

00:42 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on The Greg Hill Show

"That's the bad guy and the dumb. What idiot! Oh, loser. All right. It is the good the bad the dumb. The midweek edition. It doesn't really matter what edition it is. It's always the good, the bad and the dumb. So let's start your day, right with the good of the day. I don't know if it's so good. But basically what? What we have to say is that 2020 is ending Just the right way. Well, we have a month left. Yeah. So I mean it Z ending as strangers that began or started off. I don't know. But you know those mysterious monoliths that just kept appearing. The one in Utah can't get enough of the monoliths stories everywhere. I told you yesterday that one just mysteriously appeared. Romania. Yes, it's gone. It's gone. It's gone. People took it down or aliens took it down. We don't know why. I don't know that the one in Utah there's video that surfaced about four guys who took down the monolith just literally just Took in Iran. Yeah, there was. I saw the story with this. Hikers like Saw guys taking it down. Yeah, but here's the thing. We don't know if they were responsible for putting it up. We don't we don't They could have just been hikers that went screw it. I'm taking this with me. I'm taking it fine. If they want to come get me They can come get me, But I'm taking this with our intergalactic war. Yeah. Because on top of that NASA confirmed that there is a mysterious object coming towards Earth. Now. Really? I don't know what it is. Of course they don't said it's not an asteroid. Okay. If it's not an asteroid, then what is it? Don't just throw that out there deserve casual. Their guests is that it's a 19 sixties era booster rocket. Oh, that could be coming back could be coming back like one that when it was going around the moon or something and blasted because it's on the same orbit as us and so, Holly just coming back to us. That seems awfully small to detect that coming back in us. Yeah, like normally, when they talk about these rocks, they're like, Well, it's the size of Manhattan. Yeah, Why not? It's gonna miss us. Don't worry, Mrs. Don't worry this asteroid the size of a Georgia, But don't you worry about this One comes close. We need to be worried about if it starts slowing down. Yeah, Remember that an independence day like rice coming towards us, But it's slowing down. That's right, putting on the brakes. As it gets into our atmosphere, buckle up kids because 2020 and over yet I know it's not really good, but it's fascinating. We're all we're all manipulated by. So you know, entertainment, right? I mean, if if lets the store this hypothetical out there If you we wake up if you and I are doing this show one morning and the breaking this breaking news around the world that alien saucers are hovering above cities. Would you be scared or excited? Like because we're manipulated to fear that right? I mean, Hollywood has made these movies where it would just blow up the city. But we don't know. We don't know. Would you? Would you generally like this could be awesome. Or you'd be like I mean, you know, I guess there's two schools of thought, right? There is the Independence Day. Mars attacks, Right Type alien that just comes and just starts annihilating everyone. Just because right or there's the men in black words. A. You know these aliens needed a home. We provided We provide one for them. And there you go. There you go. Yeah, you know, because We don't know, like way. Just we just let writers in movies tell us what we should feel or think, or based on sort of raw emotion like we saw the alien spacecraft would probably be like I don't know about this, but maybe it would be like maybe they got a cure for cancer CT. What if the ziti is right? Maybe he's just a botanist looking with some plants. Yeah. I hope you know, may or may not have the ways of the force with him. We don't know exactly. By the way, I we had some recent species in the house the other day, and I thought, e t. I mean, I always think when I see that candy, I always you know, but that's only our generation. That's right, My son. My son will have something he has no idea. That's right. If I go off on home, and I had my hand out, you have any idea what getting doesn't get it? All right. So we're gonna keep you up to this. One of the things that we do on this show is keeping up to date on the monolith. Well, I mean, it seems to be a daily thing. So stay tuned off some more information tomorrow. All right. What's the bad of the bad of the days, The Mcrib is back. Yeah, I heard about that. You get one for free. If you shave your beard, and I'm kind of embarrassed yourself on the interwebs. So if you have a video of yourself shaving the beard, it's way premature the way they're doing it is, you know, because Movember ends. Yeah, Yeah, Go ahead. You shave, shave your face. You have a clean face and you posted online. You could be one of 10,000 people to get a free mcrib. Doesn't seem like a great prize. And, well, I mean, whatever that's like my question. Isn't it like three bucks? Yeah. I mean, if we're doing this for Like now I've had to make rib once and I was like Wasn't overall impressive kind of dry. Yeah, I don't need them. I mean, I don't mind a big Mac every now and then. But I don't need that sandwich. I know people love it. Don't get me wrong. I know that there's a cold following cold following you can't wait for it to come back. I'm sure it's delicious. I just It's not my thing, but I mean, honestly, what are you gonna shave? Are you gonna be clean shaven to get one for free? I mean, we're not that hard, right? I mean, it's only three bucks. I think we're four bucks. I don't know how much it is. We were in a restaurant. A week ago or so and at the end of the meal, the server gave us the bill and said, And we'd love for you to go online and fill out this survey and you could win $100 gift card the company is giving away Five a month. Right. And so that was it was a chain and I thought Is it worth 15 minutes of my time to be in a lottery for $100 gift card, and I like I I hate doing surveys. Yeah, And I thought No, because it's a chance to win. We're right. It's not a game, right?.

Utah Nasa Romania Holly Manhattan Cure Hollywood Iran Mrs. Do Movember Georgia CT
Behind the space mission crew

Innovation Now

01:18 min | 2 d ago

Behind the space mission crew

"Behind every great space mission is a great flight control team. This is a special series of innovation now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. Since november two thousand humans have been living in space continuously aboard the international space station and during every hour of every day that astronauts are in space teams of dedicated men and women on the ground. Watch over the space station. Crews and complex systems from nasr's mission control center in houston texas. But what does it take to update the software of a spacecraft traveling two hundred fifty miles overhead. How do you monitor life. Support and communication systems in orbit. Living in space isn't just about the technology but about the people who believe in teamwork vigilance responsibility and competence in a new nasa e book readers. Get an inside. Look at station operations through the eyes of ten space flight directors who have served at the helm of mission control. You can download this inspirational book operating an outpost and the new frontier from the nasa book website for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Pulley

Mission Control Center Nasr Houston Texas Nasa Jennifer Pulley
More than Empty Space

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 5 d ago

More than Empty Space

"The friday after thanksgiving and for nasa that means it's black hole. Friday this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A black hole is a fascinating astronomical object with a gravitational pull so strong that nothing not even light can escape it matter and radiation fall in. But they can't get out. Nasa telescopes like hubble new star and nicer bring the universe into focus letting astronomers identify monster black holes in nearby galaxies but with nasa's x ray observatory scientists have discovered evidence that thousands of black holes are located near the center of our own milky way galaxy. Most black holes are the remnants of large stars that die in a supernova explosion but even bigger black holes can result from stellar collisions matter swirling around supermassive black holes creates bursts of light that echo in nearby dust clouds these traveling signals could serve as new. Cosmic yardsticks marking the distance of a black hole from earth intrigued. Empty your shopping cart. Then checkout nasr's black hole gallery just don't let the name fool you because a black hole is anything but if d space for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Poet

Nasa X Ray Observatory Jennifer
A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

Why It Matters

04:54 min | Last week

A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

"We read about fires in the amazon frequently. So how are they started. Are they sorta like the california wildfires or is it something completely different so actually quite different from wildfires in other parts of the world because the rain is wet. This is dr. Tom lovejoy a senior fellow at the united nations foundation and a professor at george mason university in virginia. He's worked in the amazon. Since nineteen sixty five focusing on scientific research conservation and policy whitening strikes. Don't start fires. In the amazon people start fires and to give you a sense once. Somebody is cut down some forest. They have to wait for five days without a drop of rain before it is dry enough to set fire to get rid of all the stuff that's between the firebrand and turning it into some kind of agricultural project. Nine countries share the amazon but roughly sixty percent of it is within brazil's borders which means they have a lot of control over its fate and today across this vast territory. Small groups of people are intentionally setting fires in order to dry out the land for logging and to clear it for agriculture way of clearing land for whatever activity you want to do is very damaging to the soil. So what happens is that if later you want to reforest that particular patch of land it becomes very hard to do because the soil changes as soon as you clear it out because it's now sustaining a different kind of environment which is not rainforest like and then you can't really grow a rainforest back in that sort of setting. This is monica to bowl. A senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics and a professor at the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. People refer to amazon a lot as the lungs of the world. But that's not really what the ham was on is what the amazon does is that it keeps a lot of greenhouse gases from getting into the atmosphere. So it's not bad. The forest breathes for the world. It's that once. The forest is standing all of those greenhouse gases which are in the soil there kept. They're they're not released into the atmosphere and as soon as you start cutting down the forest. Those greenhouse gases start to go into the atmosphere started to be released. It's sort of like a climate bomb. And as soon as you start cutting down the rain forest. Bob bob is released. So how big is that. Carbon bomb really big. Scientists estimate that the amazon stores sixty to eighty billion tons of carbon or roughly twice the total amount released from fossil fuels in twenty eighteen worldwide. Losing the amazon would accelerate warming with harmful impacts felt around the world. The other issue is these hydrological patterns so when we say that we're referring to the rain cycles and it's not just local. Because given the size of the amazon again it creates a micro micro-climate but a sort of macro climate within the whole of the south american region even affecting a bit of central america as well given that the amazon is so far north. And so what happens. Is that the rain cycle patterns as you cut down the forest. They change and sometimes they change really dramatically to the point where you destroy people's lives because they can no longer grow the crops that they used to grow because the rain cycles are completely different. That has already happened. In many parts of south america that have felt this direct impact and this is only going to get worse if deforestation continues. Hydrology is the study of the movement and distribution of water because the amazon is so large and so wet. It's hydrology has a huge effect. It supplies water to almost every country. In south america and in fact according to nasa deforestation has already been linked to reduce rainfall in the region and then on top of all that you have the issue of amazon tipping point. So you get to a point. Where if you go beyond that point in terms of deforestation. The rainforest is no longer self sustaining. It's going to turn into savannah. Simply because of the ecological dynamics of how rainforests behave and there's a lot of concern that where the amazon is right now is dangerously close to this tipping point

Amazon Tom Lovejoy United Nations Foundation Peterson Institute For Interna School Of Advanced Internation George Mason University Johns Hopkins University Virginia Bob Bob Brazil California Monica South America America Nasa Savannah
SpaceX, NASA set for historic Crew-1 launch today: Everything to know

Innovation Now

01:01 min | Last week

SpaceX, NASA set for historic Crew-1 launch today: Everything to know

"As the first certified launch system in nasa's commercial crew program the crew. One mission marked a series of firsts for crew transportation it is the first international crew of four to launch john. An american commercial spacecraft. It is the first time. The space station's long duration expedition crew size will increase from six to seven crewmembers significantly adding crew time available for scientific research on the station. And it's the first time the faa has licensed a human orbital spaceflight launch. The four commercial crew astronauts will conduct science and station maintenance during their six month. Stay aboard the orbiting laboratory with a return to earth planned for the spring of twenty twenty one the astronauts fittingly named the crew dragon spacecraft resilience highlighting the dedication teams have displayed to make the launch successful during these extraordinary times and proving that when we worked together there's no limit to what we can achieve

Nasa FAA John
Joe Biden gives first post-election TV interview

CNBC's Fast Money

01:45 min | Last week

Joe Biden gives first post-election TV interview

"Joe biden president-elect giving his first interview since becoming president-elect he just sat down with nbc's. Lester holt let's get to kayla tashi with the exclusive sound kayla melissa interview wrapping just a few moments ago following president-elect biden's announcement of some key national security and foreign policy appointments and in that sitdown interview biden says the peaceful transfer of power a hallmark of american democracy as begun the head of the gsa yesterday unlocked the mechanisms for there to be a formal transition of power recognizing your status right now. Is that happening on the ground of their people talking right now who were talking yesterday. Yes immediately we got outreach. From from the nasa security shop from suggested across the board and already working out met my ability to get presidential daily. Briefs were already working out meeting with the covert team in the white house. And how to not only distribute but get from vaccine being distributed to be person able to get vaccinated. So i think we're gonna not be so far behind the curve as we thought we might be in the past. And there's a lot of immediate discussion. And and and i must say the outreach has been sincere there's not been begrudging so far and i don't expect it to be so the yes. It's already begun. That comes just hours. After the general services administration official ascertainment of the presidency biden saying that outreach is happening at all levels melissa that interview will air this evening on nightly news six thirty pm eastern time

Lester Holt Kayla Tashi Kayla Melissa Biden Joe Biden GSA NBC Nasa White House 'S Melissa
An Unexplained Monolith in the Utah Desert

Kottke Ride Home

01:57 min | Last week

An Unexplained Monolith in the Utah Desert

"A helicopter crew from. Utah's department of public safety. Were on a routine assignment coming bighorn sheep in the southeastern part of the state when they spotted a mysterious silver monolith in the middle of the red rock standing about ten to twelve feet tall. Perfect shiny triangular prism the crew. Says it definitely looks like it was planted there on purpose not dropped from above on accident. Short of some nasa experiment pilot brit. Hutchings thinks it was probably put there by an artist maybe fan of two thousand one. A space odyssey. It does bear a striking resemblance to the black monolith that appears in that film but the department of public safety reminded people in a statement that installations on public land require permits quote. No matter what planet. You're from end quotes. They've also said they won't disclose exactly where they found it. Because it's in a location that could be dangerous to navigate for amateur hikers. And they don't want to cause curious visitors to injure themselves or become stranded. But they did post a bunch of photos and videos taken by the crew with the monolith including one where one of the guys standing on top of another one's shoulders to get a measurement of the monolith against lincoln. The show notes. So you can see for yourself with this mysterious structure. Looks like i'm kind of curious how long it's been there you know. How often do people fly over this part of red rock country looking for sheep or otherwise paying close enough attention to have noticed it. The guardian pointed out that some people have noticed. The monolith bears striking resemblance to the works of artists. John mccracken who did live in nearby new mexico but died. Eight years ago he's galleries. David's werner did not return request for comment from the guardian. Is it possible. The monolith has been there for over eight years just waiting to be discovered or was it planted by someone else or some thing else. I guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Department Of Public Safety Hutchings Utah Nasa John Mccracken Lincoln The Guardian New Mexico Werner David
Space Week Night I Spy

Chompers

02:58 min | Last week

Space Week Night I Spy

"Back it's time for chompers your morning and night tooth brushing show start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and make sure to get the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth to it. Space week on chompers and today we are playing. I spy all describe an object that i spy and you have to shout out what it is. We flew away from the sun and found a bright red planet with the dusty surface with a robot on it. What do i spy shouted out. I see mars. Our neighbor in the solar system switzer rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth brushing in tiny circles around each tooth. That robot that we spied on the surface of mars came from earth cleanest curiosity and now sent it from earth to mars to find out if there ever was or could be life on mars. Curiosity is the size of a car. That has six wheels and a long robotic arm curiosity even as a camera for taking selfies on mars. Someday nasa hopes to send humans to mars to. Maybe someday you'll be able to take a selfie with curiosity so what you're brushing to the bottom of your mouth but don't brush too hard ready for your next is by floating through space. I see a bright light shooting pass. It looks like a ball of dust but behind it. I feel long tail. Streaking into the sky. What do i spy shouted out a comet. Scientists sometimes call comets dirty snowball because all the muck that they're made out of is frozen in the cold of space switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Don't forget those frontier. Here's your last ice by. I'm looking up at the sky. And i see what looks like a giant soup spoon. The earth three bright stars the makeup the handle and four stars in a rectangle that look like a bowl. What do i spy shouted out. The big dipper is what we call a constellation a group of stars in the night sky. That look like a picture when you use your imagination. I imagine you're done brushing now so come back tomorrow for more out of this world. Facts and to

Switzer Nasa
Shuttle Tire Sensors Warn Drivers of Flat Tires

Innovation Now

01:02 min | Last week

Shuttle Tire Sensors Warn Drivers of Flat Tires

"Attire sensor is a small programmable electronic device that constantly measures the air in your tire. The sensor transmits information via low frequency radio waves to the vehicles on board computer. If the tire needs air an amber warning light is illuminated on the dash during the space shuttle era. Proper tire pressure was crucial from orbit to landing. The nitrogen filled tires weathered extreme temperature changes due to very heavy loads tires had to be inflated to three hundred forty pounds per square inch but in the early days of the program. There just wasn't a good way to gauge pressure. Flight accurately so nasa contracted with a company to build a tire pressure sensor specifically for the space shuttle after the company successfully delivered the device to nasa. They adapted the sensor for use on cars today. Us law requires a pressure gauge on every car tire. Alerting drivers whenever the pressure is off

Nasa United States
NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

Innovation Now

00:58 sec | Last week

NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

"Masses commercial crew program is a unique collaboration enabling nasa to work side by side with american aerospace companies the commercial companies chosen to carry crews to and from the international space station own and operate their own hardware and infrastructure nasa engineers and aerospace specialists will work closely with the companies to ensure the successful launch of spacecraft from american soil commercial crew astronauts will train like other nasa astronauts astronauts will prepare to live and work in space for up to six months at a time that these astronauts will also work closely with boeing and spacex to understand the new spacecraft launch systems and space suits they will be using the successful launch of crew won the first nasa certified commercial flight marked the move of this revolutionary collaboration from development into regular flights

Nasa International Space Station Spacex Boeing
SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | Last week

SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

"The U. S and Europe Launch a billion dollar satellite to see the effects of climate change. Correspondent Uni Han has more Sentinel. Six Michael Freilich, launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. It's mission Observe the world's rising sea levels. NASA's climate scientist Josh Boulis, so in the nineties, sea level was rising in about two millimeters per year. In the 2000. It was more like three millimeters per year, and now it's more like four or close to five millimeters per year from 800 miles above the Earth. A satellite measures the height of the ocean with an accuracy of one inch. As a satellite ages. A second identical satellite will launch in five years. Unit is named for NASA oceanographer Michael Freilich, who died in August.

Correspondent Uni Han Michael Freilich Josh Boulis Vandenberg Air Force Base U. Europe Nasa California
SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

Scott Sloan

00:45 sec | Last week

SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

"Well, the latest now on the U. S and Europe and launching a billion dollar satellite today to see the effects of climate change. Sentinel. Six Michael Freilich, launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. It's mission observe the world's rising sea levels. NASA's climate scientist Joshua Ellis, So in the nineties, sea level was rising at about two millimeters per year. In the 2000. It was more like three millimeters per year, and now it's more like four or close to five millimeters per year from 800 miles above the Earth. A satellite measures the height of the ocean with an accuracy of one inch. As a satellite ages. A second identical satellite will launch in five years.

Michael Freilich Joshua Ellis Vandenberg Air Force Base U. Sentinel Europe Nasa California
US-European ocean monitoring satellite launches into orbit

Leo Laporte

00:31 sec | Last week

US-European ocean monitoring satellite launches into orbit

"War and lift off of Sentinel. Six. Michael Freilich, continuing a legacy of ocean observation and international collaboration to benefit all humanity. Space excesses, says successfully launched a NASA ocean monitoring satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base, You may have seen the Falcon nine Rockets smoky Trail is the rocket headed towards space shortly before 9 30 this morning, the satellite will help forecasters improve forecasts do climate modeling and track hurricanes. He was brought to you by direct buyers calm. The U.

Michael Freilich Vandenberg Air Force Base Nasa U.
SpaceX launches satellite from California to monitor sea levels

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:21 sec | Last week

SpaceX launches satellite from California to monitor sea levels

"Bird Air Force Base in California a little while ago. 43 Space X rocket took off carrying a NASA European satellite into orbit. The satellite will monitor rising sea levels of key consequence of global warming. But tonight's planned space X Starling satellite launch from Florida's Cape Canaveral has been postponed till tomorrow night.

Bird Air Force Base Nasa California Cape Canaveral Florida
SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

The Car Pro Show

00:18 sec | Last week

SpaceX launches NASA-European sea level monitor

"Satellite that's just just been been been launched launched launched into into into orbit orbit orbit will will will keep keep keep an an an eye eye eye on on on global global global sea sea sea levels. levels. levels. The The The joint joint joint venture, venture, venture, which which which is is is expected expected expected to to to last last last five five five years years years between between between NASA NASA NASA and and and the the the European European European Space Space Space Agency, Agency, Agency, is also designed to improve weather forecasting and hurricane tracking. The satellite was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in

Sea Sea Sea Nasa European European European Spa Agency, Agency Vandenberg Air Force Base
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hey everybody welcome back act to nasa in silicon valley live. I'm your host abby taber and if this is your first time joining us nasa in silicon valley live is a conversational show out of nasa's ames this research center where we talk about all the nerdiness news you need to know so right now we are simultaneously live on twitch youtube facebook and periscope but but if you want to join in the chat and ask our guests questions you need to do that on twitch so join us at w._w._w. Dot twit dot.

nasa abby taber Dot
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I think something that's really beautiful here with having all the women that we've had on the show. It's you know, there's there's we were talking about running when show Suni Williams earlier, and she famously ran the Boston marathon in space, but there's another marathon runner Chalene Flanagan and she wanted to New York City marathon last year, and she had this great article talking about her bring other women into this running club. And she said it's not so lonely at the top. If you bring others along, you know, and and that passion, you know, talking to one another making room for more women in science technology, engineering and math like we we have a responsibility to pull each other in and say, look what she's doing. Well. She's amazing. Yeah. Get a chance to highlight. Other wonder woman in your life. Absolutely. Okay. We'll be wrapping official run out of time. Thank you for joining us. And also, thank you at home for joining us. You can learn more about women at NASA by going to women dot NASA dot gov, and this has been massive Silicon Valley live a conversational show out of Nasr's Ames research center with the various scientists researchers and engineers and all all the room. Cool folks here at NASA where we get to talk about all the nerdy. Nasa news that you need to know about. And if you like that, you can find us on twitch, she YouTube Facebook and NASA TV, and if you can't catch us live that is no big deal. We will have the video on demand after the show is over and you can also catch the audio version of this podcast through services throughout these submitted beyond and huge. Thank you to our guests, and everyone that joined us on the twitch chat. We'll be back next week on Thursday November fifteenth where we'll talk about heat shields in how they help spe. Crafts by atmospheric entry and tell that until next. Thank you for watching..

NASA Chalene Flanagan Suni Williams NASA TV New York City Boston Ames research center YouTube official Nasr
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So this is like, that's that's my like technologies on on the forefront are really about. How do we how do we go to deep space? I mean, it's it really is exciting. It is cool. It was just what about the question. We wanted to ask do you guys have a favorite bass craft or air draft. Could you choose out of terrible choice to force you to make? A terrible choice for me to have to make. 'cause I love well, I like aircraft and spacecraft. So the x fifty nine low, boom. Fly demonstrator is one of my favorite aircraft right now. Just because it is exactly what NASA does does the work to create the next industry in our country, which is really amazing. And that's the plan is to playing. Create a supersonic plane that reduces the noise of the boom and and can fly over land and open to civilian so just open centers. Thirty minutes. I love I love spacecraft and right now, my favorite is deployable entry vehicle. I guess I have to say these TV having working so. So I don't think we have picture for it. But it's side by side aircraft took on sip. These like looks like a helicopter, but I said of one Mingo three two rotors and these wrote of overlap, but they're synchronized so like the blaze. Yeah. Kasich until they're on these overlapping, we were still working the need. But ah looks like a improve deficiency by twenty percent in cruise flight. Oh, so cool. That's really. Yeah. That's cool. Yeah. That might be soon. What about you? I I'm Sarah. We all lift, Lloyd. So anything that flies through the air or just in love with. So I'm worth seeing actually air is a fluid. We said that up in the beginning. Yeah. As fluid amasis aerospace engineers, we consider anything that's gas or liquid anything. That's deform -able. My hands. Yeah. Yeah. My favorite's happened to be the ones I've worked on. Yeah. The really exciting piece of that is like, you know, in my career, so far I've gotten to work on the Ryan space vehicle. We've applied the PSP there. SOS at trespassing swing is one of the experimental aircraft that we are testing and collecting a lot of date on assessing. And I think the really interesting part. I remember when we did EM one of the Orion spacecraft and woke up early because you know, it was launching at Kennedy. So it was like three o'clock in the morning here woke up early, and I've been here maybe four years at that point. So you're just shy and and excited. But yeah, it was like magical in my heart because you know, my fingerprint was on that. Yeah. And it's really cool. And like each one of us here have our fingerprints on something like that. And I think it's a wonderful example about NASA that it's like not any one of us creates an Esa less or an a dead or drone. But it's like this community of experts across many fields, including the two of all that like it's important to get the PR out there and do shows like this show. This is what now is doing. So we have our fingerprints on the knife. Because we all have a little piece of the story. Yeah. And it's all about telling her story. Yeah. We have some questions about your careers. But a quick technical question for Sarah. How is it going to reduce the super sonic, boom? So that would be the xfinity nine experimental plane. So the way it reduces the boom is by virtue of its geometry. So you can design the the vehicles geometry to create a pressure wave does that does not have as much of allowed boom when it reaches will when it when it creates that shockwave. The geometry of the plane. Yeah. And if we can think of that, it was like that pressure wave that we hear the sonic, boom. That's energy coming from the airplane and hitting our ear. So if we can distribute that energy over like a longer nose, which will look at the hill, get pictures of the x fifty nine see how long the nose is. Then we're not decreasing the energy. That's coming to us to our ears. We yeah. So that's why it's called a low, boom. There's still a boom we changed. Visit. We have tried. Cool. Okay. Well, I do have a comment from the chat. They said these women are such inspiration..

NASA Kasich Orion Lloyd Sarah Kennedy Thirty minutes twenty percent four years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"All right. Teams that we have again run out of time. And while we would love to spend the rest of our show with you guys. We, unfortunately have to think you and sake. Thanks, guys. So remember, you guys are watching us in Silicon Valley live today. We're celebrating national stem day by talking to some of the amazing wonder women of NASA. And if you have any questions for our guests, fill free to write them in the chat. And if you wanna learn more about women at NASA, you can go to women dot NASA dot gov. All right. So let's go now to our fabulous 'aeronautics crew. Let's bring out Nettie Patricia and Sarah come on out. Share having way too much fun. So I think I can you ladies introduce yourselves. And I know you guys are all aerospace engineers, but what exactly do you do? Okay. I'll start. My name's Nettie route. Airspace engineer, and I lead our pressure sensitive paint technology here at NASA Ames. Okay. Three seven through two. I'm gonna space in euro. So. Supercomputing supercomputing awesome. My name Sarah Sousa, and I designed guidance and control systems for spacecraft. All right. Should we find out where you go from? Origin stories have how did you know you wanted to do this? So I will claim that I knew when I was eight months, eight months. Kid when I was why kid is because when I was a freshman in college are sorry sophomore in college. I was able to get a internship at Johnson Space Center and work alongside astronauts who were on the space shuttle and many years later. My sister was going through our photo album. And she she sent me a picture as a picture of my mom, holding me when I was a baby and with a picture of the space shuttle in the back room, and I just I just think everything I've done throughout my life has been influenced by my family, and what we did as kids. I've always space, and it's always been something. I love your parents did. Copy of the day. My dad took the picture. Dad is very much a space enthusiast and a dreamer. And I definitely get that for my dad too. Pretty cool. So what about you Patricia? I remember took me to the planet Tanya when I was like four years old. And then so surprised but all stars you could see. And so I thought that Boeing that I wanted to something space today to and then when you know, when they always ask it's what do you wanna do when you're like a grownup? I was always saying, but then when I was in high school, I was pretty good in math physics. So I decided to go for engineering well like with space outerspace space engineering. Okay. So we have a photo of a young you can we get that front. Well, he's not old voting. Yeah. That's two years old. He's a was thinking, I think one moment after I started my internship here names on the first time, I visited this computer on. I was so surprised he was so big unload. Super Peter happened to have a name that we may know about. Yes. So this super computer. But yet anes we have another supercomputer that he's called Electra. We're actually building a third one Lewis cool those platies and electro rate. So what about unity like, what's what's your origin story? Yeah. I grew up in Tennessee. Remember going to see a see the Saint Louis arch. And I remember driving across the bridge and going to the Saint Louis arch. And I just you know. Lifted both of these things that are studying drafting in high school, and how these are extremely impressive. I wanna do whatever it is that can produce something like this. So I went into college started studying mechanical engineering, and then found fluid dynamics thermodynamics. Wow. You're speaking, my love language, the world made sense at that moment and just kept. We're going my way that had an internship as well here at NASA. Ames we go my way over to the Winton divisions. Wow. This is really cool. Yeah. These giant compressors radiators and all the things that you had studied there in your in your textbooks. We here in life and huge. Yeah. And then I found my way over to pressure sensitive paint, which which was just a a great melody like hardware-software wind tunnel. So really my happy place. A photo of young Nettie..

Nettie Patricia NASA Sarah Sousa Johnson Space Center NASA Ames Saint Louis arch Silicon Valley Boeing Peter engineer Ames Tennessee Lewis eight months four years two years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So the bay focus that we do is billing planning scheduling tools is so I get to actually learn about everybody else's job in order to create these offer tools. So and then I get to test field them in different places. So I get to learn about how trainers might be teaching astronauts how to do their job. I get to go to mission control. Learn how they control robots how they manage the international space station, how they schedule astronauts time, and all we take all that information in order to build and design our tools, and then we get to test them in different environments. We've gone to test them everywhere from underwater in the extreme environments of analogues. We also work in analogs, but these analogues Dona -sarily have to. To simulate a planetary environment. It is simulating some aspect of mission control. So they have a slightly different or they're trying to push some aspect of human spaceflight, maybe 'isolation. So we give them our tools, and we get feedback. I've gotten to go to places like volcanoes and the mission under the water in underwater. The Arctic mission control of Johnson Space Center. I'm sorry tool has been up in space station. So that was also very exciting. Pretty cool mission control is the the brain of the space missions, right where they're controlling. How would you describe it? Yeah. So mission control. So we have astronauts up in space ation, and they're super busy and the whole entire space station is manage by a huge team of controllers back on ground. And so they're located physically in Johnson Space Center, but there's also different smaller mission controls. I'm in Europe in Japan, and we have another one in Alabama. We also actually have one here. Nasa Ames, and they all coordinate to make sure that the space station is healthy that all the science payloads are working and that we're keeping the science the sorry. The astronauts working if they have any questions, we keep them healthy. So did you bring a photo? I think she did. And this one has a really cool background story. Yes. So this is a picture of me in at NASA Johnson Space Center in mission control. So this is when we did our first appointment of our tool up in space station. So I got to sit down in mission control. And I got to talk on the loops, which is just the the way they talk that the the communication loops that they have and. Yeah, it was very excited. We got to talk to the astronauts and work with them that whole week that we were there through your voice is forever like down in the NASA record. So I was actually very hesitant to talk during during the mission and one of my colleagues was sitting in the front room. So there's actually multiple not only are there thousands of people that multiple rooms so sitting in one of the back rooms and someone in the front room calls over, and it's like, please give me a status on playbook. That's our tool and so forced me to actually talk on the loop. So that might Boyce was forever. Tempted to say Houston, we have a problem. I actually very hesitant about talking because it is they are listening to so many conversations that I didn't want to like add to that problem or add to that workload. So I was actually very much like I'm gonna just be here. Unless I have to talk them only gonna talk, but he called me out..

Johnson Space Center Nasa Ames NASA Johnson Space Center Boyce NASA Europe Arctic Houston Japan Alabama
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I ever got. It was absolutely true. Right. That's simple comment. Relies on that kind of person engineering. Awesome. Pretty cool. Cool. What about you, Jessica? So I have always been interested in science and love learning and math and ever since. I was a little kid. And I remember my dad taking me to see the Haley's comet when it was passing. And so I would always had this interest in science, but it wasn't until I got to undergraduate, and I was sitting engineering at that point that I really understood how I can contribute to NASA in how I can contribute to the space program. So it was actually through an internship here. Nasa Ames, and I learned about how NASA work what kind of careers are involved in engineering or the different aspects that I could work on in order to contribute to human spaceflight. And then that let me to apply to grad school, and that's where I really started focusing on the intersection of humans, and engineering so understanding how we can develop and create tools. That support people in a very complex aerospace system. So my focus is always how do I make this tool better for people? And that's how I I. That's what I do. Now here in nessa aims. Okay. Well, let's bring up Jessica's origin photo. Because this is also a cool one. Yeah. So this is a picture of me back in nineteen ninety eight I did my, internship and this cohort of class. We had a research project. We got to visit different NASA centers. This is a picture of visiting the space shuttle, Atlantis when it was being refurbished, and it just got me really excited about working with people in human spaceflight, and there several people in there that also already now still work at NASA. So it was a pretty great sett- teams. Not only at NASA. But didn't you mention that a lot of them are here at Ames as well. Yeah. Like, our whole little cohort was really titan. And we all got the space, bug and. Yeah, some of us work here. Some of us work at Jan Johnson. Space center. Yeah. And then our mentor for that program. Also helped me get my job. So it was quite a life changing, internships or agree. We to get started. Awesome. About you. Cathy, I had to a hominid. I think I one was when I knew I wanted to be a biologist. So my background my educational background's a little unconventional I completed sixth grade, and then my father moved my sister and I over seas. So that was pretty much the end of my education. Until I moved back to the states, and I started at community college, and I took a biology class because I had no idea what it was really about. And I remember just sitting learning about the inner workings of Sal, and it's like a whole nother world whole universe inside of of us that I had no idea even existed. So that's when I was fascinated with biology, and I was sold how to do biology, and then for when I decide I really wanted to be an Astro biologist was I.

Nasa Ames NASA Jessica Jan Johnson Sal Cathy
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And and so when it's going to reenter, it's going to come in into shell shallower angle and it's not shallow shallow, just kinda grazes skipping a rock. And and it's a small spacecraft as he saw, it's only about one hundred thirty kilograms hundred pounds. And so again, if you wanna make a splash through a bigger rock, right? The rocket better and and it was going relatively slow because it was in orbit it it's top speed was only about one point, eight kilometers per second, which is slow. It doesn't flow. He's a slow. So all those things lead to probably very small splash. So not a lot of material got up if hardly any. It didn't just have to splash splash enough of it to get into sunlight so that the Hubble space telescope could see because it can see in the dark. So that's where, again, the next NASA impact emission. The next NASA Ames mission to the moon, comes in three out of the five lunar missions manage her aims. This, this. First one, man, it aims is actually quite a leader in Linda research. I just want to mention that my questions are not looting at the moment, so I don't have any questions from the chat for you just yet, but hopefully we'll get those up and running before the end. So we can through a lot of questions. So we can put you hot. Questions. Now l. cross just mentioned is a special mission for the to view, right? Yes. Tell us how you were involves. Tony's Tony's ideas. I held it. Crazy idea. Nine told him about and she said, yeah, that's crazy enough. It could work. So what does that stand for cross? No. Lunar crater observation sensing satellite. That's part of the quiz. Not the the sport. L. crow..

Tony NASA Linda research L. crow one hundred thirty kilograms eight kilometers hundred pounds
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I'm your host Abby Taber, and today we're going to be talking all about robotic exploration of the moon, and we have some really fascinating guests with us. But first let me introduce my co host, Cassandra bell. Hey, hi. So this is NASA in Silicon Valley. Live a conversational, talk show out of NASA Ames research center with various scientists, engineers, and researchers, and all around cool people at NASA to talk about all the nerdy NASA news. You need to know about if you like that we're simultaneously live on twitch. That is twitch. Dot TV, slash NASA, and we're also on Facebook and YouTube. And if you wanted to live in our chat, gotta catch us on twitch. But if you want, if you miss a live show, we will be on demand after the fact on. NASA TV, and we also have the podcast for an audio version if you like that better. So today we have with us, our guest Tony cola preach and Kimberly Eneco Smith. Thank you both for being here and can tell us a little bit about what you both do. Thanks. I'm a planetary scientist here at NASA. Ames have been here by fifteen years, almost exactly fifteen years and as a planetary scientist and mostly study planetary atmospheres, and surfaces really focusing on ISIS and and other volatile 's at freeze out. I also design and build instruments that go to different worlds and make measurements of the atmosphere is in surfaces and things like that. And can really thanks for having me. I'm a research astrophysicists here at NAS aims, and I've been here a little bit longer than Tony. I study the universe and I also build payloads or instruments, cameras, traumas that help us understand the universe around us both near and far. So I have dabbled a little bit in some of Tony's planets as well. Very cool. Most speaking of nerdy NASA news, NASA just turned sixty. Birthday now. Should sing. Oh, there last week we had cake. I had a lunchtime meeting. Cake, won't NASA turned one in October. First, that would six years would be Tober. I nineteen fifty eight. She doesn't know what actually happened to that point because like picture the president signed thing and then NASA suddenly existed or birth certificate. Must have been built on earlier research labs that existed at the time. It was 'aeronautics was the focus of what the laboratories did. They want doing space research yet, but they were very heavily into understanding arrow dynamics, aerospace engineering, and what not to help really the fledgling airline industry and aviation industry. You know doing the things that they couldn't do helping them do the research. They couldn't do pushing the envelope, you know, you know, see what else you could do, you know, by different designs. Yeah. And that was the NAC, right? Yeah, yeah, knack. Okay. Don't call it that. No national advisory committee for 'aeronautics is preceded NASA, right? And I've been scolded for calling it Neka we are NASA sow his NA. That's right. There are three centers time, right? It was one out of Langley Virginia, east coast, these coast. Now that's Langley. What's it called now. Langley laboratory to the Langley research center, one in Ohio. Was he has, no, I always forget this one was Vincent. What was it. Louis Louis, Louis, close movies. Now, of course, the Glenn research center, I know that. Yeah, and then our favorite, very favorite. I can't remember the third. Out here in California. Oh, the aims. You might have been there. The aims. So now known as Ames research center where we are right now. Yeah. And now we have ten field centers doing all kinds of amazing work. So to learn about the last six years of innovation, go to NASA dot gov, slash sixty. Yeah. So in this episode that we're going to focus on the moon research, the lunar research that aims has worked on over those years since NASA was founded. And if you have questions, be sure to leave them in the chat, and I'll be checking for those and trying to throw some those in leader. For example, already, we have questions from Zaza lavender is asking what things will you be exploring on the moon? We're gonna come to that. That's at the heart of today's episode. So to kick things off, we're going to go to our first segment. Let's play. Let's rule that..

NASA NASA Ames research center NASA TV Tony cola Langley research center Abby Taber Glenn research center Ames research center Dot TV Ames Cassandra bell Langley Virginia Silicon Valley Langley scientist Facebook Langley laboratory Louis Louis YouTube
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Follow the sun. Presented by science at NASA. The sun, it inspire songs warms us and grows our food life on land in the oceans, the daily weather and long-term climate patterns happened primarily because of the energy we received from our closest star. Even tiny variations in that energy can affect the workings of our planet's atmosphere. NASA uses instruments to follow the sun and monitor the amount of solar energy coming to us the latest instrument to do. So the total and spectral solar radiant, censor Tesis one makes those measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Tesis gathers information from its perch aboard, the international space station or the ISS flying on the platform that the orbiting laboratory provides has allowed teases to continue Nasr's forty year record of tracking the sun's radiant energy. One of the longest and most important climate data records gathered from space. Over the past several decades. Earth's ice mass has diminished, sea levels have risen drought, and precipitation patterns have changed, and growing seasons have shifted to understand the causes, including human influences of these changes and refine the models used to simulate earth's climate researchers must know the amount of incoming solar energy. Peter Paluska Tesis lead mission. Scientists explains when there's a balance between incoming energy from the sun and the infrared radiation earth emits climate remained steady. An imbalance means energy is either being stored in the system causing temperature increases or lost causing temperature decreases energy from the sun makes up half of the balance equation. Even though the measurement record shows at the sun solar energy output has not had a major influence in recent climate change that output needs to be monitored continuously. It is arguably the most important variable we need to know to understand climate says Paluska trying to understand climate without measuring. The sun's input is like trying to balance your checkbook without knowing your income climate is measured over longtime, spans decades to centuries and longer. Unlike weather that changes over small timescales to be able to connect measurements over longtime periods. Continuity and accuracy are key teases has to sensors the total radiance monitor as its name suggests measures all of the radiant energy from the sun and the spectral radiance monitor measures. How that energy is distributed over ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths. The latter helped scientists understand where in the atmosphere, solar energy is being absorbed. For example, teases spectral radiance measurements of the sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet light. This heats the stratosphere and drives changes in atmosphere, wind flow that can propagate down to the lower atmosphere and impact climate. So many factors influence. Earth's climate says police key. We need to continue learning how they all interact teases is helping us characterize the son's behavior and how earth's atmosphere response to the sun for more science when the international space station go to WWW dot NASA dot gov, slash I s dash science to continue following our closest star, visit science, dot, NASA dot gov.

NASA Peter Paluska Tesis Tesis ISS Nasr forty year
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Your shoulders well i certainly go to sleep at night feeling lucky that i get to work on such an interesting problem but you know i think as donovan was saying the more you work on this the more you appreciate how infrequent these are how well are are atmosphere has protected us from from these events so i sti sleep pretty well it has been a great project has been a real a real gift to be able to work on the i i think think so so too too that community engagement we we find a lot of people that like this problem so much that they do it as a hobby because there isn't a lot of funding i would say that through other means and so i i would say that they tend to be happy that nasa is investing in this and to have a a project which is continually working on the problem well you guys have been amazing and i'm still looking forward to understanding a little bit more so is there anything that you would add to this conversation to let our listeners know not to be afraid or maybe not that but any advice or any encouragement to what you're working on so that it's not something they have to worry about right now a lot of and information stories out so there are ways that anyone interested can find out more about the specific work the simulations we do and they're wondering now so resources for that but one thing that was told to me early on in the project is this is a natural disaster that we could potentially know about an advance and do something about and arguably the only natural disaster that we could mitigate so put the infrequency on top of the potential to actually do something about it it is a threat that we want to be aware of and the ability to mitigate depends on knowing these this can happen and then having some predetermined strategies for dealing with it and so that's really part of the the effort of this project in the global us strategy go nasa that's awesome you've been listening to the nasa and silicon valley podcast if you have any questions on twitter we're at nasa ames and we're using the hashtag nasa silicon valley remember we are nasa podcast.

donovan nasa twitter nasa ames
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"New science from jupiter presented by science at nasa when nasa juno spacecraft recently flew over the polls of jupiter researchers were astonished as if eight never seen a giant planet before and innocence they hadn't the pictures were unlike anything in the history of planetary exploration junot entered orbit on the fourth of july twenty sixteen and later found jupiter's polls covered in merely continent size storms that are densely class tiered and rubbing together in a mind blowing swirl it's like a whole new jupiter says scott bolton juneau's principal investigator from the southwest research institute the clouds were amazing what's striking about jupiter's polar storms is that there are actually multiple cyclones at each pole so instead of having one polar vortex earth jupiter was observed to have as many as eight giants world's moving simultaneously on its north pole and as many as five on its south pole even more mazing things are lurking below researchers have long wondered about the giant planets hidden interior how far down do jupiter's continentsized storms descend and what is the exotic material near the planet's core deep inside jupiter high temperatures and crushing pressures transformed you leaders copious supplies of gaseous molecular hydrogen into an exotic form of matter known as liquid metallic hydrogen think of it as a mass up of tomic nuclei in a sea of electrons freely moving about jupiter's powerful magnetic field almost certainly springs from dynamo action in jupiter's interior the process by which the motion of this electrically conducting fluid is converted into magnetic energy the exact location within the interior is a mystery that researchers are still working to solve.

scott bolton juneau principal investigator southwest research institute nasa
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Earth's magnetic fear. Presented by science at NASA. Invalid or planet and protecting us from the fury of the sun is a giant bubble of magnetism called the Magna spear. It deflects most of the solar material sweeping towards us from our star at one million miles per hour or more without the magnetosphere. The relentless action of these solar particles could strip the earth of its protective layers, which shield us from the sun's ultraviolet radiation. It's clear that this magnetic bubble was key to helping earth develop into a habitable planet. Compare earth to Mars a planet that lost its magnetosphere about four point. Two billion years ago. The solar wind is thought to have stripped away most of Mars atmosphere possibly after the red planet's magnetic field dissipated. This is left Mars as the stark barren world. We see today through the eyes of NASA orbiters Rovers by contrast, earth's Magnus fear seemed to have kept our atmosphere protected. After he is S two of the juice base physics laboratory at NASA Goddard Space, Flight center notes. If there were no magnetic field, we might have very different atmosphere left without life. As we know it. Understanding our magnetosphere is a key element, helping scientists someday forecast space weather that can affect earth's technology. Extreme space weather events can disrupt communications networks, GPS navigation and electrical Power grits. The magnetosphere is permeable shield. The solar wind will periodically connect to the magnetosphere forcing it to reconfigure. This can create a rift allowing energy to pour into our safe haven. These rifts open and close many times daily, or even many times hourly. Most of them are small and short lived. Others are vast and sustained with the sun's magnetic field connecting to earth. In this way. The fireworks start. Zest, says the earth need fear absorbs the incoming energy from the solar wind and explosively releases that energy in the form of ju- magnetic storms and sub storms. How does this happen? Magnetic lines of force converge and reconfigure resulting in magnetic energy and charged particles flying off at intense speeds. Scientists have been trying to learn why this crisscrossing magnetic field lines called magnetic reconnection triggers such a violent explosion, opening the rifts into the magnetosphere Nasr's Magnus Feerick multi scale mission or MS was launched in March twenty fifteen to observe the electron physics of magnetic reconnection for the first time bristling with energetic particle detectors and magnetic sensors. The four MS spacecraft flew in close formation to on the front side of the earth's Magnus fear where magnetic reconnection occurs. MS has since been conducting similar hunt. In the Magnus fears tail MS compliments missions from NASA and partner agencies such as thymus cluster and geo tail contributing critical new details to the ongoing study of earth's magnetosphere together data from these investigations, not only help unravel the fundamental physics of space, but also help improve space, weather forecasting for more on the active space around the earth. Stay tuned to science, NASA dot gov.

NASA Magnus Feerick NASA Goddard Space partner Two billion years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Really long time ago so um and i'll i'll do a quick fastforward because when i was already add at nasa uh i was over at my mom's house one day and she she says greg i want to show you something she shows me this little thing drawn by a six year old who turned out to be a really long time ago and it was a drying of of a few space ships and and it said when i grow up i wanna work for nasa and this one is this miss during the gemena program and i remember the mercury program to although is really really young than so i kinda i i guess it was probably and the 31st chromosome somewhere somewhere in here you know kind of destined to be my my dad also was here my parents met here at nasa ames research centers my wife and i met here at nasa ames research center it's kind of the family business buried here we didn't well is a big fan of you the other would have had to convince my wife i think so my dad was the was the guy that proved that it was possible to navigate to the moon during the apollo era and this was rain around 19 sixty yeah yeah and and so fast for it a little bit to my teen years uh you know like like jim i was good in science and math and what not on my built my own observatory we have a family ranch about an hour and a half from here in and i built and observatory ground my own mirror in it and everything and use that for uh for a few years and so uh and then when i was out of graduate school i just was talking with someone and who happened to work here and and she said i need to combine meets and people and that was uh thirty three and a half years ago now why.

nasa nasa ames research center greg gemena jim i six year one day
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And thus one way but deal that aspect of janabi is to really work actively with a investigator and collaborators to generate new data and so we we work with pi to have their funding from nasa twos fly of animal models plant microbes in its best issue and we we help them maybe get more information from their samples and make sure that all or makes gone to that abbas at the end who this is the side that i know a little bit about from working at aims hour by science department they work with researchers that other institutions right right who want to fly an experiment the space to do their science that's what you're talking about satan will help them carry out that experiment and then also we get to use the data absolutely so there is that aspect of a nasa aims were investigator will work with a principal investigator from uh that got funding to actually fly on the isis mission and and speaks week experiment so part of our work he's also there and i think do you do something new abidjan lab that as the new project manager i'm trying to push for he's ready i really think that ginned up should be serving three different communities so that that i repository by itself rudy that data really tux to the specialist the by information that can going there and donald did that i and work with man interpreted that specialists yes very very specialized people scientist but then you have another group which is the scientists in general which they don't know how to do the bioinformatic but did no ought to ask the right question and so we want to provide tools for them to be able to access to information without having to do all these very tedious and slow work so some of the repository did are being used to be processed to generate a new level of data that we would call higher order did add that can be interpreted and from their front since the idea would be he's dare a signature of cancer in some liver samples that i got from the space station so a specialist on cancer burden.

investigator principal investigator project manager scientist nasa abbas abidjan donald
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Which is i think very good is that nasa should be the custodian of the the knowledge of how live gets impacted in space and so there's a lot of studies that have been going on for twenty thirty years under the sponsorship of nasa and uh definitely we've got a big biosciences division here absolutely end so there's enough scattered for mission here and there and i think uh we're lucky to leaving though in a in a time where now we have these new technological or makes and so the you'll make sr you you hear about them every day it's actually looking at uh are you know specific changes in your in your gene oncall variance and the trying to interpret the slight different changes in eugenics in in your gene sequencing with respect to some risk to your health out that's one on meeks that so that's exploiting right now in the in the world about this although mix to have been going on for why one of them school transcript of meat which is ninety percent of the did i engine up our transcript to me data and their it's the idea of looking at the arne expression in tissues our in uh in microbes are any anything we looking at any specific will coming from the space station or from the space shuttle and up if they have been on ice for or make stat up into our reports he tori so jannati's that big riposted tori of information okay right gene gene loves the database is a it's a database but it's going to be more than a database this was the original thought for it basically let store all this information to one local place and so we've been very active in either identifying legacy that i said that should be in gin left from the get go from the past and we also very active with any new or meeks being produced on the isis of to make sure that those that comes into our repository and and we nani looking at one type of a meeks would looking out of many different oh makes this something else go proteome which is putting profile epigenetics which is how your dna gets degraded by a specific molecules that changes the.

nasa meeks jannati nani tori twenty thirty years ninety percent
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"You're listening to nasa in silicon valley episode seventy in for the intro abby here with me again hello hello if this is a slightly interesting episode just for the sake that when we planned on recording this i got horrifically ill abby jumped into the last minute to go ahead and do the recorded that authorites ari tell us about your the conversation i had i rate road turned out to be very interesting i met with silvio cost he is the manager of the gene lab project here at aintree so you know how nasa does a lot of biosciences we do biology experiments up on space station so when those experiments end it does the science doesn't end because all that data goes into a repository which is open to the public it's open access for any researchers to use and right now they're developing tools and really building a system around it where people can come analyze this space biology data that nasa helped produce and looking for discoveries that they can make within it them so what else is for researchers if that's it that's your research or for citizens scientists who may be interested they'll be able to explore as well and get more out of the data than ever though it what sylviane describes it as is nasa as the custodian of knowledge about how life is affected in space which i think is sound super exciting hata before we jump on into a reminder for folks listening we have a phone number that six five zero 604 one four zero zero give us a call and leave a message and will try to add that into the future episodes um if you want to be digital we are on all the social media platforms reason the hashtag nasa silicon valley we are a nasa podcast but we are not the only mess a podcast so as a give a quick little shatah as to some of our friends over headquarters do gravity assist there's also another a weekly podcast called this week at massa and then of course our friends over in a jsc over the johnson space center that houston we have a podcast so that's where you could find all of our.

abby nasa sylviane massa johnson space center houston ari silvio social media
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Sheriff about twice each year of full moon winds up perfectly with the earth and sun such that the earth's shadow totally blocks the sons light which would normally reflect off the moon the literry clips on january thirty first will be visible daring moon set folks in the eastern united states where the eclipse will be partial we'll have to get up in the morning to see it notes petro but it's another great chance to watch the moon the moon will lose its brightness and take on an eerie fainter than normal glow from the scant sunlight that makes its way through earth's atmosphere often cast in a reddish hugh because of the way the atmosphere benz the light totally eclipsed moons are sometimes called blood wounds we're seeing all the earth sunrises and sunsets at that moment reflected from the surface of the moon says sarah noble a program scientist at nasa headquarters the january 31st superman will also be the second full moon of the month some people call the second former in a month a blue moon that makes it a super blue moon blue moons happen every two and a half years on average with a totally clips it will be a royal spectacle indeed a super blue blood moon sometimes the celestial rhythm sink up gest right to wow us he'd your calendar reminders on the three dates mark step out into the moon sent or moon rise and look up for a trilogy of sky watching treats to learn more about the many wonders of to moonnasagov for more of the many sky watching events to be found rally visit sciencenasagov.

united states petro scientist sciencenasagov sarah noble nasa moonnasagov