24 Burst results for "multiple myeloma"

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

The Bio Report

04:25 min | 4 months ago

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

"Greg. Thanks for joining US getting so much standing. My pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Cartesian therapies, exuma biotech, and your efforts to develop rapid point of care delivery of these therapies. Let's start with Cartesian therapies themselves out of these therapies work today. Well you know if we were to look at this technology today. And put it in the context of what we do in science and medicine even fifteen years ago. The the thought that we could truly have living medicine with genetically modified. LYMPHOCYTES in the body would have been unheard of it. And really I think the basic process of taking one cells from the body. In reprogramming genetically lymphocytes in returning them back into a patient to retrain those cells to see cancer antigens much in the same way we've done with monoclonal antibodies in the past, but wiring all that into itself is what is made Carta. Medicine which has been both exciting in is of course had. Equally that the number of challenges in in many different areas. Well. How are these therapies typically prepared and administered? Well it's a complicated process that has. A tremendous amount of technical skill required as well as logistics so typically. When a subject is entering into a trial or on therapy for approved medicines, their blood is drawn and separated into white blood cells and then shipped usually on a plane to a central manufacturing facility where those cells then are taken into a cleanroom, they are activated their genetically modified they're grown for about. Fifteen days, and then they are prepared just like you would with drug. And then ship back to the site. So there's a tremendous amount of time that can be lost for patients during this period and then once those cells. Are received. Back The patient receives Olympic depleting chemotherapy regimen to kind of make space. And then the cells are infused and at that point they take off and they're on their own. These cell therapies have been more successful in hematological answers than in solid tumors. What why is that? Well I. Think if you look at the history of the Field Dang, what you will find is that. One of the principal challenges in building cellular therapies has been it. They can be incredibly potent. So in the case of something, we know very well like CD nineteen, this isn't a liquid tumor setting those cells with CD nineteen will eliminate. All targets in the body that express CD nineteen, and this is found in many lymphomas. leukaemias. But the problem is in the case of CD nineteen, you're eliminating all of the normal cells make CD nineteen, which are called E. Cells, and this is tolerable in the case of liquid tumors. But when you think about the antigens targets that we go after in solid tumors, those are often expressed in tissues that. Not Be safe if the immune system were to attack it. So we've been forced to really take steps back on how well we can make a car for solid tumors to try and make them smarter to help recognize friend from foe. So the great efficacy I think that you've seen in relapse refractory ael l.. As well as in diffuse large B. Cell Lymphoma, and now also I think exciting we in places like multiple myeloma getting that stain level of efficacy in solid tumors has required that people really think about the precision inside of the problem to make sure can get a potent car but also one that is safe.

Solid Tumors United States Carta B. Cell Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Field Dang Olympic Principal
Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 7 months ago

Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

"Marquez Marquez's here and today I. Have the privilege of Hosting Lester Morales. He is a true consultant in the human capital and employee benefits arena, and currently serves as CEO of next impact. LLC focused on innovation and changing the status quo. Next impact is a full service employee benefits and Human Resources Marketing and consulting company committed to helping other companies grow and add value to their clients before he. He founded next impact. He Co founded in Selah, a benefits administration company focused on helping advisors support their clients with ACA compliance prior to becoming an entrepreneur, lester serve nearly three years as executive vice president and chief growth officer for Willis's human capital practice, one of the largest insurance brokerages in the world in this role Lester lead over two hundred producers consultants in forty plus offices as part of a three, hundred and fifty. Fifty Million Dollar Practice Willis. A single largest practice in North America during a previous eight year stint at Willis Lester, was consistently among the top five consultants nationally between those assignments Lester served as national vice president of sales for Health Stat orlean provider of worksite clinics and disease management services. Leicester's thought later in the benefit space, and I had just the opportunity to connect with them before this and his passion for making healthcare. Healthcare more equitable employers and the employees is palpable He's he's. He's all in and I'm privileged to have them here on the podcast today, Lester, really looking forward to our discussion, they have. We should have nothing to be here -absolutely so lester before we dive into what you guys do at next impact and the quote here on the front of your site. starbucks spends more on healthcare than they do on coffee wow. Right we're going to dive into that and what your you and your team is doing to help. Prevent that or turn it around to something more sustainable. Tell us a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah, yeah, you know most people that end up in the insurance advisory space. While into it's the Mine is I'm doing this on purpose. I have a very stinks. Why unfortunately I have been a product health care insurance employee benefits when I was sixteen years old. My Dad was diagnosed with multiple myeloma for you. Listeners that don't know what that is. That's cute of your bone marrow. So I was sixteen got diagnosed found out San France Limo radiation several years back baffled. That's. Unfortunately ends up being that me. Combat statistics so sixty two's. Depending on which report you live, read out personal bankruptcy puzzle medical reasons while unfortunately we were part of that statistics are my parents had to file bankruptcy? In order to make ends meet the rent in worse yet. It's interesting about that is they've got health insurance? both employer based insurance, but you know we're in an out of pocket mass along as Hand Fifteen, twenty, two thousand a year for family. You know you do that. Do three years in a row. How many families have extra thirty forty fifty thousand dollars sitting? There Bang you. You know when you're trying to send your kid baseball camp. You get on the new pair of Jordan. Then all the thing that wonderful parents which I had you know to water? Parents did Zach I mean down the road of of Yao, interest in and understanding vow health insurance, but it also makes you understand how they're using the system is and and that although you got insurance, although theoretically that insurance is supposed to be there to supporting how it was, it was really more of a hoop jumper, and you know an obstacle alone commerce so. Back, down the field, and then the last part of really what what drives me and my? Why unfortunately I'm a big I'm a big. Momma's boy is most Latin. Men Are. A BIG MOMMA's boy. Unfortunately in two thousand fourteen moms diagnose pancreatic cancer and she passed away August. Eleven thousand seventeen, so man I'll tell you I get up every day fired up to fights for changing because I have seen that you most important. Pete in my life away from cancer the amount of money we spent the amount of confusion. The amount of just uncertainty and Hoots Jeff Junk mail system just makes sense air, and so that's that's what we get. Get up every morning

Willis Lester Lester Morales Marquez Marquez Human Resources Marketing Multiple Myeloma Starbucks North America Vice President Of Sales CEO Executive Vice President ACA Leicester Momma YAO Pete San France Baseball
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 8 months ago

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"This healthcare podcast is sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient CARE I. I School of Medicine is leading Indiana University's burst grand challenge, the precision health initiative with bold goals to cure multiple myeloma, triple, negative breast, cancer and charts coma, and prevent type, two diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Jim Welcome. Thanks for for having me.

Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Indiana Multiple Myeloma Alzheimer's Disease
Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:31 sec | 10 months ago

Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

"The Seattle based infectious disease research institute will soon begin trials on an investigational immunotherapy that could be a promising treatment option for covert nineteen it's based on immune cells in the body known as natural killer in case cells which are already used to treat leukemia multiple myeloma patients the immune cells to get the sites of active via affection kill the virus in induce an immune response that controls the if infection the trial will begin soon with approximately a hundred patients diagnosed with a coded nineteen infection

Seattle Leukemia Multiple Myeloma
6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:53 min | 1 year ago

6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

"Heck Bolden is an eighty three year old undergraduate at the heart school of music in Connecticut is also an atomic vet one of thousands of soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests during the Cold War Connecticut public radio's Diane Orson has the story of one man's remarkable journey in nineteen fifty five Hank Bolden was in his late teens and stationed in California one day the young musician was told he'd been chosen to participate in a special military exercise I had no idea what I was selected for he was flown to desert rock Nevada where he joined hundreds of other soldiers from across the country he didn't know anyone else there a day later they were marched out to trenches and the trash that I was and there was nothing but so does that look like me our our black faces a countdown began when it got down to zero that's when the big flash one of the big flash with the dropping of the atomic bomb for the testing and they had us place two point eight miles from ground zero not only in the path of the fallout but in the predicted path for the fallout then came a wave of heat and dust and there weren't any goggles a debt that we have to place our rise just had a helmet in arms supposedly to protect the eyes and give visibly see so your bones and he visibly see or other folks skeletons in our that's what I saw yes after the tests pulled in and the other soldiers had to swear an oath of secrecy never to talk about when it happened not to family doctors or to each other violation of the oath was punishable by ten years in prison and a ten thousand dollar fine golden says for decades he never talked but as the years went on he was diagnosed with bladder cancer multiple myeloma and subcapsular cataracts he began to worry that his health problems might be connected to what he'd seen there were a lot of tests in this period Alex Muller Steen isn't a story in of nuclear weapons at the Stevens institute of technology he's speaking by Skype these are really tests to see what happens to soldiers if they see a live nuclear weapon go off can they still be command do they become hysterical and no longer take orders did they become so overcome with fear that they can't do anything at the same time military commanders were not fully aware of the risks of exposing soldiers to ionizing radiation says well Steen slowly veterans who'd been unwittingly used as human research subjects began quietly sharing their stories Congress lifted the oath of secrecy in nineteen ninety six today those who can demonstrate their atomic veterans and have developed one of several specific medical conditions are eligible for compensation last year after receiving his compensation Hank bold and decided to go back to college when he got out of the army back in the fifties hidden rolled at the heart school of music but never got a degree but dropped out of college to go on a rope and music and I love to complete before right but have started so the eighty three year old audition for renowned saxophonist trevan Jackson director of hearts jazz studies division it was apparent to me that he is a practitioner about to said musician who can do it but he wants to come in and learn a little bit more about the nuts and bolts of music which I think is some to be an off old and was accepted and awarded a scholarship he says he's come to terms with what happened decades ago when he was a young soldier I have no regrets about being involuntarily volunteered because after he has played a part in and to my being here now where Matt as for sitting in classes alongside students one quarter his age Bouldin says well music will keep

Heck Bolden
CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:07 min | 1 year ago

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

"Today we're GONNA be talking to Cherie Virago professor of medicine and medical molecular genetics and also director of the stem cell program. I use school of Medicine. He Generals General's GonNa talk to us today about stem cell. Therapy and car T.. Therapy in particular which you may have heard in the news but before we get to that. Let's start with some basics first of all. Welcome to the program program thank you. Can you tell us in general what it means to be not only a professor of medicine but a professor of medical and molecular genetics so medical Michael Molecular Genetics. It's a very broad term It's it's really looking at the molecular basis of disease Not just inherited a disease but Many of the diseases have a molecular basis. Even if they're not directly inherited had he actually look get to the molecular basis. What kind of research technologies are you using? The biggest technology at the moment is Sequencing genes particularly in in terms of Chewers in my area sequencing can cell's genome to identify particular mutations. That could be targetable identifying mutations Sion's that in future could be Way We could design drugs perhaps decided Also there are ways of personalizing Medicine in a way Way We can identify Because not all cancer even the same kind of cancer is not all Homogeneous there's a lot of heterogeneity so if you can identify certain mutations in a person's at cancer cell you may be able to target that specifically perfect for that person's cancer as opposed to all the people with that kind of cancer. So how do you train to do this kind of work so in your career career how what did you do to get to this point. Well I guess there are various ways of getting there the way I got there. I trained actually in Australia Did all my hematology. Aw called you training in Australia. And then I did a PhD. That was more related to stem cell transplantation rather than molecular medicine at the time and then I moved to Ohio state where I stayed there for about six years on faculty and then the opportunity came to lead the transplant program. Ram At Indiana University. So I moved there in two thousand six. So we're talking about treating cancer. Is it all kinds of cancer or specific kinds of cancer. Turner accident well as a stem cell transplant. we're really focusing on hematological. Kansas blood cancers So leukemia multiple myeloma lymphoma. These are the ones that are amenable really to stem cell transplantation. You talk about what the differences are between those three short so It's really the cell of origin or the origin of the cancer so leukemia we're really talking about Cancers of blood stem cells the bone marrow in multiple myeloma. We're really talking about Cancer cells plasma cells which really part of the immune system in lymph falmouth with talking about cancer cells that are also part of the immune system that the less differentiated cells than the Coloma. So what what causes these. What makes someone developed one of those types of cancer? Well that's a really good question and we don't know all the the answers to that but It the it's silly as with other Kansas to I'll just blood cancers there are Hits in the genome of the the cans of the cells that turns them on to become cancerous essentially and so once they become cancerous. They just start growing multiplying without controls trolls. That the gist of it. Or Yeah. That's basically it they. They're able to multiply without control but they're also able to survive better They have a survival advantage compared to their normal counterparts talking about the history of treatment of those types of cancer. Like what do we do. And what are we. What are we got into now? And specifically of course what is stem cell therapy. Happy at the end. Yes so you know historically the we have been treating and we still the do treat These cancers with conventional cytotoxic agents these agents are essentially cellular toxins that cause DNA damage to the cells and as a result they The cells sells died and they because cancer cells tend to divide more frequently or more rapidly than normal cells and these conventional channel cytotoxic target the proliferating cells more than the Doman cells. So we're able to Mo- selectively kill cancer cells. But they are. They also affect normal cells as well as things have evolved We are now able to. We learn more about the genetics of the Kansas. His when now able to design drugs that particularly targets in pathways molecular pathways. That these cancer cells depend on so Treatment has become Less toxic to the to the patient in general so we're trying to target specifically just killing the cancer while not killing other other rapidly or any other kinda cells in the body. So what is then stem cell. Therapy like what. What's the difference between what skyping there and then going all the way to say? We're GONNA do a stem cell. Trance have so in some cases not all Kansas but some Kansas are also amenable to stem cell transplant therapy. And they're really too broadly. Speaking to approach is one where we use. The patient's own stem cells called tolerance stem cell transplantation. And where we use dona cells or allogeneic stem cell transplantation so with autologous transplantation plantation would really reverting back to the classic cytotoxic approach way we give very high doses of chemotherapy to Kill Oh as many cancer cells as possible. One of the side effects of this is that it will also cools a permanent damage to the bone marrow of people without stem cell support report. They would Essentially die of marrow failure so to collect stem cells. I there on stem cells assuming their stem cells not diseased. Then when you can give high dose. Chemotherapy give back stem cells and allow the marrow to recover so I have a couple questions there first of all. How do you get the stem cells? Out So stem cells live predominantly in the bone marrow But they do circulate the blood so you can either collect directly from the bone marrow but more commonly family today in the autologous approach we give growth factors which can move stem cells to circulate more in the blood and then we collect them. I'm by a process called a ferocious. Where basically they are collected a blood donor machine essentially that will collect them from the blood? How do you how do you how are you sure? You're not collecting cancer cells at the same time you do Some of these stem cell products will be contaminated but to some extent by cancer sells but it seems that most relapses after autologous transplantation occur not because of contamination. But because you really the the chemo a high dose chemotherapy that you've given has not killed the last cancer cell in the body. So how are you also assured that the stem cells are not. Can't where's the cancer come from. If it's not coming mm from stem cells as the simpsons or what about the sort of the the. He met a poetic stem cells. That give rise to the sherm tie. He met a point system. MM-HMM SO For example in multiple myeloma these inadequate ext themselves are not cancerous. Okay and in lymphomas Somali. They are not not cancerous. Can you just give us just a brief description of what the poetic system is so the Humana poetic system is essentially all blood forming cells and immune cells so the very primitive stem cells that give give rise to the humanitarian existent. They give rise to white cells red cells platelets as well as the components of the immune in systems such as B. Cells. T. Cells natural killer cells. We're just trying to figure out in my head and where it comes from. Because if if the are the white blood cells coming from the bone marrow in the stem cells though in development I it depends on the Canada Essentially for example if we take multiple well my Lama so the Within the immune system one cancer cell becomes Transform to become malignant and phones a clone in that clone of actually expands and has sub clones of its own and that's really the cancer but that's not arising from a in the actual stem cell of the very primitive stem cell that gives rise to all the blood forming cells in the Merrill.

Cancer T. Cells Kansas Multiple Myeloma Michael Molecular Genetics Australia School Of Medicine Professor Of Medicine Cherie Virago Ram At Indiana University Myeloma Lymphoma Director Ohio Professor Sion
First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as gene-editing human trials get underway

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as gene-editing human trials get underway

"For the first time doctors have used the new gene editing technique known as crisper to try to treat cancer patients in the US NPR's, rob Stein has more. For the patients for treated at the university of Pennsylvania one has multiple myeloma. The other has coma both had suffered relapses after undergoing previous treatment, scientists removed immune system cells from their bodies and use the new gene editing technique called crisper commodified, the DNA in the cells, and then infuse the cells back into the patient's bodies. The hope is the cells would attack the cancer. No information has been released yet about how. Well, the approach may. Or may not be

Multiple Myeloma Rob Stein Coma United States University Of Pennsylvania NPR
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"And then those are positive for the monoclonal mafi. We're gonna follow them after the surgery and look at the group that lose weight versus the group doesn't lose weight. Sure. Are they going to lose the mug us or not? So if we can prove that they hit LA. Lost this abnormal protein. That's a good things. And we're gonna try to explore and see why is it you know, because they lost certain inflammatory proteins when they lost the weight or not. And so that will be a crate advances. And so basically a known risk factor for myeloma. Yes, if patient who are appea-, let me tell you if somebody has monoclonal Gama Pathy, and if you know, and they are obese they have four and a half a chance of developing multiple myeloma compared to non Opie obese patients. Yeah. So this is a big study that was done at Saint Louis VA hospital because they have records on patients who developed myeloma, and they have, you know, they know their weight, and they know if they had manga so not so that will be four and a half time just type two diabetes tied up in that too. Or is it just the obesity? I think just the obesity. I haven't looked at. I'm not familiar with any day down diabetes. But so besides the prevention what else is so prevention, I think the other thing is that we really need to screen. I mean, we need to see in this area that we talk about the higher scary near farming community near mining community near factories that was dumping a lot of these chemicals. Can we understand how many? People do have these premium conditions will be interesting to understand that. I mean, because then we will source study the impact of you know, this environment on these preconditions. And then what we would like to see is predisposing factor. In addition to the chemicals, if you have certain gene, will you get myeloma when you're exposed to certain pathogens. So I think that's exciting to us. And then finally can we find a way to deal with high risk Milo. My thing that's really the most frustrating. You know condition we deal with and Michael is to really understand the immune makeup of these patients and try to understand how we can enhance it to help us radical the disease Howard. I mean, just because clearly we live locally how are patients doing here. Locally. And what are we doing? What kind of studies are we doing locally to to try to help? So that's a great questions as you know, Indiana University issued this gr- gr-. Grand challenge. Grant, trying to really cure three diseases and cancers in Indiana and multiple myeloma was selected as one of these diseases. And so one of the proposal that we have is that we want to understand how myeloma patients do in Indiana. We want to understand their diagnosis their treatment their outcome their side effect. In addition, we want to understand their genetic makeup and also understand the myeloma genetic makeup and environment. So we putting together what we call a cohort of patients. We want to analyze one thousand patient was myeloma and Premio on condition in Indiana. We started actually accruing patients in November. And we have more than one hundred seventy patients thus far enrolled. So what we do is we looking at their sort of baseline genetic in formations. You know, we take saliva. We take a blood, and when we do a Blencoe biopsy. We take the mile cells and the neighborhood where they live inside the mirror cells. And we tried to analyze them. And the goal is to try to understand do. They have a predisposition to certain things what is their immune profile? Was there ability to metabolize certain drugs or not, and then sort of correlate the natural history of the disease was their genetic makeup, the myeloma genetic makeup and the micro environment was in the Bom omega..

multiple myeloma Indiana obesity LA Gama Pathy Saint Louis VA hospital Indiana University Michael Grant Howard
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"So when I started working on multiple myeloma, we had only this traditional chemotherapy in two thousand and three the first in class drug was approved which is a protease inhibitor and protease inhibitor is just thinking about it like a, you know, you have a garbage disposal, and you just clogging then you just accumulation of toxic stuff, and you know. The cells start dying. So that's how it works. And these are amazing. I mean, these drugs have changed the course of the disease now there are three drugs in that class available and in two thousand six we got a class of drugs approved called the immunomodulators drugs. So and the first in class was the drug thalidomide drug that cause a birth defect. When it was used in the fifties for motion sickness and nauseous associated with pregnancy and this drug we didn't understand how it works for a long time. But so and that but the problem was using thalidomide for a long time it can cause nerve damage. Okay. So the company that makes drug start developing next generation of that drugs that caused less neuropathy. We actually have to drugs in that class now. So we have three immunomodulating drugs three inhibitor. And then more recently the FDA approved drugs. We call him monoclonal antibody. So these are drugs that recognize the surface of myeloma cells, and sort of, you know, help eradicate these myeloma Celso protein that bind to the myeloma and bring immune cells to try to radically them Saturday decide which of those to us. Well, that's a great things. That's why we do clinical trial and in clinical trials, we find the best combination. So first of all we now know that one drug is not enough you have to use a cocktail of drugs. And so we just you know, the good things for patient today is that you have different cocktails so based on their medical condition, you can find the right combination therapy. So when you say their condition, what specific example, if somebody has significant nerve damage, you went to avoid drugs that cause further nerve damage if somebody have advanced kidney failure you and avoid the drugs that can be too toxic. If you have kidney failure. So that's a good news for the patient is that we can tailor. The therapy to were there conditions, and they're actually desire. I mean, some people would like only oral regimen. They don't wanna go to envision the can really go twice, you know, week to the clinic to get chemotherapy, we have oral regimens for them. So when you say they're cocktails a multiple drugs in a class or you're picking drugs from each different class. Exactly we pick drugs from different class. So basically what we do is synergy was at overlapping. Toxicity. Okay. And so what does the usual course, you have your dream Indra maintenance how to most patients too. So most people as I told you, you know, they really do. Well, they stay in remission for a long time. You know, now the average, you know, time in remission, maybe five to seven years, but unfortunately, we have these about twenty percent of patients who relapse was in the first two years, we call these are high risk risk of what risk of shorter remission shorter survival. That's where really a lot of research going on to try to improve the. Outcome of these patients. Do treat them again. Yes. Which read them again, we tried to find novel combinations. We tried to find clinical trials for these patients. We trying to employ some newer strategy. For example, one of the nearest strategy will be what we call Carty cells, which is basically taking the patient own immune cells expand them, genetically modify them to make sure that they can recognize myeloma and kill it. So we put to Sheen's one to recognize my Loma and one killer jeans. So that's why we call it kind Merrick receptor Antillean T-cells Carty cells. So these cells are I mean, these kind of therapy is now used and clinical trial in relapsed patients, but we may be able now to use it in a clinical trials for the higher spacious affront before they get to you know, relapse and have a horrible disease that how to control how hard is it to do that. So first of all you have to collect the patient and. T cells lymphocytes that become the killer cells. So basically, it's like we collect the stem cells. We do a free says we take the blood out separate the white cells from the rest of the blood..

multiple myeloma protease inhibitor thalidomide FDA Carty Sheen twenty percent seven years two years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"What you do is you take the blood out, and you do a process like Dallas as a process called a freezes. So you collect the only the stem cells, and you store them you give the blood back to the patients, and you do this in the outpatient and a bloodbath. Four hours five hours a day. Sometimes in one day, you get all the stem cells you need sometimes you need to three days. How do you be sure that you're not collecting bad cells or that those won't turn into bed? So yeah. So we have looked actually we did research on that. So what we looking for is specific marker on the surface of these cells makes them stem cells called CD thirty four, and we look to see if we collect any Milena cells, and we did very sensitive essay and two things. One is the myeloma cells don't mobilize, you know, that effectively and the second things that they don't freeze. Well, so basically the products we give back to the patients, very unlikely to contain any Milena cells knowing that the stem cells could then are you assured that the stem cells won't then develop into cells, which will turn back into my or is that just you just have to take this stem cells are the cells that make white cells red blood cells on platelet, right? And the process of developing multiple myeloma doesn't really start at the stems. Okay. Stems stock to probably around, you know, when they sort of mature to white cells, and before they divide into lymphocytes or neutrophils different part of the white cells. It's the lymphocytes level when you know, they become B cells of the B cells become plasma cells. So maybe it's between the B cells and the plasma cells. So I guess I'm reading this question. Maybe totally naive given that we know that whatever was in this person to that such that their cells could develop into myeloma cells would they be better off with someone else's stem cells that dose sales are less likely or is that just too hard to do. Well, it's very hard to do. So we have done what we call allogeneic transplant donor stem cell transplant. The problem is that most patients in was multiple myeloma are in their late sixties. So I'll genyk transplant is very risky. We actually lose large number of these patients and despite doing an allogeneic transplant some patients have relapsed. So it's not really a route. Eighteen Lee us approach maybe in the young patients, and you may concern allergenic transplant. The issue was allergenic transplant is the risk of a graph versus house disease that immune cells from donor. Do not like that where the living in the new in the patients, so you get damage to the skin liver and the intestine, but the other thing is that the advantage of allergenic transplant used to be the graft versus disease and fortunately, the myeloma cells tend to hide from the immune system. And we don't get very good graft versus myeloma affect when allogeneic transplant. Okay. So patients get around of drugs and then stem cell therapy. And how what what's the usual course after that? So after three months later, they recover from the stem cell transplant, then some patients are considered for Menton insz therapy. So two things one we give him medicine to keep their bone from breaking down. We do that as an infusion or injection once a month, and then sometimes. We give pills of these novel chemotherapy drugs that will help maintain the, you know, the response, I think that research should be focusing on what to do after transplant when the patient have minimal residual disease. How can we improve the patient immune response to radically the residual disease is that the chemo pill, or is it some other strategies that we try actually to explore here? How many different types of drugs are available. I mean is it did everybody gets sorta the same octave of drugs or is it individualized?.

multiple myeloma Dallas Lee Menton three months Four hours five hours three days one day
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"So we do a specific blood test to check for the monoclonal protein and find it we have to find a monoclonal protein or we find an abnormal part of that protein. Raise recall, it the free light chain. So we check that the second thing that we have to look and see what they have in the bone marrow. So we do a bone marrow biopsy to see the number of these abnormal cells, and what type of cells we do genetic analysis on those cells to see. What they do. Because my my Aloma patients some of them do very well, some of them, do okay. And some of them do poorly and the genetic makeup of the mile Oma can help you distinguish these three groups. So that was actually going to be my next question is sort of all cases of multiple myeloma the same or they already different or do. They fall into a bunch of category. Yeah. I mean, I think that term multiple may not be really because of multiple lesions was in the patients things multiple presentation of the disease. Okay. So I have patients who do very, well, they get one kind of tweet -ment and go on and stay in remission forever. And then we have patients who was in a year or two they relapse and they actually don't do. Well. And then so that's about twenty percent for each group. And then the rest the sixty percent those patients, you know, have multiple relapses, but you can control the disease the can live long life. So what is the treatment for the most part? Yeah. So the treatment has evolved that used to be more chemo. Arab your traditional drugs that cause hair loss or blood counts. Abnormalities? But now, we have these recall them, so our novel drugs, they work on things that influence the proliferation of the cells or the interaction was the neighborhood where they live. So these cells can't, you know, not really find hospitable environment was in the boomer to grow. So these new drugs that in combination have produced amazing results, we still consider high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant as part of the tweet -ment to improve the outcome. And some patient may need Menton therapy after you do the stem cell transplant. So for the most part, though, it's it's drugs. Yes is drugs. And so what's the typical course if of treatment? So most patients will require what we call induction treatment, you know, which is trying to control the disease trying to improve the symptoms and. That will take three to four cycles the psychos about four weeks after that, you do the stem cell transplant, which is two components wants collecting this themselves that support the use of high dose chemotherapy, then you give this big dose chemotherapy, which tells everything in the bone marrow. But you have the patient stem cells that make blood cells stored. So the next day you give it to the patients, and these cells will grow and make healthy cells. This is when you're doing a stem cell transplant transplant in the patient cells back into their own body. Yes, how does that work? So what you do is you collect the patient own stem cells I and these cells live in the bone marrow. So what you do is you give specific hormone that stimulates these cells to grow every day for four days on the fifth day. They're blood is full of these stem cells..

multiple myeloma Menton twenty percent sixty percent four weeks four days
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"We call that condition. Magas monoclonal Gama thief, undetermined significance just have a monoclonal protein doesn't cause harm to the patient. But what happened next is that tons of these cells stock, you know, accumulating in the bone marrow. They have like ten twenty percent, but it's still not causing harm. So we call that condition smoldering myeloma. And then eventually what happened is that these. Plasma cells can affect the patients in different ways. One is that it can weaken the bund so about seventy percent of patient was myeloma will have either osteoporosis holes in the bones or the star breaking bones. So they have you know, they just tried to lift a bag, you know, and then they break a bone in their back or something like that. So myeloma can affect the bones can cause a Nimia can cause very high calcium level because you lesion calcium out of the bone. So the patient become enable to think and may go into a coma or they can actually get kidney damage, so we call these of the crab criteria for diagnosing myeloma, the c is for high calcium, the are renal or kidney failure AMA or bone disease. So you have a lot of these abnormal cells in the and you have one of these criteria. Then we you know that patient has. Multiple myeloma. What makes the plasma cells? Go bad what what goes wrong? So we actually a lot of research going on in term of environmental exposures and just this week got big settlement against roundout because they when patients develop multiple myeloma from using them. So we think there is a toxic exposures farming communities. There's increased risk of multiple myeloma near factories, and you're mining communities, for example, I have patients in your a mine in south west, Indiana, where multiple people who worked in that minds developed multiple myeloma, you know, and the questions of what did they dumped into the water? These people are drinking water. And so I think we think chemical exposure plays a role in making these plasma cells so are become malignant, and multiply, and and you know, 'cause. Harman cosies. Okay. So once somebody is once we have a concern, they've met their the crab criteria. What what happens next to help make the diagnosis? So we do several things number one. Obviously, we need to do blood tests this anemic, they have high calcium or they have kidney failure. The the second thing is that we look for this abnormal protein because myeloma start from one plasma cells the protein, they produce is unique we call it mono clone protein..

Multiple myeloma bone disease kidney damage Gama Harman cosies coma osteoporosis Indiana ten twenty percent seventy percent
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"And that's perfect because today we're going to be talking about multiple myeloma our guest this week is rough it up norm. Who's the director of the mile Oma program at Indiana University school of medicine, we're going to be talking today about multiple myeloma? And where the cutting edge research is what people are doing what people are thinking where we might be going. So welcome. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Could we start a little bit? I've we're always interested in hearing about the backgrounds of our guests. How did you get to this position? How did you get interested in your research? How did you get here? So I started one. To become a transplant surgeon. But then I ended up doing just hematology followership and boomer transplant and I did my research on plasma cells. These are the cells that cause multiple myeloma. And then I started doing, gene therapy. And gene therapy was an exciting and dangerous. I needed to focus on something. So I knew plasma cells and I loved myeloma patients. So I decided to focus on that. So let's say what are plasma cells. So plasma cells are the cells that make antibodies to help us fight infection. We need them. That's how we survive, you know, one hundred years seventy years, whatever so one what happened is at one of these plasma cells become malignant and start reproducing itself and causing harm to the patient. So so there type of white blood cell. Yes, sir. Okay. Where they made. Well, they actually start in the lymph nodes, and then they migrate to the bone marrow where they reside. You know? So you get your first encounter was for example is a Tatton us or, you know, Newman. Yeah. Bacteria in the blood, and then the these cells much sure become plasma cells produce memory antibodies to help us fight infections, as you know, when we get exposed into the new Monia, and they reside in the moment when we need them. You know, they got out they make more new antibodies to help us fight infection. So can you talk a little bit more about how they work when they're working, right? How exactly do they help us fight infection? Well, they produce a specific antibodies. So we have a repertoire of plasma cells that capable of recognizing different pathogens, you know, from the mums to the measles to influenza to the new Monja and. And so every time we get exposed to one of these pathogens these plasma cells proliferate and produce more antibodies to fight the infection. So what happens when they produce the antibodies? What happens next? Well, the antibodies bite to the pathogens, and you just neutralize it or, you know, help other cells gobble it up. Okay. So what happens when things go wrong? Well, when things goes wrong is that one of these plasma cells start accumulating in the bone marrow. So you initially have for example, maybe five percent of normal plasma cells in the boom marrow. They don't cause any harm..

multiple myeloma Indiana University school of m director Newman measles influenza one hundred years seventy years five percent
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The biz talk radio. We are back with the Kristen Hagopian show, and I love segments like these because they explain in detail time and time again the magnificent advancements. We have benefited from in the field of medicine these days, it is really quite something. And what I love is that with all the noise out there in the news, these days, wonderful medical breakthrough stories like this really don't make the headlines the way, I want them to. So let's see we can do about that joining us via our newsmaker line to talk about this this year alone. You ready for these numbers skies? Approximately thirty two thousand people in the US will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow. Doctor Jens Helen GAAS chief of myeloma at Roswell park, Comprehensive Cancer Center is joining us from a very busy day on our newsmaker line to discuss a recent FDA approved immunotherapy combo for certain adults with multiple myeloma. Welcome, sir. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me. Kristen my pleasure. Dr just kind of take it down to Fisher Price terms for people like myself, if you would what is multiple myeloma while a lot of times, we've heard the phrase zone, even have that kind of thing in our family tree break it down for people who don't really find that to be a familiar phrase, if you would so much of my Loma is a disease of the new system, those the south's that are your are the class muscles. And they are usually there to attack terms they put USA could antibodies with that. The Tech Trends that come into new section if something goes wrong of what is really going wrong, then they can develop into a cancerous. And then we call it. Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma has several distinct symptoms, for example, that the sounds phones are over activated. And they cost homes in the phones calls so quick. So they really have punch holes in the bones. Those patients and this can cause pain, and then even sectors, which again causes more pain. This one nature kind of symptom and another major symptom is fatigue. Tiredness costs by an EMMY or red blood cells are low that can cause tiredness and it's another symptom of my research. Very important one is a kidney dysfunction when there's something wrong with the kidneys. That can also be caused by Milo might even go by. Those specific symptoms that that can happen to patients with multiple myeloma. Now, you were and I'm taking notes as we're talking here, and you're talking through these symptoms, which are so helpful when you're talking to a blatant hypochondriac like myself, I hear things like oh my God fatigue. I've got Batigol God these sorts of. Meanwhile, was just some bad Mexican food. But I'm thinking, oh my God. It's going to be this whatever talk me down out of my tree if you would. And of course, the the people at risk. They're going to range from one demographic to the other if you could put a finer points, but who you found in your studies to be most at risk who would you say that would be is there any kind of a demographic that falls into this more. Or is it just everybody across the board could be a risk for this. That's an excellent question. Very important question. That's why because they're those patients oftentimes payment. I mean who hasn't after certain age. So actually, the the democratic says the median age at diagnosis is six sixty nine to seventy years of age. So it's more the elderly population. It's very very uncommon in children and adults it happens. But it's very very rare of the spec. Pain is not a common back pain that you don't have anymore. It's one that is getting worse and worse and worse. And oftentimes, it's really excruciating. Because those patients have fractious their phones, and this is very different from the regular paint that we have. And the tiredness is also getting worse and worse and worse and patients don't get out of that. And it's a very very severe symptoms. Don't have to have everything to the patient with myeloma that some of those symptoms can occur in patients. All right. I'm feeling better. Now, I appreciate that. I really appreciate that now in all seriousness. And we're going to talk about the latest FDA approved this incredible new treatment, but backup if you would for a second what in the past before this treatment came about what was the treatment in the past for this kind of a condition. Yeah. The past past which is not that long ago. Actually, I treat a patient patients. We had like two trucks, which were classy chemo therapeutic trucks that we use in our patients and that caused that kind of was a bit lower afterwards Will Smith great. But nowadays in the recent flight five to ten years. So it was a really a lot of development in the treatment of multiple myeloma. We have some lettuce specific areas where we can treat the disease much more specific than this classic classic. With people. We have new so called even Amato dilatory trucks, and producer inhibitors that are very.

multiple myeloma Kristen Hagopian US FDA EMMY Doctor Jens Helen GAAS Amato dilatory Milo Roswell park Smith producer Comprehensive Cancer Center seventy years ten years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Going to discontinue his. Cancer treatment it's a tough day I think. It's a sad day I don't, think that if he continues treatment his quality of. Life is going to get better he fought the good fight for a year and now. He will discontinue treatment and MAC we've been talking about this today about how do you actually decide when to continue taking some type of a drug. Or getting some type of treatment Or when. Do you decide to stop yeah a lot of families go through, this they have to make the very. Hard choice of do we continue to. Allow this person to fight does this person. Want to fight or do we have to, step in and say you know what the doctors. They all say you're it's it's it's not gonna do you any good or does the. Person come out and say I just don't wanna do this anymore my body is to wracked with pain I just want to go with some dignity John McCain is. Going through what a lot of us. Have either gone through a may go through It's. Just a it's just a painful, painful decision shared this on the show before my. Mom has cancer she's got something. Called multiple myeloma and it's a blood, cancer and there's no cure but it's all about the numbers if you could get. The number down you can continue to. Live when the, numbers start going up into a dangerous place you got, to knock it back. Down and, next week my mom's. Going to try this new drug and she's she even told me she said she's the Guinea pig Doesn't, make me feel good She can still fight because this, drug does have an upside but. All the studies aren't in she's. A total Guinea pig here this thing works in rats And I don't know if it works in humans. And I don't know how much you'll be able to take, they don't know how much they're. Going to do the dose that. They're going to give her but she always tells me she said i'm gonna keep living until the doctors come up with something better and they think that whatever this is that she's going to take next week it's better it's not a chemo they're supposed to be less side effects but in terms of her body being able to handle it i don't know and it scares the hell out of me because You know she's got cancer and, the one thing I've always said is I want something else, to get my. Mom I don't want cancer to get my mom You know maybe somewhere down the road or heart goes out. But I don't want cancer to get her So my brother and? My. Dad, we know we talk about the self my brother's a doctor is he on board with with yeah yeah. Because it seems, like this is the best thing that she, can take? And we'll see how she does but you know when your mother. Calls you up and says guess what I'm going to be a Guinea pig doesn't make you feel good you just, you, just get down on your. Knees and you pray that God's gonna hear your mom and you know I it's not that I listen. This is very different than what the McCain's are going through there, in a very. Public realm, doing this I can't imagine what it's like. To? Be doing it in. Public, but it's hard I mean we. All have a personal story about this right he in some way yeah you either know somebody with cancer maybe your? Family has gone through with the McCain's. Are going, through of when is it okay to say enough, enough I I don't wanna do this anymore My wife and I we weren't even married, a year? And we decided to allow somebody to come down from Wyoming to. Stay with us as they got treatment here and we were not prepared as caregivers because we we became the primary, caregivers, we weren't prepared to make. That decision and whether to stop treatment right and it was very tough because this person wanted to keep. Fighting and didn't care what the test results said that she had, to fight to. Be with, her kids and she wanted to see her, kids? Graduate high school and. So, on and so forth and we. Basically had to call the husband and have him come down and he had to be the one to say we're? Moving, you to removing you to hospice And it was tough on all of us because I mean, this person it's a noble effort it's a it's, a herculean task and a. Noble effort to fight something and everybody loves an underdog story everybody, loves. I beat the big c story but doesn't always end up that way and it was very tough for us because we did not expect we didn't expect her to, want to keep fighting and calling other hospitals and she she swore by God she would. Go down to sky harbor and get on a plane herself if we didn't take her to get other treatment and she, was ravaged by the chemo and the cancer Yeah I think my worst nightmare is for my mom, to say or the, doctor to say we can't do anymore yeah and sometimes they have to. Do that right now I wonder I wonder if that's the case with John McCain it might be but That, would be the, worst I think that for I'm just saying for, for me as you know. There's nothing you can do we can, just make the person comfortable and I think that would be the toughest pill for me to swallow if something happened with my mom. Where. Week we've tried everything yeah and when they say we've tried everything It's. Over right right so what do you do when it's over and I'm not talking about death I'm talking about what do, you do. When you finally make the decision we're going to stop treatment that's McCain's, have done well hopefully as. My my separate story my wife's mother, died of cancer they decided to stop treatment and my wife said it was the best couple of months that she could have with. Her. Mom because you're at peace you've accepted Maybe, make, amends, maybe you maybe you get? Everything out on the table because you know time is, limited and in some cases maybe it's better than suddenly going because you have time to make. What, you. Want to say I'm scared to death of having to make that decision for, my own parents I am scared to death if that happens with me? Because how many people want to stand up and say, I'm going to be the one, to tell them mom dad it's. Time to stop right or. What if they tell me I'm going to stop but you're going to be the one to tell them do not resuscitate. Or whatever Wow stopping treatment are you in a situation like this with your parent Were? You are you, currently and what do you do end of life decisions how do you how do you have a family discussion about, the, fact that? We are going to stop treatment on your terminal illness Hard conversation to. Have maybe some of you have had those conversations and, we'll open it up to you.

cancer John McCain chemo multiple myeloma Guinea Wyoming Family
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on WWL

WWL

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on WWL

"Years the couple of years that you've been involved with this type of technology and treatment do you have any stories of folks that kind of testimonials that that offer a glimpse as to how it works oh absolutely we've we of course we have to be careful we don't make medical claims for the blue room but the individual certainly is free to talk about their experience and if they are working with a practitioner who's documenting before and after again it's still an individual case case specific it's not a broad you know study with a felton participants of all age ranges yet that will come in the next year or so and we've had people that had cancer one woman up in montreal who had had cancer ten years ago she went to chemotherapy knocked it back into remission the and her cancer i don't remember i think it was melanoma better don't remember for certain multiple myeloma myeloma multiple myeloma and her cancer came back she went and got so her oncologist say we'll get a search you on chemo again that's a five year process and like oh great alright i hate this stuff it makes me sick my hair falls out you heard about the blue room she started going to the blue room and after i think she did a very intense course with supervision of fourteen sessions in nine days and she went back they checked her her d markers and she was she was back in the normal range and so they did a follow up a month later and her teeth markers i'm guessing id something we're back in the normal range over a period of a month and the doctor said well i think we can take you over chemo four and a half years early keep doing what you're doing so she was very happy that's always a great story we always caution people you know we always say make sure you're doing any of this under the supervision and guidance in consult of your medical professionals and that's part of our licensing processes we require each bloom operation as a part of getting a license to operate and constructively room that they have a physician consultant on they don't have to be on staff you don't have to be there monday to friday day in day out but they have they have to get a physician to sign on to say yes i will be the consultant i'm familiar with phototherapy and ultraviolet sufficient to incorporate into somebody's treatment plan if they're interested in doing that and so for that very reason that feeling is a very individual process disease is a very individual process and certainly we've all learned that there are no magic bullets and panaceas it's a very complex and dynamic field so thank you for emphasizing that has will some michael where do you you all you jay z the rest of the wrath nines ran thi institute go from here well goodness in the blue room we're looking to develop it in in more countries and more states in the us here in the us will probably keep it at the wellness level until we can get the the research facility to conclude some of their studies with the institutional review boards in the university process do you find it hard early do you find it harder in the us to to get these things to work only only because the us medical system is very conservative and rightly so we have no issue with them and even though altogether therapy has been grandfathered in by the fda we want to go through the process of forwardlooking studied 'cause we've collected enough data now to take five or six pathologies where there is low risk to the patient impossibly high benficial outcome and that you don't want pets in you know in the period published literature and overseen by the prescribed research boards here in the us that will go a long way for making it more acceptable in the us medical community and we're working with veterans and and ptsd on an informal level right now here in the state of washington we may be moving working with the state va just at the wellness level will working with some athletes on workout recovery and injuries injury recovery so there's a lot of different directions that the gloom and adjunct technologies can expand in the years ahead and that's very exciting cross take a second and tell us about the school.

five year nine days ten years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"My dad was in vietnam and he was exposed probably to agent orange last chemicals he fixed airplanes mechanic and so in the bomb bays you know he would be reworking their i'm sure there was some sort of residue or something that he picked up at least this is our leading theory and he developed a condition which a lot of men in his he would be like sixty eight now but it was about six years ago six years ago this coming may so next month he developed multiple myeloma and that's so he passed away six years ago and he had been fighting it then for five years multiple myeloma is basically and over an overproduction of certain cells in your bone marrow that kind of overtake everything it's kind of similar to leukemia innocence in that it but it's it's a but it's born of the bone marrow and and it and it resides in the bone marrow and crates all these cystic structures in your bones bones become weak and he was a big heavy lifting laboring guy and was a really great dad and i miss him a lot and and he went through all this treatment and alternately he passed away and on became very frail lost a lot of weight and became a very different picture of my dad but him during that yeah interestingly my first two years in medical were in philly philadelphia and then the second two years where in pittsburg so they had me go to hospital in pittsburgh because i couldn't accommodate all the medical students there so went back to pittsburgh.

vietnam multiple myeloma philadelphia pittsburg pittsburgh leukemia philly six years two years five years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on EconTalk

"Awesome versus a little background i want to hear a little bit about your specialty and and my would is my aloma and how prevalent is it mice specialties multiple myeloma milo is a cancer of plasma sales these are the cells that normally help us fight infection they make antibodies when they become cancerous the condition is called multiple myeloma multiple myeloma cancer that destroys bone causes low blood counts kidney failure and increased risk of infections he defects probably around twenty five to thirty thousand americans each year and the disease has seen a remarkable transformation in domes of new treatment options over the last ten to fifteen years and so what was once a disease that people died an average of three years to forty years is now something that patients can expect to live seven to ten years longer does it strike folks in any particular age it's a disease obey luli patients of most commonly affects patients over the age of sixty five but but you do see about four or five percent of patients less than forty being diagnosed raised with the disease and it's how's it treated right what is the state of the art of treatment right now myeloma is three treated usually with about four cycles of chemotherapy that's about four months of chemotherapy and then typically patients undergo a autologous stem cell transplantation with their own stem cells and then we give some form of maintenance therapy with a pill and you know that goes on until the disease becomes refractory.

multiple myeloma fifteen years five percent forty years four months three years ten years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"You know the mg us is similar to multiple myeloma but it may take years and in certain cases it may never progress and in some cases it might so this is the sort of thing where there's no way of knowing what can occur you know in the immediate or the further down future i think realistically you wanna make sure your immune system is strong tester vitamins minerals hormones get the nutrients on board we have some people who do intravenous vitamin therapy which can help to quadruple their killer cells again based upon traditional medical literature and try to maximize their body strengthened building so that we can see the therapy more healthy more energetic place as opposed to allowing your body to sort of go the way that it would without the nutrients so tala and she she says vitamins could might be the course of it that's that's an absolute lie you can tell her that i said that's an absolute lie there's not a stitch of research in the world that said vitamins for the close of either mg us for multiple myeloma that's the that's a dramatic lie there and i've been looking at research for thirty years that there's nothing that exists in that fashion so she just wants you to not take vitamins which potentially can let your body get weaker she get older make you worse you know it's very unfortunate there are two different times doctrine miss world those that are willing to learn and read and describe information to you and give you knowledge and help you and those who may not you ask her and say show me the research a double blind placebo controlled study that proves that some.

multiple myeloma thirty years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on Ologies

"Ray romano and nicky glaser all these people as they grow how do they all get involved in this well there is a blood cancer called multiple myeloma and peter boyle who played the dad on everybody loves raymond battled it for a number of years in every year in partnership with the international myeloma foundation his amazing family puts on this comedy benefit to raise money for research now my dad also has multiple myeloma so i reached out to imf to see if they need alexa volunteers and i got involved with the benefit that way and was really lucky to be able to take some time of one of the lead researchers in this field before the event and get him in a conference room and pepper him with questions about what he does he was so nice now usually i have listener questions from patrons supporters but today all the questions are furnished courtesy of mr award my dad who is kicking the ass of this particular blood cancer so when my dad was first diagnosed in 2013 i didn't know anything about blood diseases even though oh thirty thousand people year will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma in my uncle also had it now a my parents found out i'm not sure if anyone else who has been affected by any kind of illnesses that has done this but the words multiple myeloma were written on our post given to them by like a nurse to go home gluco the prognosis at that time was two years and i myself curled up in a ball honestly like horsely cried for a few days now it's five years later my dad is still doing well and they have this now faded pink posted note in its tape to their computer desk as a reminder of that was first really terrifying months and also of of a lot of hope and at this comedy benefit a lot of the comedians i talked to had to google the disease some on the car right over there were like our hunter no us which is totally fine for my family personally these words are on our minds every day and the people who are getting up and go and work to find cures for this and other diseases are like celebrities.

nicky glaser multiple myeloma peter boyle raymond Ray romano imf alexa horsely five years two years
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"That basically means what to you the issue run into in cancer research and even in healthcare is the ecosystem is so huge so the great thing that we had in the world of multiple myeloma was it was one cancer so as i started to build out this end to end system in precision medicine and multiple myeloma i was able to do it by saying i'm going to work with the academic centres first now i'm going to bring in the pharmaceutical companies and biotech firms now i need to bring in the community oncologist because they're starting to treat these patients i need to understand fda an nih now i need to understand the pair's how do they want to help his pay for these drugs and of course the patient is always at the center try to keep this entire ecosystem together and then to understand where's the sweet spot that we all can rally around and what are the incentives to drive each of us there the incentives may be different but if we can all agree it's critically important that we can get you there if you could change one thing right now in that world of health care in madison that you think would make the biggest impact what would that chafee patients would know the importance of their own data to them and to finding cures when i often say is patients are on the critical path to finding a cure they don't know if you actually go to the right center and you can get the most basic testing done even basic genomic testing done you will now know more about you deceased just enough.

multiple myeloma pharmaceutical companies madison chafee
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"And then i said why are we need getting more drugs into this disease and it's because it was an orphan disease and we had to make it much more attractive by building their own clinical network not explain what an orphan diseases so an uncommon disease and typically it means that it's not necessarily a space where pharmaceutical company wants to play because there aren't enough patients and so they don't have the scale so they don't make the money on it correct correct and i think many diseases have now shown that pharmaceutical companies can do quite well with orphan diseases um but back then it was really a challenge so when we built our clinical network we said okay we now know the best scientists the centers and we got everybody to work together to do these phase one and two trials you know now today we've done over seventy trials and thirty different drugs at least thirty and ten drugs have now been approved in my aloma so in gather i mean with everybody we've no triple the life span of our patients and you your actual story you ended up getting a stem cell transplant from your sister i did guess how did that all come together the interesting thing in multiple myeloma is there's a phase called smoldering which means you're immune system is trying to hold the cancer in check and back then we didn't know what you did it like it was hard to know the limit of smoldering versus act of disease so as i did my you know second third fourth opinions there's not a lot of consensus on what i should do some people would say go to the strict the transplant right away on a few others said wait and you know even back that it it makes me realise how much the decision can be placed on the patient.

pharmaceutical company pharmaceutical companies multiple myeloma immune system stem cell
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"Company as a whole technology platforms design around what's known as nuclear transport now i know that sounds like it is something to do with handling uranium but in biology terms nuclear transport is about the way cells get instructions from the dna in the nucleus which currently command center messed with carrier proteins and you can totally changed with a cell's doing the most widely studied these is called x peel one and when your cells start going rogue in turning into tumors the carrier poking place a troll and that's where cara former in though working on drugs that can selectively inhibit x peo one wicket in cancer cells in making it more difficult for them to metastasized the company's leaked a therapy is called sonics sore that's s e l i n e exa war is be study fervently from multiple myeloma to lymphoma to ghana collage nagui malignancies particularly unfortunate nasty form of brain cancer so far the data's been pretty good and we're going to be getting some major trial results over the next twelve months emma cower form is an early stage company they did just enroll their first patient face three clinical trial from multiple myeloma which means that if everything goes well the drug could hit the market may be in the next few years now from stuck hasn't been much of a form of late if searched the fourteen and march plummeted back to eat and change may trains nine thousand thirty cents however we know that the larger more stylish politics have been worrying recent months and witness shock leaves some of that strength can trickle down the earlier stage biotech's like this one.

sonics multiple myeloma lymphoma brain cancer twelve months
"multiple myeloma" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"multiple myeloma" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

"About ninety percent had cancer on day three of treatment those receiving respert own or halla parallel both had significantly higher delirium symptoms scores compared to placebo and also required more rescue mmslike them than placebo even more so the hell peril group had decreased overall survival compared to placebo thought perhaps due to prolonged delirium or innocent caught accuse so moral of the story these can be stressful situations for medical staff and family members stick with non pharmacologic strategies for treating this population to avoid worsening delirium and potentially even overall survival and this seems to be in contrast with common care practice right now absolutely particularly with the end of life symptom management article that we just discussed yet i think this is a potentially your practice changer next we have multiple myeloma diagnosis and treatment from doctors michaels and peterson from tacoma washington plasma cell malignancies are insidious and include monoclonal gemap at the of undetermined significance smoldering multiple myeloma and clinical multiple myeloma multiple myeloma as much more common impatience over sixty five and black patients have a twofold higher incidence we care about this because in addition to being a disease with high mortality multiple myeloma can cause hyper viscosity and end organ damage invasive bone disease leads to pathologic fractures bone pain and hyper kelsea mia bone marrow invasion leads to a nimia and immune changes lead to recurrent infection so colina how will patient in our practices with multiple myeloma present patients can present was symptoms or sometimes chest with lab abnormalities lab abnormalities you'll see are kind of as you mentioned the hyper calcium yet pro nouria or anemia you might also see bone lesions on x rays symptoms are often unfortunately pretty nonspecific these can include nausea vomiting malays weakness recurrent infections or weight loss our patients can also present with symptoms of bone disease peripheral neuropathy or hyper viscosity.

delirium michaels peterson multiple myeloma bone disease bone pain recurrent infection peripheral neuropathy tacoma bone marrow ninety percent