20 Episode results for "mouth breathing"

Guided Meditation - Grounding

Balanced Mind with Julie Potiker

14:09 min | 1 year ago

Guided Meditation - Grounding

"Hi it's Julie. Pot occur for the balanced. Mind Meditation Center again. Welcome finding a comfortable seats if you're stay on being just realizing that you'll be standing for about ten eleven minutes if you're lying down that's fine too. Just realize that if you fall asleep you won't be meditating. You'll be napping which if you really need that is fine with me okay. So if you're comfortable with closing your eyes though sure is if you prefer gentle downward soft focus. That's fine too. And we're GONNA take three nourishing breaths and we're going to hold it in for four reading in for four holding it for four breathing out for six going to breathe out your mouth breathing. Your nose Reading in for four four Breathing out for six Breathing in for four four breathing out for six. Now let your breath find its natural rhythm notice for just a few breath cycles where you find your breath most easily. It could be the tip of your nostrils. It's a little cooler breathing in and out could be the rice and all of your or the rise and fall of your belly but one of those places you're seeing and feeling your body breathing in in your body breathing out Slowing yourself down The same time relaxing. Your is releasing any tension in your job imagining smiled the corners of your lips dropping that smile down into your throat neck letting your shoulder blades. Go Down your bat gently dropping matt smile down into your chest taking a few moments to notice what's going on in your heart your heart today dropping down your awareness into your belly and letting your APPs release releasing your hips into what is supporting them relaxing. Your thighs your calves. You're feeds really feeling relaxation. Going down your legs softening your hands you may want to place a hand or hands on your heart or were you find it soothing just as a reminder that you showed up to give yourself this time this care this love space to practice with yourself into practice in community finding your breath Noticing your body breathing you And if and when you want to relax your hands back down into your lap just letting them rest comfortably now imagining from your sit bones and from your feet. If they're on the ground roots extending down through the floor through the foundation into the earth and at the same time nutrients going up the roots into your body. So you're grounded. You're solid but yet flexible held firmly Soft Front really firm back Your torso is like a trunk head and your arms are like the tree tops in the branches. That can move and Ben with what's going on but not break flexible but Straw soft and firm all in one being which is how your human body is down under the earth. Face root systems are vertical and horizontal and the horizontal is connecting us to each other community So we might be swaying bed at the time but we're held firmly in place breathing Trunk into the heart of tree imagining yourself. Being a human being that you are and seeing what this heart needs today. How is this heart today? Giving this heart today a word for your end breath it really would be helpful. This heart today in this human body held in community and strong but yet vulnerable and flexible. You Might WanNa breathe in a word like Ho or peace. Courage strain ease love but something coming in to yourself. That would feel good right now. Let your out breath just be bringing in something deep into your soul Filling yourself up with this fabulous word with your breath. Now you get to choose for your exhale to bestow a gift to either a specific being that you long to sand love to or it could be to all beings or categories of beings that could be frontline workers essential workers. It could be somebody in your life that you wish you could physically be with that. You can't could be somebody who suffered a loss that you wish she could be there to hold and hog but for your out breath. Whatever word you'd like to give. Pc's love hope not forgetting you're taking in a word for yourself so the practices one for me one for you in for me out trio If you've lost track of the exercise you're breathing in a word for yourself out for others and it's just what you need to take in right now for you 'cause you know what your heart needs right now and then it's giving a gift to others. It's loving kindness Now go of all of the words. Staying in the meditation and noticing comes up trying not to attach to any story lines. Just seeing what. Your thoughts feelings and emotions are doing letting it be letting it go Taking in the words of this common Kahlil Gibran called fear. It is sad that before entering the sea or river trembles with fear. She looks back at the path. She has traveled from the peaks of the mountains. The long winding road crossing forests and villages and in front of her. She sees an ocean so vast the to enter. There seems nothing more than to disappear forever. But there's no other way. The river can't go back. Nobody can go back to go back. It's impossible and existence. The river needs to take the risk of entering the ocean. Because only then we'll fear disappear because that's where the river will no. It's not about disappearing into the ocean but of becoming the ocean. There's a roomy quote that I think is appropriate to add right now while you're still contemplating and meditation these words. Roomy said you are not a drop in the Ocean. You are the ocean in a drop. You Might WanNa wiggle your toes and your fingers when you hear the sound of the chime coming back gently into the group Thank you for listening. It's truly pot occur from the balanced line Meditation Center.

Ocean mouth breathing Mind Meditation Center Julie Roomy Kahlil Gibran matt Ho Ben Pc ten eleven minutes
375: How to Breathe the Right Way (& Why It Matters!) With Max Gomez From Breathwrk

The Wellness Mama Podcast

46:49 min | 8 months ago

375: How to Breathe the Right Way (& Why It Matters!) With Max Gomez From Breathwrk

"Bobby podcast. This podcast is sponsored by wellness that's wellness within on the end, my new personal care company that creates products that go beyond just safe and natural to contain beneficial ingredients that nourish your body from the outside end. See many clean products just don't work that well, and this is why I spent the last decade researching perfecting recipes for products that not only eliminate the toxic chemicals but have ingredients that work better than conventional. Alternatives while nourishing your body from the outside in I am so excited to share these products with you and I'm especially proud of our whitening toothpastes which took years of formulating dozens and dozens of rounds of tweaks to finally perfect are whitening. Toothpaste supports healthy, oral microbial, and strengthens to the normal naturally using ingredients like hydroxy, appetite me and green tea instead of fluoride are formula contains green tea leaf extract, which is loaded with antioxidants. Plus we use a fighter chemical green tea that shown to fight bacteria that leads to Tuesday. We combine this with Hydroxy Appetite, a naturally occurring mineral and the main component of Tooth Enamel with clinical studies showing that it can strengthen teeth and avoid cavities, and of course, fresh breath is important when it comes to brushing teeth. So for that, we included peppermint leaf and need. Not Familiar with it Nima prevents bacteria from sticking teeth and turning it to play. So this protective measure means few evac area which leads to fresher breath check out our white new toothpaste along with all of our products including hair care and hand sanitizer at wellness that com that's wellness with a on the end w. e. l., l. n., E. S. E. DOT COM and a tip. If you buy a bundle of subscribe, you get an automatic discount that's built in both of those ways. So check it out while NECE DOT COM for. Today's episode is brought to you by Greens the all in one daily drink to support better health in peak performance. Even with a balanced diet, it can be difficult to cover all of your nutritional basis, and this is where Athletic Greens can help. Their daily drink is essentially nutritional insurance for your body and it's delivered straight to your door. Every month it's developed from a complex blend of seventy-five minerals, vitamins, and whole food ingredients. It's Greens pattern that's engineered to fill the nutritional gaps in your diet. Their daily drink improves your everyday performance by addressing the four pillars of health energy recovery, gut health, and immune support it's packed with. For recovery probiotics and digestive enzymes forgot health and vitamin ZINC for immune support. It's basically an all in one solution to help your body meets attritional meat and it's highly absorbable and diet friendly whether you are Kito Vegan Guilio dairy free gluten free etc is what has less than one gram of sugar and it tastes great and here's how I used. It can still use it when I. Started losing weight I was eating a lot more protein and it became hard to get enough green vegetables in because just it was hard to actually eat enough volume food was full. So I was able to use Athletic Greens to meet my veggie nutritional needs even if I was full and just didn't like eating extra space like a Multivitamin, but it's actually head and shoulders above. A lot of multivitamins they don't use any GMO's or harmful chemicals and it's NSF certified. So they really are careful about their sourcing and what goes into it. When you try Athletic Greens to my podcast, they're also gonNA send you a year supply of their vitamin D three and K two for free I talked about Vitamin D before we get it from the sun, but it can. Also be important to supplement in the winter months. This is something I test my own blood levels of and supplement when necessary, and it combines these nutrients to help sports, Heart Immune System, and respiratory system. Especially helpful this time of year so whether you're looking to boost energy levels, support your immune system or address got health. It's a great time to try. Athletic. Greens for yourself simply. Visit Athletic Greens dot com slash wellness Mama. To claim my special offer today, you'll get a free vitamin D three K. to wellness bundle with your first purchase up to a one year supply of vitamin D as an added value for free. When you try Athletic Greens, you'd be hard pressed to find a more comprehensive nutritional bundle anywhere else again that's athletic greens dot com slash wellness. Hello welcome to the Wellness Mama podcast I'm Katie from almost Mama. Dot. Com and well must dot com my new line of natural personal care products. This episode is all about breathing, which logically is a very important part of our daily lives. We all breathe somewhere between twelve and twenty times. Permanent is a really important obviously part of physiology, but also one of. The better factors that we can optimize to quickly see changes in our health, which makes sense. If you think about it, we eat a few times a day. We drink water hopefully more than a few times a day, but we breathe all day every day. So improving our breathing can have a big impact on our physiology. That's why I'm here with Max Gomez. Who is the CO founder and CEO of a new APP called breath work breath work without the OH. It's a wellness company that teaches people science backed reading exercises and after experiencing debilitating depression and anxiety himself. He discovered the positive benefits of breathing which not only helps his own recovery but improved his life in various other ways and he's now really passionate about. Teaching other people the Science and the benefits around breathing, and that's precisely with this APP dies. It's great for individuals for families and he talks about how you can use different breathing exercises to improve everything from sleep to relaxation to endurance and even how it can help kids so very, very fascinating practical episode and let's jump right in. Max Welcome. Thanks for being here. I'm excited to delve into this topic today because I've always thought that breathing obviously in rank of order of importance should be really high on the scale because we suffer the most consequences the most rapidly if we stopped breathing versus if we stop eating or drinking and I think it often is underestimated just how much breathing makes our overall health all get into my own story noticing changes in my HIV and other metrics when I changed my breathing but you come with a whole host both personal and now other expertise related to this topic. So to start off I would love to hear your story of how you first came to discover this. So a little bit of background on myself I'm originally from New Jersey a small town of four thousand people and growing up. I was Kinda kid you could never attend class and always got so bored easily and because I was different from. I was kind of boil in my early years. So somehow I managed to get myself into college and actually ended up studying neuroscience at the University of Southern California progress that science of consciously did more understand myself why I was different from my peers and it wasn't until I was in college when I got diagnosed with Adhd and then a year later realize had dyslexia on top of that. So it was nice knowing was going on but it didn't really help these things go away and as many people it hits the experience. We get higher levels of stress and anxiety, and that was definitely one of those people who got levels of strip anxiety. So after college I go through some personal things all in the span of three months. So I lose a very close relative me end up a two year relationship and I lose my job and it was crushing and devastating for me and going into that points I was already really focused didn't have control of adhd reminding Zayed's or my stress and so that sent me into this really really low dark point in my life where I actually know spent. An, entire month in bed and was twenty pounds underweight because of the stress and anxiety depression was feeling I just felt completely lost in touch with my body in my mind. I, lacked any sort of control over myself. So it was at that point where I realized I, need help and needed to find solutions for me that could work and I was so fortunate enough to find this crate therapist who was also covered by insurance, which is important to find these days who didn't WanNa, put me on medication but wanted to find alternative ways help my situation so. The first thing you tried to teach me was meditation and like so many other people everyone wants to spire to be a great meditators. But yet the find out is actually really tough to do. It's really hard to stick with the practice of meditation and if you're someone who is anxious, doesn't have a lot of time on their hands. You feel like meditation is really stressful actually So I couldn't get into meditation and I know all the amazing benefits and all the people do meditation respect it so much. But for me personally I really can stick with meditation. so He's all right. We'll try something else and the second thing he taught me was breath work. So simple breathing exercises and I remember sitting on his couch one of those classic therapist's couch and this exercise where breathe slowly into my belly imagining it was a balloon and slowly exhaled for longer than I inhaled and I was on his couch for about thirty seconds doing this exercise and I really start to feel shipped instantly I really felt this wave calm come over my body I felt my heart rate decreasing I felt my muscles relaxing and I was finally clear minded. And it was so life changing in that moment to be able to feel like I could control my body and my mind just with breath alone, and from that point forward, I absolutely fall in love with the practice of breath work and how could pat a positive benefit my life. So I started create this daily breeding practice. We know started with using it whenever we stressed anxious but then formed into waking up with breeding practices to help him come down with practices to go to sleep at practices to increasing my performance of breeding. Practices and I really want to go and study the field of breathing because it was so powerful impactful. So when I went out there to study to steal, I've realized that there were so many other people who were doing these different practices. You have so many diverse groups of people like Navy seals who practice it for high combat situations. If psychotherapist use it with their patients PTSD depression insomnia adhd, you have Olympic athletes using the breadth to improve their endurance and performance and yet Yogi is given practicing brickwork breathing for thousands of years for the. Positive health benefits of it, and it was in this journey of learning and discovering breathing and applying it to myself is that I learned the power ref is really life changing. I learned that breathing is one of the fastest and easiest ways to change the state of your body and mind learned that if we controller breath control and change our lives and it was just amazing to find that was out there and you know the amount of positive benefits, you can see through different practices, include increasing anxiety and stress to improving bledisloe circulation to. Increasing, your meaning response to helping you fall asleep at night improving energy levels endurance and to help improve your attention to, and it's so amazing. The seat the benefits out there. But with this with my story I, saw that there wasn't one place that brought all these practices together and it was really surprising to me because there is so much science behind breath work. There's so much science behind breathing and there's so many people practicing around the world, but it wasn't one central location where people can go and learn practice all these different breathing exercises. So, you know a couple of months after learning about breath work and really started in power my life and push it forward. I went to the APP store to see if anyone created a at around breathing and to my surprise, there's really nothing out there we had those meditation apps like and head space for meditation, but I can stick with those and that wasn't really for me and I thought let's put out put together a breath work APP. So I gave myself a few weeks to put together A. Prototype of pitch deck, a website and Instagram, and I'm like, maybe I will find someone who wants to start this with me as as passionate about breath me luckily after two weeks of doing hard work and put in putting in effort to really get something started. I met Makothe addy who is amazing individual who has an amazing story how she founded breath herself to weaving a nine figure offer on the table for a company that she was about the cell going on a journey around the world to really help. Founder purpose in stomach cross breath work, and she showed me in her phone that a month before she met me, she wrote a note that said credit breath work at. So when I presented her the breath work at that, I was working on creating asked the partner with Mindy and right on the spot we instantly linked up in star the company inc a week later, and then put it on the APP store and it's absolutely kind of amazing to see the response, the uptake of people who have been benefiting. From these exercises we want to create something that was still easy and so accessible, and so science-driven driven that anyone can use it and we're really starting to see that with people who were practicing with the application. There's people know who are seven years old and using for stress and anxiety people who are seventy seven years old to helping prove their endurance lung capacity We had a father right in us the other day who was saying that this helped put his autistic daughter to sleep at night he was. Because we offer this to him, and then we also have people ready into saying, Hey, this is helping me get out of bed in the morning with stress and anxiety from covid. Had someone talking to us who had a stint says loved Zinger APP whenever the feeling really agitated and it's been absolutely amazing to go from the state of feeling. Absolutely had no control in my life to actually discovering something's Patil's breathing and then applying that to my life and then being able to go on fly that. Likes to and it's been extremely grateful journey makes me grateful for this this past up a couple of months. That's awesome. Okay. So I'd love to delve into this. I ends of this a little bit because like I said, I'm like you touched on breathing is one of the biggest inputs we put into our body and so making a change there can make a really dramatic shift in overall health from my own perspective I started doing breathing exercises to help me fall asleep at night including, there's one called four, seven, eight. And then also like box breathing Asana different patterns that call my resting heart rate and seemed to help me get into pair sympathetic and improve my heart rate variability. But I know there's a lot that goes into all of this. So can you walk us through kind of some of the science behind breathing and why these things work? At a great place that shows us the importance of reading. So recently discovered that there was a seventy year longitudinal study, but there were five thousand, two, hundred participants. This indicator of life wasn't action genetics diet or daily Madame exercise someone cut it was lung capacity and breeding mechanics. So the better you breathe in the more you can control your breathing. The longer you actually live is what the showing. So it's really important to understand breathing and how works to. So one way that breathing works as an accident on nervous system and the dog never system is was responsible for a heart rate for breathing. Or skin temperature digestion, and it was previously thought that we couldn't control these things that are automatic. Nervous system was just something that happens and it was something that we're to be influenced by US. that's why they call it the autonomic nervous system because on automatic. But what happens with breathing is that since you are since breathing is a part of the nervous system can actually send a signal to your brain to change the Never, system in response. So as you know that many people today exist in state of sympathetic nervous system spots. So they're basically in a sympathetic state, which is the fight or flight state. So either increased levels of stress and anxiety their shallow breathing breathing fast heart rates high their blood pressures. They're feeling nervous agitated, and that's what happens nearness sympathetic state for too long and what you can do with breathing's you could actually change the sympathetic state into a pair sympathetic state, which is the rest and digest state. So by breathing slow and ride breathing even with your diaphragm, you can actually start the church your body and put it into sympathetic state because you know if you follow if you do something if you do this practice of reading slow, then your body tends to follow it and there's also a lot of respecters for never system which are deeper in your lungs to. Breathe slow deep into your lungs. You can actually start to send a signals back to your brain that Hey, I'm actually interested and calm state right now and by breeding like you're in a calm state, you will send a signal back in the body and put you in that calm state and that's why there's so many breathing exercise that help with people with Zaidi because when people have anxiety, they're they're breathing extremely fast breathing shallow but the worst thing to do with anxiety is try to breathe more. It's actually you WanNa breathe slowly and you WANNA breathe the less breathing more slow in control your breathing. Through, anxiety helps really lower that response when you're having it and also there's a lot of breathing for sleep at night. So you mentioned the four, seven, eight breath, which is an amazing created by Dr Andrew Wheel and What it does is it Kinda mimics the breeding pattern of someone who's in the deep sleep. So by mimicking this breathing pattern, it puts you into that state and actually makes trick your pie to think that you're falling asleep or you sleep. So you tend to be able to doze off pretty easily because of that. So that also acts on the Paris nervous system really helps. Lower, your heart rate, lower blood pressure, and clear mind, and also just the act focusing on breath itself to helps clear mind of the other thoughts that may be happening when you're more at the state and then with breath work, there's also the flip side of it too. So this breath work that you can do to actually help energize you help creepy keep you focused and increase your endurance. So with breathing, you can actually activate the sympathetic state when you want to. So if you wake up in the morning and you're feeling groggy, you're trying out of bed, there's amazing exercise you can do to actually. Help. Put you in a more alert focused state and also exercises. You can do over time which can actually increase during difference. So there's a lot of athletes who train with high of Asian who trained in high location to help increase their endurance but there's actually breathing exercise. You can do here at sea level also increase your endurance increase production of red blood cells, which helps increase the offloading of oxygen tear yourselves neater body onto all these amazing benefits behind reading the scientists is quite amazing and There is so much extensive research stays behind it and there's more and more coming out every single day. There's a great book by James so that really goes into the signs and the history behind breathing what happens to the body when you breathe properly what happens when you don't breathe properly and they're all these risks that happen to your yourself. If you do not properly one big thing that people do wrong with their breathing is at the breathe through their mouth. So if you really WANNA start to get into your breathing and to really improve your life at pretty big one place to start is by breathing through your nose. So fifty percent of the population are actually mouth breeders and mouth. Breathing is actually associated with a huge amount of risk increase cardiovascular issues decrease the cognitive functioning decrease loves of circulation decrease levels, auction efficiency, and mouth reading is actually one of the quickest ways to actually start improving your health quickly with spreading alone, and the reason why is because when you breathe through your nose, you're actually moisturizing that air coming in and you had this amazing gas called nitric oxide, which is being produced. The nasal cavity helps with blood circulation with auction efficiency and also cognitive functioning. So when you're breathing your mouth, you're actually not getting the benefits of nitric oxide, your nose. And you're also by green through mouth more. You're closing nasal cavity more because if you don't use your nose than you will kind of lose that and you're nasal cavity will start to shrink. So by breathing through your nose more, you actually opened up your nasal cavity more. So people who are chronically congested should really try to practice breathing through the nose more or to get their tabby opened up more able to take more auction. Through their nose and had the amazing benefits from nitric oxide, which is exist in the nose results have been studies that show that the people who pre through their mouth have decreased circulation in the prefrontal CORTEX and prefrontal Cortex is responsible for your decision making for your focus and is really associated people with Adhd and shown that some people who suffer with Adhd had huge amounts of positive benefits from actually breathing through the nose and. Their nose debris at night too. So there's amazing benefits with sprinting knows alone and also we lose forty percent of our water when you put your mouth. So someone who's a chronic mouth breather tend to be more dehydrated water stay hydrated, which is complete fascinating to to think that something as simple as breathing through your nose bring your mouth can really have a positive health benefit on you. That's fascinating. I know I've read some data about the problems with mouth breathing I've read a lot from the even the. Oral Health Perspective that you put yourself more at risk for cavities because the mutant bacteria that leads to cavities can be much more opportunistic with the mouth when it's dry and so breeding your mouth especially at night can lead to problems there. There's also studies talking about the link with sleep apnea are we able to retrain our body to knows breath using active techniques like this? I know I've also seen you know kind of extreme measures like taping the mouth shut, but is it can we consciously like learning better habits? When it comes to this yes. So I think the first step is really being conscious of your breathing and being aware of how you're breathing the first way to really do this instant disparate properly and feel how good it feels breathe properly. So start breathing more diaphragm and using your stomach to breathe. So a way to think about your breathing and every breath should be taken in through your nose into your stomach with your stomach being pushed out on the inhale and then collapsing back flat on the exile and that. Helps Work Diaphragm to get your diaphragm moving with the yield to your. It's recommended that you breed at bigger knows to so weak by going to these practices, you can even start five ten minutes a day just breathing theory knows and into your belly and out slowly the're knows you'll start to really feel the benefits of breathing and you also start to slowly open up your nasal cavity can breathe your nose more often the biggest thing is to become more conscious of your breathing and how you're breathing throughout the day. And you mention mouse taping, which is something that I actually start up on studying more breathing is that We often open their mouths at night and the okra amounts at night. We're actually obstructing the Airways and by tricking the airways, we actually tend to store more we get less oxygen and we also losing more water and we're not getting the oxide read their nose. So mouth taping, which is small pieces of medical tape across your mouth and night with a holes. In each end just in case you at the breather, rip it off or heat at night actually has a huge benefit. If you take your mouth at night, you could wake up in the morning feeling great because you read through your nose, the entire night that's fascinating and it reminds me of something that I think might actually overlap with something you said about. Breathing knows and improving something that would relate to exercise. So I've recently. Been Training at a local facility where they do something called Contra lateral training basically, it was designed to increase aerobic capacity even for non distance runners and non-sprinters, but for other types of athletes and The part of this is you tape your mouth shut during this kind of circuit based exercise. So you are only breathing through your nose and they see really kind of drastic changes. In aerobic capacity from this so is that kind of along as they winds is what you're talking about yeah exactly. Along the same lines. So with nose breathing, we actually have better oxygen efficiency, which means that we're at better co two nitric oxide, the inner blood in your body. So Co two is most people think as a byproduct of breathing you the auction dot co two. But. See Ot was actually responsible for helping your red blood cells auction to their cells and Co two is also an amazing vasodilator to so helps increase circulation. So if you're breathing your mouth a lot, you're actually expelling way more co two than you should be. So that's why recommends a brief your nose during exercise? So you are building up more co two in your body so. You have a better option efficiency and exchange of oxygen through your blood with the CO to end with nitric oxide in your body and what most people don't realize is that when I start to exercise through your nose, it's pretty tough but that's because your body has to adjust to the bass amounts of co two that that it's not used to. So when you have a Low Tolerance to co two you actually get winded pretty quickly and one way to actually help with your endurance in the short term is actually to increase your tolerance to co two. So the amount of time you can breed slower while running the amount of time, you can hold your breath four indicator retards co two, and by increasing these things, we could actually increase our ability to. Slower, breeding down when we're running and when we're we're we're exercising and increase the auction efficiency within your blood. That's pretty quick way to do it, and over time as you start to increase your tolerance to co two and start breeding more slow, you actually increase the red blood cell production. So increases thing EP of which is responsible for helping red blood cells produce the bone marrow and By doing slower breathing and holding your breath for longer, you actually increase the amount of red blood cells you have in it stimulates very similar survivor similar results as people who are trading in high elevation situations. So by breathing through your nose breathing slow and be more aware that you're actually able to increase endurance in the short term and then also increase red blood cell production the long. Term, which is pretty fascinating. Think about that something as slowing your breathing down can help because we think that when you're out of more but the problem is when you breathe more, you're actually expelling so much co two from your body that you're actually not able to get this auction that you're trying to prevent more to yourselves. So it's all about building up a tolerance zero two. So fascinating and it makes sense because I noticed that when it comes to like running distances which I'm not a fan of anyway I always felt like it was my lung capacity that would catch me before my legs will get tired just need more felt like I needed more air and since doing this kind of training I feel like I would actually my legs more efficiently because I don't get winded I don't run out of breath easily even with sprinting. Doing long distance workouts anyway. But I've noticed a big difference in my lung capacity and that's fascinating. It makes complete sense when you kind of explain the physiology about that. This podcast is sponsored by wellness that's wellness with the end, my new personal care company that creates products that go beyond just safe natural to contain beneficial ingredients that nourish your body from the outside Eh. See many clean products just don't work that well, and this is why I spent the last decade researching and perfecting recipes for products that not only eliminate the toxic chemicals. But the have ingredients that work better than conventional alternatives while nourishing your body from the outside I am so excited to share these products with you and I'm especially proud of our whitening toothpastes which took years of formulating dozens and dozens of frowns of tweets to finally perfect. Our Whitening toothpastes supports healthy oral microbiome and strengthens to the NAM naturally using ingredients like hydroxy appetite. And Green. Tea. Instead of fluoride are formula contains green tea leaf extract, which is loaded with antioxidants plus we'll use a fighter chemical in green tea that shown to fight bacteria that leads to tooth decay. We combine this with Hydroxy Appetite, a naturally occurring mineral and the main component of to animal clinical studies showing that it can help strengthen teeth and avoid cavities, and of course, fresh breath is important when it comes to brushing teeth. So for that, we included separately and knee, you're not familiar with. It Nima prevents bacteria from sticking to teeth turning into plaque. So this protective measure means fewer bacteria which leads to fresher breath checkout our whitening toothpaste along with all of our products including hair care and hand sanitizer at wellness that com that's wellness with you on the end W. E. L. L. N. E. S. S. E. DOT COM and hugh by a bundle or subscribe you get matic discount that's built in both of those ways. So check it out while NECE DOT com today's showed is brought to. You by Athletic Greens the all in one daily drink to support better health and peak performance. Even with a balanced diet can be difficult to cover all of your nutritional bases and this is where Athletic Greens can help. Their daily drink is essentially nutritional insurance for your body and it's delivered straight to your door. Every month it's developed from a complex blend of seventy five minerals, vitamins, and whole food ingredients. It's patter that's engineered to fill the nutritional gaps in your diet. Their daily drink improves your everyday. Performance by addressing the four pillars of health energy recovery got health and immune support. It's packed with adapted for recovery probiotics and digestive enzymes forgot health and vitamin C. and zinc for immune support. It's basically an all in one solution to help your body made its attritional needs and it's highly absorbable and diet friendly whether you are Kito Vegan Halio dairy free gluten free etc is has less than one gram of sugar and it tastes great and here's how I used it and still use it when I Started losing weight I was eating a lot more protein and it became hard to get enough Greens and vegetables in because just it was hard to actually eat enough volume of food I was full. So I was able to use Athletic Greens to meet my veggie nutritional needs even if I was full and just didn't feel like eating extra, it's basically like a Multivitamin, but it's actually head and shoulders above a lot of multivitamins. They don't use any demos or harmful chemicals and it's NSF certified. So they really are careful about their sourcing in what goes into it. When you try Athletic Greens my podcast, they're also GONNA send you a year supply of their vitamin D three and K two for free. Talked about vitamin D before we know we get it from the signed, but it can also be important to supplement especially in the winter months. This is something I test my own blood levels of and supplement when necessary, and it combines these nutrients to help support the heart immune system in respiratory system, which is especially helpful. This time of year so whether you're looking to boost energy levels, support your immune system or address got health it's. A great time to try Athletic Greensburg yourself simply visit Athletic, Greens, dot com slash wellness Mama declaim my special offer today you'll get a free vitamin D three K. to bundle with your first purchase that's up to a one year supply of vitamin D as an added value for free. When you try athletic grades, you'd be hard pressed to find a more comprehensive nutritional bundle anywhere else. So again, that's athletic greens dot com slash almost. Mama. I'm curious I know you working with a lot of people through this APP and through the development on changing their breathing I'm curious some of the ways that you've seen this change people's lives obviously I would guess in instances like that. But what other areas do you see changes in people's lives from changing breathing? So I one of the biggest changes is just people who suffer from. And separate from levels of stress and depression. So when you start to breathe with our application, we teach these exercises that really helped you calm down and become more aware that you're in control of your body, and that's when the biggest things that we tend to think that in control over minded body. But with breathing week become more in control of that. So by having the breath work with. The when you're Schumi highly anxious state, you can start to train yourself to be in control and debris even slow down breathing in order to slow on your heart rate and to increase your levels of communists and increase your ability to be present in the moment. So that's where it really starts to help people. We've seen a lot of or write in talk about how this really helping with their. Depression get up in the morning. It's helping with their anxiety when they're going for meeting a lot of people use it with their family at dinner to help everyone read on the same pace because when everyone's breathing same rate, you start to sync up your heart beets except the sink out by the energy within the room to bring people to this one granted place, and then we have other. People who are saying that this this exercise help getting the best of my life. So people are now who or insomniacs are now breathing like this every night to go sleep, and then if you do wake up, agreed to put themselves back to sleep and are saying that they're really starting to see amazing improvements in their lives and we we didn't launch the APP to Longo Willing lost in. In November. But since then we have people who are on over one hundred day streaks on the platform who absolutely cannot know wake up or go sleep without it because it does have to deposit benefit with them, and then like I mentioned before we have people ready in who use it their kids to a lot. So we have some mothers who use it with a kid when he has a panic attack or Winston frustrated with school, and then we also have a father. Daughter to help put her to sleep at night who suffers from autism in HD and he says really helping benefit them too. So we have people from all walks of life and backgrounds who could benefit breathing because there are so many breeding practices out there to do to benefit from and it's a soak setting that You know we have one place to put them all, and we have one place a show on the science of the show. How it works in your body, give you this. Amazing. You know full sensory experience when you the exercise with the APP, we have these amazing sounds that were created by this Grammy Award winning. Artists DJ white. Shadow we have vibrations, help guide you which he threw it, and then we also had really simple visuals at this help you focus on the breath because reading is so so easy but it's done wrong all the time and we WANNA make it easy for people to do it right and The APP we made us cold experience of family get to where he walked with a single click when when crevice I wanted my grandmother to be able to use it and I want everyone from five to use it, and because it's so simple. So easy in set point were able to get all these diverse users who all love it, and who are who are funding amazing benefits across their lives as incredible as it are there specific ways your stories you've heard of people using this with kids because sadly, we hear that anxiety is on the rise even for kids and certainly the last few months. Seem like they could have increased anxiety across the board for all age groups. Are there what examples you have people using this? You mentioned like family dinners are there other ways specific to kids that we can use this? Yes. So thick creating a practice with your kid is really helped beneficial and showing your kid the positive benefits at breeding slowly when you're in a stressful situation so we have this mother who? Actually gives her child her phone when he is really stressed out early. Fussy and you know is is not feeling stressed from worker that worked from school or from his classmates and when he gets the APP is able to breed with it and to really feel the effects of it and to calm himself down she says that she uses us all the time with him and it's really been helping him. Become more relaxed, and then also helping him over time become less stress and less anxious because the more you practice breathing the more you're with their breathing, the more that you breathe in a slower more proper fashion. So We also have, Kiko the monkey, who's one of our mascots who breathes in out with you to she'd WanNa, choose him, and it's great to to use that with kids because he could read this cool looking monkey and that's really one way that we're able to get to younger people. Awesome. I'm also always curious about kind of the idea, the minimum effective dose. So you made a pretty strong case for why obviously breathing is important and the way we can drastically our lives through breathing. What would you say is the minimum effective dose for something like the breath work at how much of this do we need to do to start seeing results? So you could start seeing results pretty quickly, and that's really what led me to breathing in the first place is that it is something that happens very fast. So if you are someone who has stressed and is looking for relief from stress, just doing a two minute exercise is kind of will help you get to the point of being more calm. And sticking with it for five minutes to eight minutes will also help you stay more calm overtime to just getting into it, feeling it, and then adjusting for how much in need is really the best way to do it, and then by creating a practice daily practice over time of being more aware in control your breathing and doing exercises the. Yukon down a wake you up for you to sleep. You can start to really benefit from it in the short term because it works very fast than over the long term start to really see the relationship health benefits from it had to do I want to circle back and learn a little bit more about co two tolerance because I think when it. Comes to breathing people often just think of oxygen and that's of course they put people on in the hospital when they are having trouble breathing. But the little bit that I've researched the CO two component is equally important. It's not like you said it's about that ratio not just oxygen in. So can you explain a little bit more that science and how we can? Harness that to our advantage yet. So you can build your tolerance up to co two by breeding more slow and began to hold your breath for longer and by breathing more slow you're actually get more tolerant of CO two over time. So the more you could slow down your breathing and the Morgan gets a six to five breath submitted the better efficiency. Balance You have co two an auction within your body advocate balanced have increased levels of circulation and you have increased auction efficiency. So your rent blood cells can offload oxygen to their cells in your body more efficiently because you have more co two and you get balance to co two in auction in your body. So that's really one way that the tolerance works. By building this over time, you really start to feel the effects of it and to you know be a more calm and relaxed state someone who has more tolerant to co two is actually less stress and less anxious because when you are anxious, you tend to feel like you can't read and that feeling of can't breathing actually your intolerance co two within your. Body when you're able to train yourself, tolerate Marcio to you kind of lesson that effects of the anxiety you get with when you can't beat and that's why it's really important to be hyper aware of your breathing in all the time and always remember to breathe through your nose and breathe slow in through your diaphragm and really pay attention to your breathing throughout. The. Day because if you start to breed more shallow in are unaware of it, you tend to decrease tolerance co two, which can help put you into that stressed and anxious state is recurring cycle. So it's great to really go into practice breath work in practice breathing daily basis or to help build up your tolerance co two to get you in a less. Stress anxious throughout the day Mary. Cool. So talk a little bit more about the detail of the APP. Of course, I'll make sure there's a link in the show notes for you guys to download it or it's available in the APP store What are you finding people are using this for the most in what kind of getting based on the most user cases? Yeah. So it's really exciting when we first started to see the usage of the APP we saw we thought that it'd be one use case we thought it would only be calming exercises. But what we realized is that it's pretty equally distributed across the different benefits we have. So our number one exercises sleep, which really helps people asleep at night and the number two exercises awake. So it's able to get people up in awaken energize and alert in the morning. And then the third most exercises calm. So it's a calming exercise helps which you know more since the Paris, pathetic state and then the fourth one is recharged that box breathing it's based off the navy seal breathing, which helps you know, put you in a more relaxed and calm focus state and also can help increase charge co two. So we're seeing a pretty equal distributions of the use cases within the application and we're seeing. People come in whether it be Alpha male looking to increase endurance comes in for. Something, an exercise helps increase the to tolerance, but then the end up using becoming exercise or the sleep exercise will we have the other way where we have someone who is really anxious looking for a way to calm down and the common for the calming exercises but then they realize the sleep exercise and then they realize the energize exercise, the awakening exercises. So it's been fascinating to see the users coming in for one specific reason, and then staying with it for multiple different reasons, and then creating a daily practice based on what they need and where they're at. That is so cool on. Let's talk a little bit more about heart. Rate. Variability. Touched on this a little bit I mentioned that I saw changes in that when I started being more cognizant of my breathing, there's also a science data that support this if someone is interested in improving heart variability. White type of breathing exercise would you point them toward? So to the best breathing exercises for variability are coherent breathing that's pretty equal pattern. So breathing either for six seconds sentences six seconds out or eight seconds in a second south. So helping breed at that rate really helped heart ability and then the other way is by breathing more slowly on the exile also helps Attribute Arabia ability. So breathing in for four seconds. And then breathing out for eight seconds or breathing for six seconds is one way to do it and it's always helpful to remember to read with your belly and when I start teach people breathing and when they come into the APP, we always teach them to put a hand belly when they're breathing. So they can feel themselves reading properly when doing it because that's the best way to get the most results from it. At it. Okay. That makes sense. Is there any science guest based on the different programs in the APP? Obviously the sleep ones are best on pre sleep other than that is, is there any science about the best time of day or the best environment to do these different types of breathing exercises? Yes. So there are a few times a day is in environments these exercises. The ones that are more in the APP we have them all yellow they're more winning in the more sympathetic and they're more energizing more focus. Those are best done within the morning. So their best done to wake you up and get you into bed get you going and then the calming ones are best done throughout the day too. So if you're at work in your our in. Anxious. You can still calming exercise helps you feel relaxed in place, and also if you are someone who doesn't WanNa, get that energy boost in the morning but once more common morning, you can also replace your morning instead of with yellow exercise with the economy exercise, which is green exercises. So using that in the morning and figuring out what works for you is how you can really start to benefit from these exercises and then with something like sleep, it's obviously best used at night before going to sleep or preparing for sleet and then something wore like the recharge breath in the red section, which is more focused on endurance and energy that's best use before or after exercise. I have new city at, but I'm going to give all of those try I think I've already done some of the ones the mentioned in the four, seven, eight, I've done pre sleep. It's helpful I'm looking at the APP now to have a visual that helps you do it. I could see especially for kids why this would be so helpful than trying to just count with them and explain to them because they have something tangible to follow, which is amazing as we get close to the end of our time couple somewhat unrelated questions that I love to ask I all. There is a book or a number of books that have really influenced your life and if so what they are and why? this to really important books influence my life one is the obstacles the way by Ryan holiday, and it's kind of a book. That's. About dealing tough situations and finding power within these tough situations and talks about no controlling your perspective and controlling your minds and I think that's why attract to that book was because it really helped me. Feel more control of my life and then adding the caucus breath work on top of that really helped me in power by life. So does one amazing book that was more than mindset side of things. I really don't mind in my life and then another amazing book which became probably favorite books right now since it was released two months ago is breath. and. It's called breath the new science, a lost art by James Nester and James. Nestor. Is a journalist WHO's studying breathing for the over eight years and he goes into the history of breathing. He goes to the science of reading and really makes an amazing case for why you should be paying more attention to your breathing why breathing is more important and how? Society is a little bit lagging behind with all the positive benefits of it, but you know we really see breathing becoming a bigger industry within the future and we see more people are taking control of breathing and be more aware of the breathing not going anywhere. But actually getting bigger over time in this one book was great for me to help the understand more of the science behind it into to know the history behind it to. I love that. I'll make sure those are linked in the show notes and also of course, I'll make sure we linked to breath work on like I said at the beginning I think this is such an important topic to bring awareness to because of all the inputs that we have in our life. We eat several times a day depending on if we intervene it faster or don't, and we drink water more times a day that but we breathe I. Think it's twelve to twenty times per minute. So making a change to our breath can make a much bigger were rapid change to our health than even improving things like diet, which is also very important of course and sleep an exercise and I love that you guys have turned into such a practical system and It's exciting to see you're already hearing such great results from Abuser. So thanks for the time and for sharing the science with us today. So much for having me and thanks as always to you for listening and sharing your most valuable asset your time with us. We're both so grateful that you did and I hope that you will join me again on the next episode of the Wellness Mama podcast. If you're enjoying these interviews would you please take two minutes to leave a rating or review on I tunes for me? Doing. This helps more he to find the podcast which means even more moms and families can benefit from the information. I really appreciate your time and thanks as always for listening.

Athletic Greens nose breathing mouth breathing WanNa Adhd NECE DOT com NSF James Nester Depression Paris
The Secret to Better Sleep (Minisode #11)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

27:31 min | 8 months ago

The Secret to Better Sleep (Minisode #11)

"Coming up on this week's mini episode of the broken bring podcast sleep apnea is the most. Severe form of this condition airway and oxygen deprivation. Mets when we posed during Ten to twenty, second the You Count Ten to twenty seconds in you on your hand. That's what people are doing upper thirty to forty times from not and that's your brain in deep distress and so this is how we increase the risk of out Tom if the dementia and mental decline hide one droop road here host of the Brooke. Marine podcasts do you know one of the most important nutrients you need for healthy teeth and a healthy body? Well, when you hear nutrient, you're probably not thinking of oxygen but oxygen is by far our bodies most precious commodity you simply can't live without it and. Any kid in grade school can tell you that. But we all know that even though oxygen is important. What we don't know is many of us are not getting enough of it especially at nighttime and that's primarily due to our poor breathing habits who would have thought that human beings would have had to be taught how to breathe but actually we do and I'm not talking about Yoga breathing or meditation breathing which those things are important to I'm talking about. Learning to correctly breathe through your nose. So you properly create nitric oxide, which is crucial in the oxygenation of our bodies. In this mini episode, I speak with Friends of Mine and dentist Dr Steven Lin, and Dr Mark Per Henna about how the bad habit of mouth breathing where you literally are breeding through your mouth night. especially instead of through your nose reduces the quality of your sleep disrupts the balance of our oral microbiome end makes you more prone to. Decay all from breathing from your mouth instead of your nose crazy. We discuss sleep apnea and Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome. It's a thing and how it impacts our brain health. All the stuff actually literally impacts our brain because our brain thrives on oxygen. When we don't get enough of it, our brains going to be impacted. We also talk about the benefits of mouth taping a process where you literally are training your body to now start breathing through your nose instead. Of your mouth, it sounds creepy but I've done it and it actually works. So we discuss about Mao taping more. You're really GonNa love this mini episode. So let's listen in starting with my interview with dentist Dr Steven Lin a world leading functional dentists base in Australia Tax Speaker and author of the International Number One bestselling book the Dental Diet is so let's talk about nighttime breathing during sleep and what the differences of breathing through your nose versus breathing your mouth. And what that has to do with our our oral health. Right. Yeah it ends. The same of this talk we've been having his. Teacher important will take taught me something very important about what we need, how fade our bodies and that the crucial nutrients your body will tell you when you're missing the critical factors. Bottom and nutrient needs the thirst in the mail and the first nutrient that your body needs. You can only go minute without it is oxygen and so. In mouth, we can see when not breeding with delivering enough oxygen to our our body and how this translate to add dental health is that as we mentioned before when agile is done developed promptly when we have been narrow up gloomy have risen, tasted done fit that's the back of the magazine and mandible the upper low joel the done developed that is by definition airway space, and so what that does is it pushes us into. What I like to call survival braiding, and what happens is that we are designed to break through the nose and there's some very deep. Raisins for that. In that in the nose, we released nitric oxide which mixes with the air goes into our lung and increases blood flow and pushes auction right throughout the body. Now, when we have crooked up-to-date and the hi pal, we have nasal sinuses that have a low of volume and we don't breath around knows as well as we would when we have nice and central wide jaws. Lovely Watch faces. So what happens is that we learned to break through Mao and this is delivering coal unfiltered there. That's alert air immune system gives us things, Swanson's and Adenoids but what happens is we don't deliver so oxygen and the most crucial part of this is that the mice hungry that the patio body requires auction is the brain and so when you're a breathing correctly, you're starving your brain of oxygen. And so this can happen through the day. You'll bring me through the mail seventy, five percent of the time. Your brain isn't getting enough oxygen. But when you go to sleep, there's one thing you have to do, and that's brief and deliver your brain oxygen and the reason for this is that when you go into deep levels of sweep, your brain is depending on your breathing pattern to take your nervous system into his. Level sleep that then allows himself to clean now and so oxygen and braving patents or what control that. So if you have the small crowded mouth with and you not comfortable with Nicer braiding, you'll then pushing your brain into survival mode during during slate and so as you mentioned, sleep apnea sleep apnea is the most the most severe form of this condition of airway and oxygen deprivation, and that's when we posed. During slave to ten to twenty seconds, the You Count Ten to twenty seconds in you on your hand. That's what people are doing up to thirty or forty times the not, and that's your brain in deep distress, and so this is how we increase the risk of Alzheimer's Disease Dementia and mental decline because we're not giving us a brain opportunity to regenerate and to replenish itself with the the crucial nutrient on. And where I was sharing earlier in the interview is that we typically think of like the you know if anybody has a family member or know somebody diagnosed with sleep apnea we typically think of somebody as. Being usually quite overweight. The one of the things you started noticing and hearing about from some of your colleagues is that there's a whole group of younger. Men But especially women that were coming in. With sort of these symptoms of anxiety like waking up in the morning with anxiety and Tell us how that also relates to this breathing through the nose versus breathing through the mouth. Absolutely. So when we started to talk about the spectrum sleep disorders, now we see obstructive sleep apnea is at the very very severe and but what they found in the nineties at Stanford, a Research Co. Christian. Gilmer found that there was a group who've is patients that's showed positive results for a mandibular advancement splint, which is a dental sleep device. That didn't that were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and what he did was he called it. New. Syndrome called Airway Resistance Syndrome and it's not a recognized medical term yet. But there are many many studies and lots of research out there showing that people with upper airway resistance, syndrome, which is exactly what it sounds like. It's an airway that has more resistance. So Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome is characterized by an increased pressure in the airways and. How this happens in the body is that when we sleep your muscles relax and that increased pressure is detected by the Brian is receptive at the back you threatening the Airways the tell the brain what the pressure is. Now we have a small bone structure and the muscles relax. What happens is the brain is constantly being sick these precious signals and it relates to a choking response. So the brain has been sent into fight of what? Response, and so this is a survivor when these wackle survivals sleep, and so what happens is that your brain will respond by pushing the Joel Ford and so the most common sign of Airway resistance in Jeremy Teeth grinding and we say this in the Dental practice busy look. But what happens is that people may not even notice that they have the syndrome. You know they slave they wake that I feel that rested. It's because your body doesn't get to reach date levels of slate and so when the brain is in part of its sympathetic mode, it doesn't get to relax in slave should be going to date para sympathetic mode to go into rem. Sleep, which then helps the brand Clinton self out. There's like a dishwashing effect happening in the brain with cerebrospinal fluid washes through the whole brain cleese at all the toxins and they sound the happens day rem sleep. So you'll know braiding property the brain doesn't get that opportunity to go through that self cleaning process. So what happens is you wake up, you don't feel rested you feel a bit anxious. Because you're sympathetic notice in has been activated when it should be deeply rested, you'll digestive system doesn't work because the vagus nerve in the Paris empathetic nervous system doesn't get activated as it should and you digest what you get the justice issues. So all of a sudden we see people with these chronic digestive problems sometimes the Jesse paralysis, we see them with anxiety depression we see them with teeth grinding. We headaches we see them with aches and pains in joints, and this is all people that will go to have a sleep study. They'll say Dr, I'm not sleeping very well, they'll get an say well, we'll give you a sleep sightedness and the results come back and say they don't have obstructive sleep apnea that's a policeman, the growth. But what they do have is that they'll have respiratory effort arousal. Periods Mesa. Cold R. E. R., S. rearers, and so the result will show that they have these arouse appears that are characteristic of upper, Airway Resistance Syndrome, and the people risk of the syndrome as anyone that doesn't have a Joel that's developed very to taste. So if you've had braces. Previously. In Your Life if you had your wisdom teeth out Ibi sleep on your stomach. You've had any kind of In kids, we seek his mouth breathing through the day and mouth breathing it not rec- bed wedding. We see anyone that's a little bit anxious and don't sleep well. The. Big thing to watch the kids other shadowing the odds sleep. Well, that's a big on this is happening and this is all assigned through that we're not sleeping well and the brains. In really distress balk surgeon and so we need to get back to one diagnose the problem then get us back to breathing properly and so it's there's a whole area of dentistry call my functional therapy where we learn to use the tongue in break through the nose and The principles of Yoga where we breed into the diaphragm and something about the tongue. which is hoping itself but. When your tongue is hosted to the roof of the Palette, it actually sends Paris pathetic nervous system messages back to the brain and so if you don't have your tongue posture to the Palette. Than you don't get those misses from the start and these contributes to this whole oil dysfunction braving dysfunction that flows on to a brain that is at risk of Alzheimer's disease as we now have literature that shows that obstructive sleep apnea significantly increases both outside disease dementia and the mechanism is is quite simple. If you deprive people of oxygen, what do you think's GonNa Happen to the neurosurgeon going to degenerate, and so where we now have a population of paypal the raiders? And it's old sated jaws and we can fix it. The good news is we can fix now that we understand it we just need to take the mouth and breathing and the whole body into a can't. Everyone it's true I wanNA. Give a quick shot out to my new venture pharmacy and our latest product launch the P. Shake how you start your morning sets the tone for the day. I'm a huge fan of morning routines because I think they can transform your ability to focus sleep well and get the most out of your day. Especially, this busy modern world but I often hear from people from this podcast my friends who feel like they don't know how to start the day off to set themselves up for success. What I've found is one of the best ways to begin your day is to. Feed your body the right information or the right nutrients I want to set an intention for the day practicing mindfulness but then you WanNa feed your body the right information the right nutrients. That's why Dr Hammond and I created the pagan shake in our latest venture pharmacy it's nutritionally packed morning blend that's designed to support healthy blood sugar energy and brainpower if he's your similar most favorite brain boosting like mcat and avocado oil, it also features organic Keisha Fiber for healthy gut function grass-fed college in an organic pumpkin and pea protein to support muscle synthesis there's never been a shake like this on the market That's literally why we created it because we couldn't find anything like it I think you're gonNA love it check it out at get pharmacy dot com. That's GATT pharmacy with an F. F. ARM AC y dot com slash vegan shake. Now let's get back to today's episode. Have you heard of mouth taping if you're like most people that idea of taking your mouth shut while you sleep sounds well alarming or something out of a horror movie but as it turns out, mouth taping might just be the key to a restful night of sleep and so much more. Dr Mark Henna a practicing sleep medicine dentists. In Sunnyvale California and author of the Number One bestselling book that eight hour sleep paradox talks to us about now taping as a solution to mouth breathing and how can improve our sleep our overall health, and especially our brain health when you're talking about people mouth breathing. So imagine you're sleeping at night, you're talking to somebody who has their mouth open and is just breathing through there. So now let's talk about the sort of solution side of it, which is you are somebody who is a big encourage her of mouth Daping. So tell us exactly what is mouth taping sounds pretty crazy. Doesn't it l.? You know it is. Presented differently now, I would just tell patients listen you've got mouths for these reasons and half of them will take that advice and the ones that do are typically very please but the other half would just won't do it I use it in my practice as a diagnostic tool. Firstly, I want to know if the patient can can no spree and you actually breathe through your Nose or rising clogged as the does the tape stay on they text me back in a few days and the tape stays on all night long and they're off in the morning. Then I know what I'm dealing with when it comes to treating for sleep apnea and other other things. So but in general, the concept amount taping it's it's a reminder it's not creating this impermeable seal that. Could frighten people and maybe. You know they would stop breathing at night. It's not about that. It's a reminder. It is a gentle reminder to keep your lips closed and there are a lot of people out there that can do that on their own, and that's the way it was meant to be when we go to sleep and we're relaxed all the air coming through our nose and out of her nose should be enough and there are a lot of advantages of doing that breathing through your mouth though a lot of us cannot do that. But a lot of us because we mouth tape are better at it and. And and what I tell people that you may not be good at it at first reading through your nose right breathing through your nose and mouth taping but pushed through it, work on it, and at some point because you start using her nose again there some borderline there are a lot of borderline cases I would say most of us are borderline Then you know you're pushing warm air past the nasal sinuses again, the Mucosal you're building a biomass, a nasal buy ohm you are. Creating less a Dima, you're going to get less of a historic response when you come across an hour like. Takes time but if we stop using our nose to breathe while we're not getting the nitric oxide were not production were not getting a filtration humidifier of the air There's a a temperature gradient between breathing air in through the nose as opposed to the mouth for the lungs and I would think that we would wanNA, keep that you know I mean. At a healthy level right I mean. You don't WanNa, and also we dehydrate more often we can lose up to a leader of water by mouth breathing. So if you're feeling dehydrated, I would look at if your mouth is open. Now, of course, I'm not talking about talking and eating all that. But but at nighttime, the mouth should be closed and the tape is a great reminder and you're not talking about packing tape or anything that there's actually specific smell at tate no duct tape duct tape, right so people who get scared when they first started idea like, oh my gosh like dying my slave, it's not anything. Like that, it's strong enough to maintain a closure in the mouth, but it's weak enough that if you force it, you could just force it off very easily even if you were sleeping, it would come off in just an associate with just an opening of the mouth would come off the fundamentally first and foremost I think it's just important thing to say again is that it's a tool to see. Can you breed the way that we were evolutionary evolutionary designed to bring us and if you can't now it's digging a little bit deeper I had a dear friend of mine who? Was Waking up in the morning, which is severe heart palpitations hued wake up in the morning she had severe heart palpitations there all the things Zaidi shoot text me in the morning sometimes in say like I just feel super anxious everything that and it's right around that time. My dear friend Steven Lynn semi bunch of resources including some of your resources and other stuff and said. Great you know because we happen to be talking. He's a past guest on the podcast and he said, you know you should just really overheard you talking about that. We at a conference together. You should really look into this area like does she breathe at night with her mouth open? I. Know this sounds crazy. 'cause she eats healthy she's fed everything like that. But this severe anxiety could be that when oxygen is not properly regulated night and she's breathing through her mouth. It basically never lets her nervous system feel like she's fully at rest. So she's in fire flight the whole night wakes up. And immediately feels this sort of extreme anxiety. Have you heard that example from people? I have many patients that are that way and they do wake up in a panic and their blood pressure's elevated, not just from the fighter flight. But from the acidosis from in the bloodstream from you know mouth breathing means you're going to store more often I'm you're pulling a lot more air past the small airway. If it comes to the knows it's baffled that slows down it's warmed and as it gets pulled past the airway less of it's coming through at that one time and that's less likely to pull it close. That's the burly principle essentially So there yes, absolutely it's it's it's an an an in kids is. Even more phenomenal add adhd cavity rates that are just sky high And they're the ones that are developing and growing. So breathing through your mouth while you're faces developing that's a big deal because that is what you're upset with for life in terms of your facial type. If you don't grow properly here for up to eight ten, the the the box I called the box, the nasal box, the airway box, those all tend to be squashed and made to be much smaller. And remember kids don't develop their sinuses until each four can you imagine being mouth breathing all those years and then the sinus comes online while it's not gonNa feel needed. So why developed with full potential because the kid is breathing through their mouths? It's almost like. Them, being in a wheelchair, not using their legs and their legs develop some level of atrophy don't end up being used and that's happening from breathing standpoint, and that continues the rest of their life that can lead to all sorts of challenges as we were sharing earlier. speaking of kids we have a mutual friend, Mike Muscle. Guess on this podcast. We talked about Kito and other things like that. And recently shared how you know. You've been a big inspiration by by him deciding to Ma tape their daughter. Yes. and he's been pretty open about that on social media and everything like that. So I don't think we're sharing any information that he wouldn't want to be shared, but you know when apparent is thinking about. How to support the muscle of breathing for their child, what are some of the signs that they should be looking for? Is it as simple as? Hey. Is My you know go into my kid's room at night they bring them out and they do their nose right? That's exactly at. That's the first thing. I'll say you have to kind of sneak into your kid's room when they're asleep. and find out whether that mouth is open or closed. Most parents know it's one of the first things I ask even before see the child or the oral cavity I mean there are all site all sorts of signs that the child is mouth breathing other than the fact of seeing their mouth open all the time I mean you can watch them while they're watching TV or studying certainly is doable You know I mean boogers lots not coming out of the knows I mean you know if they can't breathe through their nose if they have allergies all the time that's dead giveaway posture is a big thing a the difference between nasal breathing and mouth breathing has an effect on on all these cervical bones and pulling an air. For example, past the the the knows the pituitary gland, the the hypothalamus is there the the organs probably see light that would affect the circadian rhythm of the Child is the is the child's spinning and bed I mean it's it's a lot of it's related to sleep apnea or they snoring. It's this one big multifactoral package you have to look at and mouth breathing is part of it but the number one way to do that is exactly what you said. You got a sneak in and sit there. So I recommend. That parents take their kindle and they're not their phone because it's blue light may wake up the kit and just sit there for fifteen twenty minutes. There's a chair in the room. That's great. If you're leaning up against the back of the bed, you can hear it. You even have to see it and I would do that often Now obviously, if they have a cold, that's a different story. But when they're not sick and they don't have a cold make sure your child is is breathing through their nose at all opportune moments that would not be during exercise not if they had a cold and eating and talking and that would be it mouth as an emergency state we mouth breathe because we just need to bring in more air. Our normal state is breathing exhaling inhaling through the nose. and. When it comes to actually getting mouth Tabin, let's say with kids keeping down that story line and we want to implement it and start using them. Just walk us through what type of are all mouth tapes, equal people on Amazon exactly when they get it. So they began and do you have any tips on sort of explaining it to King Right I don't hesitate telling parents to mouth tape but most parents will hesitate mouth taping their children. There's something called vertical taping where you can just tape in vertical mode where the you know the sides of the mouth open there's a special tape that I recommend which mention but I do have a lot of patients that tape between the ages of one and a half to eight or nine and. the story I like to tell was this one kid who started at age to have these nightmares and the mother maybe about two years later year and a half. Later of the mother said Johnny you know his name is Johnny tell them what you told me and he turned to me and he told me the story. It was not just a comment was a long story about his dreams. Were getting better and he loves MOUTH TAPING AND HE GETS upset when his mom doesn't have it for him and so I hear a lot of stories like that. From improvement of dreams I'm not sure how that works but fewer cavities is a big one I have a lot of kids that have a high rate of decay. We've identified that they are mouth breathing and we tell the parents listen. You can spend two to three to four thousand dollars fixing just baby teeth deciduous teeth which I hesitate to do because that's a traumatic experience for child typically stressful or you can just let's stop this right now until there's some diet management counseling going on but mouth taping is the big one that is a big factor in decay I've seen it firsthand was a relationship between cavities and or breathing through mouth. So you know the the mouth is this. Has this incredible by on just like the gut right in the matter exactly. It's it's finally come online. I'm very excited to read about it now and and it's basically just the headwaters of the first stop on this long train line with many stations and a bacteria in the mouth of course, was a little different than the gut but. You know there's a sensitive population of bacteria in the mouth and one of the things that will turn it into a despotic kind of environment. Which you've heard that term before the gut, it can happen in the mouth There are many ways of doing that. One of the major ways is by just as the is by changing the Ph when you mouth ruth and your mouth becomes dry in the saliva is not present the Ph drops that is easily measurable measured. We we've known this for a long time, but what it does in the mouth is it allows the decay rate to increase for variety of reasons it's like us eleven the buffering. Of the saliva but the saliva has phosphorus in it and calcium and and hydroxy appetite. It has all these ingredients that are required to keep the tooth remain realizing faster than it's demoralizing teeth or like bones they just have a shiny outer shell, but they are dynamic. They're always changing and a few nights of few weeks of very dry mouth that equal urban wool switch over to the demonization side, and then you'll start seeing the case that the decay and the caries lesions forming on the teeth and. No dentist no parent should ever underestimate what that's gonNa cost you in terms of just just talking about cavities not about airway development or official development just that alone. So here's the thing the truth is. Yes exercise is important and yes, our diet is important but if we're not getting the fundamental benefits of sleep every night through breathing right then our physical and mental health are going to suffer our oral health really is the gateway to our overall health and I. Hope you got that big idea from listening to today's episode. Thank you for tuning into this episode of the Broken Rain Podcast I. Hope you enjoyed it. I'll see you again. As always, if you enjoy this episode share with a friend or leave a review I, read a lot of them and I'd love to see yours whether you love it or hate it. Please leave a review. See you next week.

mouth breathing Upper Airway Resistance Syndro Airway Resistance Syndrome apnea Dr Steven Lin Mets mental decline Mao Tom Australia raiders Alzheimer Joel Ford Gilmer official severe anxiety Brian
Deep Breaths: How Breathing Affects Sleep, Anxiety & Resilience

Fresh Air

48:09 min | 1 year ago

Deep Breaths: How Breathing Affects Sleep, Anxiety & Resilience

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air today. How can train ourselves to breathe? In ways that may improve our health the quality of our sleep and decrease anxiety and why mouth breathing is related to snoring sleep apnea and other problems. We'll talk with journalist. James Nestor author of the new book. Breath the new science of a lost art. It's about what we can learn about breathing from ancient meditation. Techniques recent scientific research and deep sea divers. Nestor tried a lot of the techniques he writes about. He started researching the subject because of his own. Respiratory problems later. Kevin Whitehead reviews new jazz recording of Transylvanian folk songs that were collected and transcribed by Bela Bartok. It features pollution Bon John. Surman and Mary. Breathing is something we take for granted unless we have respiratory problems or are sick or worried about the corona virus which attacks the lungs in the new book. Breath may guest journalist James. Nestor writes about many aspects of how we breathe and how we can train ourselves to breathe and ways that may improve our health and the quality of our sleep and decrease anxiety. He reports on my mouth. Breathing is related to snoring. Sleep APNEA and other problems with the nose has that the mouth doesn't different breathing techniques to distress reduce blood pressure and balanced the nervous system and how free divers trained to expand their lung capacity so that they can dive deep and stay underwater for up to twelve minutes on one breath when possible just tried what he's written about including participating in an experiment at Stanford which his nose was completely plugged for days to test the impact of breathing solely through the mouth the results for fascinating but the experience of total mouth breathing was unpleasant and disrupted his sleep. Nestor is also the author. A previous book called deep free diving renegade science and what the oceans tell us about ourselves any help founder research initiative to investigate how sperm whales communicate with each other through Clicks James Nestor. Welcome to fresh air. How are you doing very well? Thanks so much for having me has your research into breathing taking on a different meaning because of Covid nineteen because of its respiratory systems and the anxiety that it's creating i. The awareness of breathing has definitely increased when I first started this research several years ago. A lot of my friends were saying you're renting a book about breathing in breathing my whole life. Why would you want to write a book about that? But now these are the same friends who are seen how essential respiratory health is in helping us both prevent the onset of many illnesses and to help us get through. Illnesses like cove it to help us. Better get through them. So you had been a mouth breather and You did some snoring You had a deviated Septum which was effect affecting your ability to breathe through your nose because that kind of clogs part of their nose or blocks part of the nasal passage. I should say so to understand whether mouth breathing was really a problem. You participated in a study at Stanford University that forced you to re through your mouth. Describe what the setup was. Yeah so I had been in contact with the chief of Rhino Research or NYACK. For months and months we had several interviews. We've been talking a lot and he was telling me all the wonders of nasal breathing and how bad mouth breathing was and none of that was controversial. That's that's very well established now but nobody really knew how all the problems of mouth breathing. No one knew how soon those came on so I asked him. I said well. Why don't you test it? You're not position to test. How am I going to test? It would be unethical to ask someone to plug their nose for a certain amount of time and measure what happens. I said well I'll do it so it was never like a super size me study. That wasn't our intention. If twenty five to fifty percent of the population is breathing through their mouth so I was just lowly myself into a condition I already knew and that so many other people already knew so. The plan was for ten days. I would have silicone plugs of my knows me and one other subject breathing therapists from Sweden. I convinced him to do the study as well. And for the other ten days we would change the pathway of how we breathed and breathe through our noses instead of our mouths so that was it. That was the setup and You know we thought that mouth breathing for ten days was going to be bad but we had no idea it was gonna be so damaging. How bad was it? Well I went from storing a couple minutes a night to within three days. I was snowing four hours a night. I developed sleep apnea my stress levels. Were off the charts. My nervous system was a mess. We had a whole home lab here at my house so we were testing each other three times a day every day and writing out all of these metrics we even had were. Were looking at blood glucose how that was affected so I felt awful I felt fatigued storing sleep apnea all the rest and even performance. Athletic performance really really decreased as well and the good thing about this. I was able to take these godawful plugs out of my nose and breathe nasal e again and once I did that. Snoring disappeared sleep apnea disappeared. Nervous system came back into balance. I mean completely transformed by just changing the pathway through which we breathed. So what's in the knows that makes nose breathing better than mouth reading because mouths? Don't have that stuff so the nose filters heats and treats raw air. Most of us know that but so many of us don't realize at least. I didn't realize how it can trigger different hormones to flood into our bodies how it can lower our blood pressure. How the stages of a menstrual cycle or correlated to different areas of the knows how it monitors heart rate on and on and on even help store memories. So it's this incredible organ that is not represented in any of the departments of the National Institutes of health. And this is something that is you know just just hammered down over and over again like. Why are we studying this more? And why don't people more people realize how important nasal breathing is so? It's IT ORCHESTRATES. Innumerable functions in our body to keep balanced. When I found most surprising was that the nose actually has erectile tissue. Like men's and women's genitals so the nose is more closely connected to her genitals than any other Oregon so it is covered in that same tissue so win one area gets stimulated. The nose will become stimulated as well. Some people have to close of a connection where they get stimulated in the southerly regions. They'll start uncontrollably. Sneezing and this condition is common enough that it was given a name. Called Honeymoon Rhinitis. So that the yeah this. This is the weird stuff. You never thought you discover when you start writing a book about breathing but another thing that that is really fascinating is that erectile tissue will pulse on its own so it will close one nostril and allow breath in through the other nostril than that other nostril close allow breath in your our bodies do this on their own and this this switching happens between thirty minutes and every three hours and a lot of people. Think a lot of people who have studied this. Believe that this is the way that our bodies maintain balance because when we breathe through a right nostril circulation speeds up body GETS HOTTER CORTISOL LEVELS INCREASE. Blood pressure increases so breeding through. The left will relax more. So blood pressure will decrease lower temperature cools. The body reduces anxiety as well so our bodies are are naturally doing this and when we breathe through our mouths were denying our bodies the ability to do this and to keep us in balance. But what about if you can't breathe through your nose because either you have a cold or respiratory illness or you have a bad deviated. Septum sure around. Seventy percent of the population has a deviated Septum. That's clearly visible to the naked eye. So this is just rampant and I certainly do when I got a cat scan of of my head. It was an absolute mess but some conditions are so severe that you'll need surgical intervention for sure but the vast majority are not and something naive kept telling me is he said you know a sink is clogged in your house. You'RE GONNA find a way of unclogging. The nose should be considered in the same way for nose is clogged. You need to find a way of unclogging. You can do that by breathing. More through your nose because it's really a use it or lose it Oregon. The more you breathe through it the more you're going to be able to breathe through it. I was just talking to a clinician. Who's trained something? Like seven thousand people to nasal breathe and only four of them could not breathe through their noses after about three weeks of training. So it's it's really something the we focus on it the more we really concentrate the more were able to open it up and to get all those benefits of nasal breathing so after you did this experiment about reading exclusively for your through your mouth. You decided at night to try taping your mouth so that you couldn't breathe through mouth and you'd have to read through your nose. How did that go? Yeah so this is something a hack that I'd heard about an was extremely skeptical about. It sounded very dangerous to me until I talked to a breeding therapist at Stanford who said that. She had cured her own mouth breathing by taping her mouth at night and until I talked to a dentist who been in the field for twenty thirty years who prescribes this to his patients. Now I'm not talking about getting a fat piece of duct tape and taping that over your mouth. That's a really bad idea. I'm talking about a teeny piece of surgical tape about the size of a stamp imagined like a Charlie Chaplin Moustache. Move down an inch and my personal experience with this is it has allowed me to sleep so much. Better wake up so much more rested and to not have that dry mouth every morning so with a tape. You're talking about if your mouth really needed to open it. Could because that's not like like you said it's not like really strong tape it's just like surgical tape and a little piece of it to yourself. I'm not prescribing prescribing. It neither not prescribing anything. No no no. I'm saying this personally worked for me but don't go on Youtube. Don't go on the Internet and see these people nine pieces of tape over their lower jaws like bad idea. I've found all you need is a very small piece of tape and there's even a product out right now that is being sold as a remedy for snoring. And what is it? It's a piece of tape that you put on your lips at night so other people and they've conducted studies to show how effective it is so this this worked well for me. It's worked well for many other people but I'm not prescribing. Anything and I should mention that my guess James. Nestor is also not a doctor. He's a in his reporting on what he's learned by talking to many researchers and doctors and people who practice breathing techniques and teach breathing techniques breathing automatic. But we can control when we consciously try the quality of the breath the length of inhales and exhales and how deeply or shallowly we breathe. Can you explain why breath would for instance affect anxiety and how breathing in certain ways certain breathing techniques can decrease anxiety and being a very important subject right now so for so many of us? We think that it's important that we're breathing because if we're breathing that's good. That means we're live if we're not breathing. Bat could be dead. But it's how we take those breasts. Twenty five thousand breaths a day and thirty pounds of air enters and exits are lungs every day. So it's how we take those breaths and the nuances of those breaths that I've found play such an important role in health. Happiness and longevity so specifically with anxiety talked to our neuro psychologist went out to was lab at the Laureate Institute a brain research and he explained to me that people with anxieties or they're fear based conditions typically will breathe way too much. So what happens when you breathe? That much is you're constantly putting yourself into a state of stress so you're stimulating that sympathetic side of the nervous system and the way to change. That is to breathe deeply. Because if you think about it if you're stressed out tigers gonNA come get you. You know you're going to get hit by a car. You're to breathe. Breathe breathe as much as you can but by breathing slowly that is associated with a relaxation response so the diaphragm lowers your allowing more air into your lungs in your body immediately. Switches to a relaxed state so we may not be able to control the function of our hearts other organs in our body but we can control our breathing and when we control our breathing we can influence so much of how our bodies operate and that includes as a treatment or or at least a practice for people with these depression just changing their breathing. Psychiatrists have found can have very transformational effect. It seems so simple to be true but some of these people have been studying the subject for decades. And that's what they've found. There are many different breathing techniques. There are many different breathing meditation styles. What do they all have in common? Is there something they all have in common in terms of inhale and exhale and The basic principles underneath SA- breathing's been studied for thousands and thousands of years. There are seven books of the Chinese. Dow that deal only with breathing. What happens when we do it? Improperly and all of the benefits we can get by doing it properly so all of those ways. All of the different practices do have one thing in common. And that's because they allow you to slow down and consciously listened to yourself and feel breath is affecting you so there's many different tools in this toolbox if you want to slow down and become more relaxed you can exhale longer than you inhale so that will have a very powerful effect on you for relaxation. If you want to stimulate yourself and get going you can breathe much faster. What I've found is throughout time throughout Millennia these different cultures at different times. Different peoples. Were discovering the same exact thing over and over. So it's very interesting that right now we have the science and the techniques and measurements to really prove what these people have been saying for so long. Why does the X. Hail quiet this system because the exile is a para sympathetic response rate? Now you can put your hand over your heart if you take a very slow. Inhale in you're gonNA feel your heart speed up as you exhale you should be feeling your heart slowdown so exhaling relaxes the body. And something else happens when we take a very deep breath like this so the diaphragm when we take a breath in and that sucks bunch of blood huge perfusion of blood into the thoracic cavity as we exhale that blood shoots back out through the body so the diaphragm is considered the second heart because it plays such a huge role in circulation and it lowers the burden of the heart if we breathe properly and if we really engaged the diaphragm so these slow and low breaths. People should be practicing these as much as possible. This is the way your body wants to take an air if you want us or breathing to calm yourself down. Do you have any suggestions for the length of the inhale and the length of the exhale? Sure and this was a study I'd stumbled upon. That's about twenty years old now that some Italian researchers gathered a group of subjects and they had them recite the Ave Maria so the catholic prayer cycle and then they had them recite all money. Pardon me Which is a Buddhist prayer? But they found is that took about five and a half seconds to recite each of these these prayers and then about five and a half seconds to then inhale and so by breathing about five and a half seconds out five and a half seconds in. They found that blood to the brain increased. The body entered this state of Balance. In which all of the organs all of the system worked in harmony with one another and they covered these people with sensors. And we're able to see all of this All on data sheets and the study is is widely available so they later found that you don't need to really pray to get these benefits even though you can do that if you'd like but just by breathing at this rate about five and a half seconds and five and a half seconds out. Don't worry if you're second off you know. The point is to relax yourself. You were able to get the perfect amount of air into your body and out of your body and really allow your body to do what it's naturally designed to do which is function with the least amount of effort and they've they've taught this breathing psychiatrists have taught this breathing pattern to people with anxiety. Depression even nine eleven survivors. Who had this ghastly condition called ground class lungs and it had significant effects on them but just breathing. This way. If said if you exhale longer than you inhale that that can be very calming so if both the inhale and the exhale are five and a half seconds. You're not doing longer. Exiles is that does that matter so so. The body wants to be balanced right. We want sympathetic balance. We want para sympathetic balance so just in regular day to day activity. You want to have that balance before you go to sleep. You can extend that exile and become more relaxed but I would not be extending that exile before meeting or before an important phone call so you can use these different tools to do different things. You can also inhale longer in exile shorter if you want a little boost of energy so the even Steven like the most balanced way of breathing that I've found after studying the stuff and talking to the leaders in the field was that five to six seconds in five to six seconds out. My guest is journalists jams. Nestor author of the new book breath. The new science of a lost art. We'll talk more after we take a short break. I'm Terry Gross in this. Is Fresh air support for this podcast? And the following message come from L. A. Times studios funded by Amazon studios for the podcast paper clip inspired by its Emmy Eligible Drama Series Hunters starring. Alpa Chino and Logan Lerman join host Michael Ian Black as he teams up with a Cold War historian to explore Operation Paper Clip a top secret program that brought Nazi scientists to America. It's a story of principles compromised and war-crimes overlooked available now on apple podcasts and all other platforms. Let's get back to my interview with Journalists James Nestor author of the new book breath the new science of a lost art. It's about the impact of how we breathe on our health. Our sleep and our anxiety level. He investigates different ancient and new breathing techniques that can improve our health and expand our lung capacity. Nastiest previous book deep was about free diving in which divers go deep under water for up to twelve minutes on one breath. James you know in talking about Breath and its impact on our health and our anxiety you referred to the sympathetic and the Paris empathetic nervous system without going into too much detail. Can you just explain briefly? Would would each of them are why they why they're relevant to breath? Sure the sympathetic nervous system is the system that triggers a fight or flight reaction so when we sense danger the sympathetic nervous system switches on floods. Our bodies with stress hormones and allows US become meaner and leaner into fight harder or to run really fast. That's what that does so. The Paris pathetic is the opposite. This is the side of the nervous system that triggers a rest and relax response and we want to be in this state. When we're eating food mostly throughout the entire day we wanna be in a Paris sympathetic state. The problem is that nowadays all of us are kind of half stressed. We're not really running away from tiger or lion or fighting for our lives but we're not really relaxing either so we're staying in this grey zone where during the night or half away during our days. We're half asleep. So that's what I found was so interesting about. Breeding is by just breathing. You can elicit these different nervous system so you can take command of something that was supposed to be autonomic. That's what it's called the automatic nervous system but you can control it and you can stress yourself out if you want or you can relax yourself just by breathing. One of the things that we typically do wrong when we breathe like speaking for myself. I think I'm a very shallow breather when I'm not paying attention to my breathing. I think my my kind of state is just shallow breaths. So what's wrong with that? Well you can think about breathing as being in a boat right so you can take a bunch of very short stilted strokes and you're going to get to where you WANNA go. It's GonNa take a while but you'll get there or you can take a few very fluid and long strokes and get there so much more efficiently so your body doesn't want to be overworked all the time because if it is then things start to break down so you want to make it very easy for your body to get air especially if this is an act that we're doing twenty five thousand times a day so by just extending those inhales exhales by moving that diaphragm up and down a little more. You can have a profound effect on your blood pressure on your mental state on even on longevity because so much of longevity is correlated with respiratory health and long size one of the trips each took us. Part of your research was Philadelphia to go to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and anthropology and look at their skull collection with Dr Marianna Evans. And she told you some fascinating things about how the skull has changed through human history. I mean through through the evolution of of human history and how the nose has changed so tell us some of the most interesting things you learn about how our nose evolved so sure You know when I was first starting out researching this book. I thought I had a pretty good idea of where all of the research was was gonNA lead me. I'd identified the leaders in the field different areas. I was going to go into but about six months into it. A realize that so much of what I had planned had to be thrown out because there was a much stranger story several layers deep and it was the fact that so many of us are breathing poorly not because some sort of psychological problem. Not because we're anxious but because we can't because our skulls have changed so much especially in the last four hundred years that it's blocked or sinuses and it's made us breathe more through our mouths and the beginning when I heard this. I didn't believe it but I started talking to biological anthropologist who kept telling me the same thing over and over they said if you take a skull that's thousand years old and compare it to a new school that skull that thousand years old. There's a very good chance its teeth are going to be perfectly straight whereas the modern school. There's a very good chance. Its teeth are going to be very crooked so those perfectly straight teeth and that thousand year olds skull. They would be the same teeth you'd find in ten thousand year old school hundred thousand year old school and on back so just in the past four hundred years humans now have but ninety percent of us have some some problems with their teeth that make them grow and crooked and the reason is our mouths have grown so small that our teeth have nowhere to go so they they come in crooked and another problem with having too small of a mouth is it also gives us to small airway to easily take air in and out so. This was a story about evolution. I never heard about in school that I didn't think it could be possibly true unless you start looking at skulls. So she welcomed me Marianna Evans to go to the museum. With the largest collection of pre industrial skulls and time and time out didn't matter if the skulls were coming from Asia Africa or South America. They all had straight teeth. And if you again if you look at a skull now very good chance it's going to have crooked teeth so the obvious question is why did skulls get smaller well? I think that you know I had learned in school. That evolution always met survival of the fittest. But but it doesn't. It means change and life forms can change for the better or worse and humans have certainly been changing in ways that are a detriment to our health and this change this catalyst. That caused our mouths to go. Smaller is tied to industrial food. It's not vitamins and minerals. Many people would suspect it's chewing. The fact is for the past three hundred years. Food has been so process so soft that we're not chewing anymore so our mouths never quite develop right which means our airways are clogged. Then Dr Evans. Also tell you that as the human brain expanded at left less room for the for the nose and the mouth. This was about a million years ago when we started processing foods bashing pray against rocks and we started cooking foods about eight hundred thousand years ago our brains started growing so rapidly and they needed real estate so they took it from the front of our faces and they took it from our mouths but these changes happened over tens of thousands of years these morphological changes so the changes. That happened to our mouths happened very quickly. And we haven't been able to adapt fast enough to really acclimate to it. So that is one of the reasons why we have so many chronic breathing problems. It's tied to the shrinking the front of our faces. Let me take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us. My guest is journalist. James Nester all of the new book breath the new science of a lost art. We'll talk more after we take a short break. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from Purple Mattress. The secrets of Purple is the Purple Grid. It's a patented comfort technology designed to instantly adapt to your body's natural shape and sleep style with over twenty eight hundred open air channels and naturally temperature neutral jail. Every purple mattress comes with free shipping returns and a risk free one hundred night trial visit purple dot com slash fresh air and use Promo Code fresh air for a special offer terms apply. Let's all close our eyes. Take a deep breath. Let it out and listen to. Npr's all songs considered it's a music podcast but it's also a good friend and guide to find joy in troubled times here. All songs considered with new episodes every Tuesday and Friday. Wherever you listen to podcasts. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Journalists Jones. Nestor author of the new book breath. About what ancient forms of eastern. Meditation as well as New Science. Tell us about breathing. And how by controlling our breath through various techniques. We can improve our sleep our health and decrease our anxiety so you had respiratory problems. Ten years ago when you started others research into breathing techniques have you respiratory problems improved. I have not had pneumonia since of of been using these techniques. I haven't had bronchitis. I've been breeding clearly through my nose. I've had one stuff knows in the past year and a half when I came down with with flu. So I'm not using that as confirmed data. That says this stuff works. I'm saying that it worked for me. I just WanNa also made clear that I had no slant going into this world like my job as a journalist who writes about science a lot is to take all the data talk to as many people as I can and come out with a very objective view of what's going on here. That's what I really tried to do with this book. So I I don't WanNa be preaching slow-breathing or heavy breathing or whatever I wanted to present the facts and the studies and say this is what's worked for people. This is what the science says but on a personal point you know I will say you get pretty emotionally invested in the subject. Once you've been in it for years and years and once you've seen these people so profoundly transformed the more you dive into these worlds become consumed by it the more you want to feel these benefits and try to understand in a certain way so you can relay that back to the reader so many doctors now are trying to figure out how the corona virus works in the body and why it does the damage that it does and how they can help patients you know get over it and and recover and I know that some doctors now instead of using respirators are doing. What's called pruning in which the person who is having breathing problems because of the virus instead of lying on their back they lay on their side or I think on their chest and that that seems to somehow make it easier for them to breathe and I'm wondering if you have been reading about that and what your understanding of. It is so about four weeks ago. Five weeks ago when a patient would have very severe symptoms of covert. They would bring them in and lay them on their back and sometimes intimate them and the seem to work for a lot of the patients but would they found more recently with that by line them on their sides or on their stomachs. They could breathe so much better. I found this was so interesting because two thousand years ago Chinese doctors prescribed side sleeping as well and then you have a cardiologist. Eighty eight years ago. Seven years ago named Boo Tako that asked all patients with pneumonia or other respiratory problems to always sleep on their sides so he would even take balls to their backs so they could not sleep on their backs so it seems like this science that has been around for hundreds sometimes thousands of years just keeps popping up in these different ways and they've found that that prone breathing and they've even put some patients in a chair because they don't want them lying down is extremely effective and a lot of this has to do with how we breathe when you take a big breath your back is the more the lungs are are on your back. Your back is going to be expanding. Your chest expands a little bit but most of that is happening at the back so when you're lying on their backs they're not gonna be able to access their lungs as efficiently. So it's it's simple physics by flipping them around. There can be able to breathe better so this was just another example. I was sending this back and forth to my father-in-law who's a pulmonologist pulmonologist for for forty years and I was just like it's more of the new science of a loss. Start here we're just rediscovery and all of these hacks that have been around for so long. I didn't realize your father in law is a pulmonologist which means he works with patients who have lung issues. What does he make of the research that you present in? The book is consistent with what he's found as as a doctor and I'm wondering if he's Adding anything to his toolbox. I all I can say is we've had some very lively Thanksgiving dinners together talking the stuff of over the years but at the beginning he thought a lot of what I was in covering these like. I never heard of that. I don't know about this. He's he's a pretty conservative guy and his beliefs as far as medicine is concerned but over the years the most fascinating things for me has been presenting him with more of this research more of these studies more of these investigators and scientists who have been saying the same stuff and watching him really changed his mind. That's not what I set out to do. I want him to be critical in entrust me. He was when I was bringing up a lot of these issues but watching him. Come around and get very exciting about using these other hacks especially now especially with covert when so. Many of us aren't breathing. Well we've got mass on. We feel tightness in our chest to be able to focus on our breathing and really allow us to be healthier and to have more of a calmer state of mind. So it's it's been a fantastic conversation over several years. And he's very excited about some of this really weird stuff I've uncovered previous book was about Divers who dived deep with one breath and they can hold one breath for about twelve minutes. How do they train their lungs to expand enough to hold enough air to do all that on breath? So the world record is twelve and a half minutes breath hold. Most divers will hold their breath for eight minutes seven minutes. Which is still an incredible to me. When I first saw this. This was several years ago. It was sent out a reporting assignment to write about a free diving competition. You you watch this person. The surface take a single breath of they're completely disappear into the ocean back five or six minutes later so the way they were able to do this was by breathing. So we've been told that whatever we have whatever we're born with is what we're going to have for the rest of our lives especially as far as the organs are concerned but we can absolutely affect our lung capacity so in some of these divers have a lung capacity of fourteen leaders which is about double the size for a regular adult male. So they weren't born this way. This was something they did through. Will they train themselves debris than ways to profoundly affect their their physical bodies so of the things that you do? Is You work with a project to try to understand how whales communicate with each other through their cliques. And this is related to the book that you did on free divers because the book is also a about oceans and what we can learn from oceans so the The group is called City not like the extraterrestrial Seti group this is c. e. Ti. I'm afraid to say Saturday because I think people will think you're trying to communicate with extraterrestrials. We're trying to communicate with non human species so it's very similar in some ways know a number of years ago. I saw the real benefits of free diving and it wasn't too best. A competitor and dive down the deepest and and comeback. It was to really allow yourself to become a part of the underwater environment. Because when you're free diving in you're holding your breath at fifty hundred feet down you become a living non breeding part of everything around you so instead of animals swimming away from you as they would with scuba they swim toward you and they welcome you into their scholes or pods so after seeing free divers do this that that was the main impetus for for me wanting to focus my breathing and learn to free was to commune and get in touch with these these animals so we targeted sperm whales. Who are the largest tooth predators on the planet? They can grow as long as a school bus and it turns out that these animals share this very sophisticated form of communication through these clicks. It's almost like a Morse code type of communication so by free diving with them and not hanging around with a boat which they don't like or scuba which they don't like they welcomed you in started clicking at you and this was one of the most powerful experiences of ever had to be in the water animal size of a school bus that it anytime could kill me could chew me up with its eight inch long teeth or hit me with with fluke but chose not to but chose to to come in peace and send out these little cliques and it just got me thinking. How wonderful would it be? I understand these clicks and perhaps one day talk back with these animals so this was an experience I had so many years ago but it continues to stick with me and I was lucky enough to meet David Gruber. Who is a Marine biologist? And we've been working away for years to put a program together to use machine learning and AI to look into this communication and to try to perhaps one day cricket and learn more about these fantastic animals James. Nestor is the author of the new book. Breath the new science of a lost art after we take a short break. Kevin Whitehead will review a new jazz recording of Transylvanian folk songs that were collected and transcribed by Bela Bartok. This is fresh air support for NPR and the following message. Come from duck duck. Go Are you tired of being tracked online? Duck Duck. Go can help. They helped millions of people. Like you take control of their personal information online with one download. You can search and browse privately. Avoiding trackers duck duck. Go privacy simplified. There's no getting around it. The Corona virus pandemic has upended everything and daily decisions made by the White House and Congress will radically impact the human and economic toll to keep up with the latest join us on the NPR politics. Podcast will cut through the noise and let you know what decisions are being made and how they affect you. The twentieth century Hungarian composer. Bela Bartok loved the folk. Music of Transylvania in central Romania he transcribed thousands of songs from that region starting in nineteen. Oh nine now. A few tunes he collected get fresh treatment from a trio of improvisers jazz critic. Kevin Whitehead has more Transylvania in and around Eastern Europe's Carpathian mountains is traditionally a multi cultural region. It's music shows influences from east and West that can feed in air of wistful romanticism. Pianist Lucian Bond. Grew up in. Small Town Transylvania before he moved to the states and his longtime duo partner. Matt missionary can put a sod into his inflections veal Transylvanian also. Like they're round and around social tunes and for that. The duo call in English saxophonist and Bass clarinetist John. Surman his sound often smacks of Anglo folk music looping maypole dances and Pied Piper Calls to assembly Saxophonist John Surman. The balloon bond percussive. Piano and Matt Manera Boeing Viola from the album Transylvanian. Folksongs it's on the long standing indy label sunnyside. The players have the right chemistry. The material is closest to Lucien bonds heart and his piano can sing out but he often takes a selfless role. Nudging the other guys alone or he'll get out of their way when they blend fit counterpoint. The trio kicks out the jams a letter but this is music of stately restraint and slow buildups when John. Surman is Wailing Madman. Marysville may stay quietly busy tweaking the texture sermon loves to BLOW OF REPETITIVE BACKGROUND. Figures and Lucian Bond sets them right up his piano tolls like church bells on the Dowry Song k. is that Dowry Song Mary or Mournful Emotional tone of folk material isn't always easy to decipher. Think of all those Jolly Appalachian murder ballots on the mighty sun. The three musicians play the same circular theme each at his own tempo and with his own feel fleet piano to slow motion. Baritone Sax There's mystery in that barebones music and in much else on the album Transylvanian folksongs. But there's clarity to it as well. Lucian Bon John. Surman and Matt Monari listened to those vintage melodies as closely as they do to each other making those old bones dance one more time Kevin Whitehead is the author of the new book. Play the way you feel the essential guide to jazz stories on film. He reviewed translate folksongs by Lucian. Bon John. Surman and map missionary tomorrow. On fresh air our guests will be Time magazine reporter. Wj Hennigan who will talk about covering how New York dealt with the bodies of twenty thousand people who died of Covid nineteen over a two month period. He writes about the difficulties of handling that. Many bodies. In A and hygienic manner when funeral parlours mortuaries? And Morgues were overwhelmed. He also writes about the psychological issues for the people entrusted with handling so many bodies. A hope you'll join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham our interviews and reviews produced and edited by Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock San Brugere Lauren Crandall Heidi Simone Thia Challenor Seth Kelly and Joel Wolfram our associate producer of digital media is molly seavy. Nesper Theresa Madden directed today show. I'm Terry Gross.

mouth breathing James Nestor New Science Fresh Air James nose breathing Bela Bartok Kevin Whitehead John Surman Stanford APNEA Terry Gross erectile tissue Philadelphia Covid Npr Bon John
245: Youre not healthy if youre not breathing right  | James Nestor, NYT bestselling author of Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art

The mindbodygreen Podcast

49:37 min | 9 months ago

245: Youre not healthy if youre not breathing right | James Nestor, NYT bestselling author of Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art

"Welcome to the my buddy. Greene podcast objects, Jason walkup founder, and Cosio of my buddy green and your host. This episode of the my Buddy Greene podcast is made in partnership with else nutrition. Plant foods made from trusted ingredients or staples in anyone's fridge no matter our age. Luckily, there are innovative brands like else nutrition formulated for the littlest members of the family with whole food ingredients that are minimally processed without affecting nutrient makeup of the plants else nutrition is a safe nutritious drink for young ones, twelve months and older. The most complete alternative to cow's milk and dairy base formulas dairy free sorry free and organic. It's delicious sustainable and endorsed by leading pediatricians. Else's a clean label plant based nutrition derived from three familiar essential ingredients. We know in love Tapioca almonds and buckwheat. Introducing else nutrition the I clean label plant based nutrition drink for complete nutrition beyond the first year. James Nassar has written for outside Scientific American, the Atlantic Dwell The New York, times not to mention his appeared on national TV shows including ABC's nightline and CBS Morning News, and his latest book breath. The new science of a lost art is a runaway bestseller and just might be one of the most important books of twenty twenty as we focus on our breath as it's a powerful tool to strengthen our immune system I am beyond excited that he's with us today as we explore the power of our breath. James Welcome. So great to have you here. Thanks for having me. So I love your book I'll start there everyone listening. Talk about right book right time, right message, a powerful read breath the new science of a lost art. I gotTa say you had me at the title. But the the book is phenomenal. We're going to talk about it the let's start the the why and your personal journey journey is pretty powerful. Let's let's start there the why behind the book was actually two things that happened that inspire me to to go deeper into breathing research. First one is I had a very weird experience while ago ten eleven years ago I had been having chronic respiratory problems I, surf a lot exercising lot eating, right but I was having all these breathing difficulties. So a doctor suggested I go and check out a breathing Klassen. As I was in that class after about ten minutes just breathing in this rhythmic pattern. I just started sweating profusely like crazy far far beyond anything like jogging working out some other kind of sweat little disarming but also pretty fascinating and no one could really describe what happened I asked my doctor. She gave me a bunch of the explanations that didn't make any sense because she didn't really know but it wasn't until several years after that. That I met free divers who showed me the true. Capacity a breath and the the true potential of it they were able to harness breath to hold their breath for a nine minutes at a time dived adapts far below would scientists thought were possible but they said the applications of breathing also extended. To Land You could help us it to heal yourself to heat yourself to do all of these incredible things. So I got more interested when out into the field. But. You had like serious respiratory issues. It was definitely message personas pretty active. It was becoming an issue with your health and Wellbeing Yeah and I just thought it was a normal part of being everyone I knew either had chronic sinusitis or they had asthma or they were getting bronchitis just like me. I. I had mild pneumonia year year after year just a mild form of right when it slips from bronchitis and pneumonia I was able to took took the Z pack moved on and and so many people have such chronic respiratory problems. It's so prevalent right now that we're not really paying attention to it it's. Just, considered normal but the more I started peering into this this field and talking with the researchers said, there's nothing normal about species being constantly plugged up or mouth breathing or having all of these other issues. So that's something that that slowly revealed itself at the beginning of the research was not only the potential where breathing could bring us but how poorly were breathing the vast majority of us are breathing right now. So a couple points so you talk about capacity and in the book. There's amazing data in here and you say twenty seven departments at the National Institute of Health the NIH devoted to lung is skin disease ears on and on. But nose and sinuses aren't represented in any of them, which is mind blowing because even another great data point where between ages thirty and fifty, we lose twelve percent of her capacity with women bearing far worse than men, and if we make it to eighty, it's like who would sign up for eighty right now you know that's pretty good. I'm there but then we lose thirty percent were able to take in thirty percent less air than we did in our twenties so. Mind blowing how have we not been focused on this? Because, we're focused on pathologies and I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that like I I love. Western science. I love Western medicine I, think it's fan. I probably won't be alive without it. You know when you have a cancer or you have to have a lung transplanted, what a wonderful thing, all these technologies are but my father-in-law's a pulmonologist my brother-in-law works at. An Er says an ER doctor and they said, you know you get help when you really really need help. If you have mild chronic issues, it's Kinda like comeback when you really bad and we can help you in the meantime take this in that and it's just GonNa help abate the sin, the symptoms, and so this is widely known. This is not controversial what I'm saying it's They don't have the capacity to to really train people in breathing a you about doctors. He's fifteen patients in our about five minutes with each patient can't sit down with them and say, okay, let's take a deep breath in and take a deep. It's not going to happen. So I believe in the West that's one of the main reasons we have not heard about breathing breathing therapy and breathing awareness, same problems with nutrition and all those other. Same thing we don't have time it's all and especially with Kobe right now nutrition is coming to the forefront and. Breath work needs to come to the forefront. Absolutely, and it is because you know as as Westerners we only really get interested something when we're about to fall off the cliff then when I woke. Okay maybe we should focus on breathing but you know preventative maintenance is the best way to go with with anything and that certainly holds true for breathing and just the difference that you can make to your immune function to how your body operates to your lung and your lung capacity by breathing properly is it's an enormous difference. So I if we rewind a bit where did we go wrong so let's talk about the history of breath when and why did we stop breathing correctly? Yeah I had always thought that it was environmental or psychological tied to anxiety, which is true and it's really smoggy places. It's hard to breathe properly and you can have a bunch of respiratory problems to that. But one story was not expecting to find in this book I thought I had had it all all carved out before I went into the field because that's nonfiction works. Book proposal then you go out and write about it. It's completely wrong. Add to throw out about six months of research once I discovered that. So much of the blame has to do with our evolution it's anatomical and by that I mean our faces over the past few hundred years about four hundred years have been shrinking, shrinking, shrinking, growing longer Maoz of growing smaller. That sounds nuts because a lot of people say, what is the evolutionary advantage of a mouse shrinking because evolution means progress? But it completely does not. It Means Change and we've been changing but not in ways that benefit our health at all. If you look at the number of chronic diseases out there if you just look at our faces if you look at your teeth. So if you looked at it skull that was older than four hundred years, go back four, thousand years forty thousand years doesn't matter. It's going to have straight teeth. There's about a ninety nine point nine percent chance it's going to have. Straight teeth, no wisdom teeth extracted. No braces straight teeth, huge mouth, modern schools ninety percent of them have some form of Malik collusion, which means some sort of crookedness in their teeth problems with their jaws because our Maoz have grown. So small that teeth don't know where to go so that growing crooked and the other problem with having a mouth, it's too small is your airway as too small, which makes it harder to breathe. You look at sleep apnea look at snoring look at. Some forms of asthma chronic sinusitis because we are so plugged up here and it's a shocking thing for people who don't believe this because I didn't believe I went looked at hundreds of ancient skulls in modern skulls but you can just go online and look look at ancient skulls look at the teeth of ancient skulls and then go look in the mirror ago look at your family or go look on the street and see our teeth are and so to summarize breathing through the mouth. Not, not so good breathing through the nose good in in simplest terms for the in the in the simplest terms. Yes. Just like any other of the fifty, four, hundred different mammals out there they all breathe through the nose. We have become mouth breeders because one of the reasons czar miles of grown. So small, there's less room back there also environmental as as well ADENOID skit inflamed tonsils get inflamed chronic sinusitis. You have to breathe through your mouth and breathing through the mouth is bad news you can. You just talk about that. Curious. Like what happens I think it's like three seconds between an inhale and exhale and average. I want to say so I have not right at like what happens when you do that through the mouth verses. Do the nostrils What's that? If, you were to cut a human skull in in half and and look at it. You would see this enormous amount of space about the size of a billiard ball though smaller than a tennis ball. That takes up Oliver sinuses even come up here. So in that space, you would see this labyrinth. It looks so similar to a shell that this is called the nasal cold Joe. And our noses function. So similar to seashells which help keep invaders out, which is why they have that long maze leading to the the organism that's inside of it. Our noses do the same thing. So this is not a straight line into the back of our throat. It has to this air has curve twist as it's doing that it's getting heated up we are removing particulate we are adding moisture to it. So by the time, it reaches our lungs it is conditioned so that we can absorb so much more of that oxygen more efficiently. So it's also harder there's that pressure. That pressure is good. You get the negative pressure that vacuum. Coming in and the positive pressure coming out that pressure helps push push the tissues in the airway back a little further in open up the airway. So all of these things allow us to get about twenty percent more oxygen breathing equivalent breast through the nose than we do through the mouth. Like you're built-in filtration system if you will. It's not not only filtration so I can h vaccine. So it's it's filtration, but it's but it's also pressurizing in conditioning and it's just it's digesting in some ways that that air before it gets the lungs and you can think of the lungs is almost like an external organ, right? If you're breathing through your mouth. There's no pressure, there's no filter there's there's minimal heat minimal moisture and you are exposed whatever is in your environment. If you live in a city live in a place with lot of pollutants and a lot of viruses in the air, you don't WanNa breathe this this raw unfiltered air at all and most of us are breathing through our mouths. when it comes to children is probably over fifty percent depends on the study they vary bud the estimates are around twenty five to two on the higher end fifty percent of the population. Are Habitual mouth breeders and this is not only will it expose you to this this untreated air. But if you do it when you're a kid are like this, it will affect the skeleton pitcher and how your face grows. Yeah, it's so common. It's called ADENOID face. When you're adenoids get inflamed, you can only breathe through your mouth these kids go like this and and it's you can. You can. Once you see this, you can spot it wherever. A while so It's July or August. It's August twenty. This is what happens in cove everything just blends in. August twenty twenty. Co vid and the power of the breath and so in my mind as I mentioned earlier on this, this needs to be at the forefront. So can you talk a little bit about? What research is out there and why breath needs to come to the forefront in the context of Kobe and strengthening our immune system and our ability to stave off this terrible virus. Sure. So the person whom on Nobel laureate Louis IGNARRO. Won The won the award for his work in nitric oxide. In the nineteen nineties in he released a new wasn't a study. It was an opinion paper, a summary of his research and how breeding can help defend us against things like viruses and he believes it could help directly defend us against covid in certain ways. So by doing that. Beyond, what the knows does humidifiers air conditioning at all all slowing down all of that. It also releases a profusion of Nitric Oxide, which is this amazing molecule the place in a central role in Vaso dilation, and also nitric oxide also interacts with with pathogens with viruses. So when SARS rolled around and what was it two, thousand and four they were exposing. Cells to nitric oxide in those cells in that presence were able to live so much longer. So so ignarro believes that by breathing through the nose, we can not only help bolster our immune function, but we can also help defend us against this this virus, another element of of nasal breathing when you're breathing through the mouth and especially when you're breathing too much. You tend to place your your body and estate of stress. So your body associates that breathing too much as stress which causes inflammation. so by breathing through the nose and having that boost of nitric oxide, you can reduce inflammation you can breathe more efficiently. You can keep yourself in a state where your body is able to better heal itself and defend itself, and this is so important. Dr Steven porridges. Well, known researcher has been talking about the role of breathing in and and health immune health in the age of Kobe. So you mentioned stress and. Look were. So, many people are anxious right now as generation anxiety and rightfully rightfully. So there's a lot to be anxious about. So, can you talk a bit about? How the way we breathe can affect anxiety. Yeah. So populations who have fear based disorders anxiety even. anorexia panic and also asthmatics will traditionally be breathing far more than they need to, and they also tend to mouth rate. So by by breathing that much again, you're placing your yourself in into the state of of stress and they found that by simply changing their breeding habits to breathe slower and Tabriz less, they were able to really attenuate so many symptoms of both anxiety, an asthma work of a leash, Meerut at southern Methodist University bunch of research in this, and the reason is it's not just psychosomatic. A placebo. If you right now take a breath into Canada about three. and Xl. Account. About Eight Just. Real slowly. Now do that again and place your hand over your heart. into about three now exile to count about ten maybe you're gonNA. Feel your heart slowing down. The longer you exile the more slowly breathe. So that is because you're eliciting that Paris sympathetic side of your nervous system and that's the side that reconnects all your organs with your brain that increases circulation to all of these other organs less needed in the fight or flight stimulation on the sympathetic state, and you can simply do this by breathing and we know it's not a placebo effect or whatever. Because you can measure what happens to your heart rate variability breathing in very slow breasts new can measure what happens to your blood pressure within a couple minutes. I've been able to to plummet my blood pressure about ten to fifteen points in some people even more, and again if you don't believe me put a cuff on. When you're talking or when you're at work, hang out for a few minutes breathe at a rate of about six seconds in six seconds out even longer if if you want and check your blood pressure afterward, specially effective for people who have higher blood pressure like me so. I'm sold on on on breath work and. I'm assuming audience is chomping at the bit right now saying, okay I'm in how do we increase lung capacity where where do I start? So I'M GONNA go back to the free divers. They're like the pros Lebron James of lung capacity. increasing. By thirty to forty percent. So how how can we do what Ray-ban were not capable? You tell me how how can we? How can we achieve that? Yeah. So I I saw free divers I was at this competition and there were small people there. There were told people there. There were large people there. There were small people that found from any different country. You name it from Venezuela to Russia, whatever they all had these enormous chess. It didn't matter what's they were not born this way. Okay they did. This by power of will Herbert Nitsch has a lung capacity of about twelve leaders and the average adult male lung capacity is about six. He was not born with twelve leader lungs so and and it's so obvious seeing this from free divers. So if you look at what Yoga is and what was I intended to be, it was a technology breathing. Period this Vanessa flow in all of that that came about about one hundred years ago and people are like, no, it's not. It's ancient. It's not. So what you do yoga is you stretch stretch open your ribcage. And he breathe into one side and then you stretch and breathe into the other. So if you're doing yoga, you're already helping to stave off that entropy in your lungs. Okay. light exercise has been found to increase it about fifteen percent lung capacity, but the the key is not to do these forced. Really hard brass like I'm just going to kick my lungs but I'm just GonNa go for it It's to take these very soft breasts and loosen up your ribcage and loosen up all these muscles slowly, and you can do this by extending the range of your diaphragm. So if you take your hands and you place your thumbs toward your back and put them up, will stand up here. Put them up like that. And you breathe in through your nose what you want is your hands to move laterally Patrick McEwen, renowned breeding therapist showed this to me not just your stomach coming out which which we know in Yoga. Moving out laterally. That is the most efficient and most most profound die from attic movement, and that is going to allow you to access more of your lungs and it's another reason why these slower deeper breasts are so important is because. Blood is gravity dependent and the lower lobes of your lungs are going to be able to absorb more oxygen than higher up than all of this dead space. So you can get a lot more oxygen with a lot fewer breasts which saves your body, a lot of wear and tear if you breathing properly. So Dome Pre through the heart breathe through your stomach sensually. Slow and low this this show, I, love it. So. Just just ahead of four warning because I've gotten a few hundred emails about this is. When you're practicing a running Ahmed technique or you're practicing are practicing to more whatever and you're these settings heavy breathe through your mouth or they have you. Lion Breath they have you breathe through your chest perfectly fine. Because that's technique I'm talking about habitual chronic habits and slow low in in less is is what you want. Hey everybody. Thanks for tuning in. We're just GONNA take a quick little break to hear word from our sponsor. This. Episode of the PODCAST is supported by visits on valley. With international travel off the cards were embracing the beauty of our own backyard and Sun Valley. Idaho is at the top of my summer escapes bucket list the laid back mountain town both massive expanses of wilderness and quiet trails. You can roam free and rejuvenate and nature exactly the deep side. We all need in two thousand and twenty plus there are plenty of healthy cafes and restaurants offering local organic and sustainable fair for outdoor dining or takeaway head to visit Sun Valley Dot Com to find out more about this magical destination. Now back to the PODCAST. So. I'm glad you brought up chronic habitual habits because I'm so curious how did you start? HOW SHOULD WE START? What do you recommend someone listening saying? All right I want to start breathing through my nose and properly and low right now. I think the key is to acknowledge it, and that's why set up the book. This way is to say, Hey, we've got all these breathing issues that that aren't being acknowledged or realized retreating all these other symptoms attached to breathing. But if we treat the breathing itself, we can take care of so many of these other problems. So once you acknowledge it and Recognize it. You can then become aware of how reading throughout the day and just that awareness is a huge game changer. I found that my breathing was so erratic throughout the day I was wearing a pulse ox engaging had all the stupid geared to gauge exactly what was happening especially sending down at a computer in the morning there's something called email apnea which. Eighty percent of office workers has where he breathing just just goes to hell the moment you sit down our fifty twenty on instagram's on and that's when you you really need to focus the most and get your breathing down. So. Acknowledging it becoming aware of it, and then you know as I laid out in the foundation of the book nasal breathing. I don't care if you're working out I, don't care if you're jogging if you're doing cross fit, it is so much more efficient to be breathing through your nose. All the time may take you while to get there but once you get there, this is the pathway that we've evolved debris. Then go get other animals look at a horse when it's at a full sprint, it's not breathing from its mouth dogs will open their mouths to thermo regulate look at them when they're sleeping So after after the knows you want xl more a lot of people think deep breaths are just. Putting air on air on air. You want to live that diaphragm up when you xl take a full exile so that you can sink it down a little more when you're sinking down the diaphragm, you're able to massage those organs in. This is something I just learned that I'm GonNa be putting in that new edition of the bug, but you're able to massage those the organs in a certain way and stimulate more lymph fluid. Release Oh. This is a way of detoxifying your body. Your diaphragm works like a pump to get rid of lymph fluid. So I could go on with the other have fan this topic near you know I I love it. I'm curious. How long did it take you to get from a habitual mouth breather and I'm curious were you back then like ninety mouth and nose and where are you today and how long did it take? Yeah I knew that at night it was one hundred percent mouth I knew this because I thought it was normal forever. WanNa go to sleep with just a huge bottle of water by the bedside and wake up with a dry mouth hit. Go back to sleep wake up. Nothing normal about that. So that was the first thing I took care of, and that's the first thing I suggest people take care of once you're aware of it. That's a good start in daytime but a lot of third of your life, your breathing, your snoring, you have sleep apnea reading through your mouth. That's the first thing. First thing to do what I found that was very helpful was to place. A little piece of tape on my lips to help train my jaw shut. This does not mean a fat piece of duct tape. The sound sketchy people think at some hostage situation no no, no The I heard about this from the doctor speech language pathology at Stanford and I heard about it from a ton of other doctors since then so this is blue painter's tape I. Wish I had some? Real to you don't have to use this stuff I just found this on my wall, but the means doing this just placing it are can still breathe if I want. I can cough can talk but you just want to train your Josh shut at night and this alone I've heard from so many people has been a complete life changer for people who some of them aren't snoring anymore some of them their. SLEEP APNEA has gone down eighty ninety percent. So so how long did it take you and and what are you now? Are you eighty twenty year if you had to guess, I would you know writing a book about breathing people thank you the best super breather on the planet I'm not I'm a I'm a journalist who went into this field and talked to some supervisors talked to a bunch of scientists. but I still have work to do. I think I was a poor breather for so long I would like to think that I'm aware of my breathing all the time right now talking to you, I'm reading a lot through my mouth because that's what happened. So I'm aware of that and I'll be sure to establish some proper breathing habits after this interview So when I'm working out, I'm aware of. It all the time. So I I would like to think I'm just not during the daytime. I'm just not breathing through my mouth unless I'm talking or laughing, which is fine and at nighttime, I know him not breathing through my mouth at all 'cause I still use the tape I thought I could just train myself after a few weeks is a couple of years and I still use the stuff every single night. And so you mentioned nighttime sleep. Can you talk about the connection between proper bat breath and how it can affect your sleep? Yeah, I found this study which I thought was. So. Interesting and really frightening by the Mayo Clinic and they found that half of people with insomnia had undiagnosed sleep apnea. That's why they couldn't sleep at night and half of the people with sleep apnea had insomnia. So. They of twelve hundred subjects they look at they looked at nine hundred were given a pharmaceutical drug to an antidepressant assess awry or something else to relax them turns out that these drugs made their sleeping much worse 'cause they relaxed them too much. So every single one of them they said were failing this treatment and were getting worse and worse and Worse because they had undiagnosed sleep apnea. So we are just starting to people starting to talk about sleep. Now, how important is and all of that one hundred percent correct I view the the first pillar of sleep is you have to be breathing well, you have to be not be struggling to breathe when you're talking about fifty percent of a population snoring. Quarter having choking on itself from sleep apnea and also another even larger suffering from Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome. This is such such bad news and a lot of it. I don't know how much is associated with a pathway through which breathing I saw that in the Stanford experiment. Opening your mouth. You can do it right now when you open your mouth, your tongue naturally falls back a little deeper into the throat. When you close your mouth, the tongue naturally will go up towards the palate which opens the airway. So just just the pathway through which we breathe this isn't going to help someone with with extreme obesity. Or with with very severe sleep apnea. But for those who have mild or moderate, it can really make a huge difference sleeping on your side, not sleeping on your back inclined bed therapy. The these are things that are freely available to anyone and they had been absolute life changes for so many people. So you mentioned techniques earlier, I'm curious your take on some of the popular breathing techniques whether it's you know box breathing the Wim Hof method we've had on here Hala Tropic very popular of just curious like what what's what's your take all the different techniques? After researching each of these techniques and spending a long time in labs. Studying them what happened to my my body and looking what happened to other people I came to the conclusion that. So many of them are doing the same thing that was towards the end of the book was like it's no coincidence that Sudarshan Korea, which is very well studied sixty independent studies on it is almost identical to Wim Hof method, which is almost identical to. US because they're doing the same you can call them by different names. You can you know tell people that what what they're doing very specific to that one breathing method. But. They're having breathe very fast and then they're having you breathe very slow and we know that there's huge benefits to doing this too distressing you to balancing your nervous system function to helping with with chronic such as even auto immune issues to asthma. So that's all been known but I think people have been looking at these in these in these different plots in these different silos. But what I've found is there's a reason why they're all having similar benefits for for so many people so that that's a long way of saying. They all work. You pick whichever one you want I'm curious your take specifically on Hala Tropic I. One seems to be very popular right now. So Hala Trophic which was developed in the seventies by standoff whom I interviewed was supposed to replace LSD thoroughly for people with anxiety for panic to have these these breakthroughs and trump is the one, which which I have found their squad, a dearth of research on it. We know subjectively, that is very effective for people with severe mental problems but we don't know exactly what's happening in the body in in the brain and a lot of the clinicians aren't as interested. They're there to help people right on. That's that's awesome. So Holly Tropic is sitting in a room with loud music for three hours breathing his heart is you can't. That's that's it. I've done. It the exciting thing about this is it looks like we are going to be studying this in a real way electrodes perhaps FM are is. Blood. Gases in allowed to see what's what's really getting stimulated there in the brain but the benefit or what holiday tropic does, and this is where I think This hasn't been communicated very clearly us or super clearly by that community is it denies your brain autopsy. Jn. It Denies Your Tissues Oxygen People Think. Getting so much oxygen in my body, the opposite is happening. And that's why people have such powerful experiences is because you're denying areas in your brain certain amount of oxygen, which could stimulate the feeling that you're dying rebirth or hallucinations. Potentially dangerous extremes I. don't I talk to Jimmy Ironman had long interview with him. He ran eleven thousand of these sessions up for eleven, thousand people in a hospital, and he didn't have any prom these people who had schizophrenia these were addicts and he found that they only it only had benefit a different scale of benefit sometimes mild sometimes extremely profound. So when when you talk to a clinician someone who's using the stuff all the time. I don't think it's any more dangerous than than to be living with chronic anxiety for decades and out not getting any. Out of it I WANNA say though I'm not a doctor and I'm not here to tell some understood. For hours and then blame me that they. You Know Pete Pants, or something to have. That's that's that's not my damn understood. What what is I'm curious what's your like? Do you have specific practice where you set aside time and what are you? What's your Go-to Yeah I think the most important thing that people can do is to start breathing slowly and to start reading less that seems counterintuitive. But YOU WANNA breathe as closely in line with your metabolic needs as possible for the vast majority of us. That means breathing last. So I whenever I sit down in the morning I have my phone I have this silly APP on it that gives me this little tone. So it reminds me to breathe into account about sex and breathe out to account about six not pushing it not just. Really, focused just just very casually very lightly just by doing that, you're getting more oxygen to your brain you're allowing your heart to work with a lot less effort to do more you're getting more circulation. So if you have cold toes cold fingers all the time, you can try the slower breathing and it's going to increase the circulation to your peripherals in your extremities So I do that quite often i. Do they call it Wim Hof, breathing some, call it to Oh I do that about three or four times a week There's an instructor, Chuck McGee who does these sessions for free and then sends out the recordings for free for anyone. This guy's selfless saint who has managed completely heal himself of a bunch of chronic conditions by breathing which is great and I also try to do Sudarshan Korea. Is often as I can maybe once a week but I think the most important thing is to be conscious of it and again to try to breathe in line with your metabolic needs, not way below it and especially now way above it. So we all have to wear masks it's the cost of. Living Right now. Helpful. In focusing on the breath, I find that I'm more conscious of breathing wearing a mask and as I've tried to consciously breathe through my nose like wearing the bass like sort of puts me in. The right state of mind to focus what's what's your take on breathing with a mask and? I think it would be better to have a mask on but of course, because nowadays, we we all have it and it's made people acutely aware of their their breathing. So the the best way if you have a pulse ox seminar in these are the real hot items. Now in the age of Covid, it's interesting to see what happens to your oxygen. When you breathe slowly and I found that mine can either stay the same or actually go up when I'm breathing very slowly because you're allowing more time for that oxygen to be absorbed in your lungs. So ways that device again, can you a pulse pulse ox similar pulse ox similar sounds the latest their twenty bucks on Amazon or or at your local. Drugstore. And and they assess your blood sats. So they assess how much oxygen because one of the main indicators Cova is when you're you're oa-to starts going down and sometimes you don't even feel it. I mean some of these people registering. Oh, to like down in the eighties are seventies which is. Normal is about ninety five is in the nineties, right? So if you're down anywhere below ninety urine trouble, so it this is a great device when you first start exploring breathing in when you especially for start exploring breathing slowly because you'll notice slower and less often gives you more so that didn't. Directly. Answer your question about mass I think that the BENEF- The thing that's that bad about them. As they're hassled aware hot air got a brush, your teeth, the law of the wiser you're suffering those consequences but the benefits are they made us acutely where breathing and I think they've helped us to breathe breathe less which which is good The important thing is just because you have a mask on, don't think you can breathe through your mouth and your okay. You always WanNa be breathing through your nose in the science on that is is so solid. So. What you also have the book I love I, Love the book. All these great takeaways, surprising takeaways one of them I read this I, started laughing the nose house erectile tissue. Let's. Let's talk about that. One of the many benefits so it turns out again this is the weird stuff you you start learning about when when you write a book about breathing and and start talking to to pros in in the in the nose World Ranallah. Gist. It turned out that our noses are coated with the same exact tissue as our genitals and they respond in the same way. So they will become engorged with blood and become inflamed or the blood leaves and they opened back up. What's so interesting to me about this is that our nostrils will open this erectile tissue will open and close throughout the day. So one nostra will open, and then after about thirty minutes to three or four hours it. Will awfully close in the other will become more dominant sometimes, both will will feel open but throughout the day like right now, this nostril, my right nostril is so much more open than than my left and that's not because I'm congested here. That's because that erectile tissue is become a gorge with flooding in gently closed up. So what they found and this is where it's even wilder. There's there's been twenty years of studies probably even more than that. Looking at how breathing through one austral or the other affects US mentally and physically. So breeding through that and people yoga people know all about this breathing through the right nostril associated with heat heart rate's GONNA go up circulation. So you're GONNA be stimulating the left side, the quote analytical side of your brain even more. That's clearly been demonstrated eeg studies and the left nostrils can have. The opposite effect is GonNA lower, your heart rate. It's GONNA cool. The body so and that that's been well documented in wh what I think is fascinating is that our noses you can do alternate nostril breathing probably everyone listening to this already does this but our noses are already doing this. So they are doing alternate nostril breathing throughout the day every day through these natural channels which. To me is pretty pretty interesting. So something else I thought was really interesting. You know look we all love to eat and you talk about chewing. Chewing. Chewing and breathing. So how can we chew better? Well, there's a reason why our mouths shrunk okay and why we're so messed up and why we're suffering from sleep apnea and all these other respiratory issues. It's because the major reason is because we stopped chewing our food if you look at when this damage really started coming on. It was right at the time when industrialized processed foods started becoming a very well known and consumed talk about removing the bran and germ from rice removing the brandon germ from wheat bottling things canning. Everything soft. And without habit that mask guitarist stress especially when you're young. You're not going to build the bone mass. You're not gonNA work out these muscles. The upper palate is not gonNA come down properly as it should in really expand your mouth, which is why so many of us present company included if you have a clean thumb if you're alone and not not with other people with with code, you can put your thumb inside your upper palate, and if it's really caved in like mine is that upper palate is pushing into the upper sinuses making it harder breath. So this is all all known stuff and they've studied in his found is directly correlated to. Chewing and I put chewing under the umbrella of chewing breastfeeding versus bottle bottle-feeding when you have an infant who's been breastfeeding for two years that takes incredible amount of stress and coordination and helps to push the face out and open up that way, which is why kids who have been bottle fed will have a larger chance of having snoring and sleep apnea later on in life and to me, it makes perfect sense. Especially, those first two years you're developing. So quickly, of course I was I was bottle fed. Associate some of that with with my airway problems I can't tell my mom. This was just the thing to do and it's impossible for a lot of people to to breastfeed I. I understand this there's there's no finger-pointing here. I'm saying this is what's happened before kids were breastfed at least two years sometimes two to four years. This is how it was don for tens of thousands of years only in the past few centuries have we really switched this? So in terms of research I'm hoping you know your book the attention with Covid that there's renewed interest if you will on on breath and. So I'm curious what research you're keeping an eye on what studies maybe they're. They're happening right now they're not conclusive yet like Whoa, what are you looking at in terms of research and science I? Think nitric oxide is fascinating because now I think there's fourteen studies right now administering nitric oxide to covid patients we create our own nitric oxide right here, and if we come, we can increase that nitric oxide fifteen fold by humming. So humming side. So lately, me give me an example what type of humming what would we do? You can harm whatever you want. You can you know iron man by Black Sabbath. You can harm whatever the carpenters doesn't doesn't matter I like lower. Range like musical range very impressive. Two sides that maybe we should do another podcast another topic. That's that's pretty impressive musical range both seventies bands though really pig myself with that one. But but lower I believe lower frequencies I don't know if there's a ton of science on this. It helps loosen and stimulate that nitric oxide release and we know this and and the science of this is solid there. There was one researcher found the so so wild, but he was able to cure up his chronic sinusitis by humming for a certain amount of time four times a day. If you think about chronic sinusitis is caused by a virus, sometimes it's caused by a Fungal infection, but it's mostly virus. What does nitric oxide do it interacts directly with viruses? So the fact that they're now using nitric oxide, there's they're studying nitric oxide to use it with patients with with covid unlike of course, they are so humming nasal breathing the these are very good things to do and breathing slowly and stain relaxed. I mean, if you're looking at Steven porgies. Released this this fascinating paper looking at the role that inflammation plays in the onset of severe symptoms of Covid and we know this you look people with diabetes. You look at people with heart issues look at people with what all these people have is they have inflammation problems. So so to keep your inflammation down when the easiest things you can do beyond eating right exercise very important is to really focus on your breathing and Tabriz slower not to be breathing through your mouth. So so just just those few things it seems so easy to be true people say, no, no way. This is possible but if you look at the science behind it, it's All there and it's all easily measurable. That's what I love about breathing as well is this isn't like a hey, how do you feel I feel better that's cool. There are machines and a lot of have these machines in our house that can instantly measure how you're breathing is affecting yourself and if you can affect yourself if you can put yourself into this balanced relax state for a couple minutes imagine what's going to happen. If you can stay that way for a couple days couple weeks couple months. While we've seen, I've written about these people in the book who have been able to absolutely, he'll themselves miraculous ways by switching pretty slow in low. Slow there you go. Well, James Thank you so much as I. mentioned I I love the camera recommended enough. So important for where we are today in this crazy world, we can all breathing this way. It doesn't cost anything can do it anywhere. You don't have to sweat. And it can save your life a second that. Yeah there's there's no point not to you can. You can do it while watching tiger king or you can do it while meditating whatever you want. We carry our breath with us all the time, and so if you focus those breasts whom work more efficiently, you can really see some profound benefits. Amen to that James Thank you so much. Thanks for having me.

lung mouth breathing chronic sinusitis Covid researcher asthma Lebron James Louis IGNARRO Kobe Buddy Greene CBS Morning News Sudarshan Korea ABC James Welcome Klassen
63: Interview With Patrick McKeown

Rapid Change Matters

1:10:25 hr | 1 year ago

63: Interview With Patrick McKeown

"Welcome to episode sixty three of the rapid change matters. Podcast A conversation with leading proponent of the Butare breathing method and author of the oxygen advantage. Patrick mckeown my name's Howard Cooper and for over fourteen years. Now I've been fascinated with helping people to create personal change quickly but I still come across. Many believed that losting personal change has to take a long time consisting of reliving traumas or deep psychological analysis or simply that flawed notion that understanding. Why you have a problem will somehow make it go away. I'm on a mission to get people who work therapeutically with others to shift their thinking and realized that these beliefs and not written in stone. Rapid change can happen so to help you open up to. What's possible I'm chatting with top therapists and agents of change. Who are out there. Getting real results with real people really quickly before we get to the interview. I've got big news. Rapid Change Works is now running live training events and you can check out the latest events coming up by visiting rapid change dot works where you can also download a free quick to read. Pdf on five strategies to amplify your client response along with all the information about this episode and episode. Still to come now with the interview. Today we breathe some new life into the podcast. My next guest is the author of the book. The oxygen advantage and is someone who's trained thousands of people to breathe more efficiently. A leading proponent of the buteyko method of breathing. He may change your views on breathing for good myself. A good enormous value after reading this book and practicing the methods outlined the number is huge benefits and using some of these principles in Cloyne work to especially helping people. Things gives me enormous pleasure to welcome. Patrick McEwen to the podcast. Welcome Patrick thanks. Very much aren't good to be here. It's absolutely fantastic to have you hoping we can straighten because a many appoint listeners might not know much about you or your background or how you ended up. Becoming one of the leading proponents of the view take methods. So maybe you could give us a little luck era affiliate justify your back pressure as close as it's not a career that you would. You would go into at least twenty years ago by choice so I fell into it by accident fit into it because my own how tissues as a kid growing up I had chronic nasal obstruction. I was a chronic map reader. If you're breathing mattress sleep is impacted. Map-reading is also causing fast oppor. Chess breathing that results in education of the mind and mouth breathing also feeding into asthma. So when you have a breathing pattern disorder such as fast process breathing. It wasn't just impacting my asthma but it was impacting. My sleep and it was impacting anxiety. But of course she'll learn to live with us because you know what our way and I used to always been used to say to me. They could hear my breathing. Our did I have a head cold and debt. I still fat no matter how much era breed that I still wasn't getting an affair and it wasn't because I was under breathing. The Problem Mazda developed the habit of breathing too hard too fast too much air and that will find the face of what's often toll auch and told to people who are under stress. They're often towards take a deep Brett. Did take a big Brett. It's entirely the wrong thing to do so I was. You know after a fifteen twenty years ago. Remember exactly but Saturday was twenty your twenty years of in and out of medical doctors and hospitals and I came across an article in the newspaper about the work of a Russian doctor constantly. You take up. This is back in one thousand nine hundred page and he said two things he said. Break through your nose at all time. And he said breed lange so I started using his exercise to decongest minnows. And that night then I tape my mouth. Tonight used a nasal danger and the first morning. I didn't find much of a difference but the second morning I woke up fitting act and I woke up feeling more alert than ahead ever done that. I could ever remember. There was something that was a difference there and you know. Let me think of breathing. Breathing seldom gets attention and when it does get attention. Oftentimes the information. That's put out there. It's it's not correct and it doesn't make sense and oftentimes. I think it can do more harm than it can go if people believe that hard breathing and taken big brats is going to have calmed them down. It's entirely incorrect. So what I would like to explore his. Maybe why have misinterpretations convenient breathing? Why has breathing being overlooked? What role does breathing have to play with? People that hangs is he and poor sleep. And what's the connection between breathing sleep anxiety so to cut a long story short? It made a huge difference to my life. My background is economics from university in Dublin Dublin I wasn't the corporate world and then in two thousand and one. I had lunch that I wanted to teach breathing. So I trained in Russia doctoral. Butare he was alive at the time and he crashes may a comeback to art in two thousand and two and I've been teaching fulltime ever since I've written eight books. My latest book the oxygen advantages going into fourteen languages. And I teach this internationally so unfortunate. I found a job that I absolutely love to do. And it's very satisfying. It's very rewarding. And you know it's it's tremendous to be honest with you. It's really interesting. Hearing that one of the questions that I wanted to explore with us you knew that you had sort of congestion people. Colvin's it on your breathing. You mentioned earlier and then you suddenly see also all this thing about this on that you've never come across before. What was it stuck out to you? That the help she guy. Oh okay. That's interesting. This something there about what is. GonNa say that. I WANNA try because it'd be so easy to dismiss something a lot of people you know when you say suffer fools outside of cognitive biases. They go well well. Let's probably rubbish. Just carry on debriefing harder. But but you didn't you Kinda went. Oh hold on the soap. Make different hair. That's interesting well. The newspaper article and might not have been the first time to the cam across the importance of nose breathing. But certainly they are to. What struck a chord with me. And I was conscious that I remember being in hospital with Asman back in nineteen ninety four and also that same year we had our nine five ounce had operation. My nose fixmer knows but finally the operation surgeons never told me to break through so the surgeons at dressed as lab -struction but didn't address. The Habash and this happens with children are not US towers of as nasal operation scoring on. Children are having a noise removed but children encouraged to NASAB right afterwards. It's a real issue. We can't just change. The obstruction would act changing the behavior but I remember being in hospital with asthma attack. Nineteen ninety four to medical doctors. Come in this sense my breathing and they commented that he breeds both through his nose and trude as much and that stuck with me so I knew there was a problem there and probably that nays breathing was the way to go but it wasn't might prefer droop because if. I try to reach my nose. I felt I wasn't getting enough air so I needed techniques to be able to decongest my nose and all of these techniques have been available and written about like when I look back at this when I knock cash journals written by over one hundred years ago looking at how mark breathing can affect your children. How these kids have no attention in school. How to grow their face? I would cause crooked. Tish how deep the Like the face dollar and expressionless The teacher is accusing the child of of daydreaming. That was made and falling asleep. And we have a fifty percent of the fifty percent study. Children are persistent map breathing and it's completely being overlooked and it's a huge problem. Doors a study conducted by Kanban in stratford-upon-avon. It was believe I think if if I can remember correctly was a nature study looking at eleven thousand children and they looked at children with sleep. Disordered breathing and mouth breathing is a contributory factor to the children would sleep disorder breathing. They if untreated. They had a forty percent increase. Risk of special education dates. Now you know. Why is this being overlooked? Why is nobody talking about my breathing? Why is nobody talking about mark breathing during sleep and I would say dealing with People Xijing? How can you have a camera? And if you don't have asleep good sleep quashing and we have to consider that the bidirectional relationship between breathing sleep and the mind if we are stressed out. Breathing gets faster and upper chest but faster and upper chest. Breathing also feeds back into stress. And GITEX TO MIND. Can you have a Cam? Mind if physiologically you're breathing faster and upper chest. If you have faster and upper chest breathing map we think it impacts your sleep quality. You don't achieve deep quasi sleep and you will wake up feeling refreshed if you don't make fieldwork feeling refreshed. You're more likely to be anxious because you cannot concentrate. You cannot be productive so you cannot achieve everyday tasks that you want to do so your sleep is feeding into anxiety but also if you have an agitated mind. It's difficult to fall asleep insomnia so individuals who can't switch off where there is incessant and repetitive activity. Where there's one taught after the other approach by we're ruminating on on issues that are going on and we end up twisting and turning you know for a couple of hours before we go to sleep that's going to also result tin and waking up feeling refreshed so an agitated mind affects our sleep sleep quasi can impact. Niger tasted mind and agitated. Mind affects breathing and how we breathe effects. An an agitated mind how we breed affects your sleep. How am I stop talking in his ear? Because sometimes they go into like I remember speaking to a group of psychotherapists and I told him you know. I didn't tell the money thing but I explained cognitive behavioral therapies tremendous but it does not changing response to physiology and we know that from studies. And if you are working with somebody would anxiety with depression with high stress levels with post traumatic stress disorder. How can you really make 'em huge difference to that individual's life unless you look at sleep and unless you look at breathing and those are two things and the research in terms of breathing is not just about taking that big Brett it's not just about focusing on the bio mechanics of breathing is as often emphasized and yoga and Palatis breathing is more complex. But it's not that complex at the same time. There are trade dimensions to breathing biochemical by mechanical and cadence of the Brett and the breadth at South by working windisch. It can impart a tremendous terror -peutic beneficiary from sympa practice that you bring into your everyday life because it's true you're breathing that you influence the functions of the body. That's outside of your normal nausea Automatic control so I think it's a great inroad but when we talk about breathing we need to quantify and qualify wash. Are we talking about and how to make the changes to breathing? Because we don't want to make mistakes with this. If an individual has a belief of taking hard full big bricks they actually do more harm than good. Do you think so I I would like to just before. We get to lower clarify for the audience. What specifically the Buteiko method of breathing is a not gonNA bunch more questions a more things that I'd love to explore with. You is duly essentially through giving out advice as we grow up from hearing parents and counselors. Who Don't really understand the mechanisms get in the way of just the natural understanding of how to do it. I always knowing today. A too much analysis in too much outside influences gets us to basically practice and screw it up and then we have to reload. And that's the thing that I became to to to say sure will answer the first question. Dr Buteiko was focused mainly in the biochemistry of breathing. He said dodged. There is a normal partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood which is correct. It's forty millimeters of mercury. But if you re too hard you get rid of too much. Carbon dioxide from the bloodshed the lungs carbon dioxide is not just a waste gas it performs a number of very important functions in the human body for example. Your blood circulation is influenced by carbon dioxide. And if you break too much air you blow off carbon too much carbon dioxide your move too much carbon dioxide from the blood should the lungs and this causes blood vessels to constrict so many of your listeners will have code hands that can be impacted from breathing to heart. They have brain fog that can be impacted from breathing. Too hard and cold fish and other aspect of carbon dioxide is that it's not just a waste gas people talk about bringing oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide because when oxygen transfers from the lungs into the blood in the blood carried by Hemoglobin Molecules which are proteins inside the red blood cells but we need to presence of carbon dioxide as a catalyst for for red blood cells to release oxygen to the tissues. And that's the board effect that was discovered back in nineteen o four so again if we are breathing too hard we blow off too much. Carbon Dioxide disinterring causes red blood cells to hold onto oxygen stronger and as a result less oxygen actually gets delivered throughout the body so the harder we breed the more blood vessels constrict and the less oxygen gets delivered to tissues organs including the heart and the brain and hyperventilation. If you are most people I think will identify with this. If I say to somebody I want you now to take ten full big breaks in and out of your nose or mapped. There will often feel lightheaded and it can happen. All it takes thirty seconds on power breathing to reduce blood flow to the brain and it can reduce blood flow blood flow to the brain by up to forty percent. And that's a significant drop in a course that hard breathing synonymous drought or evolution. Would fight or flight with stress so stress of courses making us breathe faster but then it doesn't make sense for us to stop breathing harder in an attempt to negate stress. Because all we're going to do is to make it worse. So that's your take was so soon centered solely on carbon dioxide on the biochemistry getting carbon dioxide levels normal by normalizing breathing fine. He said that people aren't breathing. Too hard they are breathing too fast and they're breathing often upper chest and often true a minute. What this is doing is impairing circulation and oxygen delivered. Now you could say like at so to answer now would do take is is a super matinees. It's absolutely brilliant. But I also then started oxygen advantage by five years ago and I started oxygen advantage for this reason while for a number of reasons. But here's one of them. I brought together courses. I was giving courses back in two thousand ten because of the financial crash here in Ireland and people were. Were you know? A lot of stress was a lot of anxiety. And I started giving mindfulness courses which I've accused interest in mindfulness and I've always been following Passenger courses in reading up and a lot of my work would have been laughing at the spiritual aspect of as well as the the breathing and respiration however I often fat. Mindfulness wasn't sufficient and also we need to bring in functional breathing so I called it. The mindfulness matted why not bring in mindfulness but also bringing Buteiko and also bringing in sleep but I couldn't have noticed much. Ninety percent of the people who were attending females and we had very few male CEOS coming to the to the courses and I was wondering like may answered the ones that are most often than Nash that are stuffing with anxiety depression. But why wouldn't they turn up to a breathing course because it wasn't maybe it wasn't suited to the Alpha male tendencies and that's how oxygen advantage was born to some degree. Because I want to do a program for sports performance to increase concentration to increase resilience and to give different breathing techniques. And what what it gave me was a great freedom because Buteiko is beautiful. And who am I to change Buteiko because it was developed by a Russian doctor it's very very pure matted and I didn't want to deviate from that but what's agenda advantage. I start off from scratch and I could bring in the biomechanical aspects from Utech but I can also bring in the bio mechanical aspect. And I could also bring incoherent and cadence breathing. I could also bring in breakfasting. Intermittent type high poxy carpet company trend. And that's basically rectal exercises to kind of for sports performance but my point here is meditation is prescribed and often recommended for pupils. How can you meditate when your mind is in emotional turmoil and when I was talking to these youngsters coming in and we had three thousand people come in over twenty ten to twenty thirteen? I would always ask them. How many of you here have ever met in your life and it was. Maybe ten percent wasn't that high because a lot of them are newcomers and asked money of you still meditation and a completely dropped off and I think there's there's a message out there because it's not. Sometimes we think of the guy who has meditating the guy in the lowest position and destroyed back in. He's all the beads and he's got the robes not that's fine. Meditation is not how you watch. It's not what you do when you're in a former crashing but it's how you bring this into your everyday life. I had an agitated mind money. People have an agitated mind and if you were to look inside the heads of most individuals you will see that. Their minds isn't Arron estate of an emotional termite even though to have lovely white heat and present you with a smile and if you go to North America today everything is good. And how you doing and all of this stuff. But it doesn't tell you what's going on in their heads. Your Life is a meditation. We carry our Brentwood us. So what I wanted to do was to bring people's breathing attention onto the bretton their everyday life to get them out of the head but to do more than just get them out of their head. Increased blood flow to the brain increase. Oxygen delivered to the brand changed by mechanics breathing because the connection between the die from and the mind but also changed cadence of the Brett slowing down the breathing for practices. A five point. Five six permission to help improve Vega told by receptors are trade for your beigey response. You SINUS ARRHYTHMIA. So we're not shout breadth is something you carry chip and if you think of breathing don't just think of breathing in one dimension. When I was a beautiful instructor my silo was all about biochemistry and I didn't focus in the by mechanics and I didn't focus on the cadence of the breakfast do yoga instructor. They're often. They're silo is the by mechanics. They don't always love the the biochemistry and they don't look at the cadence of the Brett heart-rate very busy their luggage. Cadence coherence of breathing. But they don't up at the bio mechanics and don't up the biochemistry. We can't just think of breathing of dimension and in working with people anxiety and emotional termites and I have learned a lot over the years with working with these groups and oftentimes by making mistakes and people into a fear response by having them do brat toiling because people would panic disorder. You know some groups have very strong feeling towards the fear of suffocation and when I'm having people reduce that breathing volume of course we are generating Air Hong keep them. Tell them to keep going in terms of exposed or by Tehran which would be going but at times I was putting them into too much of a fight or flight response. And so you know you learn a lush and this is what experience an aging years down the road. I realized that I know something about breathing. But there's a lot I don't know and you know it's it's really one thing about the break but it's it's a wonderful thing to work. Wish I mean I think what was interesting is is one of these things that so easy toy. Look because everyone else. It delivers civil views. Just sitting there. What do you mean if someone said to you? Can you learn to move your arms up? Let me miles an expert in doing that severely replying to focusing in on something that we all take for granted an looking at the details on the way on this idea of do we a wheeled bowl and breathing perfectly and then we kind of get accident. Influences the dysfunctional patents. I'd say we wear at one point for breathing perfectly but we have to think of that. The breathing of the infant from day. One that's going to be coming from the breathing of the mutter and it's not that I'm here to put the emphasis on the mom Bush if you have a muttering estate of stress and they are breathing imperfectly. That may be disturbing gases. Could that impact the infant? That's a question I don't know. And we certainly know from craniofacial changes and I've seen it with my daughter that she was born with a very high narrow panish and that's not ideal because of course than the airways compromised. And if you have a small knows our patch more likely to moderate but infants are born breathing through the nose because the soft Polish at the back of the Moat and the EPA cloud is meat so in actual fact. An infant is an innate nasal breeder you know lifestyle factors have changed breathing so much food and lack of breastfeeding during infancy over vent over. He should houses are houses. Now got so much. Installation people may not be opened the windows and it lack of physical exercise talking talking is not good for breathing in terms of because when you talk it increases to respond to race and it increases the tide of finding which is the size of the Brett. This intern is causing over breathing. So people who talk for a living. They will often find that they are very tired at the end of today talking. That's not because of the mental concentration but that's because of the act of talking because they're breathing is harder than their metabolic needs. So you have to consider that when you breathe hard you're blowing off too much. Carbon Dioxide and talking is causing you to breath hard like when did our ancestors get up thousand years ago very few of our ancestors good up. Eight o'clock in the morning got into work worked in some office for some multinational company under stress talking on the phone all day long having to put up the competitive politics management with their open door policy. Saying that. We're looking after employees the calling employees associates and team members and order during his pitting and milking. And you know it's a really wonder about I think at sometimes. It's really a deception and it's a deception in many organizations. When I was a twenty year old I used to be jealous of the Guy I was the guy into SOC and they used to be jealous of the guy going into the big tall skyscraper going into the big six or Big Five accountancy firms. Want a wonderful job when I'm forty six and all I can say is thank God. I never had to work for one of those companies. I was in. You know I think the my only point I'm saying is it's distressed. It's put on people and you could ask to question. I don't want to go away from a book. You can ask a question here. Is it because I was in the corporate world and I didn't like it and I found a lot of stress the fat I had put stress employees under me as well. Because the monthly targets to me and people my managers of my level we were all pitted against each other. It was all dawn. You know so one handed. I just feel that it was just when I look back and also the profiling the company that I worked wish there was only about one person over thirty two years of age and the reason being is because they got guys and our twenty s they could pay them a low wage. Dinka put them under a lot of stress. Could mold them. They could melt them and when they burnt out they could get rid of them and could replace them would even younger guys so my point here is. I was in that position but was it. The job that was causing me distress or wasn't my reaction to the job. My resilience at the time wasn't good. My sleep wasn't good. My mind was already detained and after mind is agitated. This it doesn't take much of situation to put into that stress response Coming back to your question was do. We breed naturally perfectly. Yes and do we now breed naturally perfectly probably no? I think lifestyle has really gotten the way we are not. We are not living the way our ancestors live. Our faces are changing if you look at the work of professor. John meal from from London his son. Dr Mike Mulas is carrying on if you read the books. Nutrition and physical degeneration published back in the nineteen thirties in the shape of the human faces changing the airway is becoming compromised and as the airway becomes compromised those results in my breathing but my within poor breathing patterns. But we have to look at. I suppose during the genetic influence and breathing on persons but he panic disorder P. T. S. day that breathing impacted. It's not just exiled. Changes breathing patterns breathing patterns changing anxiety and in the literature. Eighty percent of people wit anxiety have breathing pattern disorders. We have to change Nash. So one of the reasons why was painted interview was the two reasons one. I knew we talked about this briefly before but just to fill the listeners. In the I've been a working with clients the many many years I would say since reading the book. The oxygen voltage. I just haven't been able to stop noticing people who I'm seeing with anxiety coming in and being a math breed the site conversations said to you like ninety percent of the People. I'm seeing you know it's eighty percent of the research but yet certainly seems very very high and It became more and more interesting to me that have commodity be looking at the way the mind is looking at this and then ignoring something which is so glaringly being presented so often so that was one thing and the other thing that led me to the book in the first place. Which is it's kind of a personal story which is all show people which was many many years ago I ended up having having a free test of the GP to check breathing. Function equals in To come and get the results you need to go in and see him and of course your mind salts wondering what is going on. Maybe Asmara. Maybe something else and he went well. There are some signs. He said with his concerned. Gp Face that awesome signs of Restrictive lung capacity. So of course. What did I do think the luggage will do? I went on Google really helpful. The only thing I could find With the phrase restrictive lung capacity was people took him out restrictive lung disease which talked about being fatal. And you can't take a deep breath them so I was told to consult on my the appointment three weeks time. So what would I do unconsciously or even consciously I would say to try and reassure myself that I was taking in Naples taking into Fox gin and I didn't have restrictive lung capacity will take a massive big deep breath. Said I'd really WANNA feel my lungs expanding and if I could feel expanding then I would not feel reassured. The of course my lungs wouldn't restrictive. So why did that For about three weeks but I noticed off the first few hours maybe even sooner only was beginning to struggle to feel like I could take a deep breath in it wasn't satiated and say we sought to say Shit. This really is a thing. I must really have the restrictive on capacity. So I'll tell you what I must do. In order to reassure myself. I'm definitely am okay. I should carry on doing even deeper breasts and so we'll have to live with the closer three weeks. Mother told me ended up at the consultant. I really struggling to shortness of breath. I really couldn't breeze a I was really convinced that I was about to. Dolly of restrictive lung disease On his Pretty Sutton and of course. The doctors just kept telling me a well challenge. It could be laity related. They said So just take some deep breaths. That was the only thing they could ever do will say to me and of course all the coming back. No wonder if ironically the consulting even said to me. He looked the Roman ruins. Gps sense and he said. I don't know why you've been set in. He's misread them. It will. You'RE SPIRO. Attributing zoff falling but at that point. I didn't feel fun because so I'm curious that I had this thing that I've seen thome does at Hunga. What would have been going on busy logically? Som Me while I think. I think it's very common that you know if we have a stressful event in our life. And you know it's a stressful event. That's been going on for say a number of weeks or months long term as opposed to short term as opposed to something that happened over few minutes or if we have perfectionist tendencies that we place high demands on ourselves and society puts a lot of pressure on us as well. You know all all ages in terms of and your a-levels you know getting a job getting house all of this stuff and that can impact her breathing. And if we get into a habit of persistently breathing a little bit faster and a little bit harder dot. Intern can change the biochemistry of the blood. Now the body. Dan Does want to normalize Ph but in the process the kidneys don't buy Kharbash so you have a reduced buffering capacity lower co two and. It's not everybody would exiled. He has lower co two but it is common that people would anxiety our genetic predisposition towards or even just perfectionist tendencies develop breathing pattern disorders and that breathing pattern disorder becomes habitual so even when distresses removed the breathing pattern sort remains and one of the symptoms of breathing pattern disorders. It's often common air hunger. So we are. Hunger is when one would have saved an increased sensitivity to the gas carbon dioxide. And you'll have a knock leash and they will typically have a well trained. Athlete will typically have a reduced sensitivity to the gas carbon Knox because carbon dioxide. That drives your breathing. So as carbon dioxide comes from the from the from the tissues into the blood as carbonated increase in the blood blood. Ph Drops in the brain reacts by sending a stimulus to breed. It's not oxygen. Drives her breathing. The but the body doesn't like it's the body doesn't breed to bring in oxygen. Yes in the process. Of course oxygen has brought in but the body breeds to get rid of excess co two but if we are overly sensitive to co two are carbon dioxide accumulation. I'm breathing this harder now. There are very simple exercise and actually go to a couple of them budget. I'm going to go to a history. There was adopted cloud lung from Popper Hospital in Cambridge back in the nineteen seventies and he was one of those physicians he was adjust physician. He was seeing Unin crime prevention and he started writing bash and he called it the Factfile Syndrome. He said you've got a group of patients are going from doctor to doctor. They are having a myriad of different symptoms an altered. They're having symptoms which is not just related to organ system and he said that these patients are going from doctor to doctor. Doctor Doctor Doctor. They're having these tests. The tests are coming back. Negative the the doctor. Dan thinks that the the patient in front of them as a hypochondriac because they have earned array of symptoms that are not related to each other and that the patient is often to to go home towards go home. Take a deep breakfast themselves. Day Dr Claude Code the Factfile Syndrome. Because he said that the thickness of the patient's file is a diagnostic. Clue of white or chronic ventilation syndrome is present on. He said the tip of the file gives us more information than the contents Darren. Now why was that not taken aboard by the medical profession because medical doctors? This is taken from a book code and behavioral and Psychological Approaches to breathing. Ring back in one thousand nine hundred four by two medical doctors. They asked a question. If hyperventilation syndrome is causing so much difficulties at their. Why hasn't it being embraced? Their conclusion was medical doctor. Said it wasn't dared demane that it was the domain of psychiatry. They handed the field of breathing hyperventilation syndrome to the psychiatrist. But two psychiatrists said it wasn't dared to Maine. They handed it back to the medical doctors and had fell between two stools. And you know even physiotherapy and physiotherapy of course is a wonderful modality but teaching die from Ati breathing but not teaching nose breathing. That's a mistake. You cannot achieve die fanatic abdominal breathing without breathing in and out through the nose. You know we have to consider that the airway is one airway it's unified airway. We have to think of the knows. We have to think of the lungs. We have to think of die from and asthma. One reason that it hasn't been embraced as well as because it takes time to work with clients and medical doctors don't have time. They're they are required to see four patients every hour and I know one medical doctor. We were like she's one of our own structures and we have a number of medical doctors on our board but the workload that they are put under like. How can you realistically assess somebody's breathing? You know in fifteen minutes and literally a don't have fifty minutes. I think her workload was seventy clients. Day was what she seventy patients. A day was what she had to say. She account just no way. It's not possible so as a result them it's turned every it's turned it into a prescription machine because of speed because of efficiency and and breathing is just one of those things could impart so many different benefits. Now I'M GONNA before I go off on a tangent I would say to people. Slowing breathing can be difficult enough for some people. Did the mind as education as I said before you know meditation is often prescribed. But how can you meditate? If your mind is a mess literally so I would say the best way to do that. To do. Small toads it has a calming effect in the mind and an exercise that you could do or anybody could be doing that. Has No side effects is take a normal breath in and out through the nose and the holder knows and count to five says number breath. Dan Number breath at five four. Three two one let go. I'm breed norm for ten seconds. So now breathe Norma for ten seconds. This seems such a simple exercise and again taken over breath in and out trio knows whole. Gino's five four three two one. Let go but breathe in ambery norm for ten seconds so you just breathing normal for ten seconds and again taken over breath in and out and hold five four three two one let go to breathe in and breathe normally for ten seconds and again taken over by in and out and hold five four three two one case. That's one exercise that can be very useful when people are stressed. Because you know hold your breath The mind desiging aged as opposed to just trying to focus on your breathing because you focus on your breath your mind goes off. You're focusing on your bed. Your mind gets out goes off you get frustrated and then you give it up whereas you can come down the central nervous system and all you're doing is and it's interesting there. You've taken up so mucus and the reason being is because Hydra taken over by the international hold and as you how'd your breath carbon dioxide increases in the blood a little but nitric. Oxide accumulates in the nasal cavity. And when you laco. You're carrying that nitric oxide into your lungs. The nitric oxide doesn't Bronco Donator Tabs. Open the airways so if there was a little bit of mucus trapped in the lungs it can bring up so I just give you a couple of minutes in the biochemistry to sell if you sit back into the sack chest. One hundred zero bugger. Naval doesn't matter how do you know just I give you a very simple instruction and what I want to just chew it into your breathing patterns feeling Brad coming in. There's your breath out. There's your breath coming into the body and there's your breath leaving the body dish breath coming into the body and there's your breath leaving the body. I would like to do is slow down the speed of your bring Ben Okay. So there's your brats scenario Brenton really slow to a certain shouldn't see as much movement and a really relaxed and slow prolonged explanation having a relaxes slow prolonged the nation and then take a very soft and slow breath in a very soft and slow breath in very soft and slow and a prolonged. Relax sex elation and the whole objective is to breathe by thirty percent less air into your body. You know that you were doing correctly when you feel their hunger. This is the biochemistry aspect of breathing. Not Concentrating to die from. I'm only concentrating on reducing the volume of breathing reducing the minute ventilation to allow carbon dioxide to accumulate in the blood to generate a feeling of air hunger. Keep practicing that just for about thirty seconds or so now. When people would panic disorder practice dot sometimes a concept into a firefight response because they have an aversion of suffocation. This is where we have to go very gentle with them. I want to give the Matisse Spoon of disaffiliation to deconditioning their body towards that feeling of suffocation but I don't want to put them into that firefight and it's a tremendous approach because you know when you slow down your breathing like Dash. Generally you will find. What in three to four minutes. You've got increased Walrus. Live in the Max your hand getting warmer and you feel drowsy so it's great exercise to do before sleep but the Air Hunger. We have to be careful which another aspect that we looked at. Dennis to buy mechanic so if you sit back into the chair I put your hands either side of your lower to rips. So you have your side have your hands either side of your lower two ribs and as you breathe in that your ribs are just gently moving out as you breathe at. Your ribs are gently moving and as you breathe in your Ribs Agenda Moving Act and as you breathe at your ribs gently moving so as you breathe in your lower ribs or gently moving out and as you breathe at your lower abs or gently moving to breathe life with this so you can breathe. This is a deep Braxton. The true sense of the word use should never hear a deep Brett. Deep Breakfast means that you are breathing low so because we want to maintain the biochemistry and the by mechanics and now what I'm GonNa do is as you do that. Bring in cadence breathing and going to simply just have your breathing for five seconds and breathe for five seconds. So I'm just GonNa time here so you're breathing in two three four five four five hours in two three four five three four five pause in two three four five out three four five pause in two three four five at three four five pause in two three four five out three four five pause so that there is simple cadence breathing. You're breathing in for five seconds. You're breathing for five seconds if you look at the research on cadence breathing in terms of influencing the autonomic nervous system the functioning of the body. That's normally outside of control. We have to think of two branches. The power sympathetic branch which is responsible for rest and digest and the sympathetic branch which is responsible are regarded as fight or flight. And even looking polly Vega Terry. But we want to do is we want to achieve a balance between the power sympathetic and sympathetic response on by practicing five at six percent. Sorry six Installation for five seconds exultation for five seconds or in relation for four seconds explanation for six seconds it brings about a balance between the par sympathetic and the sympathetic nervous system. It's it's amazing. The research that has been done in terms of cadence breathing and coherence. Hartwig freighter Benxi and you know stimulating. Vegas narrow of improving out of your ventilation and conditions that are associated anxiety has been looked at post traumatic stress sleep depression. That's just an indication of the Bradfo I would say to people is. Don't just focus on breathing in for five and act for five seconds. If you were doing it do it for a slow. So in other words think of the balance between the biochemistry by mechanics indicate and some breathing you want to focus on one dimension and sacrificed. You're too that's what normally happens breathing and I'll come back to this nose. Breathing is absolutely the foundation of all three dimensions because your nose slows down your breathing to allow oxygen transfer to take place more ready from the lungs into the blood. Nasal breathing imposes resistance to your breathing to have a more normal carbon dioxide. Yes you can still breed too hard breathing through the nose. You can have fast upper chest breathing breathing through the nose but you're less likely mouth. Breathing is the worst thing that we can do. Nobody should wake up in a dry Mac in the morning. If you have your might open in the morning you know if you have your Matt Open during sleep your sleep. Quality is not as good as it should be so I think. Yeah it's just simple term and I would love to see this getting out. There in terms of people would excited because some even if they just practised at it will cost absolutely nothing and and put it into practice now. Of course you can go deeper and I've only wants to give you a snapshot of Dash but for people to start doing that at least check to the half. The Matt Open are deciding Because sl every few minutes is not A. It's not a good idea sign. It can suggests that the person you know they have air hunger that they are feeling that they are not getting a air. And how do you address that air hunger while nasal all the time do all of your physical exercise? Which closed even if you go for a run. Initially it's tougher. But if you expose your body to a little bit of air hunger by eater slowing down and reducing breathing volume are going for a walk with your Matt closed. Are Running with your Matt closed if you can do wish dot and turned than we're quite near breathing and your breathing becomes naturally slower and die for matic. The air hunger reduces so what we want to do. Is You know you think of panic disorder. Years ago people used to say what if you're having a panic attack breathing out of a bike? The whole purpose of the by not bringing oxygen but it was to trap the carbon dioxide that was coming from the lungs into the bag to rebrith that carbon dioxide back into the lungs to increase it in the bloods because as carbon dioxide increases in the blood blood flow to the brain increases across at archery. Stylish and this is a calming affected. The brain the brain fields air hunger when it's not getting enough oxygen and a panic attack when I look at the people the breathing of people who are prone to panic disorder. These people are teetering on the brink of symptoms. It's not the crowded place. That'S THE PROBLEM. It's not the supermarket. It's not the the driving the car. The problem is they're everyday breathing is not rush that they have a habit. And that's all it is. It is a habit of persistently over breathing. I'm breathing incorrectly. Which can be changed. I'm by doing that. You Improve Your resilience when you do go into a crowded place you are beverly but to cope with it but I have to say yes. Sorry I'm just GonNa face place when I talk to a group of individuals who work with mental health. I spoke about Debenham of functional breathing. And I said it's I said cognitive behavioral therapy is absolutely wonderful which it is but I said to them I said it's not addressing respond to physiology and nobody wanted to hear what I was saying because they fat Dash I was saying that communism behavioral therapy wasn't good enough. Which wasn't and that. I was saying that you know people fat that the healthcare professionals that I was talking to because I couldn't get over it like I was running through my mind afterwards. I'm saying now I know why. Breathing hasn't got into healthcare and it hasn't been embraced in in psychotherapy because the individuals that I spoke to that day they couldn't accept dash. You know. Breathing does play a role. And that's why I would say to you know any of your listeners. You're probably wondering. Why is this so good? I haven't been told about it. We have to consider human nature. Here we are all resistant to change in. Oh if if I'm practicing something for twenty years as I was doing reputational. I was resistant to moving outside of beautiful. It was only when I did. Oxygen advantage that that kind of open up that door so I think it's a very in Asia I think it's enormous trade of the human being. We are slow to embrace our to adopt a change. Some people do but the majority of people are not resistant but I would say to the listeners. Give this a go. You know because you will generally feel the difference in two weeks and even if you were to just sit back into a chair have your lips together just but one hundred your chest one hand just above your Navel Choon into your breathing and gently slow it down and gently slow it down to the point of a little air hunger so deliberately reduced the amount of air coming into your body do it for a miniature to see how it feels if it's comfortable and continue for three minutes if it gets a bit stressful take rest than start again. Can you influence your blood circulation by slowing down your breathing? If you start to feel your hands getting warmer you know that you're on the right track and it's not just that you're increasing blood flow to your hands. You're also increasing votes brand. Sorry Howard could across through the night something fun I was GonNa say Just briefly straight it when you have people seek people who coming with anxiety that a traditional therapeutic therapists psycho therapist counselors who all essentially centrally pseudo being the very over-simplifying breathing strategies to people And just getting to take deep breaths and then doing the and so will end do you. Don't just sit in the whole goodness me. And that's keeping them trapped essentially. Yeah I would agree on. It's not offering any benefits you know even would like it does feel satisfied to take that big. Brett because you're stretching everything and you're releasing ish but it can disrupt the biochemistry and data's the issue I suppose I realized gone back. Maybe fifteen years ago that not everybody wants to hear our wants to hear on a different approach. But why did that? That's why I wrote so many books because I can put out the information that you know. Nobody's think about covert at the moment nitric oxide. There's pinnacle tries nitric oxide for covert nineteen in two thousand and five krona virus which was SARS grown viruses. A family of course this is a different strain but the SARS virus back. In Two thousand five laboratory experiments showed that nitric oxide inhibited. The replication of the cycle Dino's as a source of nitric. Oxide just cynical tries if you put in chemical tries nitric oxide you say you will see the doors. Clinical trials now on nitric oxide is a treatment of the current Cova Nineteen. But nobody's talking about nose breathing so I wanted to get information out there and I did. I just did a Webinar two weeks ago unquote at nineteen and it was oversubscribed. I didn't realize zoom. You can only have one hundred people and people were disappointed to wants to hear to open it up on. Youtube and I put it up. It's after having a half million juice and all it did was go to exercise and talk about. What can you do here? So this is the beauty about getting the information to the general public. Having people putting it into practice you will never like auto at say. Is it would breathing. Don't think that don't have it in your mind and it's good to be taken does hired big Brett's because it's not going to increase oxygen and just ask yourself. How do you feel you're feeling lightheaded? It's not a good son now. I understand what hollow tropic breathing? It's a deliberate hyperventilation for a period of time as a stressor to deal with trauma. That's fine it's short term. But it's not how we should be breathing all the time I'm concerned. But how is the person breathing whom they walk down the stretch Howard breathing Dr Truecar Howard a breathing? They are sleep Howard. A breathing. Negoti distress dots the breathing that we need to be looking at so there is a time that people will be practicing hyperventilation after during the technique etc. I don't teach hyperventilation. I'm trying to address dysfunctional breathing patterns. So I was GonNa ask you about the with the with the impulse method because officer people have been using it the is and I think there was an idea one point that he had some special sort of genetic disposition to be able to stay under the Wolves. Redo with these things. Because course he's used his framework to be able to teach other people to do successfully to now switch so even though you don't teach it. Does that fly in the face of some of these things that you're talking about or is easily explicable. Within the methodology coming from a like in terms of in terms of the science with the vim half technique gone can look at his agok. A one paper that was published by Matteis cops and I think it was published in twenty fourteen and still up to the terms of bill. Oxygen Saturation didn't increase during the hyperventilation during the retention which was the breadth tolling bill. Oxygen Saturation really dropped quite remarkably to mount everest. 'em standards you know to lower your back down to forty. Fifty percent is incredible really and did the individuals doing them half were able to stood ash. They're carbon dioxide levels dropped and didn't return back to baseline and really what the locked at the deadlock that the impact of the hyperventilation it's thirty brats followed by a Bret told that breath in hold for ten seconds. Thirty thirty hyperventilation big brexit again Within for ten seconds etc they looked at the increase of epinephrine as a result. So what it did. Was that the technique the breathing technique. It's stressed at the body which increased happen Afri- distress in the in the body which caused the body to make adaptations. So I think it's an interesting. It's an interesting model interesting breathing technique. I'm not sure if I would if I was teaching the technique I'm I wouldn't teach it every two comes into me into my door because I think some will it will suit so and I think it won't sue daughters and it was like me working with responding panic disorder. I taught. I could use the same technique. Would all people coming in? I would see some people that could cope quite well but air hunger and other people the it was scaring the life out of them so I had to change all of these exercises and this is what experienced it so you know we. We have to bear in mind that different subsets innings is in panic disorder and we shouldn't be tailoring the approach to these individuals. But this is what experience does. That's what I learned through. Experience can still part Dash. We impart that onto her own. Instructors like say to them. You Know The mistakes that I've learned over the years. I'm hoping that you don't have to make these mistakes because it can take. You wanted to figure out what's going on here. You're seeing this student in front view on instead of making them feel calm. You're making them have the opposite effect and the issue is that. Don't come back to you the next time because you know they think they're making your worse whereas I've learnt dash and this way then I can prepared to student but I can also prepare the instructor so a lot of people. Now that we trained we trained a lot of healthcare instructors providers and this is great. I think breathing now is becoming hotter is becoming better well known and I have to take them technique for part of that because it is really the breath out there. It's not a part of Western poacher. Western culture is to be doing something to be achieving to be constantly going Western culture. Is You know the the guy who sits in the corner bringing his attention or her attention in words is considered maybe Dahshur but one of the best things that we could ever do in life is take attention out of the mind onto the bread into the body in terms of concentration in terms of well being in terms of happiness in terms of bringing a stillness to the mind because the chattering mind. How do you quite into traffic mind? Well I would say we have to change breathing physiology. There is a connection between the die from Andy Emotions. If you're breathing fast. Upper chest breathing. You're going to have an increase shopping. Mind look and Google Stanford medical school slow breathing so stanford medical school slow breathing. In March of twenty seventeen day identified a new structure in the brain and Locus Kerala. And they said that. This structure first identified it in mice. They sent it. This structure is spying on your breathing. And if you break fast destruction the brain is relaying signals of education to the rest of the brain and if you breathe slowly. Destruction the brain when relay signals of Cam to the rest of the brain so true out our evolution the only times that we ever got into a state of fast rapid upper chest breathing was in times of emergency and stress. Now if we are breathing that way all of the time it's telling the body it's in a state of emergency and stress. So I forget the point that I was going to make. That was off one time. But yeah it's it's yeah it's coming coming back to just embracing it from a number of different perspectives and looking at the potential of the brand product. Pongy we've talked a bit about anxiety where he focused on that. But of course you mentioned in some of the books that you told you that wouldn't he would ask Visit nonsense issues. It so what you use it for in terms of tracing conditions justice for all the stuff as well as the main conditions that work with with breathing is is sleep insomnia snoring obstructive sleep apnea for example. Somebody who is snoring or somebody's having obstructive sleep apnea. It's more likely than they are. Mouth breathing hard breathing fast breathing because this is increasing the turbulence in the airway diseases causing resistance to breathing if you breathe hard. You're more likely to snore. If you read lightened slow your breathing. A soft and just not as much resistance and also the negative pressure. Your Airways less likely to collapse. If you're breathing his life. We have to bear in mind that how bridging the day determines how during physical exercise. And how we drink sleep so disorder. Breathing is by thirty percent. Awesome as about twenty percent thirty percent. Because of course if you breathe through your nose your nose exhibits a protective mechanism for lungs. Your nose warms moistens regulates volume but also nitric oxide by breathing. Truth in those nitric oxide. Sterilizes the air redistributes the bud threat lungs and nitric oxide by redistributing the blood TRAYVON's increases the pressure of oxygen in the blood so the Po to this was discovered back in nineteen eighty eight the Po to in the blood increased by ten percent with continuous nose. Breathing versus mark. Brayden like an you know even despite this despite the BOHR effect in nineteen zero four despite this recognition in nineteen eighty under some tremendous doctors. Writing about one is in the air knows intro doctor from New Zealand contractor James Barclay. And he's written some great stuff. Finish your doctor. Claude from hat papered hospital in Anchorage in the seventies Super Timmons late. You know there are doctors writing more and more out of about this but I would love to see getting into the mains into the hands of the general public children. You know we have children coming in. We've put our our free completely free. All of the exercise for kids a completely free online and we put them up in Youtube. All of the exercises so I wanted children. Children shouldn't be you know that there shouldn't be a reason. Why on each ear Child regardless of where they are in the world that kind of practice breathing exercise to have their hat so because sometimes I was thinking about kids might be able to afford it but with if they now have access to the Internet. They can just do. It is such a strange. We've twenty clinical trials. Asthma and I've been involved but five of them co over the last two of them there in children we showed really good improvements in terms of sleep and asthma in children by getting them to breathe through the nose. And you know. I think it's remarkable that we are making some inroads there so yeah come to make a chart. Asthma sleep anxiety children and athletic performance. Those are demand fields that Bush. And I think that comes across as until conceived as a feeling at which I had as I read some of your voltage was just kind of share like y all people more people knowing about this this site but research is so much. Ns useful stuff and and saw that is not even complicated or difficult to mattis. Now why is it not being that? I mean going back to that story of me being the spiritual consultant in and him to say well. You know it's probably just anxiety. Just take debretts announced these people whose job it is to see people who are struggling with breath day in day out. And it's not even on yourself. I think it's too simple like you can also ask the question. Why weren't we taught about stillness of the mind and school and you know we were. We were taught to think we were trained. How to analyze to decipher to reason to break information into tiny pieces. The mind was developed into a thinking tool. We were trained. How to think but we were not trained how to stop thinking and that's simple even though it can be challenging bringing our attention into the present moment taking our attention onto the Brett you know bringing our attention into the body awareness you know it's simple am and but look at the potential know like how is somebody who normally presents How is that addressed? Is it often using maybe prescribed medication? And if you look at some of the clinical trials and dash that the prescribe medications often don't even perform better than the placebo effect. You know so like I suppose I. I've often wondered why I as a kid why I wasn't taught today's debate. I often wonder why people would sleep disorders. They are not taught. Today's liberate people would ask Meyer. Dana talked to nasal bridge because people would ask a typically breed open mad faster and harder Britain which is feeding their condition. But it's just that the Brett. It's not seen as being sexy. It's not you know if you're doing. A clinical trial is a medical doctor. You don't want to do clinical China breathing because it's not good for your ego. There's no you get no respect out of that. You know your colleagues even despite you have great medical doctors who are interested in breathing but the colleagues to do them. You should be doing research on stem salads. You should be doing research than latest. You know the latest thing that the best thing that's out there in terms of scientific progress how breathing but despite its ash breathing is so simple. We should never overlook the intelligence of the human body. We have a great function there. We lost when I just for few minutes. It's really vitally important. That we we give it to consideration so if people listening to this and nothing kidding okay. Just they'll send what I gotta look into when they go and how can get in touch with you to find out more. And they could. If they're interested in terms of anxiety and panic disorder and depression. I would say to go to Buteiko. Clinic DOT COM. That's B. U. T. E. Y. K. O. Finnick DOT COM. I also wrote a book ten years ago on this. It's called anxiety free and it brings together. Mindfulness with the beauty commented on if people are interested in sports performance oxygen advantage dot com so oxygen advantage dot com on about performance concentration resilience. I'M BEAUTIFUL CLINIC DOT COM. You know different tents and two shoes and you mentioned that you recorded the youtube that a access people could do during the nineteen that just a date. This compensation that swear is now Drills the debate that we're having this conversation says the U. K. is currently in lockdown. It's the hunks of the corona at that pandemic. Would you be to Shat? Only the podcast page linked to that VIDEO NAPA National Schmidt. Five to all of those exercises would be helpful for the mind because it couvert nineteen. If people have responded to a distress I have to go very easy and of course if people have emotional distress I have to go easy so the exercise in terms of small battles gentle slow breathing light breathing in actual fact. That could be a great place. That's forty minutes so not only. Could it help if you have responded to distress but it will also help if you have emotional distress and I would also say to people does if you wake up. Dr Act in the morning stopped looking at getting your Matt closed during sleep. It's very very important. It was one of the best things that I did in terms of waking up fit and refreshed and remember as being a youngster in school. You know if you don't have the if you don't have a good night's sleep. It's very difficult to concentration that I would be looking at page and above but my attention wasn't there because my attention was stuck in my head and I think it's all it's all interconnected so we need to get you know we can't just look at Tab. You know breathing by itself but I would say definitely. Breathing is Bryant. Put the focus on but we have to take into consideration consideration emotions and sleep after. This has been so fascinating. Thank you so much time out of your busy schedule to To Talk to me into chef some of these souls I really really really hyped all the people listening and look into this in more detail and stop playing around with it. Not just full themselves but also looking brought up How the people looking more functionally not just The psychological stuff around looking at nap breathing in the impact of that six. I thank you. Is there anything you'd like to add share with the audience that I have not directly. I'm going to twenty minute relaxation. Mp Three five that put the I'll give you the link and it's deceit that that's found in the buck anxiety-free and people got a lot of benefit from it. And so you could listen to this before we go to sleep or whatever I sometimes this to myself. So it's relaxation bringing together relaxed breathing exercises just to allow you just to take some time. Ask Give give yourself arrest. Take a holiday from the mind untested. Thank you so much Patrick. Brea Prochet Guitar Time Today. I hope you enjoyed this episode and if you did one not share it with anyone you think might be interested uneven head over to itunes to give us a glowing review. You'll find more about what's coming up on our facebook page. Facebook DOT COM forward slash? Rapid Change Matters Hyphen podcast. And of course we'll find all the links relate to this episode plus those upcoming live events that will help you hone those change work skills.

nose breathing mouth breathing Brett bloods Howard Cooper Dr Buteiko Butare Cloyne Nash Dan Number polly Vega Terry intern physical exercise Patrick McEwen Patrick asthma
Best Of: The 'New Science' Of Breathing / The Migration Of All Living Things

Fresh Air

50:12 min | 1 year ago

Best Of: The 'New Science' Of Breathing / The Migration Of All Living Things

"From whyy in Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air weekend today how we can train ourselves to breathe in ways that may improve our health, the quality of our sleep and decrease anxiety. And why mouth breathing's related to snoring sleep, apnea and other problems? We'll talk with journalists James. Nestor author of the new book breath the new science of a lost art. It's about what we can learn about. Breathing from ancient meditation Techniques Recent Scientific Research and deep sea divers. Also we hear from science writer Sonia Shop Her. Two Thousand Sixteen Book Pandemic warned of deadly viral outbreaks her new book. The next great migration is about why migration is an enduring feature of human history. Later jazz critic Kevin Whitehead talks about feature films set in the jazz world. Support for NPR and the following message come from duck duck go. Are you tired of being tracked online duck duck? Go can help. They helped millions of people like you take control of their personal information online with one download you can search and browse privately. Avoiding trackers duck duck go privacy simplified. In the new book breath, my guest journalist James. Nestor writes about many aspects of how we breathe, and how we can train ourselves to breathe in ways that may improve our health and the quality of our sleep and decrease anxiety. He reports on my mouth. Breathing is related to snoring sleep. Apnea and other problems with the nose has that the mouth doesn't different breathing techniques to distress reduce blood, pressure and balance the nervous system, and how free divers trained to expand their lung capacity so that they can dive deep and stay underwater for up to twelve minutes on one breath. One possible ness just tried what he's written about including participating in an experiment at Stanford, in which his nose was completely plugged for days detest the impact of breathing solely through the mouth, the results for fascinating, but the experience of total mouth breathing was unpleasant and disrupted his sleep. Nassar is also the author of a previous book called deep, Free Diving, renegade science, and what the oceans tell us about ourselves any help founder research initiative to investigate how sperm whales communicate with each other through clicks. We originally broadcast this interview last month. James Nestor welcome to fresh air. Thanks so much for having me. Has Your research into breathing taking on a slightly different meaning because of Covid nineteen because of its respiratory systems and the anxiety that it's creating. I think the awareness of breathing has definitely increased. When I started this research several years ago, a lot of my friends were saying you running a book about breathing in breathing my whole life while would you want to write a book about that? But now these are the same friends who are seen how essential respiratory health is in helping us both prevent the onset of many illnesses and to help us get through illnesses like like cove it to help us better. Get through them. So you had been a mouth, breather and You did some snoring. You had a deviated Septum. which was effect affecting your ability to breathe through your nose because that kind of clogs part of their nose. Or blocks part of the nasal passage I should say so to understand whether mouth breathing was really a problem. You participated in this study at Stanford University. That forced you to breathe through your mouth. Describe what the setup was. Yes, so I had been in contact with the chief of Rhino, research or Nyack for months and months we'd had several interviews. We've been talking a lot. And he was telling me all the wonders of nasal breathing, and how bad mouth breathing was and none of that was controversial. That's that's very well established now, but nobody really knew how all the problems mouth breathing, no one knew how soon those came on, so I asked him I said well. Why don't you test it? You're not to tessies like how am I going to test? It would be unethical to ask someone to plug their nose. Nose for a certain amount of time and measure what happens, I said well. I'll do it, so it was never like a super size me study. That wasn't our intention. If twenty five to fifty percent of the population is breathing through their mouth, so I was just lowly myself into a condition, I already knew and that so many other people already knew so the plan was for ten days. I would have silicone plugs of my knows me and one other subject breathing therapist from Sweden I convinced him to do the study as well and for the other ten days we would change the pathway. Of how we breathed and breathe through our noses, instead of our mouths. So that, was it that was the setup and you know. We thought that mouth breathing for ten days was going to be bad, but we had no idea it was gonna be so damaging. How bad was it? Well I went from snoring a couple minutes a night to within three days. I was snowing four hours a night. I developed sleep apnea. My stress levels were off the charts. My nervous system was a mess. We had a whole home lab here at my house, so we were testing each other three times a day every day, and writing out all of these metrics we even had were were looking at blood glucose how that was affected. So I felt awful, I felt fatigued storing sleep apnea all all the rest, and even performance athletic performance, really really decreased as well and the good thing about this I was able to take these godawful plugs out of my nose and breathe. Nasal e again and once I did that. Snoring disappeared sleep. APNEA disappeared nervous system came back into balance. I mean completely transformed by just changing the pathway through which we breathed. So what's in the knows? That makes nose breathing better than math reading. 'cause mouths don't have that stuff. So the nose filters sheets treats raw air. Most of us know that, but so many of us don't realize at least I didn't realize how it can trigger different hormones to flood into our bodies how it can lower our blood pressure. How the stages of a woman's menstrual cycle, or correlated to different areas of the knows how it. Monitors heart rate on and on and on even help store memories, so it's this incredible organ that is not represented in any of the departments of the National Institutes of Health and this is something that. Is. You know just just hammered down over and over again. It's like why are we studying this more? And why don't people more people realize how important nasal breathing is? So? It's it orchestrates innumerable functions in our body to keep us balanced. When I found most surprising was that the nose actually has erectile tissue. Like men's and women's genitals. So. The nose is more closely connected to her genitals than any other Oregon, so it is covered in that same tissue so win. One area gets stimulated. The nose will become stimulated as well. Some people have to close of a connection where they get stimulated in the southerly regions. They will start. Sneezing and this condition is common enough that it was given a name called Moon Rhinitis. So. That the yeah, this, this is the weird stuff you never thought. You discover when you start writing a book about. But another thing that that is really fascinating is that erectile tissue will pulse on its own, so it will close one nostril and allow breath in through the other nostril than that other nostril close and allow Brad than in your our bodies do this on their own and this this switching happens between thirty minutes and every three hours, and a lot of people think a lot of people who have studied this believe that this is the. The way that our bodies maintain balance, because when we breathe through a right nostril, circulation speeds up body gets hotter cortisol levels increase blood pressure increases so breeding through the left will relax more so blood pressure will decrease lowers temperature cools. The body reduces anxiety as well so our bodies are are naturally doing this, and when we breathe through our mouths were denying our bodies the ability to do this and to keep us in balance. But what about if you can't breathe through your nose? Because either you have a cold or respiratory illness or you have a bad deviated septum. Sure around seventy percent of the population has deviated Septum that's clearly visible to the naked eye. So this is just rampant and I certainly do when I got a cat scan of of my head. It was an absolute mess, but some conditions so severe that you'll need surgical intervention for sure. But. The vast majority are not and something. Nyack kept telling me. Is He? Said you know if a sink is clogged in your house, you're gonNA find a way of unclogging. The nose should be considered in the same way for noses clogged. You need to find a way of unclogging. You can do that by breathing more through your because it's really a use it or lose it Oregon. The more you breathe through it, the more you're going to be able to breathe through it. I was just talking to a clinician trained something like seven thousand people to nasal breathing. Only four of them could not breathe through their noses after about three weeks of training, so it's it's really something more. We focus on it. The more we really concentrate, the more were able to open it up and to get all those benefits of nasal breathing. So after you did this experiment about breathing exclusively for your through your mouth. You decided at night to try taping your mouth so that you couldn't through your mouth and you'd have to breathe through your nose. How did that go? Yeah so this is something a hack that I'd heard about and was extremely skeptical about it sounded very dangerous to me until I talked to a breathing therapist at Stanford, who said that she had cured her own mouth breathing by taping her mouth at night, and until I talked to a dentist who been in the field for twenty thirty years. Who Prescribes this to his patients now I'm not talking about getting fat piece of duct tape and taping that over your mouth. That's a really bad idea talking about a teeny piece of surgical tape about the size of a stamp. Imagine like Charlie Chaplin Moustache, move down an inch and my personal experience with this is. Allowed me to sleep so much better. Wake up so much more rested, and to not have that dry mouth every morning. So with a tape. You're talking about if your mouth really needed to open, it could because that's not. Like like, you said it's not like really strong tape. It's just like surgical tape and a little piece of it. Yourself and I'm not prescribing. Prescribing, neither not prescribing anything, no, no, no I'm saying this personally worked for me, but don't go on Youtube. Don't go on the Internet and see these people's nine pieces of tape over their their lower jaws like bad idea. I've found all you need is a very small piece of tape, and there's even a product out right now. That is being sold as a remedy for snoring. And what is it? It's a piece of tape that you put on your lips at night, so other people and they've conducted studies to show how effective it is so this. This worked well for me. It's worked well for many other people but I'm not prescribing anything. And I should mention that my guest James Nestor also not a doctor. He's a journalist and his reporting on what he's learned. By talking to many researchers and doctors and people who practice breathing techniques and teach breathing techniques. If you're just joining us my guest as journalists. James Nestor author of the book breath the new science of lost art. We'll talk more after a break and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead. We'll talk about feature films set in the jazz world, and what he calls the Stock Jazz movie ending. This is fresh air weaken. It feels like nothing in the news. These days makes any sense so Hassan. Husselmann Hajj turned to his father and his faith for answers. He's a don't worry about the number of questions. Just worry about which questions become more clear and solidified comedian Hasan Manhattan, on how his spirituality is getting him through. Listen subscribed to. It's been a minute from NPR. Let's get back to my interview with Journalists James Nestor author of the new book breath about what ancient forms of eastern meditation as well as new science tell us about breathing, and how by controlling breath through various techniques we can improve our sleep our health and decrease anxiety. Breathing is automatic, but we can control. When we consciously try the quality of the breath, the length of inhales and exiles, and how deeply or shallowly we breathe. Can you explain why breath? Would for instance affect anxiety. And how breathing in certain ways certain breathing techniques can decrease anxiety? Being very important subject right now. So for so many of us. We think that it's just important that we're breathing because if we're breathing, that's good. That means we're live for not reading that Bat. You know could be dead, but it's how we take those breasts. We take twenty five thousand breaths a day and thirty pounds of air enters, and exits are lungs every day, so it's how we take those breaths, and the nuances of those breaths that I've found play such an important role in health, happiness and longevity, so specifically with anxiety. Talk to neuro. Psychologist went out to his lab. At the Laureate Institute, a brain research, and he explained to me that people with anxieties or they're fear, based conditions typically will breathe way too much so. What happens when you breathe that much is you're constantly putting yourself into a state of stress. So you're stimulating sympathetic side of the nervous system. And the way to change, that is to breathe deeply because if you think about it if you're stressed out. Tigers GonNA. Come get you. You know you're going to get hit by a car. You can breathe. Breathe breathe as much as you can. But by breathing slowly that is associated with a relaxation response, so the diaphragm lowers your allowing more air into your lungs in your body immediately switches to a relax state, so we may not be able to control the function of our hearts, other organs in our body, but we can control our breathing, and when we control breathing, we can influence so much of how our bodies operate, and that includes. A as a treatment, or or at least a practice for people with anxieties, depression, just changing their breathing psychiatrists found can have very transformational effect. It seems so simple to be true, but some of these people have been studying this subject for decades, and that's what they've found. There are many different breeding techniques. There are many different breathing meditation styles. What do they all have in common? Is there something they all have in common in terms of inhale and exhale and. the basic principles underneath. So breathing's been studied for thousands and thousands of years there are seven books of the Chinese Tao that deal only with breathing. What happens when we do it improperly and all of the benefits we can get. It properly. So all of those ways, all of the different practices do have one thing in common, and that's because they allow you to slow down and consciously listen to yourself and feel breath is affecting you so there's many different tools in this toolbox. If you want to slow down and become more relaxed, you can exhale longer than you inhale so that will have a very powerful effect on you. You for relaxation. If you want to stimulate yourself and get going, you can breathe much faster. So what I've found is throughout time throughout millennia. These different cultures at different times different peoples were discovering the same exact thing over and over so it's very interesting that right now we have the science and the techniques and measurements to really prove what these people have been saying for so long. Why does the X. Hail quiet system? Because the exile is para sympathetic response rate. Now you can put your hand over your heart if you take a very slow, inhale in. You're gonNA feel your heart speed up. As you exhale should be feeling your heart slowdown. So exhaling relaxes the body and something else happens when we take a very deep breath like this, so the diaphragm lowers when we take a breath and. And that sucks. Bunch of blood, huge perfusion of blood into the thoracic cavity as we x hail, that blood shoots back out through the body, so the diaphragm is considered the second heart, because it plays such a huge role in circulation, and it lowers the burden of the heart, if we breathe properly, and if we really engaged the diaphragm, so these slow and low breaths, people should be practicing these as much as possible. This is the way your body wants to take an air. If you, WANNA, start breathing to calm yourself down. Do you have any suggestions for the length of the inhale and the length of the exhale. Sure and this was a study I'd stumbled upon. That's about twenty years old now that some Italian researchers. Gathered a group of subjects, and they had them recite the Ave Maria so the Catholic prayer cycle. And then they had them recite all money putting me hum, which is a Buddhist prayer? Would they found that it took about five and a half seconds to recite each of these prayers, and then about five and a half seconds to then inhale. And so by breeding about five and a half seconds out five and a half seconds in they found that blood to the brain increased, the body, entered this state of balance, in which all of the organs all of the system worked in harmony with one another and they they covered these people with sensors, and we're able to see all of this. All data sheets and the study is widely available, so they later found that you don't need to really pray to these benefits, even though you can do that if you like, but just by breathing at this rate. About five and a half seconds and five and a half seconds out. Don't worry if you're second off, you know the point is to relax yourself. You were able to get the perfect amount of air into your body, and out of your body, and really allow your body to do what it's naturally designed to do, which is function with the least amount of effort and they've. They've taught this breathing. Psychiatrist have taught this breathing. Pattern to exile eighty depression, even nine eleven survivors, who had this ghastly condition called ground class lungs, and it had significant effects on them, but just breathing this way. You've said if you exhale longer than you inhale that that can be very calming, so if both the inhale and the exhale are five and a half seconds you're not doing the longer exhales, does that does that matter so so the body wants to be balanced, right? We want sympathetic balance. We won't para sympathetic balance so just in regular day to day activity. You want to have that balance before you go to sleep. You can extend that Xcel and become more relaxed, but I would not be extending that xcel before meeting or before important phone call. So. You can use these different tools to do different things. You can also inhale longer in xl shorter if you want a little boost of energy. So the even Steven like the most balanced way of breathing that I found after studying the stuff and talking to the leaders in the field, was that five to six seconds in five to six seconds out. James in talking about breath and its impact on our health and our anxiety, you referred to the sympathetic and the Para sympathetic nervous system without going into too much detail. Can you just explain briefly? Would what each of them are? Why whether relevant to breath? Sure, the sympathetic nervous system is the system that triggers a fight or flight reaction. So, when we sense danger, the sympathetic nervous system switches on floods, our bodies with hormones and allows US become meaner and leaner in the fight harder or to run really fast. That's what that does, so. The Para sympathetic is the opposite. This is the side of the nervous system that triggers a rest and relax response. And we WANNA. Be In this state when we're eating food mostly throughout the entire day, we want to be in a parrot sympathetic state. The problem is that nowadays. All of us are kind of half stressed. We're not really running away from a tiger or lion or fighting for our lives, but we're not really relaxing either, so we're. We're staying in this grey zone. Where during the? Or half away during our days we're half asleep. So that's what I found was so interesting about. Breeding is by just breathing. You can elicit these different nervous system states so you can take command of something that was supposed to be automatic. That's what it's called the automatic nervous system, but you can control it, and you can stress yourself out if you want or you can relax yourself just by breathing. We typically do wrong. When we breathe like speaking for myself I think I'm a very shallow breather when I'm not paying attention to my breathing, I think my my kind of state is shallow breaths. So what's wrong with that? Well you can think about breathing as being in a boat right, so you can take a bunch of very short stilted strokes, and you're going to get to where you WANNA go. It's GonNa. Take a while, but you'll get there, or you can take a few very fluid long strokes and get there so much more efficiently, so your body doesn't want to be overworked all the time. Because if it is then things, start to break down, so you want to make it very easy for your body to get air especially if this is an act that we're doing twenty five thousand times a day. So by extending those inhales an excels by moving the diaphragm up and down a little more you can have a profound effect on your blood pressure on your mental state on even on longevity, because so much of longevity is correlated with respiratory health and long size. Games Nestor is the author of the new book breath the new science of a lost art? Critic Kevin. White had spent a lot of time over the past few years. Watching movies set in the jazz world. He has a new book about films that Tell Stories about jazz called. Play the way you feel. Here's his take on what he caused the stock jazz movie ending. Over ninety some years of movies about jazz, some plot points and story elements keep coming back. We see young musicians who'd been mentored by African American elders who worked basement clubs and want to play the way they feel when the man just wants him to play the music as written. It's the movies, so they are romantic. Complications sometimes tied to divergent musical tastes. Such problems may be resolved in a version of the stock jazz movie. Ending a Big New York, concert or parties at odds are reconciled. It turns up by nineteen, thirty seven and the romantic comedy Champagne Waltz. Fred macmurray plays a saxophonist who turns old Vienna onto jazz, killing business at the Waltz Palace, next door, and wrecking Fred's romance with the waltz kings opera singer granddaughter. In the end they're all on stage New York. Romantic and musical differences are resolved, is gigantic jazz and classical orchestras Mesh on a swinging the classics mash up of Tiger Rag and the Blue Danube. It's kitschy music, but clear storytelling symbolizing the wedding, too. College. That ending got tweaked in the nineteen thirty eight Irving Berlin song, fast Alexander's ragtime band, moving the reconciliation between bandleader and singer to Carnegie. Hall the gold standard for classy venues in the movies. That template came back with minor variations for decades. In Nineteen forty-sevens, the fabulous Darcy's battling brother Bandleader, Jerry and Tommy Dorsey, playing themselves patch up their few just long enough to play a double concerto, just as the Real Dorsey cooperated long enough to make the movie. A couple months later came the film New Orleans with the most over the top New York concert ending which clears the way for an opera singer marry a jazz booker. At symphony hall the singer Acquire Three Pianos philarmonic Orchestra and Woody Herman's big band all cram on stage to murder in the film's instant. Hit Song which we've already heard Billie holiday do rather better. The New York concert capper turns up through the nineteen fifties. A jazz movie tradition as in the Benny Goodman story or Saint Louis Blues were w c Handy's disapproving people finally, his Blues Music once performed in concert alongside Mozart and Mendelssohn. More, variations came later. In nineteen seventy two's lady sings the blues after an analyst us. Diana Ross Billy holiday is finally allowed to play New York again at Carnegie with violins. The real holiday did play Carnegie Hall, but without the FIDDLES. In Two thousand sixteen. Nina Zoe Saldana as Nina Simone. WHO's been living in bitter French? Exile plays a free concert in central park and discovers people still love her reconciling. Nina, Simone and America. No reconciliation ending as grander implications. You know have. Ever run in three, you know. Serve. Me Yeah. There are other examples, but you get the idea. reworking durable plot points isn't unique to jazz films. Of course, that's just storytelling. Still these particular echoes and variations reinforce parallels between jazz and filmmaking. because. All so work myriad variations on set themes, and sometimes fall back on stock licks when inspiration fails and sometimes knowingly quote from works to affirm the historical continuum. Jazz like the movies can sometimes spin familiar lick to make it seem new again and worth bringing back one more time. You know what it means. To Mess, New Orleans. East. and. And, Yet slung long grass. Stay away. Given Whitehead Rights for point of departure and tone audio. His new book is called. Play the way you feel the essential guide to jazz stories on film. Coming up, we hear from Science Writer Sonia Shah 2016 Book Pandemic Warrant of deadly viral outbreaks. Her new book. The next great migration is about migration is an enduring feature of human history. This is fresh air weakened. Cellphone footage shows police killing unarmed black people. Protesters take to the streets. And repeat for a decade. Why. Ruin move on. A blunt reminder that we've been here before. On Code, switch from NPR. Support for NPR comes from whyy. Presenting the PODCAST, eleanor amplified and adventure series. Kids love here reporter Eleanor Atwood Crafty Villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or at whyy dot, Org. Our guests science writers. Sonia Shah has written several books including one that's made her a sought after interview guests lately that book published in two thousand. Sixteen is called pandemic. She explored the increasing threat of viral outbreaks and our own personal experience with contagious infections. Her New Book Explores another subject of intense interest in recent years, immigration while the trump administration, and some European governments are hardening their borders and cracking down on Immigrants Shah argues that mass migration is nothing new in human history, or for that matter, the history of plants and animals for centuries she writes prominent intellectuals have regarded migrants as menacing deviance, defying the natural order that places everyone in a singular natural setting, but she says science now shows that migration among all species is a biological imperative as important as breathing. SONAL Shah's new book is called the next great migration, the beauty and terror of life on the move. She spoke with fresh air's Davies. Sony share welcome back to fresh air. In an interview at the end of January of this year, you said that covid nineteen will be bigger, more dangerous and more economically damaging than the SARS epidemic You were right. How did you know? Well it seemed. Early on it was clear that this pathogen had kind of found the sweet spot between how deadly it was on one hand, which is not terribly deadly compared to all the pathogens out there that we've had. It was just deadly, enough and transmissible enough to spread really widely, and caused a lot of death and disruption, so the first stars was a lot more deadly, but less transmissible, so it kind of burnt itself out on its own, but this is something that can really sustain itself, because it doesn't kill everyone, you know, it has a lot of as symptomatic spread, and all those the the basic parameters of this virus made it clear pretty early on that this could be the next big one, and of course we know what it is. And you've had a couple of months more experienced to see this unfold. What has surprised impressed you about the shape of this pandemic? Most of it is pretty similar the way we're responding the process by which the pathogen is moving through populations. I mean there's this confrontation between. Human population that's had no experience with this thing. And suddenly it coming into population, so we've seen that before in history I think what's really been so surprising and unexpected about the way. This pandemic is unfolding that really I. Don't think anyone predicted. Was the US response being so chaotic and dysfunctional, and I don't think anyone really predicted that no-one. no-one really predicted that the CDC would become an institution that not everyone trusted anymore. You know that that are the US government would not put forward a vigorous federally lead response so that has been very surprising, and I think that's has changed how the pandemic and the response has unfolded. You, you've been interviewed a lot about the coronavirus in one thing I've heard you say that what we take out of. This will depend upon the stories that we tell ourselves. And when you look at the divergent and competing narratives that we see, it's pretty striking. You have one side saying well this. Came from China or may have come from China even perhaps a Chinese government lab, and that the administration's response was swift and effective, and the death toll is probably inflated, so it's not actually that bad, and then another side that has a completely different view. I'm wondering. Are we going to end up with an accepted understanding of what's happened here. I mean I think. All the stories that were telling right now conform to a basic narrative which is that? We have been invaded by this intruder. You know whether we say it's the Chinese virus, or it's from Wuhan or you know from some other plays. Maybe it's baby so a bat or some strange eating habit or know something outside of us. There's this sense of. US Being the passive victims of these invasive germs, and I think that kind of paradigm of I call it microbials phobia. It's it's rooted in our history of how we've treated contagious diseases. It's rooted in germ theory. The advent of scientific medicine and all of that. And, it's helped us in a lot of ways with antibiotics and vaccines, we think of the microbusiness, invasive contaminant, and then we. Targeted with killing chemicals. What it obscures is our own role in creating the opportunities that allow microbes to turn into pathogens, and to spread between us, and the problem with that is right now. We have this new pathogen here were not gonNA, have drugs and vaccines to save us from it in the short term, what we need to do is change their behavior, but the way we talk about the pathogen really obscures the role of human behavior, and all of this so I think that is something that we need to Kinda grapple with. And so how do we need to change our behavior? A lot of ways I mean I think we need to look more deeply at the way we're interacting with nature We need to look more deeply. Add the crisis of biodiversity, which is really the fundamental driver of all of these spillover pathogens coming into human populations. I mean it's not just the novel coronavirus. It's also Ebola and Zeka and HIV in the nineteen eighties and. West Nile virus and new kinds of lyme disease tick-borne disease. You know we we have a whole. Host of these pathogens that are coming out of animal populations into humans because we are destroying wildlife habitat at such a huge rate. You know we're. We're losing one hundred fifty species every day, so this biodiversity crisis is the fundamental drivers, so we need to look at that more deeply and consider. Human Health to be connected to the health of our livestock or wildlife and our ecosystems more generally. Speaking with Sonia Shah she's a science writer and the author of several books including pandemic published in two. Thousand Sixteen. Her latest book is the next Great Migration, the beauty and terror of life on the move. One of the things you deal within the book is the long held idea that people on the move, our labral their deviance that it's kind of a threat And it's interesting because you were born in the United States, but both your parents emigrated from India and I'm interested in what your own experience was being a country. in the United States while you still had a lot of cultural ties and extended family in India. What would? Met for your own sense of yourself and identity. I mean I think I adopted the sense. I got from everyone around us that I was somehow place that it somehow you know. Strange and anomalous for this body that traces its ancestry to the South Asian subcontinent to be present in north. America like I. You know I tell people where I'm. You know I'm from I'm from New York, city, that's where I was born and they know. Where are you really from? And that's a very common. Experience of of many people of Color in the United States We're not believed we know we're. Where American were we were born here? You know really most of us are not more than one or two generations is distant from an active long distance migration, and so and all of us are migrants on some timescale or another, except for maybe a very few people in parts of Africa, and so really the if anyone's anomalous, it's not me. It's the people who stayed still right right. Right that for centuries, leading intellectuals regarded migrating. And migrating animals, even as labral like out of out of the natural order of things you know that particular people races ethnic groups, animal species had a natural homeland or Habitat. That's where they belonged who propagated these ideas, and how do they connect the power structures of those of the time? Well I traced most of these ideas back to Lena's Carlin is who considered the father of modern taxonomy and he's this. Eighteenth Century Swedish naturalist and he kind of decided for all of us will wear. Does everything belong? He named everything. and. He you know He. He came from a very Christian household, and like most naturalists of the time he was very religious, and he thought of nature as an expression of God's perfection, so everything was in its rightful place for him. You know so so wherever he found things. That's a quote. Unquote belonged, and that extended to his human taxonomy, so he decided that you know the people in Africa Belong Africa the people in America they belong in America etc to such an extent that he decided that all of these different people's on different continents were not you know didn't have a shared ancestry shared migration history, but we're actually. Actually separate subspecies of humans, and in fact he called Africans even less than human that they were sort of a hybrid between real humans and this other archaic Michele human that he called Troglodyte S-, but those ideas were incredibly influential, because we see them today in our ideas about race and Abou- where people belong in where wild species belong in when a when a wild creature across his drum in a different place into a new territory we think of it as an invasive, we call it an alien, and we hints of all of that in the way, we make policy around around Immigration and newcomers in places around the world. It's interesting that. In the early twentieth century there were a lot of racist theories which held that immigration was a terrible thing that it would dilute the purity of Americans and along with this came the idea that animals to didn't migrate Ryon Air. Animals had placed that they belonged, and you know I guess the status of Scientific Natural Research. Wasn't yet in a position to really test that. You write that over the subsequent decades. We've come to understand just how much mass migration there is you WanNa. Give us some examples of the. Distances that animals traverse routinely in migration. Well I think. This is just trying to get mapped right now. Because we've had this absolute revolution in our ability to track the way animals move I mean in the past we only could see animal movement sort of episodically in glimpses you know. We didn't have batteries lasted long enough to to follow them around. Even if you were able to follow an animal around, you wouldn't have funding for 'cause animal movement was considered sort of instinctual and robotic, and there wasn't a lot of scientific interest in it, but what scientists are discovering now is that you know we're able to use new technology to. Study the way animals move and so with solar technology and GPS. We can track animals twenty, four seven over the course of their lifetime continuously so you can, you can see the full picture of the way they move, and what they're finding is that these creatures are moving farther and faster and more complex and responsive ways, dynamic ways than anyone ever thought before, and what's funny is like we've created all these. These parks and reservations to protect animals, and when when we've actually now studied will. Where do they actually go? It turns out well the drafts you know. They're supposed to stay in the park in Ethiopia that we set aside from. In fact, they're crossing borders and going. You know much farther than that. The turtles are swimming well beyond the boundaries of the marine protected zones. We've we've made up for them. So and we see animals are moving sort of en masse now because of the climate crisis, the climate change that tens of thousands of species are moving towards the Poles and up into the heights, including creatures that we don't think of as mobile we think of coral reefs for example as very still as stone walls, essentially in coral reefs are moving. Coral polyps around Jet Japan for example have moved about fourteen kilometers every year since the nineteen thirties, forests are moving. Up The Himalayan mountains climbing uphill in one thousand nine meters a decade, and there are some animals that have moved even farther like Atlantic cod wish shifted more than two hundred kilometers every decade. So so there's just this. Sense that were just being revealed to us of a planet. That's on the move in in a very dynamic responsive way. Have plenty of animals that have long regular migration routes I mean these little tiny monarch. Butterflies go from New England to Mexico thousands of miles. eels crossed the Atlantic. And I'm wondering what your sense. What? What's the lesson for us about this constant motion among animal species? What's the lesson for our understanding of Human Migration? I think what we can see in animals is that their mobility allows them to adopt to environmental change, so we see in bird species for example if they rely on seasonally available fruits, they migrate more often than bird species that. That safe feed on insects that are available year round bats that live in trees they migrate more than bat species that live in caves. Arthur posit live in seasonal ponds migrate more than those who live inside for us, so the more exposed you are to environmental chain variation, the more likely are to migrate and whole ecosystems depend on animals on the move. You know we see. And this is something. That's a complete reversal to how scientists used to think of wild migrant, says sort of parasites you know as as disruptors in Paris as what we now understand is that you know over ninety percent of the trees in rainforests for rely on the movement of birds and other animals to disperse their seeds. So wild migrants in wild movements really build the scaffolding for. Our Ecosystems. So we can see that in the in the natural world. So, what does that mean about the way we move while we know that humans are not our bodies are not. Attuned specifically adapted to specific niches. You know the way that Lynn Naess and the race scientists of the early twentieth. Century thought of the human body as very specifically adapted to a certain place, so the African body was adapted to an environment, a European body to temperate European climates, etc.. And that's not what we now know about the human body I mean we. Are Genes are not they don't robotically dictate how our bodies function our how our bodies develop. And we're very fungible. Our our genes are very responsive to environmental signals around the genes themselves from. The diets are mothers from the climates were exposed to and that kind of fluidity and responsiveness. It's what allows our bodies to thrive in such widely variable places from the Tibetan plateau to the middle of rainforests. And, it's not the kind of thing that doesn't evolve in species that are staying in one place in that are highly adapted to one specific location, our bodies are just opposite were very fungible, and so our bodies really are built to migrate. So you have to think about like the whole picture of. Why did we evolve this way? And how did our? How did migration come to be such a prominent part of our history? It's because it's benefits outweighed its risks over the long term, so this whole idea of migration crisis is what I'm trying to kind of interrogate, and and it seems to me that it could be just the opposite. That migration isn't the crisis. Migration is the solution. You write the book that the next Great Migration is upon us is this the migration driven by climate change? Yeah that. That's what's happening with. Wild species up to eighty percent of wild species that have been tracked are moving towards the Poles and up into altitude, and we see also gration patterns in humans are also changing and so given what we understand that migration is a response to environmental change in a way to adapt to environmental change. We can predict that as the climate changes that we're GONNA. Continue to see you know a a new kind of migration happening. Show you so much for speaking with us again, thank you. Sooner show spoke with fresh air's Dave, Davies her new book is called the next great migration, the beauty and terror of life on the move. Her Twenty Sixteen book is called pandemic tracking contagious from cholera to a bola and beyond. Fresh air weekend is produced by Teresa Madden Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham. Our interviews and reviews produced an edited by Amy. Salad Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock. San, brigger. Lauren, Crandell, Monterey, Seth. Kelly and Joe will from Molly. Seavy Nesper is our associate producer of digital media I'm Terry Gross.

mouth breathing James Nestor US NPR New York Kevin Whitehead nose breathing writer Stanford Apnea jazz critic Sonia Shah Terry Gross Nyack Nassar sympathetic nervous system America
Why Is Tear Gas Especially Dangerous During COVID-19?

BrainStuff

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Why Is Tear Gas Especially Dangerous During COVID-19?

"Today's episode is brought to you by capital. One capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they created no the capital, one assistant that looks out for surprise credit card charges like duplicate charges or potential fraud, then sends an alert to your phone help. If you need to fix them another way, capital one is watching out for your money when you're not capital one. What's in your Wallet See Capital One dot Com for details. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, lauren vocal bomb here. Over the past two weeks, enormous crowds of protesters in the United States have met with in some cases ominous clouds of tear gas. But the use of tear gas to disperse protesters and cities in the United States and around the world could have unintended consequences when it comes to the spread of the corona. Virus. The large crowds that have gathered to demonstrate for racial justice, and against police brutality in the weeks after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May were already worrisome to public health officials, although many demonstrators have worn masks, many crowds have grown much too large to maintain social distancing guidelines. Also, the protests have typically involved crowds of people shouting and chanting activities that could potentially send infected droplets far and wide, and that involved the kind of deep open mouth breathing that has been observed to increase the risk of catching the virus. We spoke with Amber Schnittke PhD. An Assistant Professor Microbiology, and the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Mercer University School of Medicine in Macon Georgia. She explained tear. Gas Components are mainly there to hit the pain receptors in your body to get to move. It's like you're poked with a stick. You want to get away from the pain. The other thing tear-gas does is trigger your para sympathetic response, a neurologic series of activities that are outside of your control, but because there's a chemical irritant in place, your body is going to do everything it can to flush it out. A person will feel the symptoms of the chemicals most commonly used tear-gas CS CNN CR within twenty to thirty seconds after being exposed. Schnittke said it's going to increase mucus production along the sites where you've had exposure, and that's mainly your respiratory mucosal linings in your nose. That means you'll have a runny nose. You're going to have mucus production in the lungs along the trachea your windpipe. You're going to want to cough that out. You're also going to want to salivate more than you ordinarily would. You're going to produce more tears. How much person's affected depends on many variables such as whether there's a breeze or how close they are to the agent. A person's is will sting. They may sneeze or wretch. Sh- Mickey said, but the most dangerous thing is the coughing. That will happen in response to tear gas. It's a deep cough because you're trying so hard to get this out of your body, and it has the potential to spread viral particles rather far it's your body's natural response to get rid of a chemical irritant, but it's the same mechanism that we're concerned about with virus spread. It's the perfect storm of things you don't want to happen in a pandemic. And of course, she's not the only concerned party during June fourth. Twenty Twenty House Appropriations hearing on the Coronavirus Response Centers for Disease Control Director Dr Robert Redfield also specifically called out that the use of tear gas by police might help the virus spread. We also spoke with Forest Brown, a resident of Atlanta who lives downtown, just two blocks from the CNN building and Centennial Olympic Park the entire has been the site of many, Atlanta, protests, past and present the first weekend of the current demonstrations, he stood outside his building with neighbors with an eye on protecting their property when he got a whiff of a pungent odor teargas. Brown said we could smell it, and it stung our eyes. We would go inside waited out, but it wasn't a strong hit. You could feel it, but then it dissipated. Saturday may thirtieth Sunday. Night was a different story. Brown said is actually in the interior courtyard of our building. I didn't see the cloud, but it was a bad dose. Compared to Saturday night, my symptoms were much worse, stinging and watering is it also made my lips feel like they were tingling burning I felt like I wanted to throw up. It made me feel very weak almost jittery like I might pass out. Brown says the worst of it was over in about thirty minutes though he felt nauseated for several hours, and even had blurred vision on Monday. Though he was wearing a mask following standard protocols and a full block away from where the tear gas was actually released, he was exposed to it. Schmidt key is concerned with the use of tear-gas demonstrations during the pandemic, not only because it potentially increases the spread of the corona virus, but also because the same people who are at risk for Covid, nineteen infection, people with underlying conditions are also at risk for side effects from tear gas exposure. Schmidt, said Covid, nineteen sort of blurs the lines between being a respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease. The similarities aren't uniform, but if you have asthma, you're going to be at higher risk of complications from something like tear gas exposure, people who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or any of those sorts of ailments could have more severe outcomes. She concedes that it's a difficult situation because a person can make plans to participate in a peaceful protest and find themselves in situation that they aren't prepared for. She encourages all protesters whether they were exposed, tear gas or not to make plans to be tested for covid nineteen. However? Don't get tested immediately. When the virus gets into the body, it goes into what's called the eclipse period hiding out in the cells while it makes copies of itself, then it starts to leave the cells and spread to other cells, and that's when it becomes detectable. Sh- Mickey suggests that everyone has been at a protest rally. Get tested between three and seven days after participating, even if they're not showing symptoms because of the high rate of domestic carriers. CDC Director Redfield issued the same advice at the June fourth Senate. Appropriations hearing saying I do think there is a potential unfortunately for this to be exceeding event. Sh- Mickey said protesters do have some things going for them. They're outside. They have the benefit of ventilation. They have sunlight UV. Light is advantageous for the virus. Protesters are typically young, but I wouldn't count on those things being some sort of anti covid security blanket. If, you come into contact with tear-gas Amnesty. International says the gas masks are the best protection if they're properly fitted in sealed, though if you don't have one, they recommend wearing goggles and a respirator or a weapon Danna over the nose and mouth. If you're exposed, try to stay calm and breathe slowly. Blow your nose. Rinse your mouth with water, cough and spit trying not to swallow because he want to get those irritants out. Stays episode was written by Paddy, rest Newson and produced by tyler, playing or more in this amounts of other topics. visit how stuff works dot com brain. Stuff is production of iheartradio for more podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This is DJ lad. I want you to check out the VLAD TV podcast launching on June seventeenth since two thousand eight Vlad. TV has been the leader in a hard hitting no-holds-barred interviews with the world's biggest rappers singers. Hollywood stars professional athletes and former big time criminals, and now you can catch all of our full link interviews available as audio podcasts, so listen to the Vlad TV podcast on iheartradio APP apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you get your podcast.

Mickey cough Amber Schnittke Brown CNN United States fraud Twenty Twenty House Appropriat mouth breathing George Floyd Covid corona Coronavirus Response Centers f Atlanta Minneapolis Dr Robert Redfield runny Assistant Professor Microbiolo Forest Brown
#62: The Secret to Better Sleep? Stop Doing This One Thing with Dr. Mark Burhenne

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

1:44:13 hr | 2 years ago

#62: The Secret to Better Sleep? Stop Doing This One Thing with Dr. Mark Burhenne

"I want to hear from the broken brain podcast today's episode we have my dear friend mark hanna a dentist who's passionate about the connection between our oral health and and sleep apnea super fascinating conversation stay tuned to learn more welcome to the broken brain podcast where we dive deep into the topics of neuro plasticity epigenetics mindfulness and functional medicine with the goal of helping. You understand how your brain is not broken. I'm your host droop road in each week my team and i bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health. Feel better and live more this. Week's guest is a new friend of mine. Dr mark burr hannah dr be nose. The the mouth is the gateway to health in the rest of the body. He's the author of the number one bestseller. The eight hour sleep paradox and is a practicing sleep medicine. John dentist in sunnyvale california dr has been practicing dentistry in the greater san francisco area for over thirty years. He's a speaker and his advice regularly regularly appears in media outlets c._n._n. C._b._s. yahoo health the huffington post the washington post and men south. He received his degree from school of dentistry in san francisco. Oh and as a member of the american academy of dental sleep medicine academy of general dentistry american academy of oral systemic health and and the dental board of california dr is passionate about helping people understand the connection between oral and overall health. He also spends a lot of time educating educating patients and readers about the importance of healthy sleep. Which is what we're going to talk about. In today's podcast dr be welcome to the broken bring podcasts through a pleasure. There's all mind. This is a great show. You've done a lot of great things with their show. I'm happy to <hes> we've just recently met in person but we've been a big fan of your work and ask dennis dot com and <hes> your team has been a great support to our team and vice versa and you share such great knowledge. It's why i'm so excited to have you on here and go deep into a topic that we've kind of skimmed dimmed upon but we haven't really broke it down so thank you for coming down here. I'm excited jumping to it now before we talk about sleep apnea and the connection between oral oh health and brain health and how structure upper respiratory syndrome and all those topics. I want you to sort of set the stage to help our listeners understand the type of person that you art. You have a great story that you shared before about how you got fired ten months into being a young dentist working at your first <hes> practice. Can you tell that story right well. That's not a story. I'm <hes> i'm proud of but i it was my daughter who actually said you know. This is a great story. Dad you need to share this and it does tell a lot. What about what. I was back then i did. I got fired from a big clinic that i was working with. It was great experience. <hes> based on the education i had received i was getting all the root canals more difficult cases which was kind of nice to to experience and all that but a lot of the stuff i was being told to do actually by a non dentist who was is part owner of the clinic and i was somehow able to refer some of this work out for example. If you build a bridge that's a big lot of crowns on some teeth and if if the gum disease has not been addressed then it's like remodeling the kitchen. You've got dry rot on the floor. I mean it was it so. I would sneak this patient out. Give them my personal card card without name written on the back of local predominant and that worked for eight or nine months give them other solutions to really deal with what their issue was rather than up selling them or right getting right the business sort of side involved exactly so and that was taking more x-rays and i was very careful with my root canals and and i was saying things to them that you know the administration of who obviously was concerned about production wasn't very happy with but for eight or nine months hung in there my systems were <hes> were with me on that oughta it was it was a it was a good time. It was stressful. You know being a young dentist and anytime a young dennis comes out of school and that's a very stressful time but i look back to it. I think it is a great story. <hes> if it wasn't for my daughter i probably wouldn't put it on our website but what's really beautiful about is that it starts to show that early inclinations of wanting to do things right and also differently going against the grain a little bit even though everybody might be telling you and that's the foundation of all the work that you do and the resources that you put on your website and education you bring to people <hes>. Where do you think that that came from. You know that's a good question. <hes> probably from my upbringing probably from my dad who was a physician. He was a radiologist <hes> talk about root cause. I mean they're looking for things that the visual effects of systemic disease and and <hes> you you know it's <hes> to reiterate that story part of that part of that was my education <hes> being an idealistic dentist having gone to a good school half at that was not what i was thinking it was what i learned and being thrust into a more commercial environment there were there were there were conflicts you know there. Were you know times where they didn't want me to do. What i was trained to do so that was part of it but i think it probably came from my dad <hes> wanting to really do everything for the patient not just fill the cavity find out wh- at this cavity come from what can we do to prevent that started early because i think a lot of our listeners can agree. There's always that fear that the general public has when it comes to dentistry is that is this necessary and you have to do it. It's almost like it's very there's there's questions and people still have a lot of things that they feel like they're in the dark about running comes dentistry era and there's also other avenues that are emerging that we talked about in our broken. Bring docu doc you series and we we've touched upon a little bit in some past interviewed some dentists that we'd have on here where we're really bringing back the importance on oral health both and you said something really beautiful last night at dinner when we were catching up you're saying that oral health and early signs of some challenges his when it comes to our own health can catch issues that can become major issues in our health long-term. Tell us about that well. <hes> i mean there are many different ways to look at that but i'm first of all. I'm very glad that the oral health is now merging with you know medicine and and the systemic health i mean it's always been there but now it's part of the discussion which is very very important and that's kind of what we're trying to do it. Ask the nets dot com is to educate people about that. <hes> dentistry medicine unseparated longtime ago in the late eighteen hundreds and that has not been good for our patients because oral health does contribute a lot to overestimate systemic health <hes> the study. We talked about last night. Was this columbia study. I think it was two thousand six twenty. One percent savings in the trillions of dollars of healthcare span if orel conditions are addressed early and prevent it like gum disease <hes> to me. That's something that cannot be overlooked. It needs to be addressed not just for financial reasons dozens but for the overall health of of any patient and one topic which is going to be the central point of our focus for today's interview is one of the biggest areas of the oil health and also brain connection and overall body connection and that's sleep apnea so twenty two million americans suffer from sleep apnea nia and yet many who have it never get diagnosed and there is the traditional sleep apnea that a lot of people think of an overweight older older male often who has the classic signs of of being overweight and other challenges that a doctor might recommend that they get a sleep study and and then would prescribe like a bunch of interventions including like a cpap machine but there's this whole other category of sleep apnea that dentists like yourself yourself a really bringing to the forefront so help us understand i with the basics what is sleep sleep apnea and what's actually happening in the body when somebody has it right so <hes> sleep apnea is came to me directly via you know getting a diagnosis for sleep sleep apnea that was about ten years ago and i always try and think back to what i thought of sleep apnea which was very little very little recognition of it to what i know now because it's hard to know oh and remember how a lot of people feel about this including physicians and dentists and other healthcare providers and that is that it's really not that big of a deal until it becomes a big deal but it happens much earlier than that. I think i've told you before that dennis oracle's recognize sleep apnea decades before a physician can cause. We're looking at a whole different subset of signs and symptoms so we can talk about it. If you want your going witten in functional medicine they call it. You're going upstream and you're seeing certain upstream. Factors offers that are causing yes the further upstream we can go especially in sleep apnea and going upstream by decades as a huge deal because you know that liver damage and brain damage. I mean that starts happening. At an early age it can even happen with children infants. I see seats a sleep. Apnea and other sleep disorder related breathing issues news in infants and that affects development. I can affect their brains confessed their personality a learning disorders it. It's a very broad subject so upstream upstream is important in this regard so when you talk about upstream issues with sleep apnea we talked about the classic case and mostly people would let's let's say lehman would look at sleep apnea and say that somebody might be a candidate or have risk for it when they are overweight. That's often the the big one for it so when you're going to these upstream factors to look at sleep apnea in a patient what are the things that you're paying attention to that are part of you've sleeper so that's a good question and it's mostly in the mouth or at least from the neck up. <hes> course i'm looking. I have a list that checkoff lists that i go through and do that with every patient because i assume everyone has the potential for any kind of sleep disordered breathing issue <hes> so as is i go to the list. There's the usual stuff on the list that physicians look at co morbidity of sleep apnea like high blood pressure knocked area going to the bathroom midnight <hes> there's a host of other things high blood pressure heart arrhythmias insulin resistance <hes> but when it comes to the mouth <hes> if you are struggling to gain air air at night there are things that happened in the mouth well before the effects of not being able to breathe at night and having hypoxia and slowly getting brain damage in the heart working harder than it needs to at night that all has a delayed effect the good news about the dental <hes> ramifications of sleep apnea the signs and symptoms of someone struggling for areas that we can. Let's see them much earlier. <hes> there are many. There's a gum recession at fractions. Were the side of the tooth is breaking off calving. I call it a calving having of the denton sensitivity in those areas too hot and cold a brook zing sleep wrexham is the term now. That's brexit nine grinding clenching her teeth. It can even be just clench and not a grinding motion t._m. J. sore muscles headaches in the morning dry mouth. You were talking about how many people have dry mouth well. If you're older a lot a lot of people have dry mouth. You're on medications a lot of people that are taking medications. That's very common. Side effect of most pharmaceuticals have dry mouth but there are a lot of young people that if their mouth is open open all night long. They're going to have a dry mouth in the morning sticky tongue. It's going to be a little. They're going to be thirsty at night. <hes> so dry mouth is a big one. <hes> a scalloped tongue. Hi melan alan patty scores <hes> actually physicians look at that as well <hes> there. You know it's it's a it's a combination of so many different things that if it all starts fitting together then we realized there's an issue a mouth breathing of course is a problem. A tongue tie can cause an issue with breathing at night the positioning of the tongue while you sleep <hes> <hes> <hes> if the patient can't breathe through their nose. That's again mouth breathing <hes>. That's that's all signs that something's going on. We also look at facial development. That's what i was referring to. From the neck up i can look at someone's face profile full full-frontal and have have some make some assumption as to what the size of their airway is. What the size of their sinuses this is our whether they're able to breathe or not lip posture tapering of the chen we have all different sorts of plus occasions of face type a clue asian. That's how the teeth come together a skeletal relationship of the inclusion <hes>. It's it's. It's a it's a huge list and the good news is that we can see it earlier. Then then we can <hes> you know diabetes for example ethic for those people listening on the podcast. I think thing that you're really trying to get across. Is that sleep sleep apnea which seems like if anybody has ever known somebody who has sleep apnea in the traditional sense it sounds <hes> it looks and it sounds like very <music> often aggressive right. They have a hard time breathing day. It's like it looks like a very <hes> over the top thing or whatever agr they have and you're really talking about a milder form of sleep apnea that he's often undiagnosed underdiagnosed. That's still there and many people themselves don't even know that they have it but they have it and they have all these different things including some of the things that you had mentioned this list and and before we talk talk about those things in detail. Let's just come back to sleep apnea a little further when people have sleep apnea even if it's not super severe but it's prominent what kind of long term impact does it have on our health right <hes> what you said previous to so that was very interesting. There is a threshold for noticing sleep apnea and the threshold is very low and dentistry <hes> we're able to catch it sooner and that's a very important important point. <hes> this disease starts very early in his very insidious in that way so what is sleep apnea <hes> it's again. It's it's it's very gray. <hes> there's no point or threshold where all of a sudden you'll sleep apnea. It can start from the time that you're born. <hes> it is a <hes> the the lack of the ability to breathe properly at night to the point where your sleep is interrupted and in a nutshell when we go into deep sleep muscles those are paralyzed when we reach that rim stage three stage four sleep <hes> there are some exceptions and rim of course but <hes> the muscles of the airway of <hes> become flaccid i mean they lose their tone and if you have an airway that is small to begin with chances are that the sides the walls of the airway will touch and fall together there and of course that's going to be a area of resistance for air coming through and exiting and of course that's where the storm comes from the flapping of that tissue and the more you snore or the more inflamed that tissue becomes. There's a team of the airway muscles. The muscles are <hes> have <hes> in women. They're the they have protective. Active hormones and women estrogen and progesterone protect them. That's why they catch up with men <hes> after menopause even peri menopause <hes> because they're low on those hormones i mean it is a lack of thriving at night and it it is something that <hes> is curious because as you know how did we get here i obviously we've been we look back at our ancestors and we can see from their skeletons in their and their skulls that they had different airways than we did and they didn't have these issues and there are a lot of reasons for it but but i assume i pretty much think it's very practical from my standpoint in in my practice too soon that everyone has asleep disorder breathing and <hes> and it's getting worse. There's this rising epidemic of sleep apnea and all the different permutations of how it's impacting people which we're gonna talk about a little bit but let's just chat about what you were sharing for second which is why are we heading in this direction. We're more people who don't know that they have apnea are getting apnea. You hinted at a couple of components are jaw. Structure is different so weiser jaw structure different now compared to our ancestors right. It is different. We know it's different. <hes> we have the archaeological record of of that and the question is how did we get here. It's <hes> there are many theories. They're very solid theories. <hes> it's lack of breastfeeding. Its lack of chew. It's it's eating processed foods as at at the right age when we should be eating something with more texture. It's the <hes> increase of tongue ties that could actually be eh from us pushing too much b twelve before <unk> prenatal before conception <hes>. There's a there's a better version of b twelve to be taking <hes> <hes> those are the mid line defects <hes> what else <hes> <hes> breastfeeding of taking one of those the even and the process food alone even when people eat a very healthy diet one of the things you were sharing last night at dinner is that the food arts kind coming predigested for them. It's blended or as a smoothie. It's chopped up in a salad and were no longer sort of taking things in having to use our teeth for what they were designed to do and when we're we're not chewing at that level are formation or muscles and our bones in our in our face just develop completely differently. It's actually the muscles of of chewing and swallowing and the oral posture of where we hold her tongue that shapes our lower face <hes>. It's tongue is pushing out an up if we're not chewing properly for for not using these muscles <hes> our faces will be different so whatever allows us to use more of those muscles in the right way will lead to better facial development. That's clear on extreme and we know that sleep apnea long-term people exposed to it. They're they're at a much higher risk of alzheimer's. <hes> talk about that yeah so sleep. <hes> is not the only thing in dentistry that can lead to alzheimer's and that's exciting for dentistry now. Oh by <hes> sleep is probably the biggest good sleep. Deep sleep is probably the biggest fixer of our brains the daily damage that we do to our brains. I mean the brains use a lot of energy. <hes> <hes> we we <hes> we need a lot of cleansing and detoxifying the brain at night and that only really happens the glenfiddich system. The glee will lymphatic system. These are something that was recently discovered in the brain and it was first discussed in a tedtalk. Remember were <hes> the speaker was talking about the brain shrinking and that <hes> a famous greek scientists for philosopher had actually discovered that in had mentioned it and i thought that it was fascinating but is confirmed. I mean the brain at night has a chance as does the liver has an opportunity to fix itself in clean itself and take away the waste and organs all of our metabolic processes create waste and the question is how do we how do we clean that out. The liver does its job. It does constantly during the day but the the brain only. It has a chance to do that at night. You're not getting deep sleep and you're continually being interrupted due to a small airway or collapsing our way and that brain is starting starting off not fresh in the morning and that damage that that lack of waste reduction is is accumulating and we said long-term that can lead to that can increase crease your likelihood of alzheimer's and and in the short term it could be you just wake up feeling not rested. You feel tired. You feel sluggish. There are instances this one. I'd love to touch on. There's a whole sort of group of <hes>. Can you talk about like women <hes> and and sort of like the nervous system and and the the connection there have like sleep apnea and the nervous system for out of a young women especially well well <hes> i mean there's at one study in sweden. I think it was <hes> two thousand and four <hes> where they randomly selected from over one hundred two thousand women just women across the board from twenty seven years old seventy years old and fifty percent of them had some form sleep disordered breathing now of course if you're overweight. You're older her obese high b._m._i. Made it runs in the family. You would certainly see it there but to see it in a twenty year old woman or twenty five year old woman who's fit and then and healthy that was that was a real wakeup call for women and i don't want to pick on women of course that happens to men as well but <hes> a lot of the mood disorders and and actually tim tim j disorders tend to be more prevalent in women and a lot of that has to do is sleep. How do i bring in t._m. Jada neurological and mood disorders it's because they're all related to the grinding clenching which is trying to keep the airway open. It is a factor in or a sign that that person is struggling to sleep at night so so if you're not fixing your brain at night and you're grinding at night to keep your airway open. You're gonna you're gonna suffer from depression. Perhaps mood disorders and t m j. They seemed to be paired together together and you're also not processing oxygen correctly inside the body. Can you talk about the relationship between like oxygen breathing. I think will jump into a couple of years topics slot to discuss their nitrous oxide and breathe your nose versus your mouth give us an overview on roy while it's very exciting <hes> and so when we when my daughter and i wrote the book <hes> we did some research and and in my clinical practice practice i noticed that people that can't breathe through their nose first of all let me back up. Dennis are great at knowing who mouth wreaths and who knows breathes now he's why because when we lay the patient down and start throwing water in their mouth and putting our fingers in their mouth they can't breathe. They're the ones who get up and spit a lot of the customer. They're the ones that gag a lot. If put their hand up once they compete with the knows they intolerate having that little pool of water in the back of their throat right and they can breathe passed it so it's very obvious to me too. I mean i was joked with patients. Dentistry dennis probably invented waterboarding right. I mean it's it's why people don't wanna come see us. It is a it is a <hes> a panic moment. It is a fighter flight response when you're airways blocked and you can't breath your notes i mean it's a lot like how we sleep at night. If we're not breathing night we're gonna wake up a little anxious in the mornings. We've been fighting for a life at night if you have twelve interruptions it's like i did at night before i treated my sleep apnea per hour. That's twelve grizzly bear sightings at night. I mean that's that will out your glance. Your body doesn't know the difference. I i just is wanna touch on that for a second. I'll interrupt your story. That's okay is literally at night when you have a version of sleep apnea and there's a spectrum of how severe it is your body. He is actually feels that it's at risk of dying. Yes and it can increase like <hes> cortisone. The body economic shot of adrenalin inside the body. That busy says like something's attacking me. I can't sleep properly and there's often. Have you know somebody that has severe c-pap c-pap dion who hasn't been treated. You'll see these major gasps for air in the middle or night. I had a cousin who i recommended. Gophers sleep study it came back and in the course of an hour he was stopping to breathe forty five times on every but in forty five times in our and some awesome sixty seconds and some people can't even hold their breath at long and then you know the body will wake you up. It's a it's a it's fear of of a thriving thriving. I mean it's a it's a guttural gut. Instinct of i'm going to die and and you know does that. Come through you know if you've been sleeping absolutely <hes> <hes> that's where a lot of the anxiety comes from. It's not just from the hormonal problems in the brain not being able to fix itself at night. It's from the anxiety. It's from feeling that away at night <hes> and it it's <hes> it it can really i the the enjoyment i get doing. What i do is that we can turn that around. In a matter of six months we can see people we see people and we see and we take a little interview with them. We write down some notes on how they feel in the morning and then six months after we've treated them we <hes> we interview them again and it's remarkable to see the difference. I feel a little happier. I can't close my eyes after a wake-up. I feel like getting out of bed. I feel a little bit better about a day but if you're if if you're fighting for your life at night you don't have time i mean you're you're the glasses half empty. I mean you're having a tough time. You're challenged the minute you wake up and that's the exact time a a day when you should feel rested restored and ready for you know life in general yeah and i couldn't think of anything more to put that attention on would sleep it's even but if you have the perfect diet like really put attention in your sleep first of all there's no perfect i and we don't believe in that of course but i'm just saying i'd rather have somebody just having credible sleep <hes> the not have their diet one hundred percent tuned in because that's how fundamentally important sleep is so going back to your story because i interrupted you you were talking about. Dentists are often the first to know now about that about whether or not somebody's good and you're explain the mechanism of how oxygen is processed inside the body and and and what and what happens exactly when we're breathing through the mouth versus doing what we were designed to do which is breathing through the nose so could you continue down that path so it's very interesting. I'm and i didn't know this until about five years ago <hes> and it started with the simple act of mouth taping <hes> people that for example if i make an oral appliance ans- which is something that just keeps the chin from falling back when they go to sleep that keeps the tongue in the airway open their cpap therapy apep therapy. That's the little machine that people put on these. These are the main solutions for sleep apnea. It keeps positive press pressure in the airway and keeps it from collapsing. Those things work well if the patient is able to breathe through their nose so oh that's how i i ran into this. I would make an oral plans for someone and the results were not quite would expect it and then i learned of course that well. They can't breathe through their nose. It's not gonna work doc as well same thing for a cpap so so that's how i kind of came across it then a deal out of research started reading up on it read these pulmonologist analogy books <hes> spoke to a lotta pulmonologist about it and a lot of ear-nose-and-throat <hes> m._d.'s and understood that things like for example <hes> <hes> when you breathe through your mouth only you're not able to deal with your otis your c._o. Two to mix in your blood. There's there's oa-to ah co two as a waste product. It's coming out oh to what were breathing in and we wanna get oh to oxygen to our bloodstream but if there's too much c._o. Two or if you you are in acidosis. I mean the analogy i use for patients. If you add carbonic acid to water to make bubbly the ph drops it becomes very acidic and we talked about it a lot and dentistry because that's a drink that can dissolve enamel in your mouth so <hes> it's the same thing with blood too much c._o. Two acidifies the blood and that actually harms or or prevents as much oxygen going from the lungs to the blood so that's a big deal breathing. Your nose is a better regulator of c._o. Two in other words if you breath your nose most the time your c._o. Two levels will be optimal important thing in that. I didn't realize us until five years ago and it really made me think the body is measuring. Is controlling your breathing. It's the it's the brain stem that is regulating the subconscious briefing. I think that the that part of the brain stem is looking at c._o. Two on the blood not oh too so it's not responding too much oxygen. You have which you would think that would be the process. This is responding to a much c._o. Two in your blood so that's where we get this panting short breathing which makes it worth get dizzy these early short-term effects of hyperventilation ventilation and all that i mean i the the old yogis were right. I mean breathing is so important and we somehow forgotten to breathe. Maybe it's related needed to our airways became breath your nose of course and you have a lot of allergies. Due to your environment. I mean that will turn you into a person who can only mouth breath breathe and then it's difficult to breathe so the ph of your blood as it is anywhere in the body is key to <hes> you know keeping your blood pressure trillo <hes> <hes> regulating heart rate through breathing and also just a general feeling of happiness and wellness and a lot of top athletes. I mean like when i first heard about mouth taping in the context of and we're gonna talk about what that is but when i first heard about mao taping the context of helping out with sleep apnea where people that were having troubles or certain symptoms come up from not sleeping properly i thought of sort of the history of a lot of the athletes when they work out they would often have some of them would have trainers who would say oh yeah i tell them to like take their mouth when they train because that teaches them they couldn't explain the science awesome at all but there's no they just got better performance smirk longer endurance from these these athletes that were there so there was a whole history of now taping sort of elite athletes and performance <hes> it's the same thing in mountaineering and this has been around before we know how it works but <hes> when you're climbing on high altitude you're lacking oxygen so if you do what's called the pressure of pressure breathing and rest step. It's a combination of resting your limbs so you would pause between each step. Lock your leg but the breathing between is very important. It's designed to help oxygen it your it's really venting c._o. Two it's a person of the lips breathing in your nose pushing it out but that process alone if you're partial pressures are lower like ten fifteen twenty thousand feet <hes> you're able to push more oxygen to your blood which is going to your muscles and which is what you need so we just visualize it for those that are listening when you're talking about people mouth breathing so imagine you're sleeping at night. You're talking somebody who has their mouth open right and it's just breathing through there so now. Let's talk about the sort of solution side of it. Which is you are. Somebody who is a big encourage her of mouth mouth taping so tell us exactly what is mouth taping sounds pretty crazy. Doesn't it l. <hes> you know <hes> it is i do. I presented differently now. I would just tell patients. Listen you gotta mouth taped for these reasons and half of them will take that advice and the ones that do are typically very pleased but the other half just won't do it. <hes> i use it in my practice as a diagnostic tool firstly i want to know the patient can can no sprees and you actually read your nose or resit clogged as does the tape. Stay on the text me back a few days and at the tape stays on all night long and they're peeling it off the morning then i know what i'm dealing with when it comes to treating for sleep apnea and other the other things so but in general that concept mouth taping it's it's a reminder it's not creating this impermeable seal that you know could could frighten people and maybe you know they would stop breathing at night. It's not about that. It's a reminder it is a gentle reminder to keep your lips closed and there are a lot of people out there that can do do that on their own and that's the way it was meant to be when we go to sleep and we're relaxed all the air coming through our nose out of her nose should be enough and there are a lot of advantages of of doing that breathing through your mouth though a lot of us cannot do that but a lot of us because we mouth tape or are better at it and and and what i tell people is that you may not be good at it first breathing through your nose right breath your nose and mouth taping but pushed through at work on it and at some point because you start using her nose again and there's some borderline there are a lot of borderline cases i would say most of us are borderline. <hes> then you know you're pushing warm air past the nasal sinuses again the mucosal there. You're building a bio home nasal biofilm <hes> you are creating a demon <hes> you're going to get less of a historic response when you come across an allergen pollen but it takes time but if we stop using our nose to breathe while we're not getting the nitric oxide were not a production were not getting a filtration humidity of the air <hes> and there's a a a temperature gradient between breathing air in through the nose as opposed to the mouth for the lungs and i would think that we wanna keep that you know i mean at a healthy level right. I mean you don't want to and also we dehydrate more often. We can lose up to lead a water <hes> by mouth breathing. So if you're you're feeling dehydrated i would look at if your mouth is open a lot of course i'm not talking about talking and eating and all that but but at nighttime the mouth should be closed and the tape ape is a great reminder and you're not talking about packing tape or anything that there's actually specific smell at eight not to duct tape right so people who get scared when they first heard idea like oh my gosh like dying. It's not anything like that. It's strong enough to maintain a closure in the mouth but it's weak enough that if you forced to you could just force it off very easily. Even if you were sleeping it would come off in just in so easily with just an opening of the mouth would come off the fundamentally first and foremost i think is just important thing this again is that it's a tool to see. Can you breed the way that we were evolutionary. Evolutionary designed to bring us and if you can't now it's digging a little bit deeper. I had dear friend of mine who <hes> was waking up in the morning which is severe heart palpitations. You'd wake up in the morning. She had severe heart palpitations. There was all the things zaidi she'd text me in the morning sometimes and say like i just feel super anxious just everything that and it's right around that time <hes> my dear friend steven lin semi bunch of resources including some of your resources and other stuff and said great you know because we just just happen to be talking. He's a past guest on the podcast. He said you know you should just really. I overheard you talking about that. We had a conference together. You should really look into this area like does she breathe at night with her mouth open. I know this sounds crazy. 'cause she eats healthy. She's fed everything like that but this severe anxiety it could be that when oxygen is not properly regulated night and she's breathing through her mouth. It basically never lets her nervous system feel like she's fully lee at rest so she's in firefly's. The whole night wakes up and immediately feels this sort of extreme anxiety. Have you heard that example from payoffs impasse. I have many patients that are that way and they do wake up in a panic and their blood pressure's elevated not just from the fighter flight but from the acidosis from from the bloodstream from <hes> mouth breathing means. You're going to store more often. You're pulling a lot more air past the smaller way. If it comes into the knows it's baffled it slows down it's warmed and as it gets pulled past the airway less of it's coming through at that one time and that's less likely to pull it close. That's the newly newly principle essentially <hes> so there. Yes absolutely it's. It's an in a in kids is even more phenomenal a._d._d. The a._d._h._d. <hes> <hes> cavity rates that are just sky high <hes> and they're the ones that are developing and growing so breathing through your mouth while all your faces developing <hes> that's a big deal because that is what you're set with for life in terms of your facial type. If you don't grow properly here for up to age ten the the the box called the box the nasal box the airway box those all tend to be squashed and made to be much smaller so and remember over kids don't develop their sinuses until age four. Can you imagine being mouth reading all those years and then the sinus comes online while it's not gonna feel needed so why develop up to its full potential because the kid is breathing through their mouths. It's almost like them being like a wheelchair not using their legs in their legs develops some some level of atrophy lilies and being used and that's happening from a breathing standpoint right and that continues the rest of their life that can lead to all sorts of challenges as we you're sharing earlier <hes> speaking of kids. We have a mutual friend. Mike muscle was a past guest on this podcast. We talked about kito and other things like that and <hes> recently he shared how you've been a big inspiration by by him deciding to now tape of their daughter yes <hes> and he's been pretty open about that on social media and everything like that so i don't think we're sharing information that he wouldn't wanna be shared but when a parent is thinking about <hes> how to support the muscle of breathing for their child. What are some of the signs that they should be looking for. Is it as simple as hey is. My go into my kid's room at night. <hes> uh-huh bring their mouth breathing through their nose right. That's exactly it. That's the first thing i'll say you have to kind of sneak into your kid's room when they're asleep and and find out whether that mouth is open or closed most parents know it's one of the first things i ask <hes> even before see the child or the oral cavity <hes> i mean there are all site all sorts of signs that the child is mouth breathing other than the fact of seeing their mouth open all the time. I mean you can watch them while they're watching t._v. Or studying <hes> that certainly is is doable. <hes> you know i mean boogers lots of snot coming out of the knows. I mean you know if they can't breathe through their nose if they have allergies all the time that's a dead giveaway. <hes> posture is a big thing. <hes> the difference between nasal breathing and mouth breathing has an effect on on all these cervical bones and <hes> pulling an air for example past <hes> the the the knows. I mean the <unk> glenn the <hes>. The hypothalamus is there. The those organs begins can probably see light that would affect the circadian rhythm of the child is ca the child's spinning in bed. I mean it's it's a lot of it's related to sleep apnea or they snoring <hes> <hes>. It's just one big multifactoral package you have to look at and mouth breathing is part of it but the number one way to do that is exactly what you said. You got a sneak in and sit there so i recommend recommend that parents take their kindle and they're not their phone because that's blue light may wake up the kit and just sit there for fifteen twenty minutes. There's a chair in the room. That's great. If you're leaning up against the back of the bed and you can hear it you don't even have to see it and i would do that often. <hes> now obviously if they have a colt that's a different story but when they're not sick and they don't have a cold make sure your child is is breathing through their nose at all opportune moments that would not be during exercise not if they had a cold and eating and talking and that would be it <hes> mouth breathing is an emergency state. We mouth because we just need to bring in more air. Our normal state is breathing exhaling and inhaling through the nose and when it comes to actually getting tape and let's say with kids keeping down that story line and we want to implement it and start using with them just walk us through that what type of our mouth tapes equal quoted on amazon exactly when they get it so they began and do you have any tips on sort of explaining it to right <hes>. I don't hesitate eight telling parents to mouth tape <hes> but most parents will hesitate mouth taping their children. There's something called vertical taping where you can tape in vertical mode. That were the the sides of the mouth open. <hes> there's a special tape that i recommend which i'll mention <hes> but i do have a lot of patients that tape between the ages of one and a half to age age eight or nine and <hes> the story i like to tell was this one kid who started h two and he had these nightmares and the mother maybe about two years later year and a half later. The mother said johnny you know his name is johnny. <hes> <hes> tell them what you told me and he turned to me and he told me the story it was it was not just a comment was a long story about his dreams were getting better and he loves mouth taping and he gets upset when his mom doesn't have it for him and so i hear a lot of stories like that from improvement of of dreams. I'm not sure how that works but <hes> fewer cavities is a big one. <hes> i have a lot of kids that have a high rate of decay. We've identified that they are mouth breathing and we tell the parents listen you can spend two to three to four thousand dollars fixing just baby teeth <hes> deciduous teeth <hes> which i hesitate to because that's a traumatic experience for child typically <hes> it stressful <hes> or you can just. Let's stop this right now. So there's some diet management <hes> counseling going on but mouth taping is the big one. That is a big big factor in decay. I've seen it firsthand and what's the relationship between cavities and rebounding <hes> or breathing through mouth so <hes> you know the the mouth is this this has this incredible bio dislike the gut right in through exactly it's it's finally online very excited to read about it now and and it's basically just the headwaters of the first stop on this long train line with many stations and a bacteria in the mouth of course a little different than the gut but <hes> you know there's a sensitive population of bacteria in the mouth and one of the things that will turn it into a despotic kind of environment in which you've heard that term before the gut it can happen in the mouth. <hes> there are many ways of doing that. One of the major ways is by just as in the gut is by changing the ph when when you mouth breathe in your mouth becomes dry the saliva is not present the ph drops that is easily measurable measured we we've known this for a long time but what it does in the mouth is it allows the decay rate increase for a variety of reasons. It's like a slap in the buffering of the saliva but the slava has phosphorus in it and calcium and and hydroxy appetite it has all these ingredients that are required to keep the tooth remain realizing faster than it's demoralizing ether like bones. They just have a shiny outer her shell but they are dynamic. They're always changing and a few nights of a few weeks of very dry mouth. <hes> that equilibrium wool switchover to the demonization side and then you'll start seeing the decays that the decay and the curious lesions forming on the teeth and no dentist no parent parents should ever underestimate what that's going to cost you in terms of just just talking about cavities not about airway development or facial development just that alone it's great expand span on that story because the just the traditional story that we all grew up is all cavities is sugar <hes> and i can remember even a few friends of mine that our parents like listen my kid doesn't eat any sugar and all and they saw these cavities and being perplexed and where's it coming from and so it's great to include this component to see. Is it part harder piece of the puzzle. That's going that's going on. Your diet is definitely number two but i have a lot of patients a lot of patients. That have a really good diet. <hes> uh parents in my area of where practice you know they're doing paleo and all that but they still have to k- and that's because they're breathing through their mouth or mouth is bone dry from <hes> <hes> maybe midnight one o'clock on could also be some missing key nutrients which will talk about in a little bit. Let's <hes> let's continue down that path so so let's say now. You've taped the mouth of either yourself. Your spouse would recommend that by the way don't ever tape your partner's mouth. It's it's so you you should taper off. Mouthwash tape your own mouth. They get excited. They want to try it. They can do it on their own absolutely but you can let them. Do you ever suggest that couples you know noticed or checking checking on each other. If they're breathing through there usually they already know sleep. Partner reports are very important. <hes> and the problem is with mary couples. You'll get a lot of disagreement like i. I don't snore but you snore and it goes by so i have to. I take that with a you know a very work on yourself very soccer right and then do whatever you wanna do. That's where we start mentioning the the phone apps and sleeping alone room for a few nights and getting some good data right so you've taped your mouth now is that it you know is mouth taping now the end all be all of building back that muscle up or do sometimes people have to look deeper root issues that are going on that are chronically. Gli keeping them from breathing right who they're a really good question because i mean that's not it. That's not the end of it for some people can be but <hes> for example if you have a tongue tie if you start right there because a lot of people especially parents. I don't think they even know what it's a tongue. Explain tong tight right. Well turns out our little granddaughter of eighteen months. Now had a tie and the hospital snipped it. You know they do a little quick. Procedure takes <music> all of thirty seconds and tongue tied literally is what's. It's a mid line defect. It's tissue that is along the mid line and it was supposed to do in utero following was supposed to necrosis away so that it's redundant tissue and the tissue underneath the tongue and it's like a little little it's like a string or like a rope that <hes> very thin of college and freedom and it's pulling the tongue down it pulls the tongue down in a certain position it can pull it from the back it can pull it down or can prevent issue from sticking it out moving around essentially if it is held in place there are positions of the tongue coral posture now that are her that we need to see in deep sleep because if we don't if we can't let the tongue move forward and spread out and push upwards than the airway could be block because then it's going to go in that direction so that little tie-down is very important and there's more awareness of it now. There's a whole group generation of people that unless if there wasn't that awareness in the past as much as there is now i would say yes that's true. There's a lot of people that are adults who are walking around with a very strong tongue-tied. Yes i know i know a lot of them and you know the question to them is and they asked me. Should i do it as an adult and and i i would say yes for optimal sleeping. They have asleep issue. I will refer them out for tongue-tied surgery and it's very simple operation is typically as if it's a posterior tongue tie could be a little bit more difficult than with lasers now <hes> it's. It's a compared to <hes> sleep apnea surgeries <hes> it is much easier. It is a ten fifteen twenty minute procedure. It's outpatient shen. It's usually done with local anesthesia so and there's a healing period but it's it's. It's very doable because there's traditionally in dentistry and in medicine there was this focus on like oh does. The patient have like a deviated septum. This is it that and there was all these very complicated or if somebody suffering bring with like a deep sinus issue but some of that stuff can be influenced heavily by just how he breathed this and this is a lot simple of an operation. Obviously they have to see if if somebody they can literally go to the mirror ordinance show somebody else probably hard to see your own dose and somebody trained. Yes i mean you can go on youtube. You can go to image views and you can see lots of great photo some tongue tie and if you have good lighting a flashlight and you look in the mirror you won't be able to tell hell to what degree the tongue tie is with state. It's end but you'll you'll be able to know but you know when across your dentist he'll be able to diagnosed for you and refer to the right people so only question is if they're trained he or she in whether or not that's affecting their sleep. Yes yes might say well. You have a tongue tie but if you're fine and you're right it's no big deal right and that's not a good place to to go especially. If you have a sleep disordered breathing issues need to find somebody who's trained in yesen condition diaz and talk about resources and how to get there so that's a tongue ties is is one component sometimes it's how jaws shaped and you mentioned earlier <hes> something called a dental device <hes> but let's talk about what that is and when you typically he would bring that infrared so that's for someone like myself that <hes> has a class to classification. That's a slightly retreated chen and you know where the chin tongo that's. Let's were what it goes back onto the airway and people that have developed that way <hes> whether it's through like breastfeeding or mouth breathing as a kid could also just be crazy orthodontics improperly done orthodontics i mean there are many ways to get there but it doesn't matter because if that happens i mean the the jawbone all bone itself in the tongue or quite heavy when you lie back and recline and the muscles disengage from holding that in place that's a lot of tissue that can sit on the doc in the airway the nasal ferrings nearly pushing up and closing exactly or it's getting very close to where when that muscle the back of the news of eric's the post your region of it starts it's collapsing and the tongue is loose and if you have a dry mouth all those tissues back there get become very dry too and when they're dry they tend to stick together if they're moist they get they pull away from each other more likely so that's another kind of concern with dry mouth but <hes> <hes> i mean that that is a simple way of doing it doesn't work on everyone but if the if you can and there's a way to preview this it's called the miller's maneuver while looking at what mandela advancement it does its little nasal endoscopy that goes into the nose i i've actually worked with an e._n._t. That that i kind of had tell him what to do and and he was glad to do it and i sent him some research and some studies on it but it was not in his typical specialty training and he's one of the few guys that can do it and he can literally from the top see the opening of the nasal ferrings is the farrington the folks will narrow as it goes down to the sophists and all that but if that opening wide and if you do this to the aw let listening you're pushing your job back exactly right <hes> then if they see the tongue push back into that space and that patient may be a very good candidate candidate for nor appliance because the plan simply prevents that from happening so as you lie down not only does it prevent it from falling back up against the back of the throat but it actually progress. It'll be over time we adjusted so we can actually push the jaw out <hes> now. If you have a tongue tied you can't breath your nose. I mean these are all things factors in the same that are factored into into the equation but if all that is good than these devices can help and friend of mine who's listening who's like a mouse taping and dental devices and all these things i mean when did life get get so complicated and it's really if we zoom out and remind everyone we are sort of making up for the fact that our facial structure has changed inch because our diet are lifestyle. How we are brought up <hes> has changed more in the last you know two hundred three three hundred years caesarians caesarean sections <hes> and all the different chemicals and foods that we eat that change the oral microbiome and that has left us in a place where we are not really how we originally designed so even our body is fundamentally built on the fact that we were designed to breathe through our nose as one component were sort of trying to figure out how to just get our by to do what it was doing naturally so that's we're all these tools and devices come in because the flip side is if you have severe issues with your sleep anybody who's list podcast knows were huge fan asleep. We didn't entire show with shawn on stevenson just a couple of ago when you don't have proper sleep it increases your risk of obesity and and so many of the challenge that are there we talked about alzheimer's alzheimer's and so you're somebody who thinks that your sleep is being affected or you have these other symptoms that are associated with poor sleep. This is the time to take this topic topic quite seriously because it could be the answer when you're searching out there for the right supplement or this change this other thing could be as fundamentalist fixing sleep right and that's why argue that we everyone should get a sleep study. You know at age five <hes> sooner. If you are showing symptoms at age ten we need a quick easy the alternative to measure our sleep even nightly would be nice and i've worked with different companies on that but <hes> the p._s. G which is the gold standard the police and mcgrath. That's where you go into clinically. Worry you up. You sleep in someone else's bed. You have your own room that still the gold standard but we need something besides that because it's not really available the insurance companies push back on it even a primary care physicians push back on it. They're they're actually incentivized not to do too. Many diagnostic tests and this is a good one to push back on if your patients since then and healthiness not complaining of being tired or tiredness or napping and then then that person doesn't need the sleep study. Do you have a you have a practice <hes> up up in the bay <hes> and you have a lot of patients who you've worked with to sort of help them navigate that <hes> so for those listening her like you know what i really do need a sleep study any any pointers you can give to them to navigating the medical system especially if they're not a typical candidate who would be <hes> typical candidate for sleep apnea nia overweight older male what are some key things that they can bring in besides asking nicely to their doctor to get a sleep study need to happen. I'm asking nicely. Your physician doesn't always work so let me tell you my story quickly <hes> <hes> i was very healthy very fed. I mean i would summit fourteen fifteen thousand peaks. I would ski down them. I would mountain bike for six hours straight. <hes> i still do some of that <hes> but <hes> and so i felt very very fit and then one day we dropped my oldest off to college. We are all in the same room. It had been awhile in the hotel room of course and i live at my daughter's woke me up the next morning. Glad you're just like a freight train. What's going on and that was mine. Winky wright well they could wake me up but i was tired and i was snoring and <hes> they couldn't sleep sleep so it turns out was actually my wife who was doing most of the storing so we both realized at that point in time and we're both medical professionals <hes> <hes> who would have thought right <hes> <hes> that there was a problem and the next morning we're having you know or free continental breakfast and which wasn't much much choice there but and this older man he had overheard us talking about it and he pulled aside this older gentleman no medical brown and said listen you gotta get a c. Pap you gotta get on this right away and i have to hand it to that guy because we did do that and we we did it but we then discovered how difficult it was and again. We're seasoned professionals my wife's and our n cheese and biotech biomed. I'm i'm a dentist. <hes> we do see. We have good physicians. It became a very difficult process. We felt like we weren't getting the information that we needed to make the right decisions and and through the web was there of course but there really wasn't a very organized clean concise way of dealing with this and remember these people like my wife and i we're tired. The these patients are tired. They don't know where to go and the advice that they were getting was from each singular. <hes> you know a specialty the primary care physician would let's say you're probably fine. Maybe you're depressed. Maybe you should take a psychotropic drug. <hes> you know pull pull down the blinds. Make sure your room is dark. You know that kind of stuff <hes> and then if you enter in t- <hes> i refer a lot to tease a lot of them will say well listen. <hes> the adenoids tonsils leave men. They'll get better over time but the if the patient can't breathe pass them <unk> narrowing the airway so there's a lot of pushback i talked earlier about the cost of it the insurance companies not liking it and the incentivize device medical doctors that are pushing back on diagnostics the cost of diagnostic so so we'd navigate it this whole system and that's really the genesis of y wrote that book my daughter said dad. You know you've learned a lot. Let's get that out to to our readers and and she was absolutely right so so in that book i am in my ted talk. I just i just trying keep it very simple and concise and still to this day. If they haven't read the book i get people they're very confused are being given different information from different specialties <hes> even from other other dentists and and so it's it is it's a difficult system to navigate. I'm not saying it's that way on purpose. It's just there's so many factors in diagnosing and treating and then verifying <hes> sleep that <hes> it's really it would be nice that there was a one stop shop for that kinda nothing and <hes> reading the book will help <hes> the stuff on the internet about it <hes> i would tell people don't get discouraged and you know maybe your dentist has a solution may be they can unsturdy through it and a lot of dennis now are being trained in this and they can simplify this <hes>. I'm actually you. Dennis are not allowed to diagnose sepia that is in the realm of medicine and that's fine are part of it is early screening for it. <hes> and we're happy to do that and we're good at it <hes> but when it comes to treatment we do our oral appliances. That's <music> a after a prescriptions been written by the physician and that sometimes in conjunction with the c. pap pap but i wouldn't hesitate to ask your dentist. Your dentist may have some answers for you. The thing that i am i talked about this before is i'm looking for this quick not quick but very accurate at home study that costs very a little money 'cause when i- titrate my vice my early clients i need data from that i need data from every night sleep and where that best position is for the mandible and i also need need to know for my sleep and for my wife sleep. I need to verify my ability to sleep properly because the devices are in place but if you gain weight as you age as you get older if you're a woman if you have menopause when you get menopause all these things will change your sleep so this is something we need to be checking in at least i mean daily nightly would be nice and i don't want to sound onto obsessive about that but you know we have lots of devices that can do that <hes> but at least yearly i would definitely check in with your sleep and make sure ask yourself the question. Am i getting deep sleep and kim fynt can individuals just pay out of pocket to go get a sleep study yeah yes. That's a that's getting a little bit of resistance out there. <hes> you can look gop sleep center nearby and you can choose to just go down that row right <hes> democracy how much they cost do i have set up a relationship for that interesting that you brought that up <hes> for that reason i work in live in a very affluent area and there are a lot of people that you know don't even wanna try to go through the system. They just want to sleep study. You're right away and that's fine. I have a conduit to a sleep lab that i can actually refer patients to <hes> and the cash prices thousand dollars as opposed to a p._s. G which is can be twenty five to forty five hundred dollars unless you wanna have it at the ritz carlton which is available. I don't know what that cost but that's expensive love but ultimately you know this is something that as we raise more awareness because not everybody has those resources not everybody is in a privileged position to be able to pay out of pocket doc it go do it just raising awareness morton and have you even had patients take your book in suggest if they're dentists is open minded <hes> in reading a little bit yes and kind of dig into it yes and that book's been given to a lot of dentists and that's very gratifying to hear but there's plenty of resources out there for dennis now and they are they. We are in the american academy of dental. Medicine is my favourite and that's where i learned most of what i know about sleep apnea and that's a fantastic resource and if somebody's looking for a dentist that can help them with this. Can they go on their website. They have database soccer david database by zip code and radius and it works quite well so <hes> you know i always love stories. You know there. Is there a patient of yours. <hes> we think about when they started implementing these things and really focusing focusing on it just the cascading effects. Is there anybody that comes to mind a story at testimonial that you wouldn't mind sharing with the listeners here of just what's possible when we really dialing are sleep my fixing these corn without a lot of stories and to. I don't wanna sound redundant. I've said it <hes> before <hes>. I'll give you a few real quickly. One is the woman who had the strength to leave. Her husband was a domestic abuse issue because she we helped her get her sleep. In order she she had an h. i. of thirty nine thirty nine interruptions per per hour and it was about appear of twelve months where she came in and we were all in tears whereas but she finally announces she was able to leave her husband. She was had gained the courage to do it. She was too anxious and too afraid and and wasn't feeling well. <hes> <hes> <hes> another i have is this young man who came in as a new patient jumped in the chair. I was marveling at his perfect bone structure and teeth eighth no crowding room for the wisdom teeth or future room for the wisdom teeth great airway <hes> knowing zayed at all <hes> after the exam <hes> <hes> he ran his mother jumped into her lap pulled off her sweater and latched on he was about five years old. He was still on the breast. <hes> was a patient. I'm from a african country and <hes> i mean i. I'd never seen anything like that. I didn't know that it was going to happen and then of course i made that correlation. It's like well. Of course i mean they weren't eating emigrated. They weren't eating a western diet. I mean i mean western price but just <hes> talked about that in the nineteen hundreds early seventeen hundreds so just unpack that one because i think a lot of people who are not familiar with that. They don't know if you're saying that. Is that a good thing. It's a great thing it's a great thing. I'm not sure it was a good thing for mom but she didn't seem to mind but a lot of sort of other societies kids might breastfeed for a lot longer <hes> they may breastfeed for a lot longer longer like four five years old because of their off the breast they're living in nutritional poverty and so it's a great thing because because he had breastfed longer he his bone structure was it was in fact i didn't even at at first. It was an anomaly to me. It's like you know what is is the the two barassie wet the width between the two upper second molars and the the horseshoe shape of the arch and and the room for the tongue. I mean the time when it rested just fell away. It was below the plane of inclusion but heath were pearly white. I mean it was it was an amazing thing i i it really threw me at. This was many years ago but to it but to talk about it. A little further is not here. Advocating people breastfeed to that level not possible never say that to a woman absolutely not no is not possible in modern society eddie and there's all sorts of like socio aspects. It could have been his diet as well. It could have been the way was i mean living in another country outside of the u._s. I mean there are other factors so the factor yes but but that seems like the breastfeeding is the one that made me think wow now i get it. It's a different kind of upbringing. Rights different of that was the kind of a kind of a tipping point like that. That's you know i'm sure he was born badgley. I mean the old fashioned way <hes> floor i in the right no flora in the water lots of bio everywhere yeah it was it was a formative moment for me. Let's touch on a couple of the topics here on just overall dental dental health oral health or microbiome because we stay focused on the sleep apnea and sleep component and mao taping keeping and some of the root factors that cause it and the problems with it but that's not the only thing out there when it comes to dental health and oral health what what are some other big things when you talk about dentists looking upstream and being able to see things that will come down the road ten twenty years down the line line. We talked about sleep apnea and how that could lead to a whole host of things. What are some other components that when you catch them earlier like this is an address. This could be a major major issue for the patient. The big one is gum disease pair. Donald aziz and let's talk about that. When you talk about gum disease what's what's the definition ride souls ooh that the mouth is unique and that it has these bony like protrusion is coming through this protective barrier the the mouth is very similar to the gut. It has a stratified layer. It's got a lot of mucus. It's a little thicker but it has also permeable like the gut is it is it is the beginning of the gut but since it opens and there's a lot of trauma of you know like tortilla chips and sharp things and hard crusty foods and and it the mouth can dry <hes> <hes> it it it it it it needs a slightly tougher kind of nature to it so it's pulling in a lot of air we use it to speak and to smile and helps with mating and and it helps pickup biomass we traveled through the vaginal <hes> you know through our mothers <hes> birth canal i mean they're the mouth is very unique in that way bud cut its most unique aspect is through that barrier think of in your test in seattle tooth poking through that would be very difficult to maintain from being permeable poland from allowing bacteria from the outside to get inside and in fact it is a very <hes> very vulnerable. <hes> kind of barrier or it is a barrier barrier so as a teeth come through this thick layer of mikasa <hes> we need to prevent the bacteria in the mouth from getting inside the body and it does a pretty good job until certain things happen in that is essentially what gum disease is. It's a breakdown of that barrier and the immune system in in that area. It's very attentive very <unk> a proactive <hes> it even becomes more so and i would classify gum disease actually as an autoimmune disease <hes> i really do believe that's where we're going doing with gum disease <hes> and at that to all the other autoimmune diseases these of the diseases that seven or ten a seven or six or seven of us out of ten die of and live with so again if this disease diseases very invisible beginning you know your gums don't necessarily bleed. There's no sign of it. There's no gummer session <hes> dennis measure pockets by depth in millimeters <hes> and we start at at age five or six and we get good baseline readings in those pockets that they start getting deeper. The collagen is breaking down. The body is attacking itself. <hes> it is <hes> like cytokines <hes> they're pro inflammatory cytokines they they're released in in response to an inflammatory in salter actually an invasion of bacteria and then the inflammation formation comes and that's how it works with it but there are some cytokines that actually attack parts of the body that we need and that's that little collagen layer of those little fibers that keep keep that girdle of tissue around that protruding tooth and preventing that seal from breaking and that seal is crucial to when it comes to alzheimer's. That's the the big news recently in a study out of san francisco in japan <hes> that if those bacteria get through they can enter the bloodstream and actually pass across the blood brain barrier but can also enter your spinal fluid so that now could be a causative agent in alzheimer's <hes> and that's something that sixty. I may be seventy percent of us. Having this country is ginger vitus or different stages appeared on titus that is an endemic inflammatory disease that a a lot of us. The majority of us are getting and if it contributes in that way to systemic diseases that can contribute to diabetes insulin resistance <hes> and other things too as well <hes> and sudden-death. I mean factory mia's heart infections heart muscle stuff <hes> that's a pretty serious thing so <hes> and mouth breath breathing of course contributes to that i had for throw that in exceleron accelerate because the by on changes because everything's dry the p._h. Dropped and that's just gonna make things worse. I'm not sure which comes i again. It's multifactorial but so gum disease is a big one and i think it's very important <hes> take home message for that is make sure you never get gum disease. It's very difficult to to solve. Its we arrested essentially backwards tough to go backwards. Yes it is and so it's prevention is key and are there other factors that make us more likely to have gum disease at our ancestors have that that prevalence of gum disease there there are no signs of that <hes> so it is probably diet related it could be environmentally related could be the chemicals and and the inability to build breathe through our noses and it could even be related to sleep apnea because that sleep apnea can affect the immune system but it is definitely tied to the oral microbiome and even the gut microbiome we talked about mao taping and we've talked a lot about diet and importance of certain <hes> foods in the podcast for and you know what that diet looks like and how to personalize it and what inflammatory foods are that are out there what what are some so those are the two big pillars that can contribute to a gum disease <hes> let's talk about like some other ones that are out there that not only can contribute gum mm disease but can have other challenges so let's talk about water and the water that people drink right from home and the other products sort of environmental until factors and erotics that we use mouthwash u._p. Suisse first start off with water. Most of the water in this country is treated <hes> and then it goes through a whole system of pipes some which have not been replaced in years so they can have lead contamination and other things have metals flint michigan and michigan erin brockovich even friend of ours ars and been part of our broken docu series. She says there's you know three hundred four hundred flint's that are happening around just haven't been discovered if not more not more. Maybe maybe not at that full severity but are on their way over so water. Let's let's start off with water and the way that it's treated in what you recommend your patience well also also when catherine was born my oldest <hes> she's thirty now so that was thirty thirty one years ago we <hes> one thing i wanna do is get the fluoride out of my water and the only thing thing at that at that time was <hes> distillation distillation distilling water. We bought a distiller. It was an expensive item and all our kids were raised on distilled water. I didn't want my kids to unjust floyd actually have type one fluorosis. I grew up in san francisco. There was fluoridated water and a little white spots on my teeth which is the first sign of fluorosis too much fluoride in the teeth and just one question when you were doing the distilled water realizing it and yeah. I wasn't too worried about that. I mean it's easy to remain realize but if i didn't get minerals from other sources i mean if you eat a good diet. You're getting tons of minerals. <hes> <hes> you can also add trace elements and mason minerals likely right. Yes the now it's a lot. There's a lot more. Do you recommend reverse osmosis reverse. Osmosis seems to work well yes to get out fluoride and other heavy metals and other aspects still like a distilling water because that's pretty pure i mean once it evaporates some reforms in the container. That's pure rainwater. That's pretty good garden and so that was one thing that you did on that. Let's touch on a touch on a different topic and you recommend pretty much for all of your patients who have filtered water. Yes oh absolutely that's it's a must i won't go to a friend's house their tap water unless i know how they're filtering <hes> we have friends that live on lake tahoe and they drink the water from from the lake. It's untreated <hes> we drink. We have a place up in tahoe that gets spring water from an a. Aquifer and we see the reports. It's not chlorinated. I still will filter that water. I think you have to be very careful. I mean with water. Water is very important. We drink a lot of it. <hes> there's a lot of water n._s. Were made up of a lot of h. Two hello and <hes> it better be the as clean as possible and our water supplies very contaminated. I mean don't don't listen to the government and <hes> it's not a conspiracy. Of course it is the fact that they're overwhelmed. They have to add chlorine and when you do things on on large scales. There are some compromises vices. It's that simple and even if they're testing the water treatment plant. They're not looking implications like this building that we're in right now that her office in santa monica it was built in nineteen eleven right and we used to share an office space with dear friend of ours <hes> next door before he moved into this bigger space and he kept on saying you know my stomach feels weird. Something's going on. That's where stuff finally some party members asked him. <hes> do you like are you drinking. The water here or is again the morning i went to fill up because we didn't have the water system installed yet right right and he would like do this. Building is so old for probably getting all sorts of things he got. He stopped drinking the water from the burning. His cut issues went away. Now we filtered water. There's tons of great filters that are out there. Erkki system aqua true is water filter. We offer. I commend zero. Slaughterers goes yes expensive. Yes you've been bothering. You have to be careful with bottle. Answers not bottled water micro-plastics no so yeah there's <hes> zeno estrogens that are inside of it that can confuse the body body also an n._c._a._a. Free is ridiculous. It's onto the regulus. That's not the answer environment right and also there are things called over defeats. I think that's the term where a municipal water supply will add too much fluoride and warning goes out but by the time the warning goes out the kids have had too much fluoride and that gets incorporated toll your <hes> calcified tissues including teeth the waters the first fundamental statin have clean water in your home. Yes let's go to products that people use the first obvious one. Let's talk about toothpaste jump right so people grew up they thought florida's great and there's even still the stance american dental association's affluence cool. Yes i just talk brief for well. <hes> so many dennis would disagree with me. Although there is a growing concern and there are new studies <hes> <hes> on <hes> you know <hes> what it does to the brain health of your child if you ingest floor two ways of getting forward ingesting the fluoride through water ingestion and that going into the blood let's remain going into teeth or forming and bones that are forming and then there's topple topical application of fluoride and we have fluoride toothpaste. It's not a at a very strong level <hes> <music>. I think it was mostly a marketing ploy that when the fluoride was added to the water and florida was the big deal in the sixties and the toothpaste company said listen. We've got an are toothpastes well one more reason to buy it so but <hes> i would be very wary of fluoride. I had been as you just heard for thirty plus years and my kids don't have <hes> fluorosis and they don't have any kathies <hes> they had a good diet not a perfect diet and it's possible <hes> the the fluoride solution is is a kind of a mass kind of approach to large communities that don't have access to good diet or can't afford a good diet i mean that dental handle care or regular dental care exactly and or any three of those and and that's to me is not a good solution that doesn't address root cause issues and it misleads us over time for me back then i have more data now and i would recommend viewers <hes> going to the floride action network <hes> that is a great group of p._h._d.'s and physicians that are gathering all the data against <hes> of to a ensuing actually the government on flora for dacian and so far. Everything's going very well. <hes> the lawsuit has jumped a few courts and moving upstream so <hes> the fluoride i would be wary and and my argument thirty years ago was it was a lesser of two evils. If any one of those things that i had heard about that floor could do like you know hip fractures and and luring the child's i q and all that if any if any of that was true i would feel bad because by taking out the fluoride i was risking only a few cafes and of course that was dentist could fix that but i don't want my kids to have cavities i would want any ca dabney cavities but when you weigh those two things i think have risking a few cavities is it's something you can sleep at night and long-term exposure floride is can have brain health implications and we just don't know right now we do. We do know a lot. <hes> i mean there are a lot of european <hes> water supplies that have not gone for dacian or reverse therefore dacian <hes> is the same story with chlorine chlorinated water supplies so the bromine that they add now <hes> the nation seems to be big in europe an- an- in australia as well so not everyone's florida eating the water and the americans are big on on that some other countries are but there are a lot of countries that are not and <hes> i think the jury is out as to the efficacy of fluoride and i think the jury on what it can do to you when the risks of too much fluoride or any floyd ingestion is mounting a great page on asked the dentist i i shared actually on my instagram this morning. <hes> 'cause. I always have friends asking me. <hes> people always love practical stuff. I know there's a couple of companies that you're a fan of when it comes to toothpaste instead of going down the route of colgate fluoride alright and everything like that and what are some to pacer out there that you do like right well. I mean it's our fault. Dennis have been promoting these he's carpet bombing type of toothpaste with emulsifiers and chemicals and pesticides and soaps and ingredients that have nothing to do with oral health are have everything to do with making big batch defaced and marketing right exactly <hes> so there are plenty of toothpastes author now the the choice back when i was a young man that was it was very few. Maybe four or five different types of toothpastes now you could probably pick from over one hundred and that's wonderful <hes> i love. I love earth paced. <hes> i like <hes>. I'm not a big fan of minty flavors of but they have a citrus flavor radius. I was using radius toothpaste this morning. <hes> and and to face isn't that important. If you're eating a good diet i mean you can use very little of it and you can skip it. Sometimes <hes> the brushing influencing probably the most important things if you have a a diet that's danger teeth may have to use the toothpaste that slightly more abrasive <hes> those alternatives. I just mentioned have versions of whitening. Jason's makes a good product. Dr bronner's makes a good product. These are very natural toothpastes but they're probably being made in smaller batches and that's how they're able to to make it with safer ingredients so there are lots of alternatives other now now mouthwash mouthwash nothing to say don't like it <hes> even a bad mouthwashes terrible. Even good mouthwashes a waste of time it. It just doesn't do anything <hes> it's not. It's not active enough. It's like you could rinse with saltwater and it would be it would have to sell her baking soda right yeah and we'd be better for you and we preserve the we're all microbiome exactly well. Let's look the reason that people often use mouthwash which we were talking about last night. <hes> people have issues with bad breath. What's the root issues of bad brats bios <hes> mm-hmm clearly. It's a despite office and it could be g._i. Issues as well but <hes> it's it's not mouthwash can be a harmful. It is more harmful than it doesn't good as not addressing the root issue exactly it's not addressing the root issue and is sasha masking everything that is wrong in your mouth and it masks except for ten fifteen minutes and i have patients that i know of that used to <hes> think of gotten to them by now they used to rent with <hes> listerine on top of the hour at work it was it was a you know or scope these in the bathroom and one guy even had a little what's that little whiskey flask and it wasn't whisky it was <hes> any wasn't swallowing and he was an alcoholic hollick. He was swishing that every every hour on top of the hour at work he felt that was the best way to get along with his co workers and that that is the biggest band-aid <hes> ever mouthwashes a waste of time. Don't don't invest in. It's better not to use anything and work on brushing glossing and eating well and working on on your oral microbial and to look maybe deeper at some gut despite osas mouthwash mouth <unk> back breath could be a sign that there's <hes> candida could be also some other good issues. You know think about doing a gut protocol working with a functional mass doctor and i was really getting into your gut health if there's some severe issues with that absolutely i want to go back to your book and sleep and then you for touching on those those are always topics that people ask you about what should i be using using toothbrushes teigen whitening and and we're happy to talk about let's let's let's touch on that because one other part of gum disease and oral microbiomes people brush two hundred <hes> mhm so let's let's come back to that and say you know why are people brushing so hard and and why are you such a big fan of some of the new companies that are out there like electric brushes out there even one that you did some work with a little bit. I have no problem pro plugging because they're a great company but let's talk about rushing hard. I just wanna wanna share little personal anecdote. <hes> i've had my personal dentist dr rosetta russian on the podcasts and ford and just realizing that she was like oh oh yeah you're right handed and you like when i first met her like oh yeah you're right hand and you brush too hard and i'm like oh wait. How do you know she. If you've gone recession on your side and you just you know do that. Sawing emotion and brushing too hard you gotta chill the bio mechanics of it and it's very observant of her to notice that because there is a difference between right and left handed right. You're going to be a bigger bigger risk of montgomery session. Indeed sensitivity immediately graft yasha graft wrote all sorts of other challenges there so <hes> just talk a little bit about brushing too hard so it's it's how we brush. I mean if you watch any typical movie and an actor is rushing. You'll see the sawing motion. You'll see that they you know all the t._v. As we've been brainwashed to put all this toothpaste based on our toothpaste a on toothbrush the other factor is how often you replace your toothbrush head. <hes> those nylon bristles are polished and end rounded. It's a it's a process process they call and rounding and they're smooth out of the factory but after a while you're taking nylon up against an animal enamel star harder surface you're wearing down the nylon. The nylon becomes very abrasive so <hes> you really need to replace your toothbrush. I would say every month every month. Yeah i mean you know. The standard seems to be three three months now but for a long time we weren't discussing anything it was it was when the little blue indicator would go down to a certain point or when you're bristles were angled outwards <hes> i would just be on the safe side. Take your teeth. That's the last set you're gonna get it and don't over brush and don't brush with a very warrant toothbrush and there there are companies that will send you a toothbrush head off automatically and that's wonderful. There's one that you are associated with quip. Yeah granted solution for a lot of people that are absolutely small portable. Don't over think your toothbrush but be careful foale in how you brush and how often your place your head's that's the key. I think their toothbrushes great. I'm not sure about the toothpaste but you've a bunch of other options but it's okay. I want to go back to your book. Since at your book you have a three step program for improving sleep and overall health and you're in for the eight hour sleep paradox and people looking at that would love to just cover for those three steps because i know we've kind of already covered it in some of the things here but just as a recap concern import is so important and i wish i had had this knowledge in my my journey through treating my sleep apnea would have been much easier but the first the first step in it's probably the most important step is to recognize that it could be you know a lot of patients that are still telling me they don't have sleep apnea but i know they do and <hes> that's difficult and typically men. Women are our best patients and they when a doctor says something to them. They will say you know what i'm going to look into that and get tested almost like weird pride that sometimes we'll have when it comes to sleep like what are you gonna. Tell me about sleep like i know how to see exactly right and you don't wanna knit or something is off. I noticed that a few towns well sleep is innate but it's not guaranteed and we all think were good sleepers sleepers and being able to notice in when we come from being children we sleep like babies most of the time and and then you know for sleep changes a little bit those changes angels are so small plus were not conscious while we're not there to be able to analyze her own sleep. You cannot verify your own sleep. I keep saying that to people you cannot be the decider of who tells you whether i mean you can't be that person. I sleep well. I don't sleep well. I was that person. I felt i slept well. Obviously i didn't it was was have having twelve interruptions per hour so that is that first step is the the diagnosis part of the of the of the of the three steps and that is is that before you get a diagnosis you have to be willing to get the diagnosis. You have to be open to the fact that you may have sleep apnea. Your father may be snoring. Mother may be storing. They may have high blood pressure sure or simply. Just wake up with dry mouth exactly where you're up at night right or your napping or you're getting up and going to the bathroom. That is a co morbidity of sleep apnea. We're we're designed to go to sleep and wake up and feel there are morning. People are evening people but you're designed to wake up in the morning and field rest ride vested in exactly in my case. I was very good at going to bed late. I get that second wind was a night owl. I could stay up to one or two. Am get a lot of work done. Get up the next morning at six or seven but i was burning the candle at both ends in my adrenal glands were due picking up all the pieces and you can only do that for so long but if i had known earlier that that was happening i would have gone better earlier would solve my airway issue and and i would have do what i do now and i would just get up without an alarm. The best time to set an alarm is when you go to sleep. Make sure you go to bed at the exact same time every night. Typically that will solve a lot of problems uh-huh sleep hygiene sleep hygiene. That's the number one sleep hygiene tip. I can give his just set that alarm mindset at ten <hes> my own ring will remind me as well <hes> there are a lot of apps that can do that <hes> and <hes> and also give in to that tired feeling but if you're napping <hes> i my wife was very proud of the fact that she you could sleep on trains and planes and she traveled a lot earlier in our career and and she could sleep in a matter of minutes anywhere <hes> at the dentist getting a haircut that is sleep latency and that is a severe issue. That has nothing to be proud of. It should one of the one of the things i there's one thing. I didn't like about three months. Sleep apnea now takes about twelve minutes to get to sleep but that's normal that is sleep latency. That's how long it takes you wind down and free to get into that first stage that i five percent and one stage <hes>. It's interesting interesting because i've always fallen asleep very quickly. <hes> i have both done mouth taping and nandan mile taping and i haven't seen an extreme difference difference my sister's doing it right now to and <hes>. I think you guys even send her. Some melted rueda. Thank you so much for that and <hes> she's noticing a big difference for herself. Self right <hes>. I did have a shift in my dental structure and i started having a lot of t._m. J. biting my tongue allotted sleeping at the same time time my dentist recommended that i go in and visit line <hes> to my bike to fix my bike that was showing up 'cause my tongue was kind of pushing out on my right and for the first time i would have dry mouth but since i've been on invisible line that's kind of gone away alert wrote right. I think it's helped a lot with his long can't help in those areas definitely right. It's almost like mouth guarding away ver- for that <hes> but i do wake up in the morning rested but you're saying there could be some sleep issue there hospital because you only know what no i mean your baseline. What is your baseline for me. What's the answer. Should i go do a study reduced study. Okay absolutely everyone needs to get that study though <hes> that that we will pick things up on that study and even if it's a perfect a sleep study then at least you have a baseline because your sleep will degrade over time it would be nice to know oh exactly how long your brain is in delta wave sleep for that's an important thing that is the most important stage asleep and it would be nice to know what that number is. That's an important number of the aura ring and other testers. They the the extrapolate from the data. I'm not sure how accurate it is but i can use it from day to day to compare one day to another one night to another but to know that is is key. If we know what happens in delta wave the liver of the brain everything's fixing itself wellness <hes> happiness you know fitness no cravings ravings for crazy foods during the day the villain and leptin hormones and all that <hes> being affected all of that if we could just know and have that peace of mind that we are we are getting sleep and you have really nothing to worry about why not know that the hamburger and that's a great recommendation. I wanna toss it. We were going through the three kind of talk about the price one before you that i wanna toss in two of the things that i've seen have made a huge impact on my sleep. We talked a little bit about it with shawn stevenson when he was on the podcast anybody interested it can go snap beside bodley's episodes work harmoniously because we didn't really talk about sleep apnea in him and our dental health and everything this is really something that you've been a big champion and advocate for for wanna. Thank you for your work in space. You really raising a lot of awareness so <hes> temperature played a huge role i <hes> i know that when my room mm-hmm isn't cooled down and or when i don't use <hes> why am i blanking on the device that i use bad better slips underneath them after not not that it there's there's jet which i tried for a little bit but i get something a little bit more cooler. <hes> is it is not the chilly pad. Is it chilly battle. That was dig- the name was changed to something bad which maria frigging product and <hes> it really helps ton. I have no affiliation with them at all but i noticed that if i sleep in the temperatures off significantly disturbed or corban temperature needs to drop a few degrees for us for a half a degree and renter's leader within the women just like big picture and person is a little bit different so sleeping with a with a chilly pad has made a huge difference answer me the other one which i notice a lot more for have been recommending to my friends is <hes> an air filter at night a lot of people who <hes> have trouble breathing through their nose. I find that there's this one category of people that they're overall pretty okay except they're just noses stuffy lot but especially at night and they could be moving off gassing from their bedding could have other furniture. They moved into a new house of our paint carpet my indoor. The air is typically so much worse than outdoor air so often. I encourage people to open the window if they're in a place or just get a good happe- air filter her keep it on at night. You've been on at night little white noise doesn't matter white noise at soothing and for one of my close friends we just i sent air filter. There's a company that sent me a couple of them. It's called air ear doctor again no strong affiliation with them but just a cheap air filter that works that we recommend it a few times and that's been a big help for some friends that i know here's the problem when you lie down if there's inflammation the sinuses for example when we take out a tooth we tell patients not to lie down that night when you lie down all the blood goes to that air the blood pressure gradient gradient to that wound changes inflammation and nasal inflammation is such that so that when you lie down that's i don't know if you've noticed you become more congested when you lie down so in addition to that the allergens and the things in the air that contribute to the information just made worse by lying down also where we need to sleep with ladder lider covers right or no covers have. I don't know if you've tried that but try getting used to sleeping with a cover sits difficult so used to it but i guarantee you will notice a the difference in the quality of your sleep and are you saying that because of the temperature. Are you saying that because of the material that it's made out temperature it could be. I mean down. I recently got rid of all my down comforters. We use a <hes> kind of bamboo product now in our concern because of dust my right eye was reacting to the to the down so but trysofi law covers not an easy thing to do and <hes> cleaner sheets a lot boil them you know high temperature of the europeans are good at that. I don't know boiling. You're sheets. It's i'm never heard of this. Their washers run at higher temperatures in the water. We just use the hot water tap and your hot water tap is set at whatever <hes> hot enough. Maybe for shower so so but boil your sheets. That gets doing said well. I have a german washer and and it heats the water and then cook some and they smell different sheets. I mean i don't know when you trouble to europe. You've just got back. I think that's something i've always noticed even from a kid the sheets smell and feel different in your staying in an airbnb and they were very generous with the fabric fabric softener. Usually i emailed them or my sister emails ahead of time and like no right no. We'll have to pay attention. I'm headed to italy in august with my chance or good. I'll have to go they are they're good at foiling their sheets so he took a little diversion. Let's go back to the three steps. Apsos first step is just recognizing that your candidate and this is something to pay attention bribe him second second step is the the treatment and that is a difficult trickle tedious steph for a lot of people and they're essentially three categories irs surgery. There's the cpap apep of the mask that people can wear and the oral appliance and when the people here that they don't like any of those most people would prefer the oral plans because they for that's more comfortable and more doable they can travel with it and seems easier and there's no stigma associated with it because at most your chin is sticking out a little bit but you can cover up what's inside your mouth c-pap a pat most people. I don't know why this exists but they are are deadly afraid of especially men. It's it's it's a. I don't know why but obviously it's uncomfortable. The problem with the sleep apnea pap is only thirty percent stick with it for the first year and afterwards. There's no follow. There's very little follow up. I see a lot of patients but the bulk of mostly practice for patients that have tried to c-pap have failed using a they either have sought me out or in by chance. I've said to them listen. I think you'll see apnea. <hes> do you wanna get treated for that and they go no no no i. I know i have sleep apnea. I wore my c-pap. Try to for a few months or for year and stopped using it and that was ten years ago and there was no follow up with this life threatening condition right right and so i- right away talk them back into the pepsi pappa make a deal with them at alum will make the oral appliance will get your airway partially open or fully open even by using that device and then the apep will be that much easier and also the machines have gotten better so now this is a because i've never won a c. pap. I recommended so many people go get a sleep study and also one little anecdote is one of my dearest friends had <hes> wanting to make some lifestyle changes and and loose wait as part of that process hopes and he had plateaued for so long and finally said you know that sleep study that we've been talking about go go get it your doctor and you're you're like a candidate he went and got it just continuing down the cleaning diet that he had already started and using the the c-pap the fifteen pounds and he couldn't lose they came off her that often s and i see it often and it actually happened with me i mean once i was able to get get control of my sleep apnea as able to drop sugar completely <hes> go paleo and the cravings are gone. I mean it really is a hormonal. We'll imbalance caused by the sleep. Apnea that allows that makes us crave for these foods are not good for us because his instant energy but it's bad if your teeth it's bad for your gut microbial and it's bad for your weight the one question for you so when people are put on a cpap machine <hes> that is helping them with their reading <hes> because i've never used it before. I've seen photos of them and another gotten a lot smaller. <hes> are you in addition to that mouth taping them. It depends if you're wearing in a full face mask. Perhaps not but you do still want to keep the mouth closed. They have chin straps. That was the old way of dealing with that but if you're wearing a nose pillow or knows <hes> you know if the arizona coming in through the nose if your mouth opens that pressure is released the pressures lost and there'll be a noise. It'll actually wake you up a so you. Mouth taping can be used used in conjunction with <hes> c-pap and and <hes> a pap therapy absolutely so you went down the line of number two which is all these interventions and figuring out the right of intervention for you uh-huh and the the challenge of really working with somebody knowledgeable because even in the instance of being recommended a cpap machine or interventions. There's a lot of lack cafa through earn physicians not checking in with the patient and so people try it and then they drop it because they think it in work or too inconvenient for us xactly or they can afford it and also i see that happen often insurance companies sometimes don't pay for c-pap which is amazing to me because they'll pay for heart surgery but they won't pay for one of the root causes of needing heart surgery. That's number two in often number. Two is really a commitment to your health because it's takes a little bit investigating and finding the right eighteen. We often talk about you. Got you're the c._e._o. Of your own health <hes> you got to build your team out so that can be finding the right. Dentists have to be communicating with each other. All those team members have to be on board board and really requires you to be an advocate. It's it takes work or about. What's the alternative is often the question road right what's alternative. That's number two and you kind of outline it in steps inside the book and i've talked about surgery and that's controversial and it's it's not a fun subject but in some cases surgery is required and as also <hes> orthopedic surgery where we have to break the jaw oral surgeon would do that and <hes> you can fix the jaw by moving forwards and but that's a pretty major surgery it takes longtime to heal from and there are complications and some of them are not very pleasant so but i would be careful surgery. There's no reason not to try c-pap a pep first and see if you can just do that and my my advice there would be to find someone who actually cares about fitting that mass to you and trying all the different asks <hes> the people that are very consistent and very persistent and tweak things at home and are good at adjusting things and tweaking things the ones that that make it through that first year and keep wearing it for the rest of your life number three number three is verifying the sleep ability and that is checking in <hes> if you have an appliance if you have a c. pap. You're the journeys not done. I mean things will change <hes>. You may get allergies. You're you may gain. Some white hope that doesn't happen. <hes> you're gonna get older. That's definitely going to happen. <hes> these things change <hes> that is verify your ability to sleep. Make sure that you are getting the sleep. You need do not not ever fall into the trap of saying what the c-pap seems to be working. Great machine tells me i have less than one h._i. Per hour <hes> and i feel good in the morning <hes> you cannot you cannot make that assessment yourself whether you're being treated or pre-treatment never have an opinion about your own sleep. Let someone else do that for you and and that's important beautiful so three step plan to put attention arguably the most fundamental thing that we do on a daily basis is besides breathing during the day you know even more fundamental than i mean the more that i talked to function medicine doctors our own clinic <hes> the doctor dr hammond and i have alter wellness center in massachusetts to physicians at the cleveland clinic that are part of the center for functional medicine over there. It's just becoming so much more aware of the importance of sleep <hes> because of just how bad it scott wonderful wonderful not that it's gotten bad but but that were <hes>. We seem to be more on top of this. I mean it's it's it's a very salient and very popular topic <hes> if you go to the internet and listen to podcast and everything a lot of people are talking about sleep dependence. It's a it's long overdue <hes> mark for anybody who's listening who's sort of feels like their sleeves so messed up and i'm sure you've talked to so many people who feel that way. They sort of feel hopeless or it has been something. They've gotten used to their entire life <hes>. What do you want to share to that person. Who's listening well you. You just said it. It's you get used to it. You get used to your life that way being tired sleeping nodding off not feeling great not feeling very positive and it takes a lot to get out of that state and you could change your diet you could <hes> you know take a pill. You could take a lot of vitamins or a lot of supplements. You could exercise more but you can't exercise and supplement your way out of this. You have to deal with your sleep so you really have to be kind of very first of all you have to get up and denial by your sleep and if there is asleep problem you have to be willing and open to thinking just. I just need that sleeps. I need to get that baseline and once i had that baseline and i'm fine align then i can move onto the other things so <hes> might advice would be just to be open to so someone tells you you're snoring. If someone tells you that you're seem to be yawning a lot and you're tired or you're getting grumpy and all that <hes> i would look to sleep. I would go there first and and do something about it. Get tested <hes> you know just buying these little little devices that you can wear a little watches and the the units that you can glue onto your forehead and put on your fingertips and you can start there. It's as simple as <hes> downloading putting a free app that if you can sleep in a room for a few nights alone in a quiet room and just record yourself i i've had probably thousands of patients do that and they come back and their shots like there was my wife never told me i was sleeping snoring and then they they do that and like oh my god who was was someone else in the room. It was them. I mean that's the kind of do now. We're dealing with in sleep. I was in that denial for a long time. I felt i'd never thought sleep was was going to be a problem for me or was a problem. Even though i showed all the signs of it has been amazing and i wanna thank you for coming on the podcast talk about such an important subject <hes> we have the show notes out to everything that you kind of talked talked about including your website but just remind people how they can find you. You put out a lot of great content you your team. Which is your daughter's also part of the team mazing shoutout to catherine <hes>. How can people find you and <hes> go deeper on these topics. You talked pretty much. Everything we've talked about today is on estimates dot com the website. I asked the dentist dot com. That's <hes> you can find the book there <hes> it's. That's one stop shop. You can find products that we talked about. There's an affiliate store <hes>. I think that's just the a simple way to get in contact with us and there is an email address. Their view have a question we try and answer all the questions that come in that's beautiful the eight hour sleep paradox if they can find that on your website to that's a great place to jump in for anybody who really really wants to take the next step highly recommend that book and mark thank you for coming on the podcast and sharing your wisdom with us and sharing your story. If it wasn't for what you went through wouldn't be here we would be in bed still and for those that are listening at home. If you're going through something this could be a great turning point to use it as fuel to accelerate everything that you're up to and everything that you want to give love attention fluid probably gonna show that's fun. John hi everyone. I hope you enjoy the interview. Just reminder this podcast. He's for educational purposes. Only podcast is not i repeat. It's not a substitute for professional care by a doctor or otherwise qualified. Medical professional podcast says provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you're looking for helping your journey seek out a qualified walla fide medical practitioner if you're looking for a functional medicine practitioner and can visit i f. m. dot org and searched there. Find a provider database. It's important that you have somebody in your corner. That's qualified. That's trained. That's a licensed healthcare practitioner helping you make changes. It's specially when it comes to your health.

mouth breathing Apnea sleep disordered breathing alzheimer dennis oracle california mark hanna washington post school of dentistry Dr mark burr american academy John dentist sunnyvale san francisco yahoo liver damage
219: Leo Ryan on Marathons with Zero Run Training and the Power of Breath Training for Athletic Performance and Mental Clarity | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

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1:36:07 hr | 8 months ago

219: Leo Ryan on Marathons with Zero Run Training and the Power of Breath Training for Athletic Performance and Mental Clarity | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

"Just. To go back to ask was I like to a want athletes to be able to patterning all nasal breathing at rest during the day the mice. Then what biomechanically breath. Issued yes, Savelli should roy followed by the chest. Then you're in exile should let go so if you listen to what you hear. So that was breath was in through my nose Outta my mets Ashley Inhales through the nose my daily rose than lay just froze as I. It was just recoiled just. Out of my mouth was an open jaw. Be Amazed deemed of tweets. That was performance coach and breathing specialists. The Orion you're listening to the dislike performance podcast. Thanks for being here today. So breathing is one of those things that critically important. You have to do it to live you do it a lot twenty, thousand breath today. It just might not be one of those things that especially for those of you listening and many are who are very attuned to speed and power outcomes reactively outcomes and and things that we see on that end of things on the field of play. It may not be quite as a quantitative thing. As you put five inches on your vertical by doing a French contrast program were you increase your speed through isometrics? These things it's in that sense it maybe a little more subtle. From an energetic perspective and a mental clarity perspective, it is a very big rock vary apparent and breathing has the op the ability to massively impact these areas. That's what the show's all about. Every can't. It's hard to really do justice to athletic body human performance. If we don't cover the full spectrum, breathing is a topic that I haven't dove into nearly enough and it controls so many things from recovery between bouts and sets of sprints or sprint endurance. or or game the gay movements and recovering our energy to recovering from training session to training session, how our body adapts and what type of state we're in recovery state how well are we putting energy back in the cell to our mental state and which there is a profound impact between breathing and mental state and performance state, and I wanted to do a podcast that really. For. Me I. I like just like just hearing things I. I'm always intrigued people running with their mouths taped or I've done lots of breathing different breathing techniques myself but I want to know more about the why the mechanics and hear about it from someone who's been through it all and his synthesized. The the common themes of each technique and what are we doing and what's going on here Again breathing. It can really transform your training recovery and mental state mental clarity and that means it's important not to athletics but health and life itself in is those intersections that I just love talking about. So our guest is Leo Ryan Leo is the founder of innate strength DOT COM. His achieved a prolific amount of education, human performance and breath work. He's studied from I believe more than seventy breathing techniques. Such. As the Wim Hof Batelco method, oxygen advantage, and clearly tons of others he's been a coach and mentor. To many elite athletes and has worked with coaches to Olympians, UFC fighters, and world champions. So he he is a Leo, is not only A. So leo is both breathing doctor and physical performance coach working with a wide range of clients. Today's show today show was a little bit longer than average largely because one I just don't know that much. Really. holistically about the breath breathing. So I had a ton of questions for Leo, but it was really cool because we were really able to get into a lot of really important elements. So we start with a fun story of Leo's Marathon Zero run training just. Founding the pace on the breath so he'll get into that but some of the big rocks that we cover in the show. Are Different. Categories and classifications of breathing nose breathing versus mouth breathing and different levels of that depending on what your athletic goal is. We get into breathing as readiness assessment and using that prior to accession performance breathing versus recovery breathing breathing's impact on the mental state and how to manage that through different techniques, diaphragm released techniques, and much more. This is super comprehensive. It's a really important topic and breathing is becoming more popular now for good reason although it's been around for. Breath trainings for thousands of years, the martial arts and everything but as it's becoming more apparent in athletic performance space and as was the general health space, I wanted to do a show that really gets to the. That really gets to they're really covers this and I hope to do a lot more of these. So I'm super thankful that I had the opportunity to talk with Leo Today. We're going to get to this. It's GonNa be an awesome show and really expansive. So here we go episode to Nineteen With Leo Ryan. So. Leo I heard you ran a marathon with no like running or formal training for it. Can you tell me a little bit more about that story? Sure it was. Back in twenty seventeen and I always wanted to run a marathon. I'll be honest with in clear busy and I just never really put him on mine to dedicate myself to train them on my also well, migrant I just a lot all. Decisions easy in the training programs for marathon. So, Kinda came to ahead where the test my ideas on on training I'm Jewish down to time as well. So I handle running the Dolan Marsden in two thousand, seventeen decided I haven't round in. Seven years a known during training. Know, by seeing those winning. No, ruining it all on. I didn't do any running in this training program for the Mirror. I, what I that I would do is I will get tested I. do some two Max testing a gentleman here Arnold. And did that and I'm not of started a blow in the doors for me in terms of what was happening with breathing on. On what was happening in the resurgent system? Began to understand more the relationship between. Breathing and fatigue radio was a battle. As who around the first one? At the start of the program. Iran, a mobile he found interesting was my. A Fractional extraction of auction. Co Two. over seven percent and they've even set on percent and he's all that was absolutely phenomenal. I was like, okay, am. You've is white noted go off like you're telling me everything here that I needed to go. So what will happen in the necess-. Was I decided for the test I wanted to test the difference between all nasal breathing. Which I call level womb knows meant breathing which called level too on the nose breathing which I would refer level three right. So as we went through the to access the Soames oh for the exact moment. Swish. When I switched ventilation and? For that were. So. Young and he would write down on the test than he was marking on the test where Holland on the test. So what we found interesting was the relationship between switching from. All nasal breathing to into the nose. On the DOT was within ten seconds all the special on that for me was way more important was like wall. Of the doorway for me. To how I was actually room this Meyerson because without a rolling, I had no idea how to pace myself on how is GonNa last out a distance. So, embarking a training program base around breath work and not enough. My join second did a lot of of Rehab Style and train, and for for the joins to make sure that a system at least was. I wasn't GonNa do myself sesame long-term injury by seven on the for Twenty six point two miles fat. Good to the train, it was all based around the breathing. and. We did another test four again at that relationships. Stay there. So really between the ad on the switching breathing vents on that's what I made the decision that I would actually tell you my. American as well. So I would only nasal burris for the whole Meyerson on. The reason for that is, is if you think of it as if you develop a larger over base or you can Continue Commotion Injury Sells for the Duration of American within you know where where does. Down to. Neuro muscular fatigue as opposed to General TV. From. Carbon dioxide or wrong draining the. System as well. So. That was my only gauge off. Takes over the running with. All nasal reading. I wonder if you would have just kept going how long you you know you're saying if you have the pace that you're you're you're always going to have oxygen in your cells then it comes on the joints probably either your joint cigarette break or is GonNa go or like you said neuro muscular fatigue I I, Kinda just kept going. Easier rain moving because the pain of the localized pain in the muscles. And, your brain can play games like brought in all the other the mind games at an wouldn't bring in to help them to keep going on this morning because there's a one point in the racing. Maybe my eighteen or nineteen. and. Actually in my mind. All these mind games early loaded wholesale. I don't work at. A hold on legal me misfire. Maybe have anymore in the bag nine continued to use and continue to play with. What? Is, an interesting question is how far any push the human body and this is where ultra endurance Ronan as fascinating to to me as loud that role in find their find original on their face much face to the to the natural rhythms of one. Yeah it's really fascinating stuff. I think for me my a lot of my. While I was GonNa say to how many mental chain techniques have probably been come up come up with by people who are running like marathons or in the middle of altered you'd like you got you got all that time to practice. So I'm sure when. A whole lot of pain as a motivation to. I was GONNA say as well I. I just think it's funny. How many other people probably have their mouths taped during that sure zero right or? Two thousand seventeen. was wasn't read on like if you think be auctioned nine digital is well. The method does most associated with meditating in the word in the West, which is built John. Method. So the. Lease way looking. Like, I'm doing it for masks whatever ten fifteen years I I I would play with meditating in sports and all the rest on experiment without Selah clients will nobody was your Nell. You'll see a quieter museum people every Myers. At the metal it really. Doesn't make sense it was. I was doing it for a purpose, right? If I really wanted to perform an. American. Wanted a hit a PB train for shortly would meditate. And because I would want to drop into an anaerobic state, I want push my body so hard that has to reuse lactated fuel source. You WanNa push to vary engineer performance maybe not when you're halfway through. Would certainly towards the promotion sage the race you would want to be reading pushed. Area Right. Like rip the tape author like a couple of miles to go or something. Right. Exactly it's like it's like you see informative. They change your tires with. Twenty thirty lakhs ago and you go okay. Now now is the business end of the season here, right? Yeah. That makes sense that would level I know we'll get into all this stuff too because I I was thinking about the level one two and three and what you're talking about when you first started that's okay. Now now, this makes sense to. Me Because I was just thinking, yeah I'm gonNA run. If I'm going to try for the four hundred meters and I'm running some three hundred repeats or something like four three hundreds fast and I ran the all with only knows breathing. Then I'm not going to get into those not GonNa let me into those lactate systems as a lobby a rough life. A roughly. It is. Interesting because when when I did. When I did those youtube access. Nobody, I heard anybody in the world at the time. told him I is. Speaking with Brian Mackenzie. From orig-. Piracy endurance shoot up. The like he was toying at the same time as I was Kinda. We need. So introduced me to the. Win Hof Element. On the performance of breeding where he Believed more start, and then I show him more of the auction booty joe in the nose breathing endings and from there we developed very very similarly across the board both with ourselves on our own. Our own athletes in a room clients. When I did that when I run. A marathon, this is oscillating with us just me. To finish. When when when I finished the Mars and just a show of sex on teague is is my wife is there at the end line and she was year. Refresh. Fresh, what's going on US joining us? He'll refresh my most now from life or my ribs down her destroyed. Yelling my roommate went to pot so that it would. Sell re good overall in terms of energy. Wise. It it's funny because I got my started. Already shoes, all Saas, all sorts of massage feeds. Around the chose to bring some movements underwriting movement into my body. Within three days, I was fully recovered from the event while. He recovered where I went. Okay. My main sport at the time was actually do. Competing I second I on competing in the. All Ireland in the masters of Anzio Research Event, which is the following week. Because the nine hundred. Train what it was doing. The injury so the Wednesday was feeling pretty task as. I did a full training session Thursday initial. Awesome. Amazing computer following Sunday, which is a we later Bob. And I ended up getting bronze medal and the whole event. Again, the effects of all, Meyerson the mileage of just funny six miles. No long term effects in La it's amazing. It makes you really think. People do generally Marissa and real frank. Your training could be improved so much. Yeah, as you said, I was just thinking about the implications for just recovering from trading in general because I like us I was thinking. More of a speed power athlete myself I know a lot of people listen to podcasts are, but if you can use that breath work, then recover from a marathon like that because that's One of many things that I'm interested in is. Recover Energy and recovery potential. It also leads me to think well, why do we get sore and and joints everything get destroyed? And everything going back a big part of going back to like you said energy in the cell and. Fatigue and where's the start you know? That's your number. One asset to I was so fascinated by coca. Is Training A. Amateur Sport over here in Ireland it's IT'S A. Training, are they pretty told? Debbie, almost at a semi pro level and they'd be very dedicated being team for. The previous sad was been to two years So I said, okay, I went to my for all of the Rio to maximum intended them to uncover Through the same protocol from the real to access. And All of them got similar results me which lawless as they hit their un-rolex threshold within ten to fifteen satins. They all change their reading from all nasal to knows medicine. So for me again, this old. Okay. This is dig implications for and Energy Management on your energy systems training going forward. On the time, there is little to no research on energy systems training on the way you read. Back, then like no, we know for example was. We no freezing. So pure mouth breathing will burn more sugar than nasal reading. So, you're using more sugar in your system and then you're depleting stores. Of Glucose, standard Again, if you're looking insurance across the in my mind, the Siri him of the goes that you start reusing lactate as well as an energy source quicker than is your father endurance for your doctors on where your Ram. Where you're breathing. Yeah. Those one of the things that I was I think of as you're talking about. Just different contexts like if I'm if I am training more of a like repeated sprint ability short sprint ability I, think the easiest thing well, actually asked us. But that I do WANNA get to my next question I. Love Holidays is so conversational because you just right off the bat that marathon thing just sparked like you know ten questions on me so. I think it's very easy to. Structure. I'll I'll go at this one in the venture maybe I'll get to ex- question. So but I think it's very easy for any condition just to say, okay, tape the mouth nose only and and more aerobic. Mouth Open burning. But if it's more of like a quick repeated bursts like you'd what that sugar to as the fuel source right too wouldn't you like to be able to have more for some of the power base bursts or how does that work? There is a playoff. Between the two obviously I would agree with that. From my own experience coalition, but also from from seeking with. Different doctors and sports medicine people in coaches as well. You are essentially unless you're Schumer Howarth four as like a Olympic weightlifting powerlifting. Titus Fort. You do want a decent aerobic base to yet. So on to even though you want to be hitting more creating earlier on anyway. So we which is a media on the relationships between a creating phosphate usage on reading. Your reading level was certainly in terms of you WANNA be stations for as long as you can if you're a anatomies bills that you get enough air through the systems and descend more. So to southern of carbon dioxide than why wouldn't you want to spare your CA- jin? Resources onto you absolutely need, for example, in the last ten, twenty, thirty meters of streams instead of through all engine fifty meters of a two hundred sprint, right Now, that you've been reduced the same force because you've trained force through your at your physical training, your your spring training will then why wouldn't you want to spare? Fishing hostile in spare for as long as you. Know that's that's the the helps me out extra X.'s and the cellular metabolism all these energy systems if I had to say like all these areas in my weakness, that's definitely my weakness. That's where my kind of like little bit add nece and. Extras. College courses comes out of it, but this is the way I learned like if it's like applied and breathing this reminds me a little bit too. I did a podcast with Aaron Davidson Evan Pike on on the Moxie Monitor which measures you put on your muscle and he measures blood oxygen as your training and once you get to a certain level saturation where there's not much oxygen left in the cell that's were training recovery gets prolonged and so everything lights up for me I'm like Oh wait like that like just just in terms of day to day training and that's the aerobic base to people talk I think it's easy to say oh We don't need to train the aerobics. If you know the how are you going to recover and and it's easy to get in the market where you're going to have prolonged recovery periods to if you are like more of a regular like like. More of more on the power side of things not Olympic. I'm I trying to judo Indians? Current. On. The benefits of Breast Rain Is all about recovery duck does whereas threes enhanced performance bulletin for the majority it has to do. With Corey both recovery injury a shield Ford Fleet. So it's recovery English weaned sprints is phenomenal phenomenal powerful through reading through breathing methods. then. Also posted. Then recovery preparation for the next day is it is it is the main for me is the main recovery modality. is where it all starts. That's awesome. Maybe that's. For that for that Spring, athlete their ability to use their nose during an all would sprint will be determined at wiping through their enemy. Do they have are there? So I grew wool? With chronic childhood snuck on. If you look into research, the associations between a nose grieving on jolt commended development on cheese the law evidence behind that in a few local structures very. Very narrow knows very long knows very. Very. Narrow jaw line on pointed Jolla line. It's difficult for me actually my nose is. Very, small initials are quite small and so mightily to strange all with knows only breathing is much more difficult than say for example A. Stranger with a very strong jaw huge be nostrils roller. They're basically they're probably getting in one nostril what you're getting into your. So. Yeah. So all this I mean, you've you kind of answered it on some level, but my next question was I mean breathing it's really important obviously. But why why is it so under appreciated I? Think we're starting to get to a little bit more but why do you? Why do you think this is something that we don't really it isn't in like every training method like why? Why do you think it's kind of underappreciated. Yeah, even I said it's important. What is suppose for for people when I like to do is because From the from a broader. Scope where I'm GonNa. Wise important. It's important only for recovery, but if you think of where you're breathing system. Lies is a mess say breathing system but as more than just research, you're talking about the almost Glarus dollar you're talking about, yes. You're talking about the while breathing can do for as strengthened and the detention Connecticut Shane as well. So it has. Firmly robos goes in terms of metrics of movement the Communists. Also then in terms of your physiology so highly you get Austin to the cell. For example, you focused on A. Equipment they're using terms of upload level. You don't necessarily warm-ups. Auction just in the mood you want action in the south. To. Get auction into salads is a different. Story than just awesome might go into a little. Would add you've got a role to play in terms of getting into the cell. Then you also have roles to play in terms of your ability to put attention online, keep your concentration. So there are m psychological aspects to reading as well uninsured because of his position germs. Anatomy in terms of were billed as human beings. That's why so important. overlooked. Mina. When you put that connection with? How do I even think of this I don't want my own sought is is cultural and that most breeding techniques have come from the east with eastern philosophy. More. Qualitative. It's more difficult to quantify at the breath. In fact, there is no definition on wall. A group breath is there are a lot of 'em. Let's say colonists there. There are a lot of things that indicate a high-quality Nodia said nobody's been Saran say DC's a graph in this a good brass in the insult riot. We are getting to that stage. Now as researchers are beginning to great of this psychologist coming together with a neurophysiologist at blam mechanics under under beginning to go reading from a multidimensional Africa. And I wanted to take a quick break from the show to share with you a little bit about what our spots are simply faster. Dot Com now has available in their store. You heard me mentioning the out of the show all the time about the free APP timing system in the K. box which I have and use regularly. But today wanted to share a little bit more about the bar speed monitoring units that simply faster house, which is the gym wear and the new portable flex unit. So let me start with the gym where I mentioned it regularly on the show. It's been referred to as the Cadillac of speed monitors, Carl. Valley calls it a lab inside a lunchbox as the readings you get out of the gym work, go well beyond typical concentric or just up the up phase of the lift velocities. Rather you can measure the entire shape of the barbell lift in terms of east central velocity range of motion, total work done total work being awesome by the way especially like comparing a long arm bench presser or six ten squatter versus a five eleven point guard. So you're getting all these extra metrics that you're not getting on other units. Perfect for teams wanting to match the weight room and the data synchronizes to software platforms such as coaching plus team builder an athlete monitoring. So new to the store is the flex, which is the ultra portable and lower price travel version of the coach's favorite Jim more. So just like the gym where the flex measures, the shape of each rep range of motion total work done East Cedric. So for this and the gym aware this is the advantage that a force plate would have over just knowing how high up you're getting many other metrics and information that go into this unit work compared to similar portable bar speed monitors. This unit gets the entire up rather than a fraction. So you have here to awesome tools, and if you're interested in upping your game in the velocity based training in speed world, I would definitely recommend heading to the store at simply faster dot com and checking into these two units. All right. Let's get back to the show. Yeah that-that's. When you said that that's more subtle as yet. That's it because I think in strength and conditioning particularly athletic performance it's so. It's so quantitative. You know like give me a number behind this and I'm sure you can get numbers. It's just not and it's I. Think it's with your recovery to it's almost more of a subtle effect like how do you gauge like if I'm training and I did a set of like adept jump workout apply metric workout in my vertical up Oh wow i. Could definitely see that that was why I imagine with breathing. You can start noting improve recovery, but I imagine it's potentially outside the like you said, the vast potential and endurance sports where you're gonNA notice it like marathons endurance. Perhaps the recovery element may be more subtle or the mental effects maybe slightly more subtle for many people would you say or or Kennedy a big? Name. With lots going on but for me breathing is more sensitive than is a measurement general. and. That's what I found my trial I used to use Hov. was with clients and I only use Haizhu Rena with people who are not into the breast. And people aren't aware I'll waterway. Directory six of equality breath and the efficiency. There are no Soom. messes. Quantify the physiological aspects of breathing. So for example, a stall to children's and so that the deluca measuring the these two tolerance level of her system and that started originally with a potato back in the nineteen fifties, he was the first one to quantify. The breasts Shoda quality breath and should have from a physiological perspective. It's Dark Blue. And that's why power to it is different than at. Most of the reading techniques came from Yoga or meditation or. Or? Yeah. So so you're talking about the. Those qualitative elements of breathing verses HR V.. So how do you? How do you assess the breath like in that manner? I because I think HIV is pretty popular in those assessment and readiness meters, and also this old makes me think to just I think about that. When I every time I, go into coach I do think about how is this an art form like how is this something that I can say after three years of work I've definitively become ten times better than I was when I first started I think with. A piece of I mean technology is great but you know if I'm just relying on a number a machine to tell me a number every single time I feel like there's not I can't see that I grew as much as a practitioner just rely a versus those you have to pick up those little subtle. These same way an athlete has to pick up on you know thousands or tens of thousands of different little pieces of information you know what I'm saying like. So I think that's interesting. That's why I wanted to ask you. How you what are you seeing there? Okay. So originally, I would've used A. Message Which, is what the auction advantage is built on. So the doctor was a was Russian doctor. And He, threw his own. He actually was diagnosed with a fine. It was a fatal diagnosis of hydro pressure on heart disease. So he's given. Six months to live. And Medication couldn't save that forum back in the day and he did the story goes. He he was also observing by the way in practice I observe observing people who are on their deathbeds. Any notice of the closer they got to John Deep Breathing God, and they're more distorted reading between. So the idea of reducing the grass and all breath colon on within an instant notice a difference to you felt at pains in his in his kidneys in his body and headaches all started disappeared. This is fascinating. So he embarked on a ten year journey all discovery. Primarily around the borough and Carbon Dioxide side has a huge role to play in getting auction into the cells from the blood stream to the cells. And then he went on Russia to promote the message. To teach in the masjid on he was known you'll have jury many many diseases known I secure on all people shy away from that word pure simply means if you look at the extremes to get rid of all symbols also not only context I'm using that word in. Okay. Just. In case you get ourselves in trouble here. So. When He the whole nation scale to his method we he said related Karnak's intolerance. Curls to your health status. In terms of dysfunctional grieving and. Related. Disease Effects Depending on your S. On is you improved? Your sealed tolerance as you build Donald donal within your symptoms on disease decrease in decrease decrease in. Decrees until they became. Awesome Muscle. Symptoms at all. On this is associated with a Dacosta Syndrome over pretty much every inflammatory disease or disease when you're over fifty different diseases, what they look. Qualified this in that since documentation castaway. Ninety two thousands. There hasn't. So he did not by the way on some twinkles which showed a great effectiveness mass nuts amber team. That's the one that they went after because it's a respiratory disease. At his theory has been proven since. That seal to tolerance itself is responsible. They actually now modern research is located seem to than security, which is your chemo receptor response all carbon dioxide, and or have quickly your rain to soak steel to your system. At A. Powerful. Influence on. Resilience of your research system on then because its importance in your a surge system than related calls to other diseases. Make sense yet so That was the the measurements on that I used a law was his controllable all skating. Okay. As you. So you take a exactly what normal breath in and out of the nose. An op your excellent attention holding O.'s. On you release your first urges to debris. Nicer, doing it there I I love. Your first sensation to breed you release on you find that breath hold what you. Know now more as the bull score in the auction eventually gets the same thing. The same thing. So as you used to Jagan. Improve full score unimproved on improvement yours get in of hanging in the body of fatigue in the body because of the role of your sergiy system in all of these things. And because you're taking it every morning, you're able to shacking interning with your system. Every single morning on a no, it's know how it feeling know how cutting all. So it's a great gateway into how are you feeling I'm what is your resiliency level light? And then from there like it becomes very simple to qualitatively check in and see what it's like. I'm from Hazer Regis. was less sensitive to us all I'm not nothing. Hey Cherie any sense that same dot is held a lot of my clients were completely unaware. It gives you. A A a measurement to grab a hold on as a coach. The team is very handy because I can just check in with those numbers across the board. Over so many who is entrenched with their body. while. Shaved in. Feeling than did reading is far more. Interesting I. Love. The body is always going to tell you I was gonna ask to because I. DO occasionally I do Wim Hof breathing in the mornings. I like the mental state and and I, always I, I like challenges to you hold your breath at the Dick Thirty big breaths and then you hold for how long you can go and I always like just kind of seeing where I'm at too. So we reality ensemble I'm sure they're not clearly not the same but that can you tell me get what? What, how, long you can hold your breath because I've seen this in just general health assessments to hold your breath right now how long can you go and if it's like twenty seconds, you're not you're. In a nutshell what does that say if you cannot hold your breath for very long just? Stay what does that say about physiology? HIV. Okay. So Let's solve the world. We're going to dive in this metabolism a little bit of that's okay. Albert. Cells produce AGP right. We know that the way healthy selfridge's as he is you have enough auction getting into the selling nutrients coming from your in your digestive system. While, combs with a TV in early energy in Anaerobic at working system is carbon dioxide. Heat lactase on hydrogen. That's what with A. K. When What while the main according to the BOHR effect which was in Nineteen, oh four discovered in nineteen. Oh, four while. Effect essentially says it is the level of carbon dioxide was determines how much I quickly auction gets into yourself. So if you're very sensitive carbon awesome words if soon as your rains senses seal tuner system, Roy's and Co tuner system will then you'll begin to hyperventilate. I'm blow it off as you're very sensitive. So. If you are less sensitive higher co two tolerance to it if you build a little. Rain doesn't freak out the first sign of. Well then you will be able to get more auctions yoursel sell your cells will function that Okay. So a better function sell means better. Regulation of your energy throat a body right more. More aerobic system. Working, better? The other side of the coin is as well. Seal to. Is One of the few things that houses the Bloomberg buyer. Gas Pasta Blood Brain, barrier. So the reason you breathe is nothing to do with Australia. I. See. Okay and a healthy person. The reasoning breathe is first of all to exile carbon dioxide to get rid of an ability of metabolic waste. Okay. Buddha's you're highly sensitive to because you powder the IN A. Reading or a big breathing, Qatar over many years. So if you're a very sensitive to then the rain gets very sensitive to co two, which means it automatically elicits a fight or flight response. So we'll start pull adrenaline through the body. Dot adrenaline doesn't get used continuing to anxiety and panic attacks. So. For example Doctor Feldman over there in the states don't a lot of research into. Carbon dioxide. A metabolic stress. Molecule. Which means that? For example, one one. One piece of research while as he does a very rare disease and this was them said, recently, James breath is very rare disease which she midland brain don't develop which is. Where we get our share response from what psychiatrists? So this. Lady years. Ten years to elicit a response in her. Couldn't elicit any response in our Oiseaux ever? So DONTRELLE INMAN? Allowed in on it. Okay. We're GONNA administer. You now votes dose of Carbon Dioxide and you know you might get panicky. Stay stay relaxed on. To Mass on our wound breath thirty percent carbon. And she flips. Mousa. Walter. Sure hyperventilation. Don't get out she wouldn't even finish the rest of the test. while. So we know that there is a huge role for seal to play in anxiety, performance, anxiety and. Panic and fear. Yeah that's I think that it's really amazing If you look at like the Totem Pole I think I remember like Paul, checks, totem pole and it's like That all the way up at the top. It's it's such a critical function so it just makes perfect sense that. This is goes so far beyond recovery, but just goes so far beyond recovery too and I. think that's why it's so important. I need to ask before I get because I'm just gonNA keep having follow ups because this will be my but so you mentioned you mentioned you had asthma earlier is that what got you in Nebraska? Just curious what got you into this and what? I was blessed Osma. is how I will put it in. I read about I was a kid. Like to the point of where I would have. GP's woman to my house in the middle of the night to administer extra medication to me. Because in breed them with system was shooting down. Also, in several occasions on one of his Gouda was good. You know what I lost for a lot of games every as union. and. This asthma just kept on coming back. By. The book so to speak. Had where where would it was also as it was nearing? Ideas and dreams of play in their county, which would be the elite of games. but ended teenage years. This is just getting worse and worse and worse so I would be. nineteen I spent a total of six months in bed with because of asthma attacks on the respiratory infections. Blown the. Osma tax. I had over fourteen hundred dollars over four hundred steroid tablets three inhalers three times a day Onda further tablet to Mench miasma symptoms. Doctors Gave Me Noble The Lychee my GP settle against you an appointment with the when the talk consultants recruited to consoles in. Ireland. That's GonNa take a while because that's our healthcare system. In the meantime you know the normal we can do. I really WANNA. Be a trainer. That's what I'd like to go into. And A. Genuine. Me Laugh at me. As we wrap, you'll been immobile and away to twenty we don't alter. We know what? We're doing every mechanical is no solution here. After I. Left his office in. Window for normal to lamb mom and me and she said, look, there's this guy this guy went over to Russia nerd Tako methods name is patrolling kiln. E here begun teaching workshops you WANNA get on a workshop. Next week city. Let's go. And the Brought over D I was in one of his first cohort Horta workshops this Muslim back in two thousand, three, I think he started teaching those onto. and. So in learn you take your method learn the physiology of however works and got to work training three times a day every day. But at the time I had seen the research you consolingly year later was completely symptom free. Reduce. All of Mali Respiratory Infections as the gap between them kept on growing larger and larger larger houses symptoms were disappear. And he gave him the altar moment medication. On was so eighteen months of training where it became symptom medication free. Then from there I did what I said. Do I went in I went into a coma trainer. Athletics and Sport isn't that they aren't. We don't have that many fulltime athletes or not local as as you guys over his State so. I went into the general areas are working with people with no initially was weight loss. In particular at for every received a habit disease behind them. I noticed that our new England in power Tauro nutrition on them all the while I was thinking Geez, missing something here are missing something here. It was available decision. Listen about seven years ago I, turn out I know I gotta go back and Suny the breathing techniques and bring these two people to tell. That's what went on the journey. was back to. Take your qualifications. That's what I heard to win Hof mastodons like wall. was. The with. Big Breezing he's. Not. into. It anyway, you can follow the methods and tell you no no no, it's all knows greasing. It's Kabri reasoning elax breathing brand. Once I have my eyes open to that I was going. Well, what on Earth Ellison's there you know what? What are other people teach once once yoga breathing wants A. Russian martial arts breathing. Japanese. Martial arts spree. At. Vimy of read I just starts to peel back every single technique. Of note that over hundred techniques now. thrown many many different methods backgrounds. On what will have been doing for the last? Five years ever anti more decent Samaritan especially since then is Milton tried to find as much research as possibly come from whatever area they're psychiatry or physiology or. Wall, nurses going on with breathing in around how it affects people. You're listening to the just live performance podcast brought to you by simply faster. Yet. Yeah. That was something I was really looking forward to talk with you about because I think it's very easy. Just to say, okay just just read this way like just belly breathe or just tape your mouth shut or just out that. Those are bad I. Mean it's it's certainly a huge huge step separate there. Even the simplest means can usually be extremely effective, but I in all these different things on how to be that I. my first learning was just just breath your belly. Stress you out and then it's like, oh, well, your belly and your should rise this much in your chest this much and. It's like well, what and then be thinking about Wim Hof to this coaching athletics is like you can't at some point you can't over coach the person through Sunday to do naturally at the end of the day like if I'm coaching. So, go ahead. Yeah. I was GONNA say after one dollars dismiss shutdown why don't they can't get access those multiples that are supposed to do the work like you can. You can share them. So valley read the put blocks and kettlebells and hands on and give them all the kinesthetic awareness that you one one of they just can't do it with because they're diaphragm is rich F- rafted inches of perhaps it was because of injury perhaps was because of a mode at a long term emotional stress perhaps because they need food to their body doesn't like and so. Did, the did the showdown in count work as well. So. This is where you got look at the breathing system as a whole. Okay. When this mechanical aspects that we have to restore and zinc like any other rehab program, you've got to be able to innovate those muscles and Allow, enable them to do their work for them to do the work. Then for Media Dem's business of training. You're. Honest I don't know anybody else who use up term breath training I kind of in my own mind I came up with A. Trainer and I've I've been dreaming essence seaward for so long that's how I seemed to all developing. The human body is every everything is training. and which means that it's not Oh, this technique again, I got some result so. Happy days for me because. Yes that worked for you. What else are even on the table though You know and then there's even people who try and breathing technique For them and they're like. Breathing me at all like I'm not go near that. So festival to HRUBESCH. So I can look at a period system of Brett streaming on. The scene with an the conditioning of an athlete as well and forgiven purpose see how to restore the mechanics like any other movement gem. At newnham practic- sound blind mechanics. then. You have to strain the physiology physiological component. We, what we're talking earlier on is improve your tolerance to carbon dioxide, and then you have to be able to use the breathing for her as well. The last four and generating power, strengthen our through the Connecticut chain or whether that's for efficiency in American. And the object shoes while works for you in that moment untrained, that's the that then becomes. And your diesel pattern and subconscious that you don't even. That that fits way what I like to bring things back to training someone in a sport movement because I think a lot of people seem to really resonate with that and. A saying I like it's really could be two things that strength are structured dictates the function like I can't coach athlete into a particular position. That is quote unquote biomechanically correct. If they don't have the structure, the structural links, the strength to get them there fluidly and naturally, and organically otherwise I'm just manufacturing something and so I, I'm glad you brought that up with the breathing because I think it's very easy just to say you breed this way. So could you actually get in detail then like what like an if an athlete the what are some some limitations? Some structural limitations that's GONNA keep. You met you'd mentioned about how would you approach these things? These structural limitations that an athlete might have that it's just keep them from having a good breadth of general before we even get to the technique because a lot of time I think with coaching athletes. I mean I think one of the beauty of beautiful things of being a physical prep coach if you will, and sometimes there is a skill divide in terms of what you can get to in a skill, but you can set the groundwork for these things that can become lots of things. So what what's the groundwork what should people have in place to be able to get these proper breath? Okay so You should be able unless unless got a broken nose on deviated Septum, you should be able to. Deviated. So badly that you can physically read your nose even for a minute. Will. Then you should have the in. Nose breathing at rest. Okay So. Your nose to inhale on to assail arrest and be your daily breathing. Hot, no more than any were at you will have a higher as drive. And you'll have. Again Hob. The facts of having higher sympathetic Eddie versus the two. Oh yes. Of course. I sorry I if your mouth breathing day, sure that's not going to be very good for the pair sympathetic tone all this carbon dioxide experiments. Yeah. Go breathe through your mouth for the next hour and then tell you feel like after. I mean one of the greatest books written in my opinion breathing is the most latest was built by James Nestor breath because here's a journalists, not a breathing easier writer. So he writes beautifully explains a story beautifully and he goes into the anatomy goes into the biomechanical goes into and the impassive co two he didn't experiment. Where he himself in his dream wouldn't blocked join the Stanford and blocked Knowles for ten days so that they couldn't. Breathe through their nose, and this is an experiment by a horrible back in the seventies on monkeys reserves. I know has never done on humans. So that? One day his A. Province of snoring increased by over three hundred percent while with one day. By the end of the ten days, he was developing sleep apnea. Should gain has huge consequences for hunting Alaska disease diabetes, even some cancers as well. Right? To judge so. Back to ask was I like to a want athletes to be able to patterning all nasal breeze now rests during the day in the mice. Then what by mechanically the breath smoke issuing? Yes. Savelli should roy followed by the chest. Then you're in exile should let go. So if you listen to what you hear Sh. Sh. So that was breath that was in through my nose and out on my mets as ane hails through the nose daily rose than late just froze as exile it was just recoiled the just. Out of my mouth was open Joel. And you will be amazed demand athletes who do that. Amazed. Me Is your unable to do that within you were to do on your mechanic suburban. But. What? What So what are some things that happened in? I really like when you say recoil I like that because I'm always about us. Recoil. Elastic component of the breath. The load and unload. Always, even have that. So, what are so breathing in the first bit through the belly last than the chest comes in then recoils some things that are happening. Instead I mean I'm assuming probably saw chest breathing being one. But what are some some dysfunctional? Suggests any of your listeners lie on the floor on your back, bend your knees and try video yourself doing because here's the funniest thing is most people don't base thinks their values Ryan's. Rosen and When you look done a video be like. Oh Oh that's doesn't even why isn't that? The House. So people are reverse readers. This means they only Know Miller Rim lower rid movement at all and no die from excursion and all other people can actually breathe into the lower aspects of the ribs and into the delayed bullish on new their Mitchell Jess at all. UNIN. Some people hold the rest of the top. And then they also console the resin the way. I think I do that as in default breathing. So. They're the type of source that I look for is okay. When they're inhaling is the body I mean that is a representation it's not you're not pushing the valley will. Not is due to the lower rims move. Me Move Move. All words or does it move out to the side? Can you access that data from? So second part that. I was so teaching only belly breathing I mean that would be good for who couldn't move their belly maybe but beyond that like it is a is a week technique in my opinion. Can work with can take an awful lot of time to ingrain a giant from brass by saying Sonny breeze or pacing blocks on there there's. Am I'll use use kinesthetic awareness with the fingers in the hands I use a different diaphragm release techniques which. Are Far. More potent than it. They can change some breathing within a session. And they're just pretty good. I just went experts in their fields and found out what they do and family were pretty well. Then help people who you free over the diaphragm and that's working fine when they can't get full access to jess muscles to the to the Interpol the most can inflate the justice at all. So there over is, I. Know You can see this. In around your logo using your chest. Kind of access. The rest. All on. So the recipe book. You of it from a from a athletes perspective. Kanthi. Your loans air. You're leaving James from the table when it comes to training your energy systems. Because, you're not taking a full vacuum in all of our life you're often tieger. or it's going to take long warm up, which is the other side of the coin. So speaking of warm-ups when someone comes in training I'm sure it's completely there's a lot of individual factors but how long do you spend at the front end of a training session or the back end I mean I think that's the comment on is just all right. We're GONNA breathing to warm up. Cool down to get parasitic. What is the the training session of yours look like like like how does that integrate in and how are you working within the session like just? Stand no problem for me initially. There's not much I would allow people do physical training 'em. Either can come into the in this four for years, right They're to me because. Either they they. Really. WanNa develop was me or specifically for for breath breath they WANNA. Do so mind when I go to restore mechanic. So. Check me like Oh, do the second that will drop you into a sympathetic to do for example use. So use a Wynhoff message. Gives you. Overture, dreading flown and get you all I'm doing ready to your recession I. Don't do that. Because I think for me that's. Is You're relying on your manipulating the breast shoe. Make you feel better to produce performance on the other side of the coin is as well wanted if breathing's your weakness than, why would you want to Bypass Casa? Why wouldn't you want a cheese? By utilizing specific technique. For me, I want to Rehab Breath I want to restore. That's when I go. I'm was. So once once I have their system trained you ask will what, what does it incorporate a? So for research you up. In the General Wolfe's Movement or skills training I will have I will bring rattled in into the general warm face of Rian between four and six very strong breath holds. So for me, I, like it through the nose and I like holding the nose during the breath hold because. A lot of benefits in terms of? Of, the nose for your system as well sewer, they won't breeding. They will read that the nose pigeonholed or nose and then they they might move. We're not to generate higher. And Metabolic Load Salt Lake since. You Know Wolfe's then the wall from the older power framing doodoo older still streaming at or face. To finish, warmer. Pre Competition I would get them to hyperventilate I, call it a suit and Brown ventilation. So read more than normally doesn't have a negative connotation to. Advance in the person between five and maybe. Ten fifteen to dome. To editor system. So now there are more fresh and ready to go from the first whistle or. Does that make sense yet that's and that's something I actually had won some clarification because I think that. I mean, this could be whole talk in it of itself but I do realize that we talk about mental clarity and the same pair sympathetic need for mental clarity. But what if your job is just you have to amp your body up to like you have to have some adrenaline going to compete. Just avoid yourself those things and I think it's maybe slightly different for a team sport with more openness to it where there's more things going on versus the tunneling like I worked with the swimmer who set an American record. Doing a Wim Hof style breathing before as racist because he's like, yes, you know oxygen This is this is an it's. It's not like you have lots of things to be aware of you are tunneled in on one feet to do basic was swimming. You gotta turn kick and then, but you know what I'm saying. So that's a question I'd always I, I love by the way how you said. Breathe more than versus I was actually thinking to my own mind. Okay. What can I call this for? Because if say hyperventilating it's like, what are you? What am I doing I'm this is. So. Just means more than more than your metabolic needs bought. It has a negative connotation because of the because of them it comes from. The medical industry and what it comes from mainstream in the end that it's related to a disease and dysfunction Roy whereas this assisting supermax loading. That's where I got the idea writer super maximum loading more than all. Of Your list. So that's exactly what I'm doing I. don't care whether it's faster orders whether. Or whether it's Depends on the person will prepare the different styles. So again, damage Soubra maximally than delays. Yeah I was thinking too. So you mentioned adrenaline because I I don't really I, always want to be able to take back to talk about now nuts and bolts in. My mind to just go and I want to make sure I, bring it back but you've mentioned adrenaline I Christian Tibo Canadian strength coach has been on the show a few times, and in a recent episode, you is talking about how if you have too much adrenaline system it's GonNa take that's going to prolong recovery times from the word. So I was just thinking to myself. Okay. Well, we want there's this balance right? Like if it's an important competition and it's it's a really fast, it's four hundred. And I do the tunnel or even maybe a big lift I'd imagine there's probably some of that before a big even a power. Endurance. Probably is adrenaline in various things. Perhaps, I'm not one hundred percent. Sure. You know necessarily see like Olympic lifters doing that before. It's allowed. There's there's always a calm state for sure. So there's play a trade off between what's happening aerobically and then the mind and. What do you think about that? One, one of the pathways to secreting adrenaline is by breathing. So. When you? Breathe more than your metabolic demands of You blow off carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide across the blueberry. Mary. On Your brain registers that you're no reading more than arrest on your brain automobiles. This is flatter. Flight Navy. This is this is this is the pathway that leads to fighter flights. Been Gaming being we get. So we'd automatically starts to generate. And overnight. Now. There is a difference between Jalen in in my opinion, this is just a I'm not. I'm not a scientist himself a normal life. Necessarily toll the inner workings of the body because I'm not an expert in right. In my mind, there's a difference between a a conscious. Effort on and on regulated. So conscious effort, for example, Okay. Let's say a default breeding hotter and of mine is to 'em read heavy when I get stressed. Okay. If like read heavy. Four for covenant. That is a conscious control from doing an purpose. So it's almost like, I'm on I'm. On my nervous system on while I want to achieve. Verses. I drink a county Munster yet on a whole hose although. Almost, all my inner working stars go crazy. Am I can't contain the m the hormones I can't contain the. In on my body because she'll shows. Is consciously regulated does constellations the way I think about it is I. I always think about this like the human body is a miracle in its natural state how much extra conscious for brain manufactured substitute really be put at the today none right like you shouldn't have to do. You. This is more philosophical but I don't think it's like I don't think Lebron James are make basketball's or am I know Michael Jordan I don't think they were doing all this extra conscious stuff. You know I mean I knew the mentally I mean sure mentally like the mental mindset mastery and those things. But physiologically doubt, you know the the body in its own state as an elite athletes. oftentimes I think are doing things that they're not even conscious of its just took. Yes exactly. Exactly. I DIDN'T DO A. Lot? Of. His mind. Games that he does a lot of were probably came out of competition and the like you know there's nothing better than than having life as a teacher. Yes. Whereas we're what we're trying to do is pick those processes. Feels that they can use their life isn't presenting them windass circumstances to develop them themselves like for me I don't think I don't think caveman needed to wrestling. Think because their environment was lose inline. Wendy's human assist them in other words there their food was organic grass said their their air was clean and. because. No Industry Day they got plenty of movement in through the day. They like a log I'm night they went dead with the with Like went. So the need for. Kind of restoring in reenacting body is minimal as so benefits wear those is just to get that extra performance. With the problem arose nowadays. Most are coming from a dysfunctional place in some parts of her body readers dot system with specialized techniques. Or, we need. Training. I. I would agree we're oftentimes reaching for the top of the pyramid when that bottom is mess is shaky and there's a lot of bricks missing because of our modern lifestyles and just everything that kind of goes into. US now versus being a caveman like you said. So you started session with the you mentioned the no, the nose reading breath. and then that's for the purpose of like I a diagnostic and then also So what does that giving her the session as well? The just that element. If it's just a typical Jim session, your strength typical qualities you'd get in the gym. You're asking. People. were. Just clarifying out outside of being a diagnostic you've mentioned that. Typical activity. I do like know what you said I I I like for this talk to be more about restoring than hacks like you said. But what does that? Outside of the. Gym. On four three, that is a very. Open question is because of the emotional states of people people don't realize that reading has a critical role to play in emotional Mallon's processing emotions as well. So for example, B believe you said draft lead into. Before Before the event. Visit worked for them and just right right technique for the right person. Would there's some people out should not? That message and go near with a whole because most me will imbalance smoke and then there's other people that's kind of the wind law from will end where be be breathing and being rhythmical breathing combined wrestling uneven, and you do have to take it where it is breath holding some people don't like that either. which is the nasty things so. While I will do people who've you're asked me if somebody came in. So many just Leo, a runoff session, Gimme a flavor of what you do what you do. In. Terms of how would I integrate breathing into this session? I would first of all, give them some biomechanical breathing. So get do now breath wave I'm practicing. I might send a minute or Ju- trying to restore that as needed to. Then they go off and do the normal warm offs if it's a waste session, then I ll to somehow to. Use Arrests tension through connection. So in other words as strong person, etc.. Yeah. I would use. Within towards the end, you do like to bringing the breath holding towards the end because one, it helps to resettlement to a more para sympathetic state. On, a helps to calm them down after reading sessions towards the end in adds to conditioning. Without needing to flog the muscles if that makes sense. And it also helps them to if he graduated down and helps them to. Finish. A session. Feel fresh. Accents. based. Based on your marathon experience. Absolutely. You said something about creating tension because that's something that's been interesting to me I actually like I had to costed left way but they keep adding on the hopefully i. It's just like you take. It back I mean not being a negative thing is this thing I just keep thinking about? So that's something I've been thinking about allies using the breath to create tension through the Connecticut chain I was just I spoke at A. Virtual now in a CA. Nestle string condensing regional seminar where they were talking about just that and and breath techniques to if you look at like elite athletes faces when they're doing a job, you see the cheeks out you see all this this pressure intention that's through the chain. I was just watching dairy bar, a bio mechanics and many things athletics mentor to me was. Showing video recently with it was Carson Wall wore home who recently set i? Think the world number two all time in the four hundred hurdles but it showed every time he would take a hurdle compared to its competitors. You could see even because he's a much more pale complex So maybe that's you could see it more but like you could just see this the pressure through his system every time he would in his thorax every time you would take off over a hurdle. So what? Can you just tell me a little bit about that like teaching people to create tension because that's I. Think pressurization I think. So often not looked at as one of these methods of creating power. Could you expand on that a little bit? Yeah. I. Mean Martin Martial Arts have known for centuries, thousands of years right in them to do that also vocalized as well, which creates even more tension. When you need it and I love to be able to create that not. Tension through Shane at you have to be access the muzzle some game going back to restoring those breeding kind. Okay. Because if you if your diaphragm isn't newlyweds. On moving well, then your ability to clean strikes on news, the Schroer is reduced as well. And moves it all works together. As. We all know that injured on the impression that cylinder works together and also works with the CONNEC chains of the body. So if you look. The diaphragm is an external thing during the sophist, Ryan as over the for the mouths down into the throat down into the stomach accessing external saying, which means as diaphragm 'em. Sweetie squeezes in on the esophagus to prevent. Food passing into the stomach Odalis well and winning when it's. When the diaphragm when you were in hand with the diaphragm open was well to allow more food pass through the ESOPHAGUS. Around. Is. The only single most solicits Tara Zonta the whole body. So every vertical column of the kinetic chain passes through whether you're GonNa Thomas Myers whether you're looking at all the superficial nightline feedback lying as supervision, Detroit lions, or any of the spiral lines our line they pass through the diaphragm at some level. So think of them as columns kinetic chain. So other diaphragm. As you inhale Lenexa, you're either from the top down approach creating more tension through the chain or you're releasing tension like a corkscrew reader timing in. In increasing tensions between the diaphragm and the cease or you're you're you're loosing allowing some of that tension to disobeys. With those power to disagree. Okay. So once you can ask the die from, you can then use to create more tension. Dr John Duty. Yard was. accused. Quite. Well not not known I, well, he wrote a book, the Ninety S at on medicine in nose breathing as well. You even. Though the elite tennis players. I don't forward was like belief Jean King. Train Martinez Naronha was very famous tennis player in the she in fact, she's When, the longest-serving professionals on think she wanted to won the highest amount of. All Major. One of Meta word in tennis. Right? What he trainer Autumn League translates in humans say. You should this no matter, the nine, hundred, ninety Jesus that you. You should have an alternate step region potter. So. For example, when we swimming when swimmers are training you. Greg me. Wrong You're swimming code photo from basically the swimming. You don't want so many taking a a unilateral grass as stroke and every day of training at for swimming because they're gonNA overdo up some Walsall's on one side and about dealing with the acronym I was actually the coach for similar. So I can't. I but that sounds right though yeah that sounds sounds sounds appropriate. Insuring your ahead to get in the water, you're going to rotate more. Let's say you're turn your head to the you're going to rotate more through the right side of your body. You'RE GONNA have a higher elbow list in order to get a from fall. So you'll end if you only turn to the right in the whole time is, is a recreational swimmers, is that they develop name balance? Swimming. Stroke. Okay. Through the same can happen with ruining. If you inhale only as your left foot hits the floor every single time new gray more tensions from the left side and. Through the rights to the kinetic chain. Incorporating Dr Duty Harder you will. Increase the likelihood of injury all the way through that less. And the he saw a lot of them lot of knee injuries in hip injuries as a result. Really interesting. So. Yeah. I wouldn't also in terms of. The connection both in terms of maximal loading will county use your ex sales for strength. Whether it's cliched where the WANNA go. Produce forest or is whether it's a strange where you want to generate maximal force with whizzes many strides as you can wear your hair in your exile with your full strength. So. So with that, that's really interesting with the the single leg thing the landing breath on every leg that actually makes me appreciate I was just thinking about like bounding exercises I appreciate that. You can't really without doing it every step. So maybe there's something pressure wise there I hadn't really thought of. What. So what do you do with that importance? They're like a mindful element that you're using people are doing like like a lunch or even running that you're like that is in the the putting their mindset tabby aware of in that context and obviously the martial arts. Absolutely like through. Martial arts and becomes a need in the martial arts. Is Tall. Maybe, not openly as much as I talk about. The power of Reading for a long long time vs surprised you had or Costa wasn't aware that you use breathing to create and generate our. will be a more. The celebrities will four for general population for athletes. Running is a great way salon get them starting walking. Get them. Every time they take a stab you know initially on getting Sayeret, just like swimming, you say, okay, every third stroke, every fifth stroke, every seven strokes reminded extend the length of time of one breast Mash Chew. These ray to develop that are endurance and fitness qualities. You would have a more efficient breathing system with any. If I was a sprinter, I would almost want to be you almost use your for for power. By Using a short arrest every maybe three footfalls. Amazon. On it's just a matter of of the rhythm. So literally when you're Walkin you. Hit your song as you want to inhale on, assign an alternate a line slot with a right. And that's how I came to power into people and they won't say that rhythm like Jozy once they got rhythm these. Joy Integrated into a jaw into a role into a syringe. Until. Send me cones conscious nature the. Interesting at this thing that's so cool. How those things that are in the weirdness field I'm so last question says our times drawing short. I I wanted to just get a just a couple methods on restoring like you said not to have to rely on hacks shortcuts not that I think those things are bad Babbitt obviously WanNa, we got to get to that database of it. All right. So just a couple. Like you mentioned getting the diaphragm working properly techniques like what are just a couple of things that to be aware of in terms of restoring the I know there's obviously a lot of them and we have our podcast just a couple of things that can be really for that restoration. Okay, even trying to back and Research Dr Larry Simple breathing technique is four six freezing breeding for four seconds exile for six seconds. To minutes Oh, inhale two, three, four, axle two, three, four, five, six. You can repeat that for two minutes as been shown to. Set You more into A. Essays together Lashawn Stress State an also opened the frontal lobe in the brain so that you can think more clearly because when your stress from below shows infected being still Sam That's beautiful. Beautiful technique for for helping people to drop into that space. From their boss breathing would. You call it an advancement of that technique, which is beautiful. People use the both I like an adopted genyk technique so it can be used to help help you focus on. Economic energized for one of the word on also too common relaxed depending on who you are and how you're using. So off freezing comes remain seals you're looking at A. Box because you have an even. Between Inhale, hold on the talk. Sales. Hold of the Bulb you pick a base number let's say four seconds in for four, four, four, four hold for four un-european off cycle game two minutes is Clinton appears to be a minimum racial would've your e-enjoying redraw into deeper states then at maintain them three, not ten minutes. Find four seconds easy. They needed started shouting your cell phone progress yourself moved five, six, seven, eight, eight sacking the box find in seven seconds you can get to seven seconds and then I tend to advance another technique again. WanNa do it also helps you to? At little bit of Co two tolerance at. Breath holes on the controlling the assault highlander also helps you to do that your Positi Abbas as you go all those base numbers. You're your Iran's will begin to open more. More, air in order to. Older. Timber Old. Search. Youthful techniques that I use a on help us people particularly at four, six US in recovery. Boss breathing on using the as a nice cam laid yet somebody told us. Four six again on us at to sleep better. Whereas at boss breeding us more in the morning time as again to get them just more set for the day on. Awesome. So that yeah. That gets me thinking that the box breathing or more the breathing and the focus type element 'cause I know I think that doesn't that help accuracy like shooting accuracy like focus like those types of things Absolutely and. Again, this is why breathing become so popular computer. The All Blacks Ruby team if you look at. Cristiano Renaldo who wouldn't be one of the most famous soccer players in the world low and see what they're doing. You don't get A. Tennis greater is known for using the Wynhoff method you UTICA Roger. Federer written our. Read on recently in terms of the way, he uses his nose read. remains. A lot of people whether. Or? From other means they. They know that breeding help to hand them down and to help focus mess now been shown in science where you haven't connection between your breathing rhythms. Attention. The brain as shown in the lowest Kariya's of the of the rain. From, a heart rate plan you your heart sees into the diaphragm. There's no between the heart and the diaphragm. There's no gapped. The Party of the heart actually attach is onto the diaphragm and spreads over the top from. So as you grieve faster your heart rate faster as you read slower your heart rate. Slower. Your your brain senses dot. It automatically then comes down of you're thinking brain enables you to focus unplaced your attention of things for a longer period is. I love that I love how allow integrated is like the heart is right there Okay. So last question just quickly like release techniques like you've mentioned like manual therapy, I think just rubbing around the the ribs diaphragm areas pretty people this different techniques but is there one that you'd find any any that you find particularly effective earth things people can do I know like are reactivated. There's there's that people with that type of thing, any anything that you find helpful or particularly useful for the different types of restoration. I would say get your hands and feeling feeling you're. So underneath the rooms and bridge nice and calmly and light and lightly as you. Should be able to hold your so simple to test DIADEMA's retractable. Especially, lie down is when you exile coming, can you hope those fingers or your diaphragm and all those road the inside? This nothing was how in your body you have on you you shouldn't be able to the tissue licensed so at you show able to feel under their. Tents or highly addictive like is it? Is it is a rare is like a rare state is the cordray or? Full. Hired for tonight's and simple. That's That's a PC. Kyushu he'll sell I, like to use that. Hard. Means ways to bring awareness into it. Like to reason, Icing County and just play around and there is an is easy shrine. Manually just match issue in there. Or. Yours is fantastic. Use IT and a lot of techniques same with. A few. Different. Ones. Yoga. More. Lonesome. Yeah Awesome Yeah ask the I've I've done the be activated and then the and Kt. So I just curious on European I laugh. Okay. So last quick question because you got this is for me personally selfish as you were talking about the things that are Deficiencies or whatever, and I I do think when I catch myself sometimes holding and how does this differ from box breathing because they're very good at the box reading type stuff great control there. But I'm a person who a hold my breath of the top I think I have a lot of tension I think I don't think I. Let it fall out very well. So the difference basically between a box breathing like you're teaching box breathing but also for someone who might be a breath holder and not just let it fall and that relax down what are some thoughts there. This is where coal and creating a specialized technique. You're doing it on purpose for a reason and verses your at subconscious natural wrap rhythm if you're holding your natural breathing rhythm. So we inhale either through the moment, MEMPHIS you inhale. Any hold of the top. And then let go org you inhale. Kinda purse your lips or you constrict your throat to console her exile I have found that that has very. Very serious emotional. Emotional health consequences as sonos words is representative of you controlling your life right if you're controlling something and contracting something that should be a recoil. She'll be just let. Oh Out on fair to the rest of your life as well. Right and are you the person that you know what happens when control is taken out of your ability right? If, that's ingrained into your breath, that is the most basic process you have. So you will drop into. I found anyways appeal into anxiety tolerance. Very quickly. Those types of. Are. In Controlled exile or bristled will drop in. Putting, conerns at very quickly win control is taken from them in life or when become disorganized Whereas if you can even enter that person inclined as you can retire Nebraska. Right. When you lose control life lifer when life throws you a curve ball. Simply richer breath. To help to senator you to then be able to think clearly make a plan. Doesn't make sense. For me, the by mechanics them the physiology, your body dictates while of in the mind and when. when the storm comes or when when when chaos ensues, right? Yes, trying to as you're talking, this is great. I got this. Ever knows more about me now since they are since, I've explaining my my breathing never that motion come from. So I, I will be working on that and. I love that. Well, I think that's about I would love to. There's this is such a huge topic. Dowse tons of questions, but I think that's the end of our time together and Manlio thank you so much. I have a lot of things to work on I'm sure all of us listening do as well and I'm except for the next time we get to talk shelby I'll be following what you're doing. So where can people find you if they WANNA learn more about all this? Yes sure. My on on instagram handle is. Leo. Daniel, I've a website called innate strength dot com that's a dash strength dot com and you'll find and Derek. Mainly my breathing is I do online. So I how the, for example, the twelve week project. Which is a groom training program takes people through that restorative as into s phase of training breathing and teaches them how to apply to sport at. A variety of sports our to endurance in there, and then between apple through the through the webinars co chew at live. Haven't you apply chain her apply breathing to sport, and then I have one coaching in online to. Awesome. Well, thank you so much. I really appreciate your time. I have so much to think about that until next time having a man. Sleeping all thank you for having me. A. Man That was such an expansive show. Thanks for tuning in and I know my knowledge game on breathing and breath was definitely up there and I hope yours was to I'm sure it was. There's so much great stuff on that night lots of stuff for me to continue on my own education coaching journey with. So before I get out of here, if you enjoyed the show could leave us. A rating or review on itunes or stitcher whatever you're listening to I'd really appreciate that and it really helps us out just spreading the message this show to those people that would find it useful. Also wanted to give a shout out to our sponsor simply fast dot com. They'd been a longtime sponsor of this show and we really appreciate that. All right. We'll see you guys next week.

nose breathing mouth breathing Leo Ryan Leo James Nestor Leo Ryan Roy asthma Ireland Wim Hof Meyerson John Deep UFC Savelli Wim Hof Batelco Russia Connecticut Leo Today
CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN DAY FIVE: The Last Will And Testament Of Topical Host Leslie Price

The Topical

10:16 min | 1 year ago

CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN DAY FIVE: The Last Will And Testament Of Topical Host Leslie Price

"Hello topical listeners. I'm Leslie Price and I have some sad breaking news for you today. If you're listening to this right now it means that I am dead and that my house cleaner Francis who comes in once a month has no doubt discovered my decaying corpse. I know this is unsettling for a lot of you and you might be wondering how I died. Well I am today with one last story but I won last ad from cash APP. The topical is presented by cash APP. The number one finance APP in the APP store. But it's more than just an APP. It's also a friend or maybe more than a friend. No no that would be crazy. We're just friends unless cash APP feels the same way. Don't let passing up. Cash have become the biggest regret of your life download today and get ten dollars when you sign up using Promo Code Topical. We'll folks I am not proud of it but ever since. Opr implemented a strict podcast from home policy. I've admittedly being going a little. Stir crazy over here and despite the citywide shelter in place mandates. I have over the past. Few days sought reprieve outside these four walls that I've been relegated to sometimes for fresh air sometimes to catch a movie or grabbing drinks with some friends but most often just released some of the energy pent up inside me with a little exercise. Those of you who are familiar with kind of Linga Yoga know that it's an intensive spiritual practice of the mind and body and one that I've been practicing for many years on Tuesdays and Thursdays and occasionally Wednesdays and it pains me to say. This week was no exception now for more advanced students such as myself. Malinga also involves the practice of energy exchange by using the abdominal muscles to cough rejuvenating life forces directly into the mouth of your kind of link partner now. I know what you're thinking are relaxing. Yoga class is the absolute last place. You'd think you'd be in danger. Needless to say the email I received from my instructor. Swamy Derek came as quite a shock. Here's what he had to say. Nama Stay Leslie. My physician is informed that I have the disease. That's going around right now. And I think the exceptionally powerful burst of energy. I transferred into your mouth during our last session was also apparently full of negative life preventing vibes. I suggest two hours of intense meditation on your throat. Chakra once again. I apologize and wish you a speedy recovery. Oh and please look over the terms of the liability waiver you signed in my no refund policy. Thank you own Shanty Swami Derek. So listener there. It is nive corona virus the disease I have tried to avoid through isolation for the past four days or so and as I see it. There are only two options. Now I can either wait for my throat to dry up as I struggled to breathe until I inevitably drown in the fluid slowly building up in my lungs or I can die like a man with my head in the oven for me. The choice is clear. I choose to keep my dignity but I I have a few loose ends to tie up. Hello Hey Steve. It's Leslie. Is Debbie There Leslie? You know you're not allowed to call here anymore. It looks. I wouldn't be calling if it weren't important. I got some bad news concerning my health and I just want to tell the mother of my children. Something it'll be quick. I promise hang on Debbie. Is that you yes? You're a terrible fucking person and I hate you. Oh Yeah Bill Great. Oh all right just thirty. Three more failed relationships to get closure on after the Braille. Giving away on my shit stay with me for one last time allom is. There's something interfering with your happiness or preventing you from achieving your goals is it easily. Treatable with an antibiotic and a newfound understanding of modern contraceptive techniques. If so congratulations but for everything else. There's better help better help. Assesses your needs and will match you with your own licensed professional therapist ever since my wife and kids decided to social distance themselves for me. I've been using better help to ease my sense of loneliness and so far it's really helping. But don't take my word for it. Sign up now and start communicating securely and online twenty four hours better help committed to facilitating great therapeutic matches so they make it easy and free to change counselors if needed and with this special offer for topical listeners. You can get ten percent off your first month. And after that first month my family will return to me from upstate. And we'll all be together again and everything will be back to normal and just how it should be. I just know anyway Just go to better help dot com slash topical for ten percent off. That's better help. H. E. L. P. Slash topical. I Leslie Ann. Price being of sound mind do hereby declared this to be my final will and testament to my cousin. Shameless I leave this box of miscellaneous chords. May you have better luck figuring out. What the hell they all go to than I ever did. Do my assistant Jeanie. I leave my fifteen thousand bottles of hand sanitizer. I was left with after Amazon. Banned me for price gouging to my son. Travis I leave to you. My most cherished possession of all my vendetta against the country of Finland. I've already written death threats to several high profile individuals in your name to make the transfer vengeance easier for you and to the OPR merge store. I leave my collection of OPR tote bags available for thirty nine ninety nine each and this blooper reel of the topical Silliest News Blenders. The death toll is reported to be over nine people so far. Sorry did you say nine remmy. Oh my gosh no no. No no not for a minute there. I was like nine. That can't be no sorry a slip of the tongue. That's nine hundred. People are in fact quite yes. You'll be able to laugh along with your old pound Leslie. Long after I've been chopped into pieces and fed to sharks in the ocean as per my final wishes and finally to you. Yes you all of my wonderful listeners out there I'd leave for you the most precious gift of all the final words of your friend and host Leslie Price. If this illness has taught me anything it's that life is too short. Regretfully I wasted most of mine. Dumbing down the news. For a bunch of mouth breathing imbeciles listener. Consider this my dying wish. I beg of you if you survive this pandemic. Do not make the same mistake. Ided don't waste a single moment more of your precious life on podcasting podcasting for God's sake can you imagine a less useful way to spend once finite time on earth? What a fool I was. No do something that's actually fulfilling and do it for people who appreciate you not a bunch of spoiled morons crawling up your ass wining for a new episode every time you try and take a day off if you make it through this listener. Promise me you will throw your microphones into the nearest river and get out into the world. Take the hand of the one you love and go have unrecorded. Conversations and live damage live like no one is listening because in reality. They probably aren't well. That's it for me listeners. Now all that is left to do is turn on the gas. Stick my head under the broiler and say goodbye. That's it for the topical today. I was leslie price and stay Leslie. Swami Derek Sorry Suomi Derek. I'm a little busy at the moment. Leslie I just wanted to apologize and let you know that there has been some confusion. I do not have covert nineteen. Yeah turns out with syphilis. I have syphilis. Oh my God that that means. I don't have it nicely. You probably do because the painful source. I have on my mouth of very contagious. I'm sorry for the Confusion Leslie. I'll let you know when classes start back up. Okay Shanti Shanti Swami Shanty. Oh my God. I don't have the corona virus. It's just civilised it's just syphilis. Oh my God. This is the best I've ever heard. I've got a new lease on life. I am a changed man. Things are going to be now. I'm GONNA live the rest of this life the way it was meant to be lived. I'm finally going to do all the things I've dreamed of doing. I'm going to travel. I'm going to go on cruises. I mean I've never even been to Europe and I'm going Spain France Italy. I want to see them. All at tickets are so cheap folks. This calls for a celebration. The bars and restaurants might be close by Casa Di. Leslie is open for business and I hear. The bartender pours a strong Margarita. Only have five cups though so you'll have to share but that's okay. We're all friends here so cup one couple. Everyone's invited come see me off tonight. Because in the morning I fly to wrote for what is sure to be an adventure up a lifetime folks. I'm Leslie Price and today is the first day of the rest of my life. I love you all.

Debbie There Leslie Leslie Price OPR Swamy Derek Leslie Ann syphilis Shanti Shanti Swami Shanty Francis Finland Europe Linga Yoga OPR Swami Derek mouth breathing partner instructor Casa Di Jeanie Amazon
James Nestor | The Power of Water and Breath

Good Life Project

1:06:05 hr | 1 year ago

James Nestor | The Power of Water and Breath

"The kid growing up in Orange County California James. Nestor had a love affair with the notion he'd find himself in the water surfing pretty much every day. Or every chance he could and it was his happy place where the world would vanish away. He would settle into that hyper present of flow or bliss which is pretty fascinating because decades later now living as a writer in San Francisco that deep passion for the water and the state that brought him to has never left him in fact it led eventually to an obsession with the rarefied sport and culture of free diving where people train themselves to dive so fast and deep into the ocean holding their breath that the pressure literally transforms their physiology and brains into something entirely different as the light fades from the water. This led to his book deep where he didn't just about free divers but also became one and that then spiralled into a powerful fascination with how free divers are somehow mysteriously accepted into the mystical underwater sanctuary of the world's largest mammals and that eventually led to a more recent fascination with breathing. And how the way? We breathe which has been largely ignored by modern medicine. Barring treatment for pulmonary illness how it's actually one of the most powerful gateways to health longevity peace of mind even transcendent states and he shares all of his discoveries now years of research in his latest book breath the new science of a lost art we dive into all of this including some things that are really going to invite you to completely reexamined how you read and why and how it might unlock some powerful things in your own life so excited to share this conversation with you. I'm Jonathan fields and this is good life good. Life Project is supported by better help so many of us are going through a lot right now and could really use someone to talk to and friends and family. They make great but talking with someone who is truly qualified to help you feel better can be real game changer. And better help can do just that. They're the world's largest online counselling service. You can get started. No matter where you are in the world quickly they assess your needs and match you with your own license professional therapists. Then you schedule weekly video or phone sessions and the comfort privacy and safety of your own space and they make it easy and free to change counselors. If you feel you'd like to try someone else better help also gives you access to an incredible range of expertise which might not be available where you are. It's more affordable than traditional line. Counseling and financial aid may be available so visit better help dot com slash good life that's better. H E L P dot com slash. Good life and join the over. Eight hundred thousand people taking charge of their mental health with the help of inexperienced professional and as a special offer for good life project listeners. You'll get ten percent off your first month at better help dot com slash good life. It sounds like a common theme in your life really has been a fierce obsession with Canada. Two things how things work and also the water. Just a lifelong attraction to the water. I think that's true to to a large extent you now growing up in the OC in Orange County. A lot of people think or at least they have this perception that southern California's this dreamland of convertibles and beaches and all that but you know the the area in Orange County in which I grew up in Tustin extremely conservative place. I mean it's it's really equivalent to to Texas in many ways so it was interesting to be surrounded by this perception of free loving. You Know Beach Vibe Care Free No worries and then also be within this place which was so obsessed with worrying about everything you know extremely conservative on on every level interesting dichotomy to navigate. Especially when you're when you're young a teenager. Yeah where did you fall in that spectrum because I think also when people think about who's the kid who's in the water all the time who's the surfer they think about the hypocrite. The the free loving kid but my guess is if you sat on a wave you know an and you had two hundred people out there on any given day you're GonNa get a cross section of the entire Expand of WHO's in that area. Oh I think just everybody went to the beach. I mean that was really the only thing to do the summers down. There suffocatingly hot now. Hundred ten sometimes so every single day I will get a pocketful of change and take the bus the beach with my friends. We'd stay out there all day. We come back in the evening. Wake up and do it again so you did have an incredible cross section of people. I mean every walk of life. Everyone was out there all the time and being that I didn't grow up on the beach. Grew up fifteen miles from it. That meant I was an outsider. Not Not a local at thirty second street so that was always interesting to navigate. But you know I found once you're in the water everybody becomes a lot more equal. It depends how respectful you are. How good you are surfing or swimming in. All of that really fades away. There's any any mark of status the car you you're driving or or your watch or whatever you don't have that on the water so it's a great equalizer in a lot of ways. Yeah I mean. I have a lot of friends who are lifelong surfer. Some who grew up around there some who grew up. Actually a more a little bit Southlake Sandiego Swami's growing up and And to the one you know. They depending no matter how they started out. They've all kind of said the same thing it is it is the great equalizer and also you know there's also they're very there's a culture around it were there. There's a very specific set of rules that you live by and that you respect and if you disrespect the rules or the people within that system you pay the price met. That's completely true with the crowd out there from a human standpoint and it's true from a natural standpoint you know you have to respect the rules of the ocean and if you think you're too good or if you think you're going to circumvent them in some way you're going to get thrown down in some very serious ways. That's what I also liked about it. So much is there. Were a different set of rules that to me made a lot more sense than the rules on land. The rules on the ocean were applied to everybody again beyond status or anything else and they just seemed a lot more fair. You know these. These are the rules of the of the wild in many respects and you have to abide. It's interestingly it's sort of like the ultimate merit based ecosystem right and there's no cronyism on the waves. It's true I mean this cronyism be between the people the surfers out there. But there's that only lasts so long because then your friends are. GonNa go in and then you're out there alone and that to me is always the most wonderful part of being in the C is for one reason or the other when people get bored. The waves aren't good or it's too late or it's too early. No one else is out there. And you're alone in this wilderness. And and that's what attracts me to San Francisco so much people don't think of San Francisco's a great surfing beach because it isn't so don't come here anybody but it's it's it's still very very wild and you can still find a peak all your around who no one around and really have that connection. Yeah it teaches you how to be with yourself and it also teaches you a lot of people think about surfing like well you just out there riding waves all day long New York. They're waiting for waves all day long. And you you pick up a couple awesome you pick up one or two killer runs like dance good day and it's it's such a different mindset than the average mindset about how he pursue life almost wonder if it's instills in US sort of a different approach to the pursuit of what you want from a younger age. Think it I think it. Does you know there was one. I don't know who it was some famous surfer. That who said no one who surfs all the time that he knew of had psychologists or psychiatrists so maybe either because these. These people were to deranged or because they already had their stop together. Go out there and and surf everyday. I don't know the reason but I think that there is a certain truth to that and certainly the people that I know who are religiously connected to the ocean. They seem not to have So much feeling of a burden. On the stresses of life on land and. I certainly feel a release every single time. I'm out there. Which is why I go pretty crazy. After a few weeks I am not able to get in the water so you know I I think that there is. There's those two elements were were terrestrial people where we evolved on the land and yet when we go back to the ocean we go back to our very earliest roots of before we were people and as Corny as that may sound. I really think that there's a strong connection that you feel that your body feels and resonates with you when you're out in the yeah now completely agree. I actually am. I grew up just outside of New York City. The end of my block was a beach I will I was bay. Not Ocean we were. We were out there waterskiing and fishing instead of surfing but it was that to this day. It's the place where I go to touchstone in is the place where I go just. I don't have to be in the water. I can just be sitting on dock or walking along the beach. But there's there's a down regulation of my nervous system and my state of being. That happens just being in the context of water. That is so hard for me to find anywhere else. And that's that's all measurable it's not just psychosomatic. It's this is stuff that has been measured time and time again of how the body reacts to either being in the water or by the water which is why seventy what is it. Seventy eighty percent of the population lives within thirty minutes of a coast. You know I think that that's we do that for a reason because we have that that connection that now completely agree on the other end of that. I have a friend who is Big Wave Surfer She grew up sort of Irish surfing royalty with her her her dad and uncle or grandfather you know she's. East Ski Britain spent on the as a couple of years. Back would surf on this. Pinger or pink. Helmet is five feet tall surfing these waves. That are ten times the size of her. And it's amazing to hear her. Describe the experience of you the way she has as you can't be afraid you have to have the absolute respect for the power of what you're embracing but you have to move to a place beyond fear or else it's over and it it's really interesting training ground to take it to that space as well. I think it's extremely advanced to get your mind to to be thinking that way and that's something that resonates with almost all activities on the water whether you're sailing across the open sea or whether you're diving you know you can't free dive with with fear in your heart. You're you're going to go down ten feet and turn around so it almost gets to the point where you have to become delusional in in your own self worth in your confidence in order to do some of this stuff and that's to me. What separates the people who who last in in these sports and in who don't is there context of where they fit in and knowing their level of just the tipping point of their level where they can make it where they might not make it be able to understand and respect. That is really the key the key. Yeah and at the same time you were talking about an environment. Where every time you step into that next threshold the stakes go up. You know and Pretty Soon. The stakes are life and death. Seven is the ultimate training ground. Basically for sure and and to me. That's in many ways is what makes it so much more real there's there's so much padding around or at least we've created in our in our society. Now you know even playgrounds or completely padded they have sand or they have that weird colorful padding stuff that there's there's much less risk in doing. Thanks on land but I view that a lot of that goes out the window when you when you enter into the ocean because we just don't have those yet there's you know some flotation devices. Some of those surfers vast. But those are only for big way people. If you're the regular Joe when you're just going out to the sea to you in a board and even if your body surfing it's just you you and a pair of fins in you need to figure it out at least in in San Francisco a lot of other beaches. There's no lifeguards either. So you have to understand that and be cognizant of it the the entire time you're out there especially if the waves are big and in know your limits the whole time and know that balance and to me. That's what really centers things is. Then you get in your car and you've got airbags seatbelts and then you drive home and you get a flat tire you've got AAA. There's none of that out out in the in the ocean. There's there's no one to call except you know your your inner strength and and your own relationship with with yourself and your abilities. Yeah that's such an interesting frame because if you think about probably the most intrinsically rewarding moments of life are also the moments where we are most present in what we're doing and then you you think about what you just described. You know when when you step in the water you have to be there. There's it's not about like it because if you're not GONNA get tossed around. He may end up in a bad place. But as soon as you step out of that environment into the car with the protection to life with the protection we can basically pay to buy enough protection to not have to be present in almost every other part of our lives and you wonder on one hand. What are we actually buying ourselves into and out of? That's I completely agree with that. Like even having a phone conversation checking email checking twitter and checking instagram. We constantly padded if the phone conversations boring we have all these other means to entertain ourselves but but in the ocean again that that really goes out the window. And it's that it's that safety net you know coming loose from you that I find so so liberating and I think that's another reason why when you're surfing or when you're swimming you're or bodysurfing freedom of whatever you were in that exact moment you're not thinking when you're on a wave maybe when you're waiting for ways for half an hour you're thinking about work and all that. I've come up with my best ideas in those situations but when you're actually on a wave when you're within this activity you are locked in to that microseconds of a moment the entire way and I think that that absolute focus and present at least in in my life a lot of other people I know. is really lacking you know. We're not going out and hunting for food now. We have to be locked into that moment. When is the right time to or at least a lot of people aren't hunting their food But I think that this is something that that allowed. Humans to evolve is to have pure and utter focus on a moment and so much society now is built on not having that focus now so agree with that for Longtime Mountain. Biking was was my jam in my life and there was a time where actually I rode from grandson. Colorado to Moab Utah on the Coca Pelletrau. Which is this at least the way that I did. It was was really. There's only one direction that you go in the entire time. You're on the edge of falling off into the abyss and it was grueling and psychologically taxing physically taxing and more of the most incredible experiences in my life simply because the nature of the activity demanded that you ha- you cannot be anywhere but there and I feel like the more whether you get through the water where they go through nature. Whatever is the the thing that you choose? I mean I think we would all be better off had bringing more of that into our lives. You you referenced earlier free diving which I want to explore a little bit You grooten group in the OC End Up in the world of advertising. Copywriting start freelance writing on the side. You get into the of magazines because that's start to realize writing is your jam at and eventually find yourself writing full-time different magazines. Doing long form pieces short-form pieces and at some point you get a Gig to cover this thing called free diving I guess it was for outside. Magazine was the first time that's right. Tell me how that unfolds and then what what is the experience that comes out of that yes so a couple years before that happened. I had always following. You know the good rules laid out in the. Oh see I had followed this. Very linear path. You know you could high school go to college get a job get a house. Get Your Car. Get your dog all of that and you know. I was still writing on the side just because it was something I was really passionate about by day was writing copying ads and catalogs and all that stuff but at night is when I would do freelance magazine writing. I never thought I could make a living doing it. I mean it was sketchy back then. And it's even more sketchy now but finally. I just came to this moment where I had been working at this one place extremely easy job and good pay assistant and stuff but I remember it my four year review. My boss sat me down and he told me exactly what he told me. It is thirty year review and exactly same thing with the second year. And that's when I I quit at that moment and it wasn't really premeditated and so I kinda flounder. Who wasn't sure what I was going to do but I knew I didn't want to do that. So I really felt this fork in the road from that. Oc Life to this other very wild life where Nothing was planned. Everything had to be improvised. So after a couple of years writing magazine pieces things were starting to pick up a little bit not enough to make me comfortable at all. A friend mentioned. Hey have you ever heard of free diving in a note that this is really hard for people people to believe? But I hadn't even though I had spent my whole life by the ocean Surfing and swimming I didn't spend too much time below the surface but I had never heard of free diamond. Had never actually seen it so I said Oh. This sounds like an interesting subject. Right right up my alley. I wrote my editor at outside said it so happens to be in a couple of weeks. There's this international free diving competition in Greece. I thought there was no way. This guy's GonNa send me out Greece about a subject. I knew nothing about but I guess the the pitch was good enough for intriguing enough that a week later he said okay. You're on so Without knowing much about this the sport at all without knowing any of the players I went to Greece. And that's when a completely different fork in the road started in my life and another door opened a when I saw the first free diver take a single breath of air and upturn his body. No fins know anything and completely disappear into a crystal clear ocean and he was gone for five minutes. Came back up and he just dove three hundred feet and I had never seen anything like that and I didn't think it was possible at all and yet the next person showed up to the same thing even lower next person even lower than that so that first day out there was I. This is such a cliche phrase but it was it was life defining and life changing for me because I realized that there was a completely different side of nature and the ocean which I thought I knew and I you know I was standing right in the middle of it. And the beating. Heart of of this activity knew nothing about. In so many ways it looked like interstellar travel. You know if you were to flip the globe upside down. These people were floating off into this blue space. No gravity know anything else in coming back and you know touching down to the to the sailboat. That was out there so it absolutely fascinated me and I called my editor that night. I was like Oh my God. This thing is just absolutely nuts. He was very excited about it. And that's really where things started in that direction and we're talking about people basically just in the water. There's no tanks. There's no anything it's just them. It's just strength training. Their bodies training the breast and then literally just starting to to dive straight down. Which is counterintuitive on so many levels for so many people can like well. A but the body floats. So how do you go that far down and I guess what you learn over time is at the first? What thirty feet or or you the body does what? But then the quality of the body composition starts to change and the pressure. That's put on it so that you become a lead way too deeply and you start to go down. That's that's exactly right and that's another thing that completely blew. My mind is a lot of these. People were wearing wetsuits because three hundred feet down. It's really cold doesn't matter if you're in a tropical climate to usually really cold down there so with a wet suit you're extremely buoyant. Any surfer knows this. You put on your wetsuit. And it's it's really hard to dive down even a few feet and so to watch these people you know in the first like fifteen feet twenty feet. They're kicking their swimming. They're putting themselves down. And then all of a sudden they just stop and instead of getting pulled up to the surface they start drifting effortlessly down deeper and deeper into the water until they're completely gone and I knew nothing about this and I learned later that it's that shift of buoyancy that occurs. What what I ended up calling the doorway to the deep other free divers of use that term as well in which the body stops getting pulled to the surface and starts getting pulled to the bottom. And you will just keep falling at that same rate as low as you WanNa go so it just adds this absolutely surreal aspect to to watching the especially in clearwater where you can watch these people just fade away into nothing and then come back and reemerge and be completely fine a couple things happen as you descend. Also one you lose light you know so at the top you can see them so them fading away into nothingness. Is You in part there? There's distance between your but also the light Ba- essentially leaves the borders so they're effectively in the pitch black. Which is I mean. It's got to be incredibly disorienting. Also I've done a little bit of scuba diving and my passion. We went night diving wants. This is years back on the Barrier Reef Ron Boat. You jump off. And we'll have these little torches and you know we're in pairs as long as they had the torch on. I can Orient Myself. But for those who don't know about scuba diving. You wear weight vest and that helps you become neutrally buoyant. So you're not floating up or down and I remember losing my torch and the light went out and it was pitch black. We were three hours off. The mainland was a dark night and I started to freak out because I didn't know whether to swim. Left right up or down to get back up to the surface. And this is that but amplified exponentially. Yeah just imagine if you're holding your breath in that situation and the these are people. These are the pros. Do this anyone that goes down. Forty fifty feet and most water. You're going to be able to see just fine. But it's not only the quality of the light that shifts also. The color of the light fades out the deeper. You go right so so reds and oranges are gonNA fade out around. You know maybe fifty seventy feet until it becomes this completely monochromatic world. So you're you're in a world of of grays and and blacks that's it that's all that's down there. Because light the frequencies of light can penetrate that that deep something else that happens beyond that is the body transforms. You become a terrestrial animal and you turn into a marine animal. And this isn't just a again some psychological transformation this is something that occurs within each of our bodies everyone has these abilities called the master switch of life or the Mammalian dive reflexes and what happens is instinctively instinctually. I should say your your heart rate is going to lower. Your brain is going to enter a meditative state all the blood from your extremities your hands your arms your legs. We're going to start pushing into your core to keep your organs alive and Plasmas is going to enter into your lungs to perfect to prevent them from collapsing. And you. You really become this different diving. Animal the deeper you go the more pronounced. All of these are reflexes. Become so by the time you've reached three hundred and four hundred feet. You know you you bear. Maybe a passing resemblance to your form in the terrestrial world and anyone can can experience this. You can go to a bathroom right. Now on splash cold water on your face in your heart. Rate's GonNa Lower probably about twenty twenty five percent just by doing that. These are the same reflexes that dolphins have. Whales have other Marine Mammals. Have that humans have them to Were connected to the ocean in the same way of these. These other animals just so few of us Ever use them or feel them nowadays so it almost it the environment forces your body into this transformed in almost meditative state and at neo part of it is also as you go down one atmosphere. Which is what about thirty thirty three feet when you start to go more and more with each new atmosphere going down the pressure on your body increases more and more and more so you're literally has to transform or else it will employ it into itself so you know for for years and years. Scientists thought the deepest human could go down. Would be one hundred feet is otherwise you're gonNA COLLAPSE. Your lungs are going to collapse. You're you're going to die. But they didn't know about the Maillane dive reflexes. So Greek divers have been diving to depths below that for for thousands of years. You know there's archaeological evidence of free diving. The goes back ten thousand years so so this is something that is innately part of who we are where we came from. So it's it's nothing that that is artificial of forced if you let yourself become re immersed in the water you're going to wake up all of these dormant reflexes that everybody has. That was something that I found most fascinating about free diving. The competitive side was interesting to see the limits of the body. But a lot of people didn't make their dives and that was awful. They did come out with bloody faces and it's pretty pretty horrific but luckily I discovered at that event this completely other side of free diving. That was much more nurturing. Almost like a meditation or yoga practice underwater. And that's the side that really went deep into and pursued. It sounds like there's almost a spiritual side to it and in fact I mean from a state of mind when you start to get down that de we talked about the physiological changes but what about the psychological changes the sort of big almost spiritual experiences. It's a force meditation and this is what any free diver will tell you. There's no way you can go out there. Worried and stressed out and breathe fast and then try to push yourself down there. You have to completely let go which means you need to let go of. Your thoughts need to relax your body. You need to submit to this. Larger thing that you're entering into so that was another aspect that really appealed to me is that you had to really leave everything on on land including your thoughts about land. Near stresses think about worker fly to whatever you have to leave that behind and just soak into that that moment that you're in the water you're surrounded by oceanic animals and you just let yourself be be free and let your body do what it's naturally designed to do. Which has dived deep? The As I guess has become a your mode of at a certain point. You can't just observe and right you have to become a part it's very sort of Michael Palin esque and the experience journalism approach. No you did earlier with like doing a DP Saen bio Benzes biodiesel and how people were using discarded know like French fry oil to transfer cars in the end up driving a bio Ben's so when you're out here you're in Greece and then you start going deeper into the story and you're seeing and and and talking about learning all these things something something flips knew that says okay so I can't I can't just be an observer like I need to write about this from the inside out also. I just think some of that has to do with the the subject matter you know. I wrote a lot of pieces about architects or Hollywood stars or political figures. But none of what they were saying about their world really attracted me to want to know more about it. I know that seems really crass. And I'm not ripping on anyone's vocation but there there wasn't too much That was mysterious enough to to really to invite me to spend more time in in a lot of those worlds but luckily luckily enough you know it was able to pitch enough stories about ideas that I was naturally interested in like the Bio ben's piece. I had a fulltime job at that time and that was so boring. And so writing these magazine pieces. I would just pick things that I was interested in and it turned out that that yeah it was like this makes total sense. Why not run an old Mercedes off of us with vegetable oil and and so once I saw how to do that. I said Oh. I'm going to buy one of these cars and do that. I still have the car. It's a out front of my house right now. So free diving was the same thing. Even though I had never heard about free diving didn't have any experience in its. It was something that immediately mystified me in attracted me to it and you know. It's a little tricky win. Your science journalists have to be an objective observer into these worlds otherwise people think you slamming it in some way but there's only so much of this the stuff that really interests you that that you can hold back from no intention in deep free diving zero. I no intention of having myself as part of that book or as part of that story but on my third expedition seeing these free divers at this time I was out in reunion island off the coast of Madagascar like very distant weird location watching these divers go down and their job was to sneak up behind sharks and to tag their back fins with these little trackers Because sharks kept attacking people and eating people off the coast and Just watching this activity and the relationship with these animals because something else really interesting happens when free diving is you're not an observer into the oceanic environment you're apart of it. An animal's immediately recognized that their prey doesn't swim down to them and look in the eyes and hang out. The prey is up at the surface. Not Looking at them so to see that dynamic. I thought wow this is. This is something I wanted to learn more about. I also thought it could allow me better access to be able to ride about these worlds and what it was like to go down. Fifty seventy five hundred feet on a single breath and focusing on that moment in time. Yeah I mean was to the extent that you had an expectation of what you thought it was going to be. How did the actual experienced and I guess? I'm most curious about the first time had it compare to your expectations are for some was awful and it continued to be awful for months and months and months. You know you have this dream vision of. I'm just GonNa practiced a little bit. Then I'm GONNA be swimming around with whales dolphins and sharks and everything's going to be cool and beautiful and I found this new hobby in life and then you start to practice doing this. And it was violent and suffocating totally miserable. I picked this school. I was in Florida on some other research so I picked the school in Tampa and instead of free diving in the ocean. They had you dive in the this former quarry this this mine that had just filled up with water and so within ten feet you can see the surface so they were trying to train us to go down fifty feet along this rope and so I had my breathing you know. Have my lungs? Pretty well acclimated to doing this. Really focused on that. I had not focused on the psychological part of what it would feel like to push yourself down. Twenty thirty feet turn around to look up to see the surface. Nc nothing so that was something that took a long time to get my head around. Also it didn't help that at this free diving competition. I saw a lot of reckless people doing reckless things and had a lot of bloody faces and passed out. You know passed out people in my mind. I guess you could say I was going to mention. There is a lot of these people in their past out. There is open if you ever look into. Someone's eyes when they passed out you're looking into the the true abyss and so that's something that still gives me the chills so. I had all these psychological hangups about it. Not physical but psychological. What turns out I mean. I'm curious when you go from something like that. Yeah I have a friend who has done a whole bunch of plant as medicine and and probably under journeys and the first third were described as the most horrendous experience of their life and then something happened. That made them say. I can't do this. It is so profound and transformative. There was something happened. I'm always curious when you start something like that. And it is kind of more on the horrific side in the brutal side and then it becomes something that becomes much more on the almost spiritual and opening inexpensive side. Is that gradual evolution for your. Was Your Moment. It was being around the right community number one to seeing these people do these dives responsibly over and over and over and to see them. Interact with animals that I care passionately for sharks dolphins or whales and just to see what that world would allow you access to if you got over that Hump over that hurdle and so. It was months of training again. I want to reiterate that the physical side was actually pretty easy. There's a pool near my house. I would ride my bike to and just swim underwater laps Willie condition my body had around fifteen feet just went back and forth so that part of it came came commonly and easily. The the mental part took a while. But I finally got there and I think at the time. I'm trying to think if there was one pinnacle moment was probably at when we were in Sri Lanka and Trying to dive with sperm whales. The the largest predators on on earth who also share this amazing sophisticated form of communication and seeing the other divers having these experiences and seeing the whales. React to these divers right. So the the whales perception of humans is on boats hunting them or polluting their their homes but to see whales have a different perception of humans and to WanNa incorporate that perception and be part of it was was really moving thing and so that's when a lot of those hang ups you know let I let go of them and was able to just allow myself to to become immersed in that environment and with everything that comes with it including being possibly eaten by a sixty foot long sperm oil with eight inch long teeth and I know that I'm not trying to to make it sound callous in any way. But there's a there's a complete knowing when you're there with his animal that can destroy you at any second by myriad means and decides not to and it decides turn around and Click at you and be curious about you want to interact with you. So that's when a lot of my fears both about free diving and about everything else. That encompasses really went away. That I can't even imagine that moment. I mean I've I've seen video these animals. You actually Did A tedtalk Would showed some stunning footage of this end. It's just breathtaking cameron. Imagine being in the water literally feet away from these. It's it's interesting because like as a journalist I've been lucky enough to go to some pretty weird places right about some interesting subjects and interesting people but Wales and free diving. This was years ago that I had this experience. I think about it all the time and I was literally just on the phone this morning with a friend were waiting for travel to open up again. Because we're going to go die with Wales without any cameras or notepads this time just just to do it and this is a reaction that every single person. I know that has that has gone diving with Wales. Had that face to face like they are completely changed after that. So it's something that that I will keep with me and free diving more excited about doing it now than I've ever been so it's nice to find something that was a very interesting subject from my perspective to write about but also could be incorporated into my life that would continue to nurture me after the book was out after the story. Stop and part of that exploration. Two part of the training that goes into free diving is it's physical but it's also it's it's breath oriented there there you learn to train to breathe certain ways to regulate the the balance of gases basically your body before you go down which which laid the groundwork for most recent book rest to a certain extent. I mean I know. Part of it was that and then part of it. Was this experience that you had through the art of living. That's exactly right You know when I mentioned that fork in the road in my life in Greece That forecast many many tongs STU. It arcus their teams. I guess that's the proper proper word for forget but I was talking to free divers who were not interested in competition and they were just interested in free diving. Of course naturally asked us. It will be freed. I had had you do this. How do you hold your breath? They said the only way to hold. Your breath is to learn how to breathe to learn how to breathe properly. Said the real cool thing about this is you. Don't only have to use this in the water. You can use this in everything in life and they told me crazy stories about people who were heating their bodies up and snow melting circles around their bodies at night breed just breathing for eight hours. People put diseases in remission people who are losing weight just by shifting their breathing so I remember that conversation and I put it in the back file of big file cabinet bunch of weird ideas and I kept going back to it because I kept seeing articles and kept talking to people who kept adding other little tidbits to that story. I thought You know of written a book about holding your breath. It'd be interesting to see what breathing could do both scientifically and the history of this medical history of and all that for for the rest of us for for landlubbers spark that idea. And what was non non-fiction? You submit a proposal then you get an amount of money to go out and ride the right the book so I wrote this proposal pretty quickly. I thought I have figured out. You know wrote it in about a month said nailed all the proper characters and all. That wasn't tell about six months. Eight months in to actually writing the book that I realized every direction I thought I should go into was completely wrong so I had to ditch the entire proposal and start over again and breathing ended up being barn on the weirdest and most fascinating subject. I've I've ever gone into and I'm still in the midst of it right now. Even after finishing the book it is. It's really incredible. I have a background in the world of Yoga and but my one really the entry for to Yoga was actually breathing. It was on and I was. I got really curious. How when you look it and it's not just yoga if you actually go back and you look get every single spiritual or healing tradition in every single culture over generations thousands of thousands of years the all reference breathing as sort of like the fundamental modality to regulate or mediate everything. Know like your psychology your physiology your wellbeing and yet when you bring that up as something valid to explore especially in Sorta like Western culture people kinda tip their heads side residents like what. And that's exactly what I was doing when I first heard these stories right I but it was interesting enough and it was valid enough just barely to make me. WanNa pursue further research into it and once I started really getting my feet wet and talking to real scientists at top university Stanford Harvard. All these people had been saying this stuff for for decades and no one was really listening so I started a real deep dive in into history. And just echoing. What what you just said. Breathing was an essential part of health throughout for the past few thousand years in medicine. If he did it poorly you were going to get sick if he did it properly. You're gonNA live long and have a healthy life. So even the first yoga that dates back five thousand years was a technology of sitting and breathing had nothing to do with movements are poses. It was sitting and breathing and you look at the Chinese Dow. They have seven books dedicated entirely to breeding. What happens when you do it? Improperly what happens when you do it properly so I think that western science is now just really starting to get caught up with us especially with all this Kobe stuff but the what I found so so frustrating but also so fascinating is that this research has been there the whole time and no one's really looked at it from a scientific perspective on how well it looks and taken all these disparate fields together and put them in into into one place in. I think that some of that is because breathing's a tricky thing in medicine it's There was one researcher. Said it's in this no man's land between physiology and biology so nobody's really paying attention to a pulmonologist. Pay attention to diseases of the lungs. They're not looking into the benefits of healthy breathing. Even though the benefits of healthy breathing from what I've found or more important or as important as what you eat or how much you exercise. It all comes down to breathing. That's the first thing you have to start with. I mean I think there is such a fascinating parallel between that world and psychology and that for generations psychology was focused on bringing sick people back to baseline and then the positive psychology movement comes along and says okay so baseline is actually not enough. You know like what if we could bring people from baseline from instead of not sick to for you're actually flourishing in the world. You know and I feel breathing has released similar Carl. Ary with but that's what yoga was to. It was not intended to be used for sick people. It was intended to be used for healthy people to bring them up on the next level in all of eastern medicine. If you look at it it's all based on prevention. You go to your doctor when you feel good so you can keep feeling good and all of Western medicine is based on therapy. You go when you're feeling sick. You know which is why in my opinion. I don't think a lot of eastern medicines are too effective. In IN FIXING BIG BLOWN-UP CHRONIC DISEASES. That have been going on for years and years and years. In someone's body you break your leg. You don't really want acupuncture you want to go to the ER and have that dealt with properly. And I think it's it's those blind spots on both sides of of medicine that really need to be bridged to use this eastern medicine as a way to not get sick in US Western medicine for when you're really sick and and but but again the whole point is to not lose the balance to begin with sue constantly. Staying in Homeo- stasis one of the things that you discover early on is where most people just are relatively agnostic as to what pathway air takes into your lungs out of your lungs. You discover that whether you're breathing through your mouth or whether you breathing your nose actually has found different. And you don't WanNa just research this again. We go experiential here as this whole thing. Became you end up hooking up with another guy and doing this experiment at Stanford Where you spend half the time breathing through three knows only in half the time breathing through your mouth only share more about this. Because it's Kinda crazy. Yeah I realize I'm sound like a broken record here. But but the caveat again is when I started this project this book I told my publish. I'm not going to be a part of this. I was a part of the last book. Been a part of too many articles. I really want to be on the outside. I WANNA be the objective observer. That's where I need to be. But then we realized once again that so many of these these grey areas and blind spots needed to be filled and I was willing to put myself into those areas in detests. What was happening in my body in in labs through to breathing. In this isn't like some at least the Stamford experiment. Wasn't their Human Guinea pig. Oh let's see what happens. You know some people said. Oh it's like super size me. It's it in some respects. It is but in super size me you know. He's eating at the same restaurant three times a day. A fifty percent of the population. That's one estimate. says that we are chronic mouth breather so so half of US breathing from the mouth so so the experiment was set up to see what was happening to a large percentage of the population every day. What was happening to their minds bodies and I looked for some research on this. If anyone had done this and they're just there wasn't a lot so I had been in conversations with the chief of Rhino Research at Stanford and about by our third interview starting to get pretty chummy with the is nameless Giac guard nyack great dude and I I patched idea. I've said well you know we can sit here over lunch and talk about the stuff hypothetically or or we can test it. What do you think? And he said yes so me and one other one other guy. Anders Olsen who is a world renowned breeding coach and therapist? So I thought Oh this is going to be interesting. Well if we took one of the best breeders in the world and made him like fifty percent of the population what would happen to his body so over ten days they plugged our noses with us. Silicon with tape over that so that we were forced to breathe only to our mouths were forced to breathe the way we would likely be breathing in the future. The way large swath of the population is already breathing. So within a single night My snoring increased by thirteen hundred percent We felt awful. We fell constantly thirsty. We felt fatigued. There were psychological markers but what I found what was more interesting was what was actually the data. What was happening to our bodies so we took pulmonary function tests before blood were cats. I mean anything you can imagine seventy different markers and by the end of those ten days. I was snoring and hadn't been snoring before the other subject snoring through half the night we had sleep apnea. We felt absolutely awful. Our bodies were cooling. We were losing a to which is essential molecule in the body It was it was horrendous. It was as awful as probably sounds but The good part about this as we were then able to switch our modes after ten days so they move those those plugs out and we put tape over our lips and we just breathed from our noses and the first night all the snoring disappeared sleep apnea disappeared. Every heart rate variability went through the roof. We're able to exercise much more efficiently We had more more power longer endurance. Easier recovery. I mean I could go on and on. I won't give you the whole the whole layout but it just echoed. What what the Chinese had been saying for thousands of years in one one quote that I thought was great was on this is from the Dow Says the breath inhaled through the mouth is called NICI or adverse breath which is extremely harmful? Be careful not to have breath inhaled from the mouth. That was twelve hundred years ago so everything that that we found added credence to that. It seems so obvious but you look at any other animal fifty four hundred different mammals. They're not brought mouth breathing unless they're throwing off heat their thermal regulating their breathing through their noses. All the time and humans should be doing this as well. It changes your your mental state and Your physiology it also really interesting numbers around performance you know in terms of just the difference between breathing through your nose versus your mouth. Yeah and and trainers had been looking at this in researching this for years about twenty years ago. Dr John Do Yard had bicyclists get on a stationary bike and then train by just breathing through the mouth and just breathing through their nose in. He found that someone who had been breathing. Forty Seven Times. A minute through the mouth was breeding fourteen times through the nose but the same amount of oxygen and was able to push so much harder with less effort so the competitive advantage is huge. You know double. Digit percentage advantage to doing this. And it's something that is just mostly loss on us because a large percentage of the population. I would beg to say half of it or more has problems breathing through their nose. We've we've lost this ability on some of its due to evolution in some of its due to the environment but I think one of the most important health hacks that everyone should do. All the time is breathe through your nose. Science certainly backs that up and it sounds like it's all there's a use it or lose it affect to that too so it's you may have trouble starting to get back into it because especially if you're one of that fifty percents that you know brees predominantly through your mouth because it kind of gets plugged up when you don't use it. It's you know. It's like almost like a muscle atrophying. It's at the tissue inflaming. It makes it harder do but then as you slowly reintroduce it it begins to open up and you may find yourself able to do it. In a way that you thought was wouldn't be possible with exactly right at a doctor. Another doctor at Stanford had looked at the noses of patients who had learned jammies who had a hole drilled in their throat so they could breathe out that that channel and she found that their noses within two months to two years had completely plugged up one hundred percent because they weren't used and she fixed her herself her own chronic mouth breathing by training herself to breathe through her nose all the time. And the more you do it the more you're going to be able to do it because you are changing your physiology. You're changing your your anatomy year strengthening the soft tissues on the back of the mouth and widening your airways by just breathing through your nose because of the pressure you know in in a lot of people are are hesitant to do this because they say oh. I. Don't get enough oxygen breathing through my nose while you're going to get about twenty percent more oxygen breathing through knows than through your mouth. So which is what makes it especially effective for exercising yet. Something I think it just pattern to experience breath feeling a certain way and it takes a little while sort of for brains to be like. Oh this is as it's going to be okay as a little uncomfortable and beginning much me. Okay but your body wants to. It really wants you to break through that. That's the thing this is it. Shouldn't it might feel a little force at the beginning but it will be rewarding you ten times over if you start breathing through the nose for one of the other things that you explored was the effect of different breathing patterns and you mentioned earlier even before you got into this you were having all these conversations with the three diving crew about these mythical and mystical stories about people throwing heat off their body in the cold and healing everything. And how could that even be possible? And it's funny you you you reference Herbert Benson. Who wrote a book? It's gotTa be thirty five forty years ago now about the relaxation response. I reference these monks. Who Part of their their right of passage was to sit outside. You know in Subzero temperatures covered in wet shawls and they would do a type of breathing and meditation where there were not just not die but they would literally dry shawls you would see them steaming off them and I remember reading that years ago and being has needed and researching and discovering this thing called to mow which now a lot of us know as sort of you know that somebody who's really popularized that Wim Hof has served taken that and and build a a more modern artifice around a disturbed technique which has been around for. You know it's probably thousands of years share a little bit about about that and how it can actually Change what your body's capable of doing. Yeah and this was another one of those subjects one of those areas where we've had the science. The stuff has been backed up for such a long time but no one's really been listening so one of the researchers that I got really fascinated with was Carl staue who was a choral teacher in New Jersey and found that by training his students how to exhale mourn. Xl properly they were able to really gain residents and more volume with their voices and he ended up getting called up by the met opera to to train their singers and then the VA hospitals asked him to come in and train emphysema six. Who had this surrender disease emphysema? Who weren't being cared for at all? They were plugged into an oxygen tank and and basically left to die. This had gone on for fifty years but just through breathing by teaching these people how to breathe properly. He rehabilitated. People more than any researcher thought was was possible and their x rays mounds and mounds of x rays to prove this but still the second style left the hospital system after ten years of working within it. All of that research went away and his book is now like three hundred dollars on Amazon. And it's really hard to find because nobody read it at the time was released in nineteen seventy so these these patterns kept repeating and especially with with to Moan so. This is a meditation a technology. That's been around for a thousand years about one hundred years ago. Alexandra David Neil. A French opera singer traveled to the Himalayas and learned it in wrote about it. I think our book came out in Nineteen Twenty seven so it got a little bump of interest then and then the next big bump happened with with Benson who had heard these stories. Probably Read David neals book and actually went out to test it and prove that these monks were able to breathe in ways to stimulate an incredible amount of heat within their bodies and more importantly to sustain that heat for hours at a time they were able to sit in snow for hours and not get hypothermia or frostbite which our understanding of medical science. How how is that possible? So then when Wim Hof Kmart he's the. The torch was passed to Wim Hof. Who discovered this? You know round year two thousand and now is built quite an empire around breathing and and to Mo- in having this ability. What's been so great about seeing what whims been doing. Is He's having the stuff. Scientifically tested with controlled controlled. Studies of these of various. People have been testing this over and over and finding that this incredible transformation takes place in the body by just breathing to the point where many people with autoimmune diseases. Psoriasis ECZEMA even type. One diabetes can either blunt or outright according to them. Sure these problems by shifting how they're breathing which you know of course sounds like complete pseudoscience but then you look at the data and then you look at the CRP profiles of these people and you find what they're doing is absolutely legit and all of this stuff is real so I see that this is really the moment for for to mow. Hundreds of thousands of people are doing it. Now we're we now have ways of measuring that to prove how powerful it really is. Yeah and what I love about all of this. I mean there's so many other things that you explore in the book but what I love about. The the bigger conversation around breathing is that it's accessible to anyone. It's free you can do it for life and it puts it gives you a sense of agency you know it makes you were so used to going to somebody else to fix us but when you start to explore breathing as a modality for everything from your physiological changes to psychological changes to simply calming down. I mean Just the most fundamental reaction you know the the connection between your inhales exhales in triggering you're sympathetic vs para sympathetic nervous system and whether that puts you into fight flight or freeze versus really chill common meditative. You know it's is such a powerful tool when you start learning. Well it's not just about getting air into my lungs. It's not just about transferring. You know oxygen into my red blood cells because my so my body function it is about that but this process which we all just assumed was part of the autonomic nervous system it just it just happens. We actually have the ability to intervene to make an intentional to change the way we do it and in doing so create really profound changes in nearly every part of our being. It's exactly right. It's an autonomic function that only of Onomic. It's it's conscious and when we take control of it we can actually control how organs are functioning and their relationship with one another and or hormone levels and our circulation and on and on and on by simply controlling our breathing. It is an absolute anchor to to our health and to our well-being furred you know from this point until until we age. So they found in in nineteen eighty. They found that single. Most important marker of longevity wasn't genetics wasn't diet was an exercise it was lung capacity so the more lung capacity the healthier. Your lungs are the longer you're gonNA live. According to the data so this is something the ancients have known for thousands and thousands of years know one of the reasons that there are so many yoga poses. Now you stretching breathing into your right side stretching breathing into your left side. Guess what happens when you do that. You are increasing your lung capacity and your buttressing your respiratory health every time you do these poses and you breathe in these ways. So it you know I think that some of the apprehension in breathing where people kind of Pooh Pooh it is the medicine itself which is air. Not a lot of people think that we can change the sculpture of our jaws or faces or are ribs just air or that we can flood our bodies with different hormones or turn on circulation or turn it off but for the people who have studied this. Who HAVE X-RAYS and data people who have experienced this that that air thirty pounds of it that enters and exits are lungs? Every day is as important as food. Were eating how much we're moving around. And that's something I I really absolutely believe in especially after these years and years in this field desk so powerful something that I was so excited to to dive into your exploration of it because it gave me a whole bunch of new places to sort of to go narrow and deep which is I think it'll be a focus of mine for a for a while now says feels like a good place for us to come full circle as well so hanging out here in this cross country container of the good life project. If I offer up the phrase to live a good life comes up to be present I think again I realized how cliche that is an end to follow your own path. There's another cliche for you. Might as well use used to at the same time but something I've learned in my life is is to. You'd know naturally to follow your instinct where you need to go and how you need to do it and to trust in that. I think is a vital to to be happy in in the day to day. Thank you thank you so much for listening and thanks also to our fantastic sponsors. Who helped make this show possible? You can check them out in the links we have included in today's show notes. And while you're at it if you've ever asked yourself what should I do with my life? We have created a really cool online assessment. That will help you discover the source code for the work that you're here to do. You can find it at sparky type DOT com. That's S. P. A. R. K. E. T. Y. P. E. DOT COM or. Just click the link in the show notes. And of course if you haven't already done so be sure to click on the subscribe button in your listening so you never miss an episode and then share. Share the love. If there's something that you've heard in in this episode that you would love to turn into a conversation share it with people and have that conversation because when ideas become conversations that lead to action. That's when real change takes hold Cenex time

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S5E11: Guest: Mats - Boyfriend Wants to Watch Me With Other People

Don't Blame Me!

1:10:17 hr | 1 year ago

S5E11: Guest: Mats - Boyfriend Wants to Watch Me With Other People

"Hello everybody and welcome. Come back to the annual annuals. The right word for our annual Valentine's Day episode with my boyfriend. Marcus MOTT's hello. Are you so excited to be here. Stoked awesome great cool. It's the third one one. Yeah yeah figure really excited for the second one. Yeah Yeah what you came in like guns blurred for the second one. Yeah I mean I felt like the first one of the mouth breathing and a mouth breathing knows whistling and so then. What's what's your feeling this time? How are you going into this I just WanNa give good advice. Okay well you also want to be entertaining. We'll yeah but good advice. Prices inherently entertaining. Not No it's not. Hopefully advice is inherently entertaining. So I'll just give us out get bad advice drugs. Yeah well just just checked doing health and medical professionals Russia. I was just GONNA say. Make sure you're doing what you think you're doing guys if your new haired this isn't advice podcast. If you WANNA call in for an upcoming episode come on baby take it away. And it isn't all the upsets. So what's the phone number on the even the area code Through and zero. They we go because Los Angeles three one zero area coats is their three zero six nine four zero nine seven. Six is our phone number if you WANNA give us a call And if you're an internationalist or you can send there's an audio message at Megan podcasts. At CHIEL DOT com. So are you so excited because they know your again a huge fan of the show. You've such nice ankles ankles have such fat ones okay. Let's go again. I'm just calling. Ah I I wanted to say that I love your podcast. Also I wanted. I thought it was kind of funny that I also Eleo. My birthday is August and my boyfriend has also a Catholic Horn. We have also been together for over four years urge over coming up to four years but my question is we do not live together. We've been trying to save up to buy a house for for a while now And for whatever reason just feel good so unattainable like something always comes up or we'll be really. I'm good at finding money saving money and then something else comes up and I just I just know I feel very discouraged and I know that he does too and I feel like against you're putting a lot of distance on our relationship We don't live very far from each other but we both work full time. It's just I want to be together. We want to start our lives together. He's my best friend. I love him more than anybody in the world and I just we just want to start our lives together but for some reason it feel really hard so I wanted to see if you have any advice on saving money and and maybe you're trying to get the money for a house I did move out before with previous boyfriend and it didn't work out so I'm he's still living at home and my boyfriend's still living at home and Yeah I just wanted to see what advice he might have on saving money and moving out. Thank you love your podcast by your leg. Set the questions for May Yeah I purposely. The last time we talked about this about like picking questions you were like. They wanted to have any conventions for Ned and stuff off that I was like. Oh for Ned. We like. We got some finance question like someone asked to finance question. Your hope we get a finance. I mean I think I also unlike check my privilege here in the sense that I didn't go to college so I don't have any student loans. I don't have any debt like that and because I started making money. I don't want this to be a humble brag. I just wanted to be like I can't speak from like pinching pennies experience but I didn't grow up with a ton of money but I became financially independent when I was like eighteen. Nineteen and the thing I think about saving and we've talked so at this on our faith our private facebook group got a question talking about saving money and I was like the whole thing was saving money as you should feel like. You're saving money it. There is no cheat of being able to do everything everything that you WanNa do while still saving money and I think that and I even think about it now because I definitely to be super transparent made way more money than I do like now like when I was uploading and like the Golden Age of Youtube. And you're getting millions of us on a video and all of that sort of stuff It's cutting back on like luxuries and things that you don't need an I personally think that you pick one. It's not like okay. I'm going to do all the things that I don't get rid of two. I think that it should be okay. If you like. Do you WANNA get lash extensions. Do you want to get your nails done or do you WanNa go get massages is like pick your vice. And the other thing I would say like the small things shop seasonally for Grocery shopping And making sure that you're not spending useless money on I don't know like subscription APPs like all of that sort of stuff and just cutting out those things it should kind of suck should kind of feel like I really want to do that and I think foam it was a really good motivator and not going out with your friends all of the time and spending money and doing that kind of stuff. I think those are those things I can speak on for. Like what I we're saving for a house and that's also Los Angeles so I also wonder where you live because that will play a huge factor but those are the things that I would like right off the bat say is it should feel like you're saving money like and it should feel like kind of sucky and good at the same time. What about you Mr Finance Bro? Knowing where you live would be A little bit helpful because it definitely changes the calculus and you know How you get to where you WANNA go It it also my me and that if home ownership is like the real goal like that is the thing then unfortunately like you. I have to think like that. You might have to think about relocating like if you're in L. A.. It's so much harder than it is in place like Nashville lawyer. Portland's pretty hard. Yeah I mean it. It's just more difficult by without knowing that I'll try and be like as broad as possible. One thing that a lot of people don't realize that it's really easy to do if you go into your online a credit card portal or your online bank account. you can actually export Your transaction history and do an excel sheet. I know most people are like fuck. You know if you really WanNa like manage this this you can go. You can download it And you can you google like a couple of easy formulas that help you like separate things by date or by like you know if you sign things like categories like groceries you know Entertainment or like nights our whatever you can kinda sore by month like how much you're spending on each one and it can be. It can be a little jarring. I think like a lot of people. Don't the realize like how much they're spending on certain categories or things each month and once you kind of have all that stuff delineated knitted until like a pretty easy to navigate like summary. Then you can start thinking about like what you do day-to-day in like like where you can make like fairly easy cuts. So if I think back for myself when I was making a lot less money You know in looking back on houses spending it even like two years ago I was I was still going out like a fair amount of still spending alive on like bar tabs. You know spending a lot on like nights out with my friends and while I still do those things. It's it's much more of like a special occasion you know maybe like once a month once every two weeks and even then I'm very conscious about How much I'm spending like an In an actual like night out like in a single session The other thing that you can do is If you depending on who you bank with you can actually probably set up a consultation with. It's like a private wealth manager for free. I would say after that. You know. They'll charge fees on like transactions they do on your behalf and things like that but that's really valuable The person that I use I've used since I was in middle school and it's sort of like it. Even though I only talk to her maybe like four times a year. It's pretty invaluable. Like just speaking with Thir like an hour each time you know telling her about like what I'm thinking big things. I want to spend money on the future like you know. If I'm starting to make more money issue make recommendations on like how Shout to Donna by the way I think she listens to this. Actually Donna. The lasting Mary particular to this caller is like if you're paying rent right now. They're not at home they they're living at home. I think you need to move in together like as on a rental and like well. That's not that's going to save US money. Yeah I think they should be thinking that like thinking in the mindset that they have rent and put that money that really good point and I think you need to share your expenses with each other her and then again from the facebook group is your fun money. That's cash you take that you have that cash in once that once. That cash is gone for the month. Then you have no more money you can start a finance podcast now. I'm not not even close. We'll have some of those people. Listen to a lot of those two. Hello I'm friends and I'm in college now. So in kind of a little I I I I I for a while like my rebound out essentially from my relationship would for like a super now seaway whatever it was really bad at work as we as we and it was always like. It's like you all And this was probably back and year on in January. We're looking out for a while and then laughs spray. It kinda got more more serious and we were like the class together. Dr And we worked at the same place. We were like trade dollar shifts rounds. Were always working together. We just like have time together because it not like. I ended up catching stealing a really really nice guy. Whatever and I have I go over there and relationship Kinda like schools have joined her ham? And you all you WanNa do you like what are you thinking. I was Kinda like I know. Just where my heart like this relationship. I don't think I'm ready. I just want you to know. This is where my house I would like to do. I just like I I want to let him now and he all feeling whatever but you'll just out of places library graduate. It's easier like me. He wasn't sure if you I want to get into a relationship and I respect that So we just Kinda got young great need because obviously feeling he's kind of like getting myself Albert anyways and then we like Hannukah caulking summer summer and I realized that like Oh my God I realized I like this whole friends benefits thing. It's really hurting me. So I just Kinda told him I was like I was just talking for a little bit like in like kind of heel and he was like he's a guy you get that that's fine anyway. which is like in the summer? He ended up sending the Super Long Really Nice. How the message it was and we started talking again and and now like I really like you and I really want to date you display like I feel like I damn? I don't know like he's not played. He knows how I feel. Yeah I don't know like try. Just take what he called before and I was like Oh. I don't think I'm ready to do you. Just like respect that and move on or like kind of tell him again like hey listen like I thank you and I want to see something different city. I'm wondering if the same city is now coming up to visit where I go to school soon to someone to see him. I don't so now we all as though I appreciate it. Oh my God. You are an over over communicating not necessarily cogen communicator. But you do communicate a lot of Kudos to. I'm sorry thighs let she needs to be told. Yeah Sickness Fair. That's not necessarily your strong suit. I mean it depends on the situation. Russian here's the thing I think every you've done everything up to this point pretty much absolutely right except still fucking. Yeah that I may not well. It sounded like that stopped for awhile. which was the right call and then like you He this is such a bad word for this but like relapsed. Not The right word I guess like what I would say is. It's a really do anything if you don't know if you're going to be living in the same city in a few months but it also sounds like she wants permission to move. Yeah well in that case like if I if I guess like to use like myself example if I had like. It's not exactly the same but if I had like emotionally chosen where I was going to go live based on like where all my friends were going to go live I have no idea like how that would have turned out. I would've gone in lived in New York and I obviously Salihi probably would've never met Meghan which you know. I wouldn't have been good now. I mean aside from that like a no idea have like you know like would that have been worse from my career. A like all of these things would have been. Yeah or exactly So I don't think like someone that you have feelings for in college should be the thing that's like dictating where you move especially if it's like if you guys are going to college together in like I don't know Miami or something like that. And he's moving to you grin Cleveland Cincinnati Akron. Wherever you move in like six months later blows like that is not good for you So I would you know let things ride and like holders happy memory and works out. We'll let things right implies that like continue tonight. That's not what I'm saying. Sorry it's like I would like cut your losses. Yeah he's okay. Yeah here's what I would say. Now that your advice was in great. I agree with what you said but I think if he really really really really liked you wanted to date you he would. It doesn't seem like he's that far away no and also so him. So you're the first time when you so you didn't go into telling him that you would feelings for him with being like I don't WanNa be in a relationship or anything like that you so you just told them that you had feelings for him. which again I think? That's that's the right call as always say like just say the feelings because you feel them not because you need something in response or you you only feel a certain way if they feel a certain way so you you did everything right there and then but his response of being like why like too but like do you want a date that to me is I hate to say but it's not. It doesn't like you that much because I think then it would be like. I really like you really want to date you. But I'm I'm obviously all four like finding out what the other person wants to do consent to relationships and all that but you saying like oh no not really I think he. I think that was a really nice move for him to kind of give you some sort of power and feeling like that's not what you wanted to do. But I think if that's truly what you not didn't want to do you would have started the conversation with. I don't want a relationship or anything like that and then you would have said how you felt because I think that for him like he obviously cares about you. I don't think either view like each other enough and I think he the Friends of benefits thing we talk about. It's tricky because it's you already like that person as a friend like you really like who they are and then you start sleeping with them and it becomes like a relationship because it's someone who you're friends with who you're fucking and I seen all the time say worked to tossed together like that's it becomes more than like that's like a friends with benefits but more like a rom com sort of thing like you're sleeping with one of your best best best best friends and it doesn't sound like either of you. Were really dating other people and that fills the spot. We don't know that dating other beautiful. Yeah no valid but I think it kind of fills that spot for you and I think if things had continued on if he really. I think if you really had feelings for you the same way that you have feelings for him. I think it wouldn't need to. I don't think you would need to bring it up again. I think it would be something that would get brought up naturally and because because you were the one who came forward with your feelings I because I think if he was the one who said at first and you you shut him down then yeah he probably would feel uncomfortable kind of taking that step and then being like. Hey just to reassess but you. You already did that so I think he knows he's here knows that he could come to you if he wanted a relationship again so I don't think he's yeah I I just I think if it's free you if you need to tell them one more time mm-hmm because you just you need knowstone left on unturned. You WanNa try that. But I don't necessarily know if you're going to get the answer that you want don't and if that's going to be more crushing I would just kind of I dunno walkaway safe bet that a twenty three year old guy living in in a new city without a real relationship that he has a responsibility towards he's definitely at the very least gone another dates which I don't know how you would feel about that? I'm guessing that you don't feel great about that however It's totally fine that he was probably doing that. He is not in relationship with you By if you're kind of like coming at this from from the assumption that he's been waiting for you like be ready. I think that's a bad assumption and you need to think about how that would make you you feel and if you do decide to like come clean with him. There's a pretty good chance that like he'll be like Oh. Oh I'm I'm enjoying dating or like I'm enjoying being single or admit some Monday. It you'll have like an answer you need to like just start making decisions lake AAC Separate from this situation You're probably going to be pretty upset. I mean that's the reason why he didn't want He. He was moving and he's still moving so I don't think that really changes that and also like we said moving to a new place with like starting a relationship like new city. All of that sort of stuff. I think if anything you guys stay friends data their people and who knows you might end up together later but I just don't think the timing for this this is right and I don't think no matter how much you really like someone. You can't change that sort of timing and I think if you push too hard you could fuck like it could back. It could mean that you wouldn't have something later down the line if you guys started dating and you move to another city for like work like you will regret it. Like inherently hampers tempers your experience of moving to new place we talked about. We've had so many episodes like that so keep in mind as well. Should we go onto the next. I am twenty years old and I am in a long distance relationship The guy that I met last year in College And he has graduated and have a full time job and or all things are going really. Well We've been dating for like a year and two months about now And just lately I've been thinking a lot about The way that we have different opinions about things and A lot of them seem like small things but then like if I think about it enough it seems like it could end up being a big deal and I just don't really know how to There's a lot of it especially since we're long distance but Cynically we have had a conversation Numerous Times about oh how we kind of have different opinions on what it means to be supportive And basically I think that if you you are dating or friends with someone or just you know any loved one you should support them even if you don't maybe agree with everything they're doing doing If you're all adult than I think the adult in could do is to just support your one. and He seems to think that but if he strongly disagrees with something that someone else thinks or does that that means that he shouldn't support them. And I just feel very conflicted about it And it kind of confuses me and it makes me feel like maybe be I'm not always going to have his support. which kind of sucks to think about Since I want him to be my partner for a really long time So I guess I'm kind of just asking for opinions Does seem like maybe. Maybe he's being unreasonable. Which I think he is or am? I I don't know I just. It bothers me. That thinks that there are certain situations where he might not have to give me his support initially. Well you're you're you're calling into. I'm pretty sure a horror people who agree to do you want our opinion. Well yes but because she really. Because here's the thing. Do you understand the fucking of this podcast I do. I do understand the premise of the podcast. By also understand that like there's a site there's psychological trick people problem problem that people. I know you're gonNA agree with what I'm about to say. There's a psychological trick that people pull on themselves in which they will like like a reach out to a resource that confirms the way that they think and I think that's a locum to our podcast so nice to. Hey this is what all the fucking time. Yeah and it's our job to tell you that you're wrong. This is this is so oh. I'm sorry if you never listened to podcasts. Ever again but I think this is so off base. I think I don't think that and I don't even necessarily think that you you realize like what you're necessarily saying because okay. Let's say an eye with this with every before for like your friend. Your friend is a raging alcoholic. You don't support them and continuing to be a raging alcoholic like that's not like you support them as a friend as a person you don't necessarily need to support someone's decisions and I think that's why you need to differentiate between your boyfriend can support you but that that doesn't mean he supports every decision that you make because sometimes you make dumb shit you do stupid shit and if your partner is like I support that decision. It's a great idea then inherently they're not supporting you they're supporting bad choices and things that don't actually assist or help you along your life. It's the same thing like I you. You don't support a racist. There's all of these things and I think if you want to also doesn't mean that he doesn't love you you can disagree on something and like Whoa this like we'll disagree on stuff like that all the time and I think that's fine invalid but I think the people who care about you the most are we're gonNA call you out when they say when they don't they see something and they don't think it's the right choice or move to make but your partners shouldn't I should unconditionally. We love you. But I don't think they should support every decision that you make because I think that's it's enabling. Yeah and it's just it's it's so we like what do you you want in a like. I don't know that's just kind of like a side kick like you just want a hype. Man You don't want someone who's GonNa necessarily co like not even just coexist the big collaborate elaborate with you and have that back and forth in that kind of discussion and in turn the same thing. Like what if he'd like. What if they like one day you are married? Let's say and if he decided added that he's like you know what I've decided that I want to I want to. I want to give all of my money away and I want to live in an RV. And you're supposed to support him unconditionally. Because then that it's attached to you. Do you want to sell all. Do you want to get rid of all of your money and live in an RV or or anything if he decides. Hey I wanNA start murdering people and you're like great cool. Let me grab the fucking shoveled. Dude you don't even in like smaller things like. Hey I wanNA suspend I wanted. I want to start spending. I WANNA put fifty percent of our income towards lottery tickets and like. Are you supposed to support that unconditionally. or or if he's like. Hey I wanNA rob a bank. There's all of these different things but if you think even your friends like if your friends like hey I wanted start. I don't know beating people up for the fun of it. I WANNA start doing anything. That's just not cool like no. You don't support people that like like in bad decisions you can support them through the good decisions but I think it's not controlling them and telling them like Oh. You can't do that. But if they ask for your honest advice in your honest opinion give it. Yeah I mean you like. Do you make perfect decisions all the time like do what what would happen if it was like. Go ahead do it do it do it. You took you so you you said it very well you You kind of the. RV example is kind of like what I was GonNa say I was GonNA. I'd say what if what if you guys got married. And then he was like a lawyer or something and then he was like actually I want to go out and spend six years getting my PhD in philosophy. And so I can get a thirty grand a year adjunct teaching job at a Community College. Like are you ready to die. The too many rhapsodic. She wants to ride or die she Bonnie Clyde. That's Bonnie Bonnie that's what you want. Yeah I'm going to be really harsh I think your way of thinking is inherently self centered. Yeah and and I I grew up in Denver There are people in my life. Just use like very like timely example will that are Republicans I do not support them. I Love Them. I support them and other things that they do in their life in Somali businesses businesses. They've made in like pass me for advice about in some of the personal decisions they made about like you know. Oh should i. You know I'm thinking about asking this person to marry Miriam. We're thinking about having a kid a support them in that I do not support them inherently in their political beliefs. I've told them that has not changed our relationship. It's changed our relationship a little bit but it hasn't materially changed our relationship but they know I do not support the that portion of their their life and they are responsible enough in rational enough to realize that because I do not support them in. That doesn't make me a bad actor in their life like that because of that one that one thing or two do things that I don't support them on. I'm there for like a bad person or like I'm out till like ruined their life. That kind of sounds like what your definition support is in like. You really need to reassess that because it is if you are if you're you're only gonNA look for people in your life or you're only going to have people in your life that support every single decision you make no matter how bad or every single opinion you have no matter under how misplace you're going to be very lonely or you're gonna live in a fantasy land that is going to get broken in a very lake unsympathetic and Mercilus way. You can't surround yourself with only yes men and like yes people they just doesn't. It doesn't work but I also think like it's healthy. Debate and discussion is fine. When it comes to certain things but I think you also I take it back to my first point I? I don't think I'm hoping I'm really hoping that your definition of like support unconditionally. You're not thinking in this big picture. And they now now that we're saying this you're like oh well no that totally makes sense. But if it's if your boyfriend's highly critical if if you wanna get your nose period. She's like no don't do that. That's there's certain choices that are all you and if he's giving you unsolicited advice at like negative opinions and all of that sort of stuff. He's not supporting you wanting to likes. Pick up a new hobby or supporting you having your own friends and stuff like that. There's all there's all of those different those different things that I'm I'm hoping that's what you're thinking more of and in that case if he's not supporting like your happiness and that sort of stuff. I think that that's definitely something you should evaluate but in the same way if your friend was in an abusive relationship you wouldn't support the relationship. You'd support your friend and you might even if you might even support those two people individually and wanting the abuser to get help and figure out what's going on with them and changing their ways and you support your friend who's going through it but you don't support the relationship you're not. Yeah you're being and you're not aiding in that kind of bad behavior but yeah I would just have a bigger conversation with him about that. Because I don't think I don't think you guys are probably l. e. on the same page. But I don't think communicating well and if you're not then you must have parents who told you you were great twenty four seven every single day all of that sort of stuff and I think you'll be it's GonNa be a harsh fucking reality when you realize that that's not how the world works like like. That's not how not only it's not. How relationships work is just not how the world works at all? It's not it's not built to fulfil that system system of yes. Yes yes everything you do is perfect and right all of the time and then also like are you just going to like. I always think about it in the sense of if you are perfect perfect exactly how you are now then. Like what you just downhill from here like. Do you get worse or are you just done so from personal experience which is the elevated Sunday. Yes I agree with that. Like if you're talking about is like if you when to facetime with your boyfriend you're like I want to volunteer at a women's support group and he was like. Oh I don't don't do that. I don't want you to talk to other women than like like you should not listen to him but if your ability to distinguish between good opinions and bad opinions in like good advice him bad advice like is materially like diminished. If you don't want to hear other opinions so I listen to our podcast. CAST so like if you if you have a job right with a supervisor. It's likely that a supervisor is going to be like. I don't think like you did that. Perfectly try again or I think you need to do this a little bit more. Are you just going to be like the person's not supportive in my life. Like I fucking quit like now. And you're going to go to another shavings GOP. And so like maybe. Maybe that's what she's how she's doing. Not Support learn learn a little objectivity. You're not perfect at all. And nobody is and the people people closest to are the ones who should be the ones who are calling you on it. It shouldn't be like the strangers that simple. You should trust the most to give you an honest opinion. let us know if if you guys weren't take a quick break and we'll be right back. Do you need a break from your inbox. Could the exhausting amount of social media. It's time to prioritize a little meat time to help you recharge and dipsy can help you. Focus on something more pleasurable than whatever is on your to do list. dipsy is an audio apple of short sexy and stories and guided sessions that are designed to turn you on and help you get in touch with yourself. These stories are relatable and immersive. So you feel like like you're right in there. There's something for everyone. Whoever and whatever you're into and they add new content every week find stories about spontaneous hookups? The Stranger love that. Ah trying a new toy together big fan of that or even getting tied up. I mean that's an obvious. The guided sessions can help. You unlock new confidence or heightened intimacy MRI with your partner. This year try a new way of getting turned on with dipsy so Melissa. I heard that heard that you have you indulgence. Nations in some stories plus I dipped into it. You Dip your toe in to the scene. dipsy heck yeah I mean you know. I was just meaning some relaxation last night and I listened to one where it's just a guy and he was just like he had the hottest fully and he was just like going on a little journey with me and then switched over that one. Just got me in the mood and then switched over to one with the couple. Were doctors doctors in the hospital. ooh Yeah so there were like interns and sneaking away for a little bit into the on call room not on call surgeons dead Ed bodies they were in the on. Call Room that sexy. You know one got me all the way over in case. It's anybody wants to know you and for listeners. The show dipsy is offering a thirty day free trial when you go to dipsy stories dot com slash. Blame that's a thirty day free trial and you go to. Dip Dip sa stories dot com slash. Blame dipsy stories dot com slash. 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I'm just going to say my favorite part is my individual. Vitamin Packs. Have My name on them and it makes me feel great. I love this quiz. Is I'm a quiz in general but this one goes really really really in depth and the recommendations that you get are fantastic and so different and I just find really on top of exactly what I need. I really like the little energy little packet things those I had. It doesn't add on their fantastic. Pick me up in the middle of the day for fifty percent off your first I care of order go to take care of dot com enter code blame fifty. That's take care of DOT COM and code. Blame fifty for fifty percents off your I care of order. Paul Hi guys. We're back from our break now. We're getting into it when I say so. Hi Megan Melissa and guests I was just calling for some advice. to some relationship nations should advise so me and my boyfriend having dated for about three years. We are sophomores in college and The question is she recently has brought up. She knew that he had wanted to try. like psychedelics or shrooms and just a little back story He doesn't really do drugs or anything. I mean he does Smoke sometimes and He drinks and I don't really I mean I have never smoked and I occasionally drink but it's not really my scene but I mean I've never had a problem with it and our relationship because it's just something that's fine with me as long as it's not interfering But with this I don't know why but if feel different And I I'm trying to keep an open mind about it but basically the question is if I'm crazy for not wanting to do it. I pretty much told him that I didn't want to. And he agreed like he was obviously. He wasn't just going to do it knowing that I didn't want to But obviously he was kind of not bad but you know disciplinarian like obviously. I don't WANNA be controlling. That's just not what our relationship is about. But I don't know I feel like I'm just wondering if like saying that he shouldn't do like like a good thing to do. I don't know I I kind of controlling office about it and they say fine. They say they do things but then again they kind of have the same lifestyles me. So it's Kinda understandable that they have to take so I was just wondering your take on it. Well you can control is The fact that you can tell them how you feel But did he ask you you know but got some Yeah I think like it's it's your right to say I don't think this is a good idea. I hope that you don't do them. Then the other thing you control troll is if he doesn't listen to you and He does like drop acid or like do shrooms uh-huh or whatever You can say you know in. He's like I want to keep doing this you can you. Can they look. I'm not comfortable with that. Maybe we should take breaker. May we see each other anymore. you shouldn't you. You shouldn't have to alter when it comes to something like this like this isn't something that you necessarily need to feel accommodating of like you can't control like what he's GonNa do but like you can control like how you deal with it because look like in the event that like you're like oh whatever like it should be fine. Just been someone that has Seeing this and he goes out and he drops acid and then he like freaks out like breaks. All your shit or like you're taking care of them like batily pretty annoying in like you could. It would feel more annoying if you've been like Oh yeah no I get it like. It's just like Yellow Solo Pool. Do a yellow yeah. That's sad like You just have to reconcile the the fact that he's he might do it anyway. We have very different takes on this. I think controversial opinion. I think it is a little controlling trolling. If someone doesn't ask hey wants like so I can do this year. I think if if apple so that's what I was going to say that's the other thing you're you're like twenty. This is the time to experiment. This is when you when your sophomore and call all of that sort of stuff. I think at this point now if if you were like hey I really WanNa go first of all you have to go to bug in burning man and like heaven experience man perfect Segue so okay. So here's what I'll say though. I am here talk. These awesome patent leather like colonel. Colonel General Hats. We can finally mad. I do my my just like it. Quick my my my favorite sub-genre instagram imposed that I see no young entertainment professionals that go burning man here and they're like this is what it's all about. It's like this is not the advice that you're going to get from anybody the elsewhere take you'll get from like an actual professional But I- ranked drugs. I ranked drugs in the order of like consequences and side effects and addiction. All of that stuff in psychedelics are just above. We'd that's it's the of if it's not it's not coke it's not so I think if it's not a drug that ended up in the beginning sequence of CSI with a girl face down in a pool dead then and it's not as scary to me and so but I think age age terms and so at this point as I'm like a twenty six year old if he if if have you were about to be like hey I want to go out and let go do a bunch of fucking coke with my friends. I I don't support that. So if that's what you WanNa do that's the kind of relate that's who I wanna be with. I'm out old but I'm not gonNa tell me like you can't do that but being curious is totally valid and it's very fair. It's okay to be curious with drinking. It's okay to be curious about drugs. Nov that's up and the only real or the time that you've got a really big issue there is if you don't have a lot of awareness and education around it and that's you can end up putting yourself in a really unsafe situation not being with the right people when you're taking it not taking the right amount of something and not knowing the side effects or being like hey. Do I have any history of schizophrenia. In my family family then I should stay away from psychedelics. That should be something that I shouldn't really taken or if I have a family history of addiction I'm not going to. I'm going to let my doctor doctor. No before I get a prescription from getting my wisdom teeth out and I'm getting like oxy and I'm going to ask for something. That's a far less addictive painkiller. So but if you if it's just like a big no sort of thing that's how I think really sketchy in bad stuff can kind of happen and and I mean I've done drugs I've and I think about like for. Yeah but the older that I got and I definitely don't do like hardcore dabbled in a party drug every once in a while and every once in a while like three times three times three occasions Asians like three weekends. I was safe about it and I think about it if I had done that. And if I hadn't had friends or or people I could turn to feel like I had some knowledge about it. I probably could've taken some really fucked up shit and it could have been like a big mistake and I think the fact that he's talking to you about it. I think if he asks your opinion you can be like. I mean honestly it's not my ideal circumstance like but if that's something that you WanNa do as long in your safe about it I know where you are. You have a plan for everything thin like go ahead Kinda. Just do what you're gonna do but if someone who wants to experiment with drugs isn't your per like isn't who you WANNA be with. It's not about changing him. I think it's about the knowing. Okay cool this is not the relationship for me so that yeah yeah and I think that's kind of what I was trying to say so I think like what we're both saying like fits other. Hi Megan I'm twenty two and I'm pretty new to the dating and sexto so the guy on wiz right now now is really into orgies and I don't really mind that can do it on his own time but he's also really into into watching me having sex with someone else he. He asked me if I had any sex tapes and ray now he asked me if I can have sex with someone else and tape it for him so I don't really know what should he do. I told him it's not really my thing I told him like. I'm not really down to it but should I keep seeing him or is he better off with someone who was down to do those things with him picturing her like the tiniest she's thumbed Alita and she's with a cook that's what is apparently not. Apparently he's like some weird laycock orgy like dom hybrid faceted president. Yeah for someone who's actually experienced you. I mean you talk about a trial by fire. was the guy from fifty shades of Gray Gray Krige Project Christian grey. That's essentially what you're walking into. I I I find it so fascinating. When like these two types the people me because I feel like it happens like so much more than you think you know like? Oh I don't really like I don't have that much experience than like the plot of regret and that yeah and then like you know the checkout person that urban outfitters they have a crush on yeah by the way like I like to have sex with like like eight or nine people every weekend together also I just being like not king shaming at all but like that just like logistically being into orgies jeeze if all the things to be into the soil moving pieces like you've really resigned. That's what I did find all of those people. That's not an easy one to have. What's the definite like? What's the number definition of four four three nine anything after three? That's an orgy. My mind goes to eight though I mean I can but that's like a put put it this way. I'm Big Bang ratio. I'm a big. I'm a big golfer. Normal normal golf groups for people read and we have like a standing group. We struggled to get together to go golfing every weekend. We have a standing standing like that. Maybe you guys would be more proactive. If there was sex stake involved easy. Maybe if you guys knew urine get your prostate takeover show off love. No they they. They're on the lookout for this Actually I just realized this is going to come out when I'm like on a Bachelor Party and we're all gonna like gathered around the laptop so yeah we'll get into the caller. Yeah so here's what I would say I would say. I think it's great that he's being super forthcoming with the stuff after he's into but I think you also I. It needs to be a conversation with him of being like okay. If I'm not into this kind of stuff and you said that you're you're fine with him doing whatever he wants to do. Whatever he's into ads Kim like? Is this something that you're looking for in a partner or not and I would also say you're has you asking like Oh should I just move on and let him find someone else. Also if you're if you're not actually like that into into the stuff that he's doing and going they orgies and him all of that kind of stuff like if you feel like you kind of need to be like that or you don't have a ton of experience and you liked liked him if it's awesome you're comfortable with that's okay and even if you have said that you're comfortable with it I don't WanNa put ideas into your head that you're not actually a you. Totally can be but it can also be up to you. That's not something that your into. It doesn't have to be like okay. He's he wants to date someone who's like that and I'm like that so therefore he won't WanNa date me. You're also it's okay if you want to date someone who's not into stuff like that but I would just ask him and have a conversation with him and don't agree to anything and you don't sound like you are at all which is great like agreed any don't agree to anything that you're not the kinks that he's Trying to sell you not sell you on but like get you to participate in our are kinks that could potentially like put you yourself in at risk so he wants you to go out and find someone to have sex as a one off in film it. That person may be a carrier of something that you don't want to. That person might be a bad actor like what if you film it and then and they publish it. I mean that's reality of the time we live in and I would have no effect on him probably and it would have all the effect on you. Well well this is also a king that involves you. Yeah exactly. It's not it's not like hey I really like it. It involves you but it's not like AAC just the two of you trying. Something can actually. Yeah so like I think because you articulated like very prepared yourself for this eventuality. which is it doesn't sound like you're comfortable with this at all so you should probably follow Megan's advice say say? Is this something that you absolutely need right now in relationships someone that's lake Down to try these things with you participate in these things with you and if he says yes then you should be like okay. That's great I'm not that person I we should see other people. People still be your friend. But I'm not going to be your kink vehicle anymore and I mean you already like are beyond accommodating like literally saying like. Yeah if he wants to participate in stuff like that on his own time not Oughta people like you out there so I guess good for you also did she say how long they been dating. Because there's a I am. I'm I'm torn in the a sense of I think if you have a dealbreaker kink and I think that's really important to discuss early on into dating. Somebody and I think you should express that because it should be something that you don't get injured relationship with someone and then spring some like a very important thing on but at the same time. I'm also wondering how long it's been been and he's brought these two things up to you and if it's if it's a little too early on that this could be like a red flag but I don't WanNa say it's a red flag because I I think that's kind of Jamia that she's new today during the so. I'm assuming it's newer probably newer introduction. Yeah I think there's a right time to bring up the right time in a right way to bring up. I think that deal breaker. You bring up real soon though if you're into this but wouldn't you also bring it up is in like got. This is a deal breaker for me. There is an. I'm not to the treat. Him like predatory all at any point but people fetish is women who you don't have a ton of experience and I don't want you to get caught up into something where someone's recognizing that taking Benadryl. It's like it's even if you think of like young. Uh I mean girls. Who aren't that young? But who look really young and who are like short and petite that becomes like this Ike. It's this fetish is thing and I don't want you to get caught up in that so I think it's it's also don't think about it. Yeah you don't think about it in terms of all of these things but think about it like what's your judge of his character and who he is and like do you trust him at like the him as a person before him as all of these other things. Because I think that will also give you some insight into whether or not you even want to continue to pursue all all of this stuff while let us guys have ever participate in cooking very curious to. I'm curious to you've gotTa Outta Leo and Aquarius Year. We're like okay. Should we go onto an update update. Yeah we're GONNA update slash. They're asking for more advice he's I am twenty two and I have actually been featured on the podcast before At the time I was calling to break up I was in the episode with Alexi Wasser. you may or may not be glad to know that I am beyond happy now. That break-up was the best thing that ever happened to me. Since then I moved home. It changed schools funded program that super passionate for and have become like miles. More confident in myself and Looking back on that relationship and also the podcast episode ice Verily downplayed how toxic relationship was and how emotionally abusive he was to me His his very codependent and everything was my fault and he was never wrong and I was stupid for everything otherwise So you fast forward and I have met a new guy I really didn't want to I'm loving being single. And but this guy is just like sweet like sweet as can be and we get along really well and he thinks I like the earth is on my shoulders And it's a really really good feeling and I know he would never hurt me and he knows sort of about the baggage that I have and we've already had a couple conversations about it because I am scared to push the relationship We were exclusive for like eight hours in the Nice Big Long Essay about how I'm just not ready and I'm so sorry in. It's not anything you've done it's me and if you're not cool this is totally fine and he responded bonded with just with like. Thanks for being honest like I honestly I kind of agree. I think we're moving really fast. And so he's super like considerate and and Sweden understanding and he's great and I don't think there's really much wrong with him except for the fact that my family would hate him very traditional and he's very not So that's like one thing but that's like way down the line with the other thing is I am loving being single and being independent and I plan on going therapy to like handle the trauma that I dealt with with my last relationship ship but in the meantime while I'm healing I would just really like some advice. He already knows that. I WANNA move slow and I appreciate him so much for that and I appreciate any advice you could give to someone who's just trying to heal but also be happy and actually be selfish for ones thank you no I agree with you. It's like anything. How can you agree with me? Know what does it mean to be a traditional. Yeah well they can't hear that that's what I yeah. I am curious when people say the law like Oh like I come from really traditional background in like he's like my second brother is not like I have no care no fucking idea what that means. Do you mean like what's traditional. I think about racism. I wonder wonder where my mind you know like the fact that the House bunny star is the lead singer from all American rejects. Okay first of all he does not started. It makes no second campus like the Guy Colin Farrell Colin Hanks. But he's like he's like the initials shoals oldest from all American rejects the initial guy. He makes literally thirties. Like it's he's he's like the guy who she likes at first yes and no one. Even I ever even knew that the guy from all American rejects until finally I can say about I like that guy okay. He's a he plays Bass plays such violation of our family mort awards. But I also wonder if it's maybe it's a religious. It's religious eighth if it's like my family's really Christian and he's an atheist or something burning some. Ah Okay. Here's what I would say. I think therapies are really great idea. I think that's where your top priority already in focus should be is getting into their apy because I think through therapy. y'All and I've learned a lot of to is that there is no traditional way to get over trauma. And what do you mean by traditional cancer wind of the hope. There's it's not. It's not this black and white sort of thing and I think in your mind there is a. There's a process of being like I should be single. Misses something and you enjoy being single but it also it. You're you can have independence and you should have independence in relationship. Being in a relationship shouldn't mean giving up your independence and I think because you are in such toxic relationship before those things kind of go hand in hand and I think through therapy you'll find how it how getting over how working through all all of this is going to be because it's going to be different for you than anyone else and I think being communicative with this guy that you're seeing is really great and then I also thank on. Why do you like being single? What you like about being single? Do you like dating other people. Do you like all that stuff like give. It is the those sort of very standard standard like the definition of being single. If it's that then totally stay single but if you're what you like about being single is because you're not in a controlling relationship that might the new guy might not be controlling relationship. It might be like you still have your you still have your independence. You should still be able to hang out with your friends and do all of this sort of stuff and not feel like you're becoming part of like an entity and like you're losing a part of yourself so I would figure that kind of stuff out how And because yeah I think moot taking it slow in new relationship is good regardless of what like baggage personal stuff that you're you're bringing into it because I think the starting a relationship slow at least for me. If you're I don't WanNa say you're hyper. I'm definitely hyper paranoid of people's intentions. And how they feel about me and not getting hurt and stuff like that and the slower that you do take it the more confident you can be that when someone is revealing their feelings and how they really feel about you. It's because they know you and it's because they're able to make that decision because they spent time getting to know you and you've kind of taken you've taken your time through all of that And it doesn't feel triggering necessarily but I think the more you can communicate with him is a great thing and then I would also spend a lot of time doing stuff that you like and hobbies and hanging out with friends and all of that kind of stuff and then if it is like dating other people totally go for it and he sounds like a great guy but but also like from the beginning. Timing is such a huge thing he can be a great guy but it could also like. Maybe that's not the next person you want to do. Like maybe you do WanNa continue to be casual and see other people. That doesn't doesn't mean that you're missing out on the only other good guy that there is. There's a million other guys like him and you just happen to be with someone who was awful and terrible. But that's not not the norm so I think it's smart to not rush into something else knew just because it kind of like cleanses your palate from the other thing He can be like a great guy. Hi and can be okay if you just. Don't yeah you just don't want to date seriously and you just WanNa continue to have fun and all that I wouldn't know obviously from experienced but what I would assume it feels like when you get out of a relationship that is pretty emotionally only toxic. And where you're kind of like the victim of a lot of that toxicity is. It can be pretty disconcerted. I'm guessing pretty discombobulating. I don't mean to laugh. I'm sorry in the sense that like you say you like being single because I'm guessing you're like Oh. I can go to the gym wearing a sports bra. Uh and I don't like get a text. Are you wearing a sports bar at the gym. Our guys looking at it And it's like wow. This is amazing. So yeah I I would take a couple of months figure out like it's not even like what you like about being single. I think that's that's part of it then. Another way of thinking about is like what do you like doing a normal person. Yeah that's on me and I think that's I think that's the part that you're associating relationships and like single angle hood with your past relationship which is totally valid. But that's not the norm. Yeah and I think when I say a one hundred percent I think what I'm what I'm I'm saying is like you know it can be discombobulating like you literally have nothing to dislike compare or you can't discern like what it means to be you just like a regular independent person in the scope of like a relationship the Serapio term that might well. Yeah my therapist is always. It's the you've if you coming from trauma everything like that. You question your own reality and you question is is what I'm seeing. True is what I'm going through. Is this normal. Is it not because your frame of reference and what you look back onto your association with whatever relationship it is that was what was ingrained as normal in your brain and then also the same thing that you said which you called yourself. I can't believe I was so stupid and missile not stupid people who are when you get into an emotionally abusive relationship. It's you know a thousand times. It's you put the lobster into the cold water and then you turn the heat up and you're like how the fuck did I end up here like. No one walks into a relationship Asian chip where you can if you could see the red flags. The first time it wouldn't have happened gets manipulative and so that becomes yet. You start comparing everything to in questioning. Is this one of those signs that I missed the first time around and fuck the last do talked very sucky dude. Well happier out of that situation situation and Hell yeah go to therapy. It's a great I mean I don't WanNa say is a great time like it's a it's A. It's a good time. It's not necessarily great all the time but the outcomes they're all great plus our therapist told me this kills me. She told me that I had mentioned how I didn't have friends But I was like I was like I'm fine with it. And then she was like really I was like yeah. I'm a lot she goes wasn't your therapist. I'm be your friend that's all you've ever wanted. You've been talking about this all. Oh while I've ever and then. She gave me Connecticut sand to play with an hang with it in our last session. And then she's GonNa take that home and I was like no and she goes no no take kit and also she uses it for children and I love her. She's the best okay. Well that's that's it's what we've got. Thanks so much for listening. If you want to call in for an upcoming episode Lisa voicemail at three one zero six nine four zero nine seven six international listeners. Here's you can send us an audio message. At podcast EDGY DOT COM. Please follow me on instagram. My engagement sucks also all the PODCASTS. Don't blondine pod all of our soldiers those are listed on blow if you WANNA listen ad free stitcher premium and please preorder my book. It is coming out may fifth May. That's right yeah may fifth. It's on Amazon Amazon Amazon. You can put it wherever books are sold that let you preorder. It's called you're not special. You can just search Meghan ranked turnout special or you're not special book. Give it a preorder. It will make Nissan incredibly happy And if you guys like this episode please rate us and if you WANNA watch it on Youtube Youtube too you can see us. Sit awkwardly far apart. And that's it guys. We'll see you. Next time. Any last words he proposes on the. Yeah I'm fucking you did saying your engagement suck so but you're talking about your. What would care my engagement sucking getting no? Thanks for having me. 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Patrick Mckeon - You've been breathing wrong your whole life!

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

1:07:43 hr | 1 year ago

Patrick Mckeon - You've been breathing wrong your whole life!

"Welcome back to another episode of the epic table podcast. This is your first time. Welcome this is where we talk about human performance and how I can apply it through help. You guys use it as a resource as everyday lawsuit we had to Jason Woodland on CEO and founder of. Thera gone now. Theravada was also about his podcast. We talked about recovering. Not just from a surface level. We talked about how to improve your central nervous. And how he's divorced that how we can take simple techniques every single day to learn from it and the effects of simply improving and recovering a central web system which is really exciting because something we can do everyday speaking of something we can do. Every day we have Hutch mature and the author of the Oxygen Veg on I and on Saipan for these because talking about breathing something that we do obviously every single genuine. What's amazing is that we looked. Sorry far heads sometimes in new technologies to improve performance through oxygen and whatnot but maybe or perhaps simply just needs to move out on his radio. You snore. You have problems with you. Know the way that you asleep ing do you feel. Sometimes you not exactly getting the best breath also. These are things that we can look at and adjust every single day and today. We discussed that with Patrick. You and he's a phenomenal. Individual himself actually suffer from asthma early on and she looked at techniques that he could adjust. And then you know improving every single day loss so if you look into impressive performance wanting to simply no if you breathing correctly. I'm excited listen to on Jason. If you're one of those people would love to get a review. And he'll thoughts shown social media. Instagram tiger screen shot. And let everyone know that this is something that can all absolutely do everything that. I knew that for all things on the seat. We need oxygen Nelson Brian Wrestling. So I'm not saying any title. I Patrick McEwen author of the Oxygen Advantage Vantage Patrick Account. Welcome to the Tel podcast. Matt thanks very much on beer so if my listeners obviously patches. Yoda fantastic accent. He's in Ireland right now but through his work you know it's been exception rating up on your philosophies and how we can all so much more about one of the most natural ways to improve who we are as humans but before we go into your actual practices in the program. You've tried tonight. I'm really interested in hearing about your personal story because that's how it about right. You had problems with asthma respiration that Kinda made you want to die further into and come up with oxygen advantage. Might Patrick Play Space. Sure. Of course yeah I I suppose I was like many other people I did. The wrong degree went into the wrong occupation. Absolutely hated us but on the other side have shoes and You know after twenty years of having Asmi don't just investment I was also the in distress citing Zayed's sides and sleep patterns. Were very poor. That's kind of normal when you have a breathing pattern disorder so so I read a newspaper article on its head about to breathe through your nose which I wasn't doing. I was constantly map breathing during sleep during rest and even going for a walk and And I wasn't doing that either. I was breathing hard. I would be the guy you know you go for a jog and I the one that was like a train huffing and puffing self so as made changed my own. Houten's made a big difference to how I talked to my breathing to my sleep to my concentration and To to my mind so so that was that was. That's part of the journey begun. It's pretty simple. Isn't it some but I think what I'm so excited. Batty's I mean you've broken it down very not show I guess complex but like For people who don't realize there's actually a quote in your book that you you talk about When if you breathe in a date breath most people think that's a benefit and you'll you referred to as actually Actually you actually detrimental your ability to You know benefit from performance. Now that's to do with oxygen carbon dioxide. So I'm really the part that I love so Mike. Can you actually just go straight into the process of breath and what happens? And then we'll dive into the changes that we need to cats Performance so what happens when we I think we need to understand a law that was discovered back in nineteen. Oh four and it's called aboard a fact or an effect on it's based on a piece of physiology that you would find in pretty much any medical textbook unresponsive. Physiology is the Oxygen Hemoglobin dissociation curve but in simple terms. It's not true that oxygen is good carbon dioxide his badge we need to have a balance and when we take a breath of air into our lungs and oxygen passes into the blood most oxygen. The blood is carried by a hemoglobin molecule. Which is a protein but in the red blood cell and hemoglobin carries ninety eight percent of oxygen but for Hemoglobin to release oxygen to the tissues. It's released in the presence of carbon dioxide and increased body temperature. So if you think of a working muscle that working muscle is going to need more oxygen than muscles pitcher not working so hard on. How does the working muscle attract more oxygen? With the harder you work muscle the hotter it becomes and the more carbon dioxide the generates announced a change in body terrorists to change in the temperature of the muscle and is to change in carbon dioxide and reluctant dropped blood. Ph that causes red blood cells to release oxygen to that muscle. Now if you think of a despite on how many times have we heard the instruction take a deep wrecked and you see the individual taking this full big fresh air into their lungs while they're not necessarily increasing oxygen of taking the blood because it's already almost fully saturated and in the process. They're getting rid of widened amount of carbon dioxide from the lungs and from the blood and this is causing less oxygen to be delivered from the hemoglobin to the tissues so the harder we breed relative to what our body needs the less oxygen that gets delivered that's a very hissy putting it essentially Commodore as you said has been always looked at as the enemy puts actually gateway to allowing oxygen to be absorbed and you touch upon. That's the point like oxygen saturation. General is I it doesn't change too much looking as you said that. You quite ninety five to ninety anywhere Bob. Ninety six ninety seven ninety percent of your blood should be oxygen anything law of concerns. But you never really going to have one hundred percent because if you have one hundred percents such ration. You never having transitioned from oxygen from the blood into the muscles. The good old not to have that to happen. You talk about that. Carbon Dioxide has to increase threats. Like you have to have that Get The essentially the Dole. Why the if the Dole wise only slowly Little Bit Assira. To only oxygen gets into the blood confessed that you saw your body allows for an increase in a threshold of see it too. Which is what will happen in later. Down the track is that of the most you are able to have as a threshold. More oxygen again to block is that that's correct. That's pretty much it now. It's it's it's it's a simple as data and it's not a simpler but in terms of I suppose what we're looking to have as we're looking to home stasis and we're looking to have a normal pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood and money of stolen and it's you know it's not true that everybody would breathing pattern disorder has low carbon dioxide in blood Quite a number of people do and even if you look at some of the papers. I see the paper by a professor from one of the American universities keys and he looked at fifty one subjects and I think there were twenty seven years of age. And we're all healthy and fit people. Only five of them had normal breathing and he was looking at. How can you screen for breathing pattern disorders in sports on his conclusion? Mas Bretault time has to be above twenty five seconds and he measured the same ways to both score. And if you're Bret told. Time is above twenty five seconds. You have a native nine percent chance that dysfunctional breathing is not to present so it's relatively common dysfunctional breathing with some people they will have lower. Co Two but it comes back to the one thing that you raised the stock done. You know we often have a belief in the Western world that it's really good to be taking these Big brats like we have to turn out information of down you think of all of the studios who are teaching breathing exercises and you should never hear anybody breathing during rest in any studio if you're doing postures if you're doing any sort of work if it's doing very light physical exercise nobody should be deliberately increasing the volume of verde breed because in the process. They are reducing the oxygen delivery to to treat the body Dry because obviously do yoga at the former studios you're referring to so let's speak a little bit further to that so but by taking on a B. Breath. What actually happens at the cellular level? Can you STA young reiterate that again? Okay when you take a bigger Brett we have to bear in mind at oxygen. His car two ways in the blood ninety eight percent of discouraged bound by hemoglobin on about one and a half percent or so of oxygen is dissolved directly in the plasma. Now when we buried hard safe for instance if we were doing something like taking thirty hard brexit and drew the matter knows we won't increase oxygen uptake. Won't increase the up the blood oxygen saturation because hemoglobin is already fully saturated but we can increase little the oxygen dissolved in the plasma. But it's the process of hard breathing that we get rid of too much. Carbon dioxide from the lungs and this in turn reduces carbon dioxide in the blood and when carbon dioxide is reducing in the blood blood Ph increases and the affinity of Hemoglobin frocks Chin. Get STRONGER IN OTHER WORDS. The bond of oxygen for Red Blood Sorry the bond of red blood says for oxygen gets stronger when carbon dioxide is lower. So I suppose it comes back to you. Ident people might ask the question. Why surely when I go for a run? My breathing is going to be faster and harder. That's correct but how much faster and harder because you see a guy or a Gal with Dysfunctional breathing if you're breathing his off during rest. Your breathing is off during physical exercise and your breathing is off during sleep and foot sort of symptoms. Would you have if your breathing off during exercise gassing out too soon you know how many athletes have looked like sometimes looking. It's doing press conferences and I see faster up chest breathing into guys just sitting there as rest. You know you know straightway. It's likely this guy's going to have disproportionate. Breathlessness during physical. Exercise is going to gossip too soon. He can have muscle fatigue. And if you're not getting enough oxygen delivery to those working muscled how can we have been sure dash and it's something that seldom talk about I love it man I this is. This is sorry as a stock Such a natural thing breathing is a process. That is one of the most natural things we can help And through your studies and what you've done is incredible lund. So what what I love. Is You of flip the switch on this whole perspective? You're changing what we've been thought thinking so long it's like taking a deep breaths is something we always hear about in recovery so obviously will get into the training of oxygen advantage annual perception of what we should be doing but before we do. Let's talk about the the detriment of lack of oxygen to the body and physical performance in athletes were talk in general so numerous studies that talk about a lack of development to the Brian in young young individuals particularly adolescent age This ozzy problems with sleeping can you? Can you speak to that a bit moment? Yeah it's really more so about the effective mouth. Breathing has on sleep in terms of childhood development. There's money studies looking at the effects of sleep disordered breathing and Childhood and wit sleep disorder breathing. It's very common. That child breeds open mouths now if an adult breed soon open maturing sleep. It's likely that adult is more likely to snore. Have SLEEP APNEA AND TO WAKE UP TIRED. But for a child it's different because the child's brain is growing and carbonic she Next study in stratford-upon-avon from twenty ten. I think study went on for eight years. Looking at eleven thousand Children Day looked at the risk of special education needs of children would sleep disordered breathing. It increased by forty percent now when you bear in mind. The number of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and and would under conditions. You know we really have to wonder. What's the role of sleep? And this and for me think of sleep we have to think of Airway. A nasal breathing is obsolete crucial. And this is not new information. This has been known there was journal back. Nineteen O nine clouds dental cosmos. And I read it you know. Use It on my own my own talks and when you look at what was written back over one hundred years ago that the faces. Dolan expressionless child loses attention. The teachers accusing the child of daydreaming and the child is at Waking Up. A headache is doesn't have concentration. And all of these these things. We see in children's Day on very few healthcare professions talking about the importance of nasal breathing in childhood. Except the top sleep doctrine. The roads just before he passed on the Guy Club doctor Christian gaming up from Stanford Medical School and he spoke about the critical importance of restoring nasal breathing for children both during wakefulness on during sleep. And he went on to say you know. I've seen them in conferences. And I was talking alongside amount. I've seen him stand up and he would say to. The doctors present would allergy respect. He said you're talking about everything except about the importance of restoring nasal breathing during sleep and I would go as fire saying. I don't think you have a good night sleep unless you break your nose now. Dot has a huge white. You know costing there because you think of anybody in terms of performance. How can you be at the top of your game whether you're in school whether you're at university whether you're in sports unless you have the energy and the concentration to focus on what you're doing and I remember going in secondary school or high school? My concentration was dreadful. I'd be looking at the page but my attention wasn't on the page I wasn't you know learning the material. That was fun to me because my attention was totally stuck in my head in a constant state of that brain fog. And you know we're measuring children's academic performance and so-called intelligence primarily from an academic point of view. But how many people is asking the question Howard these kids sleeping and Howard. These kids breathing and of course. It's not just about the kids. We have to consider adults here as well. My son important. You know. I think if it's like a sokoll breathing and sleep on again natural natural things that we go through and I have a very important purpose. Breathing's obvious sleeping is obvious in principle but at a at a a real we'd level. I guess if he cited the wider we're able to recove- by memory stole memory to develop to learn to. You know make really care. Decisions is is so critical And definitely directed and without debt proven we affect on sleep. And so you know when upbraiding to generate enough ability to get into Rambo slow I sleep and that that's an issue in itself so you talked about Nizwa breathing. What is the difference and we talk about the effect on neurotransmitters in the brain by breeding free annoys versus you email. I think it's more likely I think it's more like the the effect the building is having causing sleep fragmentation. That's when we breach an open mouth. We tend to breed. Tend to have lighter sleep and the other thing with with the architecture of the Airway can change. There's a number of things that can happen with my breathing during sleep you know in terms of the architecture of the airway that the tongue is more likely to fall into the throat. The map rating is causing a drawing edge of the Upper Airway can lead to inflammation if destroy the operate mouth. Breathing also was leading to fast shallow breathing. Using the upper chest. Disinterring reduces lung volume and as a result the upper airways more liable to collapse during sleep. So it a condition called obstructive sleep apnea which is relatively common for example in. Mayo's it's more common than females but it affects between men between the ages of thirty and forty nine by twenty six percent of men and from the age of fifty to seventy effects about forty three percent of males and females. It's about nine percent of females aged between thirty and forty nine years of age on from. It's about twenty seven percent from fifty to seventy years of age so with triplets with females. When they go through menopause but I do think it's too steep fragmentation like other aspects of it. Is You know if somebody's waking up dry match in the morning okay. They feel that jab the They're not as rested as they should be But also that may need to get hope to go to the bathroom more frequently and if you have to get up to go to the bathroom during during the night you are having sleep fragmentation. So I think that's the impact. I think that we don't get down to the deep deep sleep. And if we are in deep sleep or constantly getting aroused from so and obstructive CPAP is a really dreadful condition in terms of the stress puts on the heart and it's linked with money other conditions including dementia. In Oh so it's a very common condition very much so that it's going to be increased risk of With people who asked breed we do need are closed. We need our tongue resting in the roof of the out. Because you know you watch your tongue resting in the rift the Matt so that. Your Tong is less likely to approach the airway and sleep. Medicine has changed. In a number of ways the last five years with the recognition that there are four funeral types of sleep apnea. It's not just an anatomical issue. The Airway offender snoring and sleep apnea but there are three non anatomic factors and we have to consider the airway from the point of view of an engineer. No engineer more. Their salt will just look at a pipe without looking at flow but when sleep is being considered generally it's only the pipe that's being considered and its Nash. The amount of air that you're breathing through ish but if you're breathing fast and shallow. There's an increased turbulence in the Upper Airway and this is more likely to cause collapse into arousal from sleep and I often say to Miss Jones. Make the sound of a snore. You know anybody can make the sound of snow during break from this. What you do you tighten up your airway and you breathe harder. So if it's true the Magyar kind of go like this. If it's true the knows you'll go like this. So there's a different sounder to make that sound you typically breed faster and harder. Now if you were really to slow down your breathing determinants in the upper airways less and snoring and obstructive sleep apnea is less. It's not just about the size of the airway. It's also a bad flow. Just make one more point before forgotten. Children who undergo tonsilectomy annoyed ECTOMY. If nasal breathing is not restored. There is a sixty five percent worse. There's a sixty five percent risk of worsening in what's called their apnea hype up the index within three years so money tousands of children are having operations to improve their sleep. They have their tonsils removed. They have their adenoids removed. But there is very little follow for these kids in terms of restoring these breathing you cannot just remove the obstruction of the nose. You also need to change the behavior and the pattern of breathing and you know I as another tied an operation on my nose in nineteen ninety four and I spoke with one hundred and fifty year knows intro doctors last year in Madrid and I to the doctors I explained that did a wonderful job fixing my nose but they never taught me how to breathe through my nose and I think some of them are smiling. There may be some gutted. Maybe some didn't get it. We kind of just fixed the obstruction. We do have to change the Habash. And that's a thing that we all know. Data explains in some way a capacity. Where is the per person sleeping next to us or does Some might for the definitely looking forward to talking about the program you set in but is it just for those who've probably realized that the breeding Being painted by Zahir no sounds. Should I be alarmed? Should I be concerned as to you know the severity unlike? I just want people to realize dogs. The Evan is somebody of form has experienced some sort of snoring. And whether you never done it yourself. Economy is slowly necessarily. But you working in someone's told you now is it. Always the case at snoring is a result of a lack of Control braving And if saw she way be pretty concerned about it. As human development continues even as as our human development continues to human race. You one could argue that the size of the airway is getting smaller that the facial structures changing and as the airway gets smaller. It is going to increase resistance to breathing. But you know what's causing resistance are turbulence in the Upper Airway? Open I talk about the upper airway on talking about the nays. The nasal cavity denies a firing switches. Bird meets Detroit. The aura firing system out meets Detroit. We have to consider both the size of the airway diameter amish as well as the flow of breathing now which children. No child should snore. A child who has sleep disordered breathing that includes snoring to have ten times the risk of of learning difficulties. So you know if you look at the amount of kids with. Add adhd and. They're often put on Ritalin. And has that really dissolution when reading it could be their sleep. Is the big problem here. And there. A number of wonder Florida dentists in the United States. Who recognize this recognized this entre throat and address book coming out by Journalists Coach James? Nestor it's due out in. May actually be dismount and the book is called Brett and James. Nestor is a journalist. Who has invested breathing for the last four years? And I was looking just Penguin semi on kind of a preview copy of vision. And I read ish and it's really touching on the stuff that we touched on the oxygen advantage. Bokan delight to see it because James. Nestor doesn't have a vested point of view. You know he's a journalist. He's not writing about like one could argue that. I'm working in this field and hence I want to get the information out there but when you see a journalist going on. He interviewed a lot of individuals. Dr William Hang from from California. He interviewed Dr Michael Gallup Mariana Evans Pam Dr. John and he went flew to different countries interview. These people and we really have something. That's going on the shape of the human faces changing the airways changing and some of it is coming down to food. You know in terms of going from switching from traditional foods over to what we are now consuming process diets and also lack of chewing lack of breastfeeding lack of awareness of tongue tied lack of awareness of mouth breathing the effects of ash and there is also another aspect in terms of the connection between food and sleep. Because if you're constantly having disruptions to your sleep what happens is there's two hormones affected one is grin and dealers. Leptin and granted stimulates appetite and Leptin suppresses appetite. But if you have if you have constant disruptions to your sleep you will tend to wake up and be hungry during the day as a result to eat more and as you eat more you put on more Waesche. You put more weight on the tongue. More ways on Detroit's more wages the belly and as you put on more wage you have increased the sleep up the so there's always a connection between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea and. It's another vicious circle so we should be looking at you know in terms of the four functions of the Human Body. We're talking about we'RE TALKING ABOUT SLEEP. We're talking about nutrition and we're also talking about emotions of the mind because I like to bring in this. You know we see people who remember depression anxiety and when you start investigating their sleep that often tell you that they're wake up feeling exhausted and then if I asked him well. Has Anybody ever referred you to do a sleep study to check out do you have obstructive sleep apnea dancers often? No and I think it's the reason being is because all too often we consider the person with depression. They're exhausted because of their depression. But maybe it is the exhaustion that is causing the depression. You know the human body is to interwoven just to money. Connections Darren bidirectional relationships between one function on another and in medicine. Every function has been isolated. But you can't do that. The human body because every function is intertwined. You'll have to look at the big picture and that's exactly it. It's almost like the ground. Zero of problems is somewhat other. You could definitely argue is breathing. Ron. Because that's that's the start of it and if you have breathing correctly you not going to rot and it becomes ambitious. Sokoll is you told just exponentially escalating the answer. There's a number of significant studies that like Utah. Those whole minds of that. Same ground that just a couple of things But very dude specific indicators of of hundreds of things are implied that if you draw slave we'd have prayed correctly Put up body into many of problems. Such as potential can't saw a metabolic syndrome diabetes Alzheimer's all those kinds of things he tossed on The The the the things wants to meet him Oxygen Saturation. I absorption. So it's all well to have a Alex as we said Alison Saturation Doesn't change too much so the importance of is actually. How much muscles absorbs isn't that? How much oxygen yesterday have in terms of your hemoglobin separate assets ratio? It's more a case of how much body absorbs tossed upon not Can you just I like. This is actually more for the him before. Side of athletes So what happens the oxygen during our workouts and wondering what's it removing while what I would say is if I was working. Madani alita are recreational athletes? I would always tell them to do something recreation. I I say for recreational athlete. You should do all of your physical exercise. But you're Mike closed on here. Here's the reason being. It's tougher at the start for the first six to eight weeks and the reason being is because you are breathing. Truest smarter entry and as a result. You know your nostrils are smaller than your mouth. And it's forcing you to do physical exercise. You know which are mark closed that you're exposing the body to an increased air hunger now. An increased air hunger. During physical exercise is due to the increased carbon dioxide in the blood and if you continuously exposure body says increased air hunger air hunger diminishes over time so what it means is Dan for a given level of physical exercise? You don't need as much breathing. So there's an economic saving there because it it does this there is cost associated with moving your breathing muscles. You know if you if you're arresting where about two to three percent of our video too is going to support the breathing muscles and if we go for walk about maybe five percent six percent if we do fairly intense physical exercise is probably about ten percent and if we do maximum physical exercise it's about thirteen to fifteen percent but if we do have a breathing pattern disorder it increases dash and for individuals who were during the hyperventilation provocation test. That's when they really breathed deliberately hard for thirty seconds to three minutes the oxygen consumption to support their breathing muscles increase to thirty percent. So does all about breathing. Efficiency NUMBER ONE IS. How do you teach in athletes to do more with less the next load on them? So for the recreational athlete I would say do everything which closed yet. It's tougher but keep doing ish and then it gets easy and that's when you start you know you're breathing lighter forgiven intensity of exercise for the elite athletes. I would say do fifty percent of your training which are closed. Why because it adds an extra load onto you and again. It's the same reasons and I say to a fifty percent which are mouth open so that you don't have muscle deconditioning because initially when you do trauma to nose breathing you're not going to have the same intensity because you're feeling that restriction drew to the air hunger but that's that's up -tations of the body and nose breathing allows you to take the air deeper into the lungs and the greatest concentration of blood is in the low regions of the lungs so nose breathing also increase the oxygen taking the blood. Now I know I already said that. You can't increase the blood oxygen saturation by by increasing your breathing but you can increase the Buxton saturation by switching to nasal breathing. Now it might be one or two percent but at the same time when you're doing a physical exercise but breathing through your nose. The carbon dioxide and blood is is higher and wit sustained physical exercise with nasal breathing. You can tolerate a higher and pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood. I'm Wa- discipline allow more to released from the red blood cells to tissues so if you if you look at the work the professor George Dahlem. Da L. A. And Dan. This is so understudied that there're very few papers in the words investigating the benefits of nasal breathing versus mouth breathing or any difference between the two but he is looked at it and one paper that was published in twenty ten recreational athletes. He got some breathing through their nose for six months. During physical exercise he done tests dumb after six months. When the physical adaptations had taken pace they were able to achieve one hundred percent of their work regime. Ten St on the graded exercise test with nasal breathing versus moat. But with twenty. Two percent less ventilation so twenty. Two percent less less breathing and an increased carbon dioxide in the blood forty four millimeters of mercury versus forty which in turn led to a reduction in the fraction of expired oxygen so D- individuals breathing through the nose that I had a better oxygen taking the bud but they had a better oxygen delivery to the tissues. Now if you look at a few other studies that were published back thirty years ago by Dr John Doe Yard looking at the brainwave states in nasal breathing versus map breathing. Nasal BREEDERS ENTERED FLOW. Stace not breathing mouth breathing trouser. Evolution is associated with fight or flight. Our ancestors didn't Jews their mouths debris during physical exercise look at the research of neanderthals two years ago researchers found the undertows toilets had these really wide nostrils to allow the conditioning of a large volume of air. Trudeau knows not just during rest but also during physical exercise we we have lost the art of breathing and we have lost the art of breathing. Only relatively recently now. I know some people will say well. Dr Western price book wasn't very scientific or etc. It was really an observation and it was using the best available science at that time published back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and he'd locked. Ash. The craniofacial changes of individuals. Spend a switch from traditional died over to a process dies first generation. Children became operators. These children had deformed dental actress data overcrowding of teat dead higher per pilots and they didn't have good airway. And you know you have to consider if you want to be developed not leash you need a good airway so breathing. Efficiency is one thing but human development is another thing yet. You touched upon sympathetic and the passive pathetic death so miss you so just to reiterate you signed it. Used to be dominant through the past sympathetic. And now it's through the sympathetic because of the fact that why that we've changed out. I Guess Breeding Patterns Zach when I suppose you know we always want to kind of have an optimal. You want to have a balanced between the power sympathetic and sympathetic. Because we want to be resilient we want to be able to adopt whatever. Environmental changes are whatever comes our way but I would say to mouth breeders a definitely more stuck in that sympathetic tone Lauren. That fight or flight response more agitated education of the mind if you think of. How do we breed when we get stressed well? We breed fast and shallow. How does a map reader breed fast and shallow because your nose imposes resistance to your breathing? That's two to three times out of the moat and by slowing down your breathing. This helps to calm the mind. So again twenty seventeen Stanford medical school if you were to Google Stanford Medical School and slow breathing. They identified a new structure. In the brain the locus corollas and they said that the primary purpose of this structure is despite on your breathing. So when you really slow down your breathing destructure will determine that you are slowing down your Brett and destruction would relay signals of come to the rest of the brain but Mao printers. Don't have slow breathing. I wasn't a slow breeder when I was a map reader because you have no resistance to your breathing during wakefulness and also mapping always activating the upper chest and our diet from breathing muscle is not just for expiration. You know even if you were to look at it from the point of view functional movement. Can you have functional movement unless you have functional breathing? Is it just a coincidence? That ninety percent of people who have good functional movement also have good functional breathing and if breathing is normalized movement is normalized and movement is normalized. You're more risk of injury however there's also connection between die from and the mind so if you're breathing using the die from just breathing low breathing lash reading slow breathing deep and use an acronym. Lsd So people remember so light is about the biochemistry of breathing. Slow is about bringing a cadence of breathing more specifically practices between five point. Five to six bits per minute and that's to stimulate the vagus nerve to increased heart rate for your buzzer improve. Response resigned Arrhythmia stimulate. What's called borrow receptors or pressure receptors? But basically slow breathing to restored by these systems which are disturbed by stress. And then we look at depressing which is targeting the bio mechanics and the problem with breathing. Donnas that people are all in their own little silos and I was in my silo to whip you take. Oh as my background. I looked primarily at the biochemistry. It's not enough so the oxygen advantage is very much bio chemically focused. But the next book is going to be different. That's one currency rising. I'm GONNA broad broad Nash in terms of looking at functional breathing from three dimensions the biochemistry the cadence of the Brett the by mechanics and true the Brett when you really break down. What's going on there? I think it's amazing. I think I'm only scratching the surface here. Have the more I go down this rabbit hole. I'm twenty years down this rabbit hole and the more. I'm down there that the less realized I do know it's incredible and I'm sitting here. I'm writing notes. I'm Jay rotting notes as you. It just from personal development is a renowned always paypal you reference Essentially what you you with Athlete's the ability to do more with less. And we've seen that in hot consistently with allergy training. I believe you referenced. The first this was not in sixty eight Mexico impacts pictures that right. Yeah it it it was. I really when kind of you know. Strength and conditioning coach is on coach. Started wondering how are the athletes that were performing up? There now didn't do very well. You know at altitude but it was fun to come back down to sea level to started surpassing their personal best on. Dong drew the question. That was just something in this. In terms of altitude training so attitude training would be when did spends a period of time. Maybe a couple of weeks at an altitude of maybe two thousand meters terabytes and an order to expose the body hypotheses for the body to make adaptations including increase red blood cells For example the hormonal rich reporting or EPO. Epo when the body is put into a HYPOC STACE. The kidneys understood that liver to a lesser extent. Synthesized this hormone and a richer appointee in repeal. It's goes as a maturation of the red blood cells in the bone marrow. So by increasing red blood cells increases your oxygen carrying capacity and that in turn increases your view to Max now we do Brett toiling and we deliberately put the body into a high poxy state. But it's intermittent and it's not just that we're dropping blood oxygen saturation. But we're also increasing carbon dioxide. So what we would be doing is doing intermittent type pox ick high per capita training. And I think the biggest effect of what we're doing is instead it's disturbing the acid base balance that were increasing hygiene in the blood and were deliberately putting the body into a state of acidosis to force the body to improve buffering capacity which is probably happening inside in the muscle but this intern then can delay lactic acid fatigue. So if you think about the two are doing high intensity and for training to stimulate ANAEROBIC glycolysis. Well if you're wearing a potok similar which is a little device that you wear in your finger you know. And it's got a red light and infrared lightness and it tells you of all your hemoglobin. How much of it is occupied by oxygen? If you do high intensity interval training with your mouth open your blood oxygen saturation. Were drop down to about ninety three percent. If you do it with your Mac closed your blood oxygen saturation. Were dropped down to about ninety one percent. You are hardly high poxy at that point so what we do. Is We do jogging. Do running leaders sprinting. Brett tolling on an explanation and were dropping the oxygen saturation severe hypoxia. But we're also at the same time increasing carbon dioxide because the drop to bid oxygen saturation hydrogen coming from the tissue. Doesn't get oxidized. It associates Peru Vic. Acid form lactic acids and disinterred dissociates into hydrogen than lactation but the carbon dioxide is well on the other hand we are increasing Dash. So we're getting a hydrogen ion from the carbon dioxide affect and hydrogen from the oxygen effect. And what that's doing is basically you know. We're stressing the body but we're doing it but in limits you know I don't want to. I don't like Oxygen Saturation drops down below seventy percent. I don't want people getting disoriented. I certainly don't want people passing out and people can pass out if your blood oxygen saturation drops down to below sixty percent. And I don't think there's a need to force body to make those adaptations and you know. I could talk about a paper that was published in twenty eighteen by a researcher called. Warren's W O or s and he got twenty one at least rugby union athletes disappear during peak season. I think they were in the early. Twenty S ANAHEIM. Him Do the same exercise we do. Forty meter sprints after an explanation for four weeks and a control group are just doing their forty meter spent but normal breathing. The repeated sprint Abbasi in the group that was doing breadth holding on the explanation. That repeated spent about increased from nine to fourteen point. Eight for weeks now. This is what a leash professional rugby union players. If you if you get a one percent improvement would elite athletes. It's it's massive. But to increase repeated spent buzzy from nine to fourteen point Asian Edwards. The athletes could do fourteen point. Age repeated sprints forty meters with thirty seconds the departure every thirty seconds before exhaustion to increase dash from from nine to fourteen pages a huge improvement the control group who was doing high intensity interval training marginal change come up from nine to maybe ten that was you know so. I think I think by making simple adaptations to an existing training regime. One can be clever about this. I'm breathing has not been tapped into because normally I think people thought was it was a bunch of hippies. Are you know these guys with the open standards going around with lung hair hugging trees and things like that? We have to bear in mind. There's more to it than breathing. Just taking a depresed. Batmans he's accurate that's repeated sprint. Ability is huge particularly in the tame spoiled while owner tasteful and a lot of the functional and the hard time sports because the ability to perform at your best and doing over and over again give in a given time is huge so just to kind of like some paper help. Works is your body at intensity training working an aerobically and then what you WanNa do is obviously have the ability to not have your laptop The ballpark that Incense Your Hotter Don's elevate so much to the way your body to not remove them you want your ability to remove on the Hodgin to be better than to -bility to produce and that way you're able to continually continually sprint repeatedly. Oh performance high intensity along now by doing what? They saw this technique that we're about to dive into and learning to breathe through your nose or even just learning to be more efficient with oxygen by doing more with less you your ability to actually Delight that onsite of continuous boot up improves And so that's exciting for people in the sporting world because it means you can improve your performance without having to do anything to technical other than just lanes of three. Which is a really exciting. So Patrick night is where I'm really excited jumping to some of the procedures that you you know you talk about. So let's let's stop striding through the ball test. I know it's a thing we do in the very thing we do in the morning so like what is. What is the ball test? The blood test is as soon as you wake up in the morning. Sit Up in the bed and just allow your breathing to recover for a minute or two identical number breath in through your nose and time in seconds until you feel the first definite breed our first involuntary contractions of your breathing muscles. And when you let go your breathing should be fairly normal. So it's a measurement of the first physiological response or the reaction of the brain to tell you to resume breathing so if you can imagine it despite when you exhale Andrew. Stop breathing during that time. Carbon Dioxide is going to increase in the blood drops and Madala. The brain reacts to that by sending an impulse to breathe at some point. So you're measuring. How long does it take for the brain to react just sandy and post to braids now? It's generally regarded? That test is generally regarded as a measure of the Chemo of your body to Carbon Dioxide. And it's also measure of breathlessness so the session and deer insurance of breathlessness. So why would the chemo? Sensitivity of your body to carbon dioxide important while well trained athletes and elite athletes typically have a reduced ventilator response to carbon dioxide in other words they can tolerate a high buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood. But we want to do is win. Athletes be want to measure you know. We want to get some indicator of how senses of our day to build to the buildup of carbon dioxide. Because if an athlete is overly sensitive to carbon dioxide buildup will mean that they will have disproportionate breakfasts and I know. Strength and conditioning coaches may put that down to lack of condition but that athletes may be training hard but as their training hard. They are breathing. Hard and training does not change breathing patterns. Because it's your everyday breathing. That dictates how you breathe during your physical training like if you have an it. That's every now and again having the Matt Opener. During Hay fever season you know because there's pollen their nose stuffy than they are breathing through them out and they sleep at the match openness night. All that's going to impact Dr Degree of breakfast and during physical training so I'm not concerned but of course I'm concerned. But how is the Guy Sitting in front me? How is he breathing? But I'm even more concerned with. How is he breathing when he leaves me? How does he breathed when he goes into the we? Go TO SLEEP. Produce Training etc. So that's one test we use the boat and then we also use what's called the maximum breathlessness test now. This test wouldn't be so but if the fee matters pregnant or if anybody is any serious medical conditions including cardiovascular issues but we also want to measure what's the oprah limits of tolerance of breathlessness and for this we take you know you arresting. Don't do much physical movements but have you know you're arresting first of all and then you take a norm breath in through your nose. Hold your nose and start walking and counter money paces. Can you hold your breath for until you're really bursting for Brett? So this is a maximum and the goal is that the bow score is forty seconds and the maximum breathlessness test is eighty to a hundred paces. And that's what we want. Now you'll be surprised of. Seeing the Olympic athletes would bow scores of twelve and fifteen seconds android maximum breathlessness test of twenty and thirty paces. That really needs to improve and but it improves. It's a sign. That breathing is becoming more efficient. That's something we can do. It has an and to be clear. You make very star of oxygen advantage. There are some people that should be very careful. When applying some of these brain techniques can use to make it clear hoods those people Before we proceed yes of course like the one aspect functional breathing is generally find for for vast majority of people breathing through your nose Jesse slowing your breathing with lateral expansion contraction of the lower ribs. That's all good and if the female is pregnant I don't teach them breathing exercises because I don't want change their environment and I don't want to change the oxygen that's delivered to the fetus or changed her immune system. I'm we can changed. Immune system true the Brett now with people with the likes of high blood pressure different cardiovascular conditions they can get a lot of beneficial from doing slow breathing especially to a cadence of six. Brett's permission because it stimulates pressure receptors in the major blood vessels to make the more sensitive to help the autonomic nervous system. The recovery are to improve the functioning of the A. N. S. now Brett. Tolling is a different ballgame. Retorting is a stressor. That's fine we don't first of all we don't do hyperventilation before Brett tolling. We just normal breathing but we have. The individual breathe normally entered our nose out. Trudeau knows holder knows and one of the the exercise that we will do that. You know you have to breathe. Introducer knows Start Walking with their match closed holding their nose. Walk Faster go into jog jog faster. Gwent were run Guintaras sprint. So as the air hunger gets stronger go faster and then at the end let go but minimum breathing for six Brett's and have a semi active recovery just general walking minimum breathing for six Braxton normal breathing for tweeting Brett's and then repeated and repeated five times. I we do that to stress the body but that's only suitable for relatively fish has the individuals you know. It's not suitable for as pregnancy any serious medical conditions. Never do strong breath holes. Sometimes if I'm working with Asthma Yup I can push paper but asthma but I know where to push them and but I've made mistakes over the past I've seen people have put them into full blown panic attacks and I've done that I've done a a few times So I've learned to lash by teaching these exercises and sometimes people would be teaching breathing exercises and they kind of used the same breathing exercises for everybody. You can't you can't do that like if you're doing functional breathing generally that's fairly okay because there's minimal risk but if have somebody who is predisposed panic disorder for example and if you have do a strong bret told that fear of suffocation will will drive into such a fight or flight response that you know a mentally. They will think that they are going to die now. There's probably you know they're fine but they don't think that way because we often have suffocation is often the symptom of different conditions. The feeling of suffocation happens during an asthma attack. It happens during a panic attack. It happens during anxiety so we deliberately Dan Potter individual into a feeling of suffocation with their body doesn't know whether this is read are Nash. And their body would perceive that as a trash so there is a way to Jewish underway. Not to do it but I think for for for you know for healthy individuals. It's a great way to stress the body a little bit and to do it to the point that you know it's not causing damage. We never want dash but to give a few examples. Dan What happens when you do a breadth. Holt while you can open up your nose you can open up your your airways. Am You increase oxygen? You increase blood flow to the brain because when you do a Bret told. Yes your blood. Oxygen Saturation is dropping. But at the same time. Carbon Dioxide in the blood is increasing. I'm this carbon dioxide. Do but it dilates blood vessels and causes oxygen delivery to be increased to the brain so for example. If I'm having athletes do a warm up I want them to do their warm up. Fifteen twenty minutes all with nasal breathing and we start off with lateral expansion contraction of low rips to help cam the mind. But into their warm-up I will have them do five strong battles because I want to put them into that stress stage. I want to activate the sympathetic effect. I want to increase blood flow to the brain. I want to make them highly focused on alert and I want their spleen to attract to released red blood cells into circulation prior to doing physical exercise. I want our nose to be open. I want the Airways to be open. And I also want increased oxygen delivery to the working muscles prior to the exercise and again little secrets but the only reason I'm saying their secret that being around for a hundred years I'm but nobody Simpson about them and that's you touch very good point across the spectrum of things that we can do this on just the athletes but it's everyday individuals because ultimately As we touched on earlier if you getting oxygen to the body's the muscles into the Brian in an efficient manner you performing better and that's not just physically cognitively as well brilliant breakdown complex issues your ability to Make decisions Stole Memory laserlike focused at all these kind of things? It is required and dialogue prostate performance job with our families. Everything like that. So this is as the obvious. Obviously a physical performances. There's so many things that help Will that rely on the correct form of Braiding Patrick do Do you have any other techniques you WanNa talk upon that you highlighting Advantage might any anything that the papal right now. Other than the bolt test and some of those other things that We could simply administer. I think it would be a good practice for people to put it into practice in to see. Sometimes people will say well you know why is why do us bite? You say to breed lasts. Everybody else is telling me to read more say okay. Practice practice breeding less. Sit Down in a nice comfortable chair. Put one hand in your chest and one hand just above your navel and Choon into your breathing pattern and especially feel the airflow coming in and out of your nose and as you're feeling the airflow coming into your nose gently slow down the speed of the breath as it enters your nostrils and when the breadth is leaving the body have a very slow and relaxed and prolonged desolation. So then when you need to be again you think. Very soft and slow gender thin deliberately. Slow down your breathing to the point that you feel less air coming into your nose almost that you are hardly breathing at all and when you slow down the speed of the breath in and when you have a very relaxed and slow gentle breath out you will you will feel or you should fail an air hunger so try to breathe slowly for three to four minutes with our hunger and then check. Are you feeling drowsy is drew changes live in the moat? And can you increase the temperature of your fingers internally? Not just because they're against your body but you could even just have your your hands on your lap. Are Your hands on the armchair for example said are not touching you but if you reduce your breathing you improve the temperature of your hands. Code hands are often very common with people who over break on tells you that harder you breed your blood. Vessels are constricting and I think most people will notice money. People will have experienced at some point in their life. They got into a state of little bit of anxiety. They started breathing harder and they felt lightheaded and dizzy. Why would you feel lightheaded and dizzy from breathing harder? Threes and being was because there was a reduction of blood Brand it wasn't an increased oxygen delivery to the brain increase stocks delivery. Brian doesn't make your lightheaded. But when drizzle reduction to blood flow and oxygen delivery brand lightheadedness can be a symptom so I would say for pupil to practices. And I'd also say don you touched on the whole aspect of mental health. We find me go through education. We are taught how to think how to break information into tiny pieces how to analyze how to decipher how to reason. We are trained. How to think the mind is trained into the superb analytic tool. We are trained. How to think? But WE ARE NOT TRAINED. How to stop thinking and the mind is ever distracted. Social media would emails with text messaging. And I think there's really a state of education of the mind and especially with the youngsters coming up here you know. All of these tools are training the brain to be distracted on. If your brain is distracted. You can't concentrate but you also are stressed more. You worry more and drawing Shis. So I'd say tiny buddy focus on your breath because you're taking your attention out of the mind onto your breathing you car your Brett which you all of the time and of course you know at the mind wanders bring your attention back onto the Brett. The mind wanders. Bring your attention back onto the Brett. Don't set a goal that your task is to get a quiet mind but genty keep bringing your attention back onto your breathing. Slow down your breathing. So from a psychological point of view from physiological point of view you have to bring a stillness to the mind one of the best things. If I was asked to choice I went to a university in Dublin Trinity College Dublin. A hat to work very very hard to get in there and I got my master's degree in there and if anybody gave me a choice your masters degree over the ability to bring a stillness to the mind I would choose any day of the week the ability to bring a stillness to the mind because the human mind is that instrument through which we perceive all of our life's experiences but Yash we never asked question. How DOES MY MIND WORK? That is powerful. That is so powerful. It's cool to hear that you would y your your stills the MoD above anything. That's that's crazy man. That's Awesome I. It makes complete sense to be to be real as well Might I'm conscious of on and there's a thousand will questions I have so we'll have to have to get back on the next time. I'll be with you and Kirk for you. Always always deal with the title podcast Of what we're Talk Matt to the food but before we go few quickfire round of questions and we'll just begin with what is what is Patrick. Morning retainment what are you? What are you doing the morning? I typically like morning for me is a great time trying to finish a now at the moment so typically very early I can start at maybe four five five o'clock in the morning. I'm very limited time and I find us a tremendous way. I can concentrate on at the same time. It's almost that you're stealing time. But you're standing quality time so that's what I do in the morning and have a coffee. I live very rarely in the middle of nowhere. Total silence total darkness and of course at four o'clock in the morning five o'clock in the morning there some light coming in by. Yup. That's how I start my day. That's awesome How how do you control the controllable mate? I use the example of whenever I want to go somewhere. That's I don't know there's going to be activity presence. I take my gym shoes to make sure the gym. All if I know that Maybe going to be eating a table meal on a Sunday on Saturday. So how does how does Patrick? Control the controllable. It's a good question I traveled a lash. And sometimes it's not possible to control the control. I you know what? Sometimes I'm you know I wouldn't say got a good degree of discipline but then there's times that I lack of us and I have to sing about life in that. I want to enjoy it as well so you know. I'm not leash but what I do is I always make sure that I get in some physical exercise day. Typically in our nine and a half more brisk walk could be light jog but typically more walking in the country environment and I can do that anywhere even if I don't have the right shoes with me you know. I love to have a balance. And that's really what I wanted. I never wanted to feel stressed over. The that. Need the rush to to make money. We often see it in our life around us. I think there's a lot of stress out there. A lot of anxiety and society is but a lot of stress in individuals and this may be is what the breadth can do that. It helps you to bring some kind of focus on. May maybe that we are more likely to make the right decisions than Nash. Instead of just getting swept along with the current of what society wants absolately reminds. You say that yeah like you know being just kind of like setting up and doing way. Want exactly might. What's this is my favorite. So if you were fruit. A food meal earning gradient. What would you be in? Why Guinness over? What do you think that works for me? I don't know that's That's what would I be and why I like Avocados. Debbie might real thing usually about one or two a day and so that's the only thing that comes to mind. Of course. I love a bear Guinness. That works for me to Richmond. Doesn't you know I mean that's maybe that's my fall down. Who knows might well? Apricot have a great story with Brady through the skin and I was saying with Guinness. You need lofty the beast. It's a fantastic way to go of. Dum Dum thanks thank you. I'm working on Might Song on on just four listeners. I'm a massive fan of the oxygen advantage this book and so I've definitely if you you're interested in a really simple modality or training thing that you guys can older just that it doesn't take any purchase other than obviously yet in the book itself a highly recommend picking up oxygen advantage and you can pick it up wherever you pick books online and all and Patrick has done a very good job of summating everything. That's scientific inroad into a wide. We can relate to familial level the sporty references. Because that's just how I that's how I operate but might so you've hinted at a second book is let's when when are we expecting that might get you back on the podcast? When that wants relations. Well that's a good question. This book is Israeli. A little bit different in terms of it's very much a focus on health. We're talking about sleep. Dentistry females really that has been overlooked in terms of breathing. But the female body in terms of changes of hormones can have a huge impact and breathing diabetes type on In terms of improving control of Diabetes Epilepsy Functional Movement. Back pain pain so I've kind of looked at putting together a lot of research in terms of topics and breathing. That weren't covered here today. And so you have like the oxygen advantage I had written and then my book agents said that you have to rewrite the whole thing again. This guy says I need you to write this focus. If you're talking to the Fella down the pub I've written about eighty thousand words and I'm not quite sure if it's if I'm talking down the pumps up near to approach book Asian Ascend on the manuscript to him. But you know what would see? I love to see it out in six months to year. That's when I see it. I was looking for that matter. That's that's exactly the of what? I've always interested in as well so go is. Obviously if you're interested in saying what's Patrick's Batman where can we find you? The best point of Reference Oxygen Advantage Dot Com is the best and we're on social media even though I hate the stuff but went on us because we need to get information out there as well so we're on instagram. Got some videos on Youtube. Good free content there as well to get us out of fantastic us. O obviously Vegan is and if you need more information let me know always a fan of the three things alerts and podcast today in. I'm already reading. Winds will do as I continue to book. I'm just GonNa leave you with these guys. So you imagine the fact that you performing what you have been at this point in time and you probably save it to base somewhat a high regard but now often listeners joss you potentially have sun with more in general potential to shave side and all you have to do his brief to simple as that said Patrick. Thank you so much for joining us today Enjoy the rest died in Ireland will be in touch. Might a yeah love. Love everything you do. Thank you so much. Great Time loved the love. The trash thanks very much.

sleep disordered breathing Brett mouth breathing physical exercise nose breathing Upper Airway Matt Opener APNEA asthma Brian Wrestling Detroit Mike Patrick Instagram Trudeau Nash Jason Woodland Patrick McEwen
Babbage: The fast and the spurious

The Economist: Babbage

26:50 min | 9 months ago

Babbage: The fast and the spurious

"The Drugs and vaccines for Kobe, nineteen are appearing faster than ever. Put Our government's approving them to easily. The Klay Message to any other government is don't start dropping your citizens with vaccines do not properly tested. It's just not worth it. Hello, and welcome to baggage from economist radio our weekly podcast on technology and science. I'm Kenneth Kooky a a senior editor at the Economist and coming up on today's show. Musk's quest to wire a computer into the human brain. What they demonstrated. The other night was a device that can record from a thousands and twenty four, these the wise a thousand brain cells. And every breath you tank. Just, light breathing display over a couple of minutes youth can really feel this change in your body. But I Any new effective vaccine will be given emergency approval by the British government, which aims to move with unprecedented speed. In America Donald Trump has promised to deliver a vaccine before the end of the year. Yet this week he said the administration will not work with the World Health. Organization. Linked effort to develop distribute a covert nineteen vaccine. While drugs and vaccines are vital to controlling covid nineteen. The WHO warned that a vaccine that is only moderately effective could actually worsen the pandemic. On August Eleventh Vladimir Putin of Russia declared victory push the. Each potential. Another government made the claim that it was the world's first approve of Vaccine Sputnik Five. This involves injecting people with a harmless virus that has been modified to express one of the proteins made by SARS cough to the virus that causes covert nineteen. The approach is similar to other vaccine candidates around the world veteran trials. But the speed of sputnik five use raises troubling issues. We know very little about the testing of this vaccine such as how long it was tested for. In, for long because it was given to only seventy six people, Tasha loader is the economists health policy editor. The results of the tests have not been published. The Russian said they've also tested the vaccine animals. Those results have not been published either and so really we haven't information vacuum about his except for what the institute the did. The studies have said to us, which is very little. How did that come to be approved so quickly? Well, I mean. The Russian government simply decided that it didn't go through the sorts of normal trials that you would expect a vaccine. It redrew the finishing line. You know there are a lot of covert vaccines around the world going through was a called phase three trials and the pappas phase three trials is that you give them to thousands and thousands of people on you find out firstly, if the vaccine works secondly, if in thousands of people, it's still safe tested. Thousands of people that you really get a good signal in a large number of people to serve whether it is really well tolerated. So I suppose there is a thing called best practices in drug development and they're not actually adhering to it. Yes. Absolutely. But the Russians are not the only ones who have been doing this and they may not have been the first earlier this year. One of our correspondents in Beijing had told us that he'd heard. Anecdotal. Reports. Airport workers were being given a Chinese vaccine on the sort of reports that we're hearing now from China that some workers in state-owned industries had been given a vaccine seem to agree with those sort of anecdotal reports we were hearing. So I think it's quite clear that some countries willing to relax the normal requirements for medicine safety in order to just move quickly. Now, that's not something that we should expect to see in countries and regions with. Agencies that a much more independent that governments that makes you think about the governments of Russia and China. They have much more of a stranglehold if you like over the regulatory agencies, one would hope that the regulatory agencies in other countries have a bit more spine and will wait the results of phase three trials that is banned minimum trust to move ahead safely vaccine development. So what's the problem of rushing it? Will the problem is the vaccine could be unsafe and there's a couple of ways in which a vaccine could be safe one it could come with side effects thought all dodging dangerous. You do get ready neurological conditions triggered. The other concern is something cooled vaccine enhanced disease. This is where you give someone vaccine. and. Lowering the risk that someone gets sick or dies from a disease, it actually increases it and you know we've seen signs of vaccine enhanced diseases in talk development. In the past, it's not particularly common, but it is something that can happen and doctors y you put vaccines through phase three trials. You you need to rule out that problem you need to make sure that the vaccine you give to someone is not going to give him side effect ten it's not going to make Cova nineteen us. Now. It's not just Russia or China that's been rapidly improving vaccines and drugs without adequate trials. On August. Twenty third president trump announced approval of the use of convalescent plasma therapy to treat covid nineteen. The FDA has issued an emergency use authorization for re-treatment known as convalescent plasma. How does that work and why was that rush to? The convalescent plasma is essentially take blood from people who've coverage from covid nineteen. Do you extract out the antibodies that they've made in their blood in something called plasma, and then you give it to someone who's sick and plasma therapies been used for over one hundred years on it works in some diseases and not in others we do think convalescent plasma is promising therapy this question of Shit and there are trials going on the planet but as yet they haven't been very conclusive. It still sane as an experimental therapy and president trump describe this as a very historic breakthrough. This is what I've been looking to do for a long time. This is a great thing today. I'm pleased to make a truly historic announcement and are. The FDA Looked at the results of one trial and said, there's enough evidence to authorize it to use. It's former drug approval, and there's a couple of problems with this one is the the evidence is really poor. It's not randomized controlled trial told those. nope. To See by group is just to trial where some patients would give convalescent plasmas sooner than others and some people are concerned that the group that had the high mortality actually had more sicker patients in it, and that's one of the problems when you're not doing randomized controlled trial. Another one of the issues is really that it was just so badly handled by the FDA the head of the FDA cutoff and announced that thirty five people of every hundred treated with compliment plasma with be saved on that number was just completely wrong he had. Gotten his statistics wrong heat confused, relative, and absolute risk on. The actual figure it was more like three lives saved cools that's worth having, but it certainly isn't very historic breakthrough and. We really do need to kind of white for proper randomized controlled trials to really answer the question of whether this therapy wax. The touch. It seems like there's a real paradox here because in the midst of the pandemic, we want governments to act quickly. But here we think they're doing it wrong. How do we square the circle? How can we have it both ways speed plus regulatory muster? Will we have got speed? That's the kind of insane thing is that we're? Moving incredibly rapidly and the results have phase three trials for vaccines could come in in the next three or four weeks. Nobody's ever move moved quickly. So what I would say is the every legitimate step has been taken to accelerate the speed with which drugs and vaccines have moved. What people are complaining about now is that these are unreasonable stops and that essentially governments behaving and slightly risky fashion and doing. So for political reasons if the British government all. The Europeans wanted to accelerate struck vaccines like this they could but they haven't, and why is that? Well, nobody here is coming up for reelection in November asked Mr. Trump is all in China they may wish Russia may wish to sort of show what strong powerful countries they are, how they're taking care of their citizens I mean there's all sorts of political dimensions to moves that have been made Tasha voter you very much. Thank you so much can. For, more pandemic and a wide ranging look at a fast changing world subscribed to the economist go. Economists Dot. com slash podcast offer for the best introductory offer and the link is in the show notes. Again, that's a communist dot com slash podcast offer. And don't forget to tell them. Can Censure. Next up pandemic or no twenty twenty has been a bumper year, for Elon, musk inmate space x became the first private company ever to send humans into orbit. While over the past eight months, Tesla's market capitalization has more than quadrupled making it the most. Valuable car company on the planet. Last Friday another musk venture, the Niro technology company neural link which connect to computer into the human brain notched up what seems to be another win with public demonstration of its technology at use in. Aches. Aren't welcome to the product. Emma. Of Real excited we've got I think it's going to. Blow your mind. Shoot a form, the demo captured the public imagination, and trended wildly online. But as a computer enhanced human brain, really within reach the near link team is working on what's called the brain machine interface, and that involves electrodes of very spoil wise placed into the brain to record the electrical activity from brain cells. Andrew Jackson is a professor of neural interfaces at Newcastle University and what they demonstrated the other night was a device that they've built that can record. From one thousand and twenty four of these little wives about a thousand brain cells and the activity is processed by an implant that sits inside the skull, and then realize that activity wirelessly out to a receiver and the case of New Orleans pig Gertrude. I. Think her name was what activities specifically was being detected and relaid in the pig that we saw the electrodes were placed in. A sensory part of the brain related to the Peace Now. So. You're hearing are real time signals from the link in Grocery had. So this year link and says what? Was the activity of sensory neurons that were relying information about the the paycheck sniffing at various objects. They also showed a video I think they had recorded from brain cells in the motor area of the brain. When we have. Of our picks on a treadmill. Funny concept really in that video, they were suggesting that they were able to infer the movement of the pigs. On a treadmill from listening to these brain signals. In classical style this has been very snazzy presented and Garner a lot of attention but from your perspective someone who's been a lot in this field as an academic, is there anything particularly new or innovative about what neural incas done with this technology thing what they've done a nice job on is. A lot of the engineering of the device itself. So to some extent, I think they've made a lot of progress in the areas that perhaps you might expect a tech company well resourced to make make progress on. So so previously, lot of the work that has been done in animals and also some work has been using these techniques in humans has tended to use a cables connecting the electrodes in the brain through the skin to large racks of equipment. Computers and so forth powered from the mains in order to process and make sense of this data and what they've done is taken a lot of that electronics shrunk it down, made it low power. Enabling it to be placed within the skull and relaying these signals. Wirelessly, the other thing that they showed which I think is very nice is. A robot a bit like a sewing machine. To. Insert these electrodes and apparently automatically avoid blood vessels to do a minimum amount of damage. So I think all of this is very impressive where I am more skeptical is. The the claims that they're making of being able to. Sort of read thoughts and enhance brain function through this technology. There's there's quite a big gap between being able to record these brain cells compared to some of the claims that became rather more outlandish about being able to read thoughts and and read memories and things like that because to some extent that require much more progress in actually understanding how these signals relate to complex mental and cognitive functions does this have the markings of a turf war between academics and entrepreneurs because I know that he on must recently responded to? A news report in which your own criticisms of neuro link had been quoted and he said basically that his view was academics, overweight ideas and underweight bring them to fruition or less kindly that they're all talking no trousers what do you say to that? So I I think it would be very unfortunate if this ends up being a sort of tribal arguments, Elon Musk I'm sure recognizes that he's following in the footsteps of some very pioneering work in the academic field that really pushed the idea of brain machine interfaces forward of basic. Fundamental neuroscience research into practical demonstrations of devices that could help people with spinal cord injury. I think that from the academic point of view, we ought to see this as a success story that a technology that for a long time has been being developed in in the academic research arena is capturing the attention of near technology companies. So I did not mean to any of the comments that I made I didn't mean to turn this into a turf war I think that we will. All benefit from from the exchange of ideas and working together. You heard it here. First Turf War averted and Professor Jackson to end with a look forward musk said that the ultimate goal of neuro link is to usher in an age of quote super, human cognition in your view, does that claim that view of the future really belong in the realm of science fiction as far ahead as we currently see so I think it's very hard to judge these things I think that clearly Ilan Musk likes big ideas and he likes big kind of visions. I think that at the moment, the state of the technology president is that there hasn't really been demonstrated and I think it will be quite a while before anyone demonstrates a cognitive enhancement using this kind of brain machine interface technology that doesn't mean we shouldn't try and that doesn't mean that there's probably not a lot of very interesting science and maybe all sorts of other benefits that we will get along the way but I think it's important to be somewhat kind of modest and accepting of the fact that there's still an awful lot. We don't understand about the brain how the brain works and how intelligence works Professor Andrew Jackson thank you very much. Thank you for having me. Up. This podcast is supported by a vast vast is a global leader in cybersecurity trusted by over four hundred, thirty, five million users of ask privacy solutions to keep your identity and actions hidden security solutions to stop malware phishing virus attacks, and performance enhancing solutions to clean up in speed up your devices avast empowers you to feel safer private and more confident online to do what you WanNa do in your connected life shop work browse confidently on all your devices learn more about a vast privacy security and performance products at avast dot com. In finally. Take our breathing almost entirely for granted. Like the beating of the heart or the work of digestive system, it feels like a process that's been taken care of by the body beyond the need of any conscious attention. But this may not be the case in his latest book breath. The new science of a Lost Art James Nestor argues that our species has actually lost the ability to breathe correctly. And that reconnecting with ancient and largely forgotten breathing practices could bring about a host of benefits both mental and physical. The one estimate I heard was that eighty percent of the population has some sort of dysfunction in their breathing. These people don't necessarily have sleep apnea or snoring even though a large percentage of the population has that but many of them may be breathed too much or struggled to breathe a little too much or their noses are constantly plugged up and once they fixed those issues they can find. How beneficial therapeutic healthy breathing really is, let's go right there. Why is breathing? So important that's something that we do twenty five thousand times a day, and if we aren't doing it properly, our bodies have to constantly compensate for instance I've heard a one estimate of about a quarter of the population suffers from chronic over breathing. We breathe way more than our bodies actually need and if we're constantly doing. That were causing a lot of wear and tear on our heart and other systems. So if you think about it, if you're in a car and you're just reading at every stop light eventually, that's going to cause a lot of wear and tear on that car an on the engine and our bodies in many ways worth the exact same way. Did we ever do it? Well did we ever? Breathe in the best way possible and if we did, how did we ever stop or forget? Well, it's hard to breathing from ancient populations. But what we can do is we can look at the skele- pitcher of all of these ancient faces and all of these mouths and what we find is that people about five hundred years ago when industrialization of food really start ramping up, they had these huge. These huge mouse in these forward growing faces. So they had larger airways in their nasal apertures were much larger than ours, and that's why ancient people didn't have crooked teeth about ninety percent of the modern population has some sort of misalignment or crookedness in their teeth. That's because we have smaller mouths without smaller mouth with a smaller away, which is one of the reasons we have so many chronic breathing problems right now how does one breathe properly? What scientists have found is that very good resting breathing rate is about six breasts five breaths per minute. That's about five to six seconds in five to six seconds out when you do this, all of the systems in the body start to synchronize your heart rate's GonNa slow down, it's going to beat more easily your blood pressure's GonNa go down if you have high blood pressure and all of this allows the body to. Do it naturally wants to do more easily over an extended amount of time and just by breathing this way over a couple of minutes, you can really feel this change in your body. You can imagine if you do that for a couple of days or a couple of weeks or a COUPLA months, and that's what I went out to find people who had done that and had really transform their health and some miraculous way. I. James. That was incredible. That's about the worst way you can possibly breath. Okay. So. I have tried seeing other Maria breathing as well, and it seems like that really did slow me down explained to me what's going on with that? Well, you're a good Catholic So what the scientists did about twenty years ago they looked at different prayers they looked at the other Maria, they looked at satire NAMA which is a Kunda leany mantra. They looked at own money pod Meeham, which is Buddhist mantra when the most famous Buddhist mantras of all and they found that all of. These prayers locked in at that same about five to six breaths per minute because that's about that the mean of all of these different prayers and they have prophesized that these prayers not just for the religious method. But because they placed the body in this state of peace and then allowed all the systems of the body to work at peak efficiency. Now, you experimented on yourself for the book or at least you took part in research by plugging up your nostrils for days on end. Tell me about this. Yeah, just hearing that gives me a little PTSD. So I had been working with the Chief of radiology research down at Stanford and we had had many conversations and he's a nose guy. So he was saying that you know the noses is this miraculous organ were not using it as much as we should and because we're not using it, we could be suffering from all of these health problems on and on and on I said, well, how soon does the damage from mouth breathing come on and he didn't know because no one had tested it. So we developed this little experiment to where me and one other. Subject to plug our noses and just breathe through or mouths for ten days and I know that sounds like some sort of cloudy Jackass stunt that wasn't the intention because fifty percent of the modern population chronically breathes through its mouth. So we were really rolling ourselves into a state that my body already knew and that most of the population already knew but testing and within a day, I went from not snoring snoring we both got sleep apnea, my blood pressure went through the roof I mean I could give you a whole laundry list of other problems now, for listeners who want to improve their health and through their breathing. How. Quickly does this transformation take place if we start being conscious and practicing nasal breathing when can we start becoming more charismatic, handsome richer and? I can't guarantee any of those things. But if you can place your hand safely, don't do this while driving over your heart and take an inhale him to account about five or six. And then to exhale and keep exiling five six, maybe seven or eight, you're gonNA feel your heart rate. Slow down and you'RE GONNA feel. If you keep doing this take another very slow inhale Halen and a longer xl. You'RE GONNA. Probably feel some circulation to your fingers and your toes. You'RE GONNA be getting more oxygen to your brain. So this transformation that I just lead you through happened in about fifteen seconds. So if you're able to control your breathing and do it in a healthy way and allow your body to work. So efficiently, these problems so many problems attached to allergies and asthma, and they've found even with autoimmune disease and anxiety and depression. Symptoms of these problems can be abated and in some cases, people no longer report suffering from them and not sound like huge claims. But this is coming from leaders in the field at top institutions. Gyms Esther. Thank you very much This was a breath of fresh air. Thank you for having. And thank you for listening to badge while you're with us, please give us a rating on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. I'm Kentucky and in London where I'm breathing in five seconds intervals. This is the.

Donald Trump Russia president FDA China Ilan Musk Professor Andrew Jackson British government Vladimir Putin Russian government Kobe World Health Kenneth Kooky Beijing mouth breathing senior editor Tesla
Addressing the angles of it all, adding it all up with animals

Xtra Xtra Presented By VDG Sports

23:02 min | 1 year ago

Addressing the angles of it all, adding it all up with animals

"Welcome to extra extra presented by sports. I'm your host Vince. Douglas Gregory no filter for very recent. Too don't say a word. Don't say one were pleased. Yes less just as just do to do. Let's just keep it moving the noobs in a newer peeps. You know by now it's HAP- been so many times. I've lost count. I've lost count and I can't remember I can't recall the last time I said those words live. I said those words live. I said those words you know recently but you know what it is. You know what it is and I suggest if you don't go back review historic documents go back in reviewed historic documents and there are some that are poor recent that I pick out for you dive chosen for you that you will have the opportunity to know what goes there for the rest of the non verbal communication is there you picked up on it you know. I know we know it is. It's over with. It's overweight. Not GOING TO HAPPEN. He GonNa do it. Maybe from forced to once again. Maybe if I'm forced to in the future right now present day is not happening. It's not happening yet. I do understand. I know you can't win all the time. Even though we like to win we liked to win. We like winning. You can't win all the time you have to take the ail you have to take the loss you have to use that eventually to your advantage assuming assuming you are strategic assuming that you care if you don't do what to do if you don't hey new judge zone but me on the hand. I know I have to address this big elephant in the room. I know I'm going to have to address. The elephant in the room and noticed elephant is not pink. No this elephant is not blue in fact the elephant is. It's I can't tell I can't tell it's not invisible but it's definitely transparent it's definitely transparent but I have to address the elephant in the room and I'm going to get there. I'm going to get there. Just hold. That thought hold hold. That thought you can hold it in your hand or you can just let it float above your head. Just hold it for one minute or two. Just hold it. I'M NOT GONNA put a time on it because of I'll put a time on it then when I don't meet that go. Dan Don't meet that expectation s taken another Ale. That's failing again and I don't want to lose. I don't want to fail and Noam not competing against you know not competing against anyone else. I'm competing against myself. My own worst enemy trust saying twenty times fast. Try saying that three times fast or just about try saying it period and I communicate to you non verbal at first but I just had to go out I had to go ahead and get it out of verbal Lee former new pts had to go ahead and get it out the from news. You can't win all the time you have to feel. You have to take the ill and no. I'm not going that direction. I am going a different direction and no. I'M NOT GONNA attack. No I'm not going to attack the people who feel as though that we should get trophies that we should. We should all be winners. We should always have winners. Everyone is winning. Everybody should be winners. I'm not going to attack you. I'm not going to go down that line of thought I'm not going to go down that rabbit hole because been there done net and if you need to our point you in the right direction and say vamps while points in the right direction. I just saved. Audio's appoint you to right direction. Just say go do what you have to do but just leave me. Let me let me be this one thing where I just fell at one point one particular point. In time I was being judged. I was judged unfairly. I was being judged unfairly amongst my peers. I was being judged unfairly amongst every one I should say everyone that was Within my world in the world of winning the world of winners losers the WORL- of not everybody gets office or let's just say World Banter Haha jokes or he jokes. That just aren't funny. He jokes the Jess is not funny. Well see the thing is i. Don't mind I don't mind having to use the restroom in a sit down using the restroom and sitting down it's it's okay. It is okay to me. Go ahead and judge but this is a no judge zone. Am I GONNA hit back? I'm not going to hit back. I'm just going to point out some facts. I'm GonNa hit you with the facts. I'm going to tell the truth. Because leader of the mouth breather. Be Me that'd be me or I a truth teller. I'm going to continue to tell the truth. I'M GONNA continue to do the right thing. I'M GONNA continue to hold myself too. High sets of standards that maybe impossible to reach. But even though I don't hit every level I don't hit every standard it's still. It's still pretty still pretty. Big is still pretty. Amazing is still pretty big and amazing and I just combined two words together in one is my favorite word. So you know it's super duper and poured and see I brought back super-duper brought back super duper if a noobs you don't you don't get the super duper yet. You don't get to super duper yet. But their eggs. You get the super duper so I know. I know you're listening to every word. I know you focused. I know you are just waiting waiting for the moment waiting for the opportunity to be like. Yup. That's why it's super duper that is why and it is super important and it was amazing as well. I don't mind having a sit down to use the restroom because sometime you have to take the Ale sometime you have to lose some time. You just can't win. You can't win all the time once I figure when I crack the CO basically when I crack the code and realize that you can't win all the time when I when I came to that moment of clarity where everything just open up. The Sun came out the clouds potted birds singing and I just looked at the birds. And say `but you ain't got nothing on me because my my voice is an Djelic. My voice is bird like I can do all the things you do and I can do it better. It's SORTA burs with singing and Chirpy and I was let me go is well. I was letting go as well and it was. It was beautiful. It was gorgeous. It was stunning. It was radish it was Raven. I found that inner peace. My spirit animal was just popping dancing and singing out of my chest and say Vince. Don't worry about it you just you just you just stand straight up and just let me do the work dispirit. Animal did the work Found at an piece. I smelled that in a piece when I realize you can't win all the time. You can't win all the time. And when it inner peace came the whole energy just changed the whole vibe. Just change the whole mood. Everything became reasonable. Everything became great. And I'm just GONNA leave it at that everything. He became great when I found it in piece that you can't win all the time. That's why I have no problem of using the restroom and having to sit down and I'm having to sit down to pee and yes. This is a family program and I am well aware of that so you might want to break out. The ear muffs. But I'm going to do my best. I'M GONNA TRY MA hottest and hopefully hopefully. I learn that. It's okay to fail. I learn that I'm I'm this is going to be a dicey situation. This is GONNA be Dicey Turkey but I'm a pair I am prepared life. Experiences have prepared me for this moment to address the elephant in the room and no it's not about competing against others no. It's not about competing against other people. That WANNA compete against me about trivial type things. Nah IF YOU WANNA challenge go ahead and challenge but it's fine I am. I am when we're sending me as I said before Johnny Opportunity Obstacles talking about again. Ooh Yeah still holding. I thought please continue to hold. That thought continue. Just let it float or just eject either or you'll adventure you choose your adventure you choose. But I'm going on epic journey. I am going on this epic journey. You can choose the comic view onto if not. It's okay. It is okay. It wasn't until I found it enterpise knowing it wasn't founded enterpise knowing you can't win all the time and all that other stuff happened spirit. Animal intuition gut feeling all of it just came together and it was just this one big synergy. Everything was working in concert. Everything was working together. It was an ensemble of May as e essence essence is the is the word because this energy. That was alluring out this energy. That was coming out and when I realized I'll let having to sit down to use the restroom. And at the same time you have to do it you have no choice. And I am prideful. In certain situations there are sometimes where I want to do this. But you have to do some things that you don't want to do and what you're doing those things you don't want to do some time it's just ail you gotta take the Ale you gotTa feel to learn he kinda failed to grow imme- Having to sit down and that was definitely that was definitely me accepting that was definitely me taken and no. I don't do it all the time in. That's why I have to address the elephant in the room have to address the elephant in the room. That is very very transparent and is not pink. It's not blue. I can't tell what color it is. I just know it's in the room. It's in the room and it must be addressed so this sitting down to a pe- all the time. It's only on certain occasions and it's definitely definitely in the morning. It's definitely in the morning I don't know about you and I'm talking about you and you knew who I'm talking about. No one in particular. It's just a you floor. Okay I digress. I know it is sometime. Impossible to use the restroom in morning. Time if you're going to continue to do same way now maybe. You just like just splash and P. N. E. in everywhere. You just go ahead and go on with your your animal instincts. Maybe your spirit animal the dog. Maybe your spirit animal is squawk maybe your spirit out was something just like the spray and markets territor must be around that my spirit. Animal is something more civilized. My spirit animal is something that is how can I put this culture? So I'M NOT GONNA get up and Jess Bray Everywhere. Because sometime in the morning you just kick control. Some time in the morning is just physically not possible to aim and shoot in score. Shoot and score. You do the math. You do the math. In fact hold that thought is well sometime. It is very very difficult near impossible or just not going to happen where you can just shoot in score in. I'm not going to uh I'm not gonNA piss all over the floor. I'm not GonNa do the things that I'm not going to do things that other species do. I'm not going to do two things. Then wild animals do as well because I want to say a little civilized. I am a little culture. And there's there's this complex thought process that I tend to go through and so I realized I had this inner peace as well my energy my essence and all that stuff was going in the right direction and my spirit animal is culture so I realized that I have to sit down. I sit down. I do not care judge me. I won't judge you but I gotta sit down. I'm not going to spray everywhere. I don't want to clean it up and then if I don't clean it up because the stinking and you don't want that smell in your home unless that you a less. That's what you do unless that's what makes you feel good and do what makes you feel good. I'm going to do. It makes me feel good as well and I don't want to clean up after myself in. I don't WanNa let that. Just lay in marinate and get investor in. Do all those things. This is going to bring my smile down. Brima smile doubt. I WANNA keep the smile. I wanted to keep the peace. I WanNa keep the enemy piece. I WANNA keep bangs all to the good so I'm okay with sit down indefinitely getting up in the morning. You have to do it and if you are doing. Maybe there's another reason why you're you're you're able to not have to or you. Just don't care that's not my job to figure it out in fact I'm just here to lay out the facts so I have this now. I have to sit down and even sitting down. That's a challenge within a challenge within a challenge. And you don't win at challenge all the time meaning when you sit down. They're still the same problem. You just you just you just basically the problem in half you basically just took one part of the problem way but you still have the problem and if you're sitting down and if you aren't a sports player if you don't play sport if you don't like sports if you don't care for Sports. I'm just GonNa say you probably a genius? You probably know math and see. There's that math thought. I'm glad you held now. You can let it go because here we are. I hope that you know math. I hope you know trigonometry Hoping to geometry. I hope you know maybe a little calculus. Or how about this? You gotta get your angles right. You gotta get your angles right. And that's why. Save you a sports player if you play some form of sport. If you know some form of sport you're good to go because you can maneuver in a certain way you can situate in a certain way and you can get the angles right. And once you get the angers light you a good but you was wrong at the angle is bad if you make this impossible angle. That's not real an angle and it doesn't form a triangle if you don't understand what triangle is you don't know base you don't notice how partners if you can't if you can't figure out the protagonist there. I'd suggest I'd suggest you just flip a coin and just point aim a direction and hope and hope for the best point eight and a direction and hope for the best because if it might be a splash back or your might just go straight through and in a main goal that was there to begin with you know not paying on the floor. You just peed on the floor so even though you just have the problem away by sitting down or squatting or what maneuvering so you're closer to scoring. You're closer to get nick. We're supposed to go still showers with an challenge because they get the right. If you're not gonna English right is going to splash go any and everywhere and you have to be the same thing that you didn't want to do to begin with. So what was the purpose the begin? That's why you have been no sport or you have to know your math. And if you don't know your sport and you don't know you map out suggest free advice advice and it's definitely free advice coming from the leader. The supreme leader chosen went especially one. The one that you say lead US fearless mouth breathing. Well I am. I'm graduating. This free advice Dan. If you don't know math you know sporting all it you might as well just you might as well just when you get to begin with and just say it is what it is. It's manny being manny. I can't figure it out. I don't know what it is. I'm just GonNa go ahead and pee on the floor to begin with. I'm just going to go ahead. And pee on the floor to begin with and just let it just let it. Let go now if that's the end game if that is the choice maybe gotta decide whether or not you're going to clean it up. Maybe going to decide. You're going to let it Fester GonNa let it marinate. Those are your decision my decision. I've made my uncomfortable. Were taken ill knowing that I can't win all the time I found that in a piece. I'm okay with sitting bow. I like sport. I know math I know angles are no tree. I Know Calculus. I know all the things that can possibly help me out. I know the calculations where I can maneuver in such a way. I'm night into splash. Back I can maneuver in. Such weight is not hitting the floor maneuver in such a way is not bouncing. Back and splash up on me. Who wants that not not so I can take the loss. I can take the failure to not try to do what I normally do what I want to do because it's quick it's easy fast but it's Okay. I can lose I can. I can admit see the elephant in the room. I admit I feel sometime. I do things that I don't want to do. I don't want to sit down. I don't WanNa do math. Who wants to do mave that early in the morning? Who wants to do trade that early in the morning? Who's sitting there trying to figure out square root that early and more not I but it gotta do what you gotTa do even though you don't WanNa do it even though you don't WanNa do it. I'm taking Ale. I'm taking a loss. It's okay to it is okay because alternative in that situation alternative in that situation. It ain't it ain't it won't make me feel good in fact my spirit animal wouldn't allow that spear animal wouldn't accept that because already found that in a piece and have. I didn't find it in a piece I'd be amongst I'd be amongst a not the malpractice. I'll be amongst yeah see. I can't even get it out because I'm not there but Dallas has gone now.

Sports Vince Jess Bray Dan Douglas Gregory Ale Noam enterpise Lee US Dallas Johnny Brima manny nick mouth breathing one minute
Best of 2019: Brian Mackenzie and Rob Wilson

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

1:13:18 hr | 1 year ago

Best of 2019: Brian Mackenzie and Rob Wilson

"The mind is the KENO senses. The breakfast came a mile bike. It is a profound statement that most people is like what decrees back podcast. My name is on the line during today. You're never really interesting. Discussions Rob Wilson Brian. Mackenzie who are running now seminar by that name and I've I've known Brian for many years or ten years. Not least author of you know I knew when I started crossing endurance. He's Yaw through unbreakable. Runner is that right. Yeah Unbreakable runner power speed and earns the last one was. We did a podcast about unless yes we did. It was awesome like you were at the vanguard of the unplugged movement thought speaking about it with regard to trade but like I'm seeing more and more information pop up about. Yeah getting unplugged from your iphone but will ironically. That's I think the importance of what it is. We're here to kind of really talk about and wooden and something that is you know which you'll totally get and understand based you know. I can't wait to get back to that okay so So Brian Comes from. That's kind of Endurance strength conditioning. Cross it you know just like all around human developer and ROB has education but he calls manual therapy. I'm curious what that is as opposed to nonmeal while so manual therapy means specifically that I using my hands to manipulate the in Bhai. It will so Sasha's nicer therapist exactly ORF as opposed to like a psychotherapist or just if they they are they're they're in trouble but even like physical therapist not all use manual therapy techniques so might be more exercise instructive whereas mine was spoke. Like civically. Leon yeah using the hands very cool okay. And he's got a background man after my own Passions Jikun Joe Judo Movie Tie kyw. I don't even know what that word is in Cali so my experience with movie tie was are still the Jews in Thailand and of course that national champion happens to be a tiny seal. We're trading right. Wants the reciprocate so we all are Allies in the gym where this guy basically getting beat up yes and getting our legs chopped up. I felt like someone took like a machete sheds legs strengthening some of my most. That's like my most formative. It's like getting hit with a baseball bat over Baseball Baseball Bat. You can't believe that a human being can hit that hard especially one that small right. Yeah so I know like our Moi ties or master who is Chai Hi sir. Suit brought Thai boxing to the states when he would come seminar he would kick the banana bag and he couldn't have been much taller than like five four. Is that the bank bananas. You know what is it seemed like if you might never mortgage. I'd never inquired but now I'm curious. I didn't feel like bananas when I kick checked. But it started when he when he hid the he would kick this thing and it would basically fold around his shin. Wow that was your ticketed if it did not just stare back all right. Good try again Yeah so it was a it was a really good number. You know Mike Practice go do radio we got a black then. One of our practices was basically slapping. Our you're hitting really hard are forearms and our shins and the idea was was that you're creating all these little micro breaks in the bones and then that was those he'll like with all cement would come in and fill up the cracks and then he knew it again and they break again. The cement come so we started like lily breaking their bones in their humor. Not Femur the Tibia Ghia over and over and over and over literally almost every time they practice until you have these dumps right treetrunks yeah you might my co-writer on power. Speed endurance was a big tigers spent years in Thailand fighting and he was his shins. Were like steel. It was just you know I've always had the same. You don't like Karate Chopper Karate Guy He don't do Ju Jitsu wickets Jaakko and you don't like try to kick but we try not have been but what you do is they're coming at you. Just poke him in the eye. The strategy exactly what. They're not exact. That's having a plan all right off on that but it's all connected to bracket owner everything back. The breath ev. Large Movement Endurance Sta bodies. The bodies number number one goal is respiration bright. That's it that's a great way to say it. You know I would. I would say the other ways like if you were considering a fuelling yourself. Like most people think of macronutrients maybe micronutrients but really do they think of water and oxygen Friday the primer fuel. Your body uses oxygen. I used to give a lecture at the cross endurance stuff because we talk about nutrition and I would say so. Here's the hierarchy in it'd be like oxygen hydration right then a nutrition and then everything else kind of fell in line and we would talk about nutrition. That was the nutrition lecture. But I didn't at the time was not connecting will will what's been. How do we get more efficient or better at using that oxygen molecule and the average person when that when they look at the hierarchy the at the top it's smoke and then alcoholic coffee? hydration and the big Mac and the Mac lakes the a Netflix. Yeah Yeah entertain myself or we could change those four things in general populous standpoint. Absolutely but I mean you you look but if you do this was the interesting thing the big the most interesting and it all started you know it starts with me or it starts with rob but even at the most elite levels what in any sport we were seeing major discrepancy you had a gold medal great but like we still were picking up discrepancies and respiration. What was going on? What we you know we think is going on or how we think we're using oxygen? I think that goes really back to. I mean he'll understand. This is your yoga background. Like what is Yoga. What's the foundation? Yoga breath Dhamma Bone I. What does that mean rob stunned one? Hell Rob's broken that. Were down quite well into a language I think we all understand. Yes so like when you look at ancient practice like prom. A- It literally means Energy Control Yama means my poor control restraint in Pronto yet. Means lifeforce or breath right they're synonymous terms and if you look at it from the perspective of the Yoga Culture being a a storytelling culture. This romantic nature does not by our standard of scientific culture. But that doesn't mean they don't have empirical knowledge. That's valid right so if we translate that into a Western scientific language energy literally means how we produce work right and breath is Absolutely the epicenter of our body deals with all of our energetic requirements Both physiologically and psychologically it's not it's the absolute hub in the center of the wheel. There's no denying it if you understand human physiology at all so when you look at how many layers of understanding in those ancient people may have had because they spent so much time with it that perhaps when they said energy control. It wasn't as this woo woo as we might think. Maybe it wasn't as esoteric in the more. I studied this stuff the more I realize that a lot of those words are rules. AFAM their heuristic for behavioral paths like Energy Control. Like how efficient are you with your body your movement your attention your intention engine and those are all completely linked together and breath is at the center of that because the only limiters for breath control are nearly dead and dead dead Unless you have severe neurological impairment or or you get awareness or awareness but everybody has access to it right all right so there's nobody you can say like when I I'm on my bike I don't breathe that's not true otherwise you'd be dead or another dead exactly. It started started. You back up right. You know what you said something. Interesting empirical evidence. I believe that the Yogis the receipts had empirical evidence was just subjective and so it wasn't readily observable by the by the western scientists because they didn't have the methodology to do studies ethnographic studies in depth studies. Nor did they care. Yeah I think they're all one hundred percent of glass when you talk about evidence based fitness and he was talking about objective evidence. But when I looked at that and said the evidence is the subject of evidence. How do I feel when when I do across it work out? How do I feel when I crossed it before? I started cross it or verses. After six months I can see the difference in terms of the six pack. ADDS maybe you know roots and everything else was growing looking a little bit more like a mutant which Lhota cross-fitters do these days set subject But there's really is. What's the subjective sense of self? Then the crewing resolve that training which includes you know breathing more and more effectively and moving more and more effectively Salihi stuff like that. So yeah there is evidence it was just basically certainly this massive objectives then which got collected through the stories like he said and then which was transmitted both through training in some actually exceptional writing absolutely which most westerners haven't yet addressed vast except for those who are passionate. Yeah Yeah and a lot of times. I think people are fast to throw the baby out with the bathwater but you know sort of parallel that we see in martial martial arts is There was a time when like for example traditional styles of karate when MMA came on the scene people would throw it away. Yeah like all that's not applicable in Moctar gone but now you see traditional karate style athletes very successful if they understand how to apply it in the context so all of this his context driven so you have to understand the context of the story and his application. So that you can get to the bottom of what they're talking about and then go okay. Well what culture do I I live in. And how do I apply those same lessons in the context that I find myself in. Otherwise you'll miss all the good stuff thrown away. I love this. Let's stay on Yoga for a second 'cause very passionate as you know we knew about you so tangibly in his Yoga Sutras says basically I. Here's Yoga if you're ready you'll hear what I have to say. It's profound in and of itself right because if you're not ready then you won't even understand what I'm about to say what he's saying then he goes right into yoga is about seizing. The fluctuation of the modifications education of the mind is basically about controlling the mind training retraining. The mind right and then he begins to tell you how to do it and he says I. We're GONNA a develop some basically some disciplines around how we live. Check right we gotta eat better. We're GONNA move better. We've got a challenge ourselves GonNa do these different things and then but we need to do is begin to move her body so that were less agitated and we can manage your stress check and next we take control of our breath and we'd bring the life force into our body till enliven it into further develop the mind and then the rest right everything flows from there now. These aren't necessarily linear. Even though they're explained in a linear manner they are actually all done at the same behind right and what he'll go back to later is saying you know what. Actually the breath is the path even when working working on those disciplines of movement and fueling the breath is what's going to control the physiology so that the physical level breath is everything because it's going to basically get your the body to a state where he can even be disciplined enough to do the movements and to do the further deeper work of meditation concentration yet and it makes expense. If you're if you've ever been a yeah if you're if you're a teacher of anything and you know something as simple as like how you to dress yourself. How you you know you like so my my parents were restrict my mom's real strict so it was like make your bed every morning? uh-huh keep your room really clean and there's a lot of profound was to me. It was just like Mama's woman clean house you know but there was a lot of profound lessons about me being responsible for my space and even something like that people think is sort of CS esoteric and nebulous like the Yoga Sutras. It's actually really important that you had to learn this life stuff in order because ultimately breath control at it's sort of peak expression can be very subtle title And if you're not able to do the discipline of like hey make your bed. It makes a lot more challenging But you you are doing it all at the same time. I'm but you know people's ability to sort of grasp new behavior. A lot of times happens in a linear fashion but I on the surface right but later they. Oh Oh that was there the whole time you know. I know that's happened to me repetitively regardless of what I was studying will on that same fries. B K S I ain't are the mind. Is the king senses. The breath is a king of the mind Like that is a profound statement that most people is like what but it's so attractive now to us because we look at. I look at an athlete. And so this is what most athletes I've ever dealt with are just like yeah. Yeah whatever was something like that and I'm so I WANNA get flexible because I do yoga so it could be better at my sport fortress-like yeah you're missing the point of that so we don't Yoga's been completed one hundred percent one percent and so you start to look at an an athlete and work with an athlete and you see these discrepancies. That are actually the same discrepancies that you'll see in anything. That is a fundamental like trace it back so a dysfunctional movement pattern which classmate to talk about really stems from a dysfunctional mental pattern which is linked to a dysfunctional breathing patterns which is evolving a reverse right which exactly Greece's the groove on just `functional. What being so you can reverse engineer that and start with the breath because every every thought pattern and emotional pattern has a corresponding breath patterns? So if you can engineer the breath patterns in a functional capacity that are gonNA and that'll lead to better thinking better emotional states that will lead to more movement and then those will cycle back right to more virtual cycle of you know more effective breathing. And so now you're on now you're getting somewhere on developmental path and so it's about becoming using his tool to become a more conscious participant in the direction of your own life right. It's like hey what is this behavior. I'm engaging in whether it's a sport. Behavior a mechanical behavior food related. Whatever it is? What's the what's the root of the behavior? Engaging in then is a behavior that that I want it always ends up boiling down to that ultimately what do I want and the one of the things about what do I desire Seles Menendez fiction quiz different right different. WHAT DO I? What's my actual vector lingering? What trajectory am I on? And what part am I playing right in that and the trajectory and one of the things about breath that so amazing that it never lies to you. You're physiology is absolute direct reflection of the state eight. You're in and it. It doesn't care one way or the other. It's like here I am and this is how it is and if you confront it and deal with that stuff stuff it puts you on a much better path of understanding yourself and your relationships with other people and outside of all the cool like sports ramifications locations that are around the stuff which is really cool stuff. You know one of the major benefits that I know I've seen personally and Brian has do as I'm just a better human being. I have better relationship with my loved ones and people at work with and well myself I think is where yeah ultimately. That's where it mobile homes where you said okay. Yeah and so I love any benefits but yet either but you make a blunt you know. He makes a blanket or hard statement like respiration the the absolute indicator of what's happening with energy and metabolic. And so when we start to really look at that from the Oh like that's a bold statement like what does that mean if I've got across it athlete doing something and I'm I'm watching him. huff and puff through their mouth in this from the beginning of a workout cow and knows which is something. We routinely did day Well if we actually look that metabolic way okay. Well let's test that. Let's look at that but look at that from scientific standpoint standpoint. Oh you're burning sugar. One hundred percent basically. And if I'm doing that work out after workout after work out or I'm an alternate alternate turns athlete and I'm off running long distances right but I'm supposed to be this aerobic athlete but my mouth is wide open. What am I doing? What's going on? I have no control. I'm not controlling anything. I'm not using anything so we start to move into this area of really grasping or hey we're talking about the mind in creating getting a better person will let begins with what I'm doing in any movement I'm towing right you know. And that is where the control and we see. Oh if we actually grab hold of something we're actually metabolic controlling were in control of what is happening substrate standpoint. That is a game changer. All the way around for any any sport any athlete and human being sitting on a couch like Hey oh we can get you breathing. You can't work out can't move too much great. Let's get that you breathing. We're going to get you more efficient. At using oxygen as an energy source that changes the entire entire paradigm. So I think that fits right into my brain or my head's at and what type of person I'm coming because I'm looking at it for an athlete because they're not interested in You know world over here of what we're trying to talk about being a better human being okay. Great we'll get there and other route. I'm GONNA show you with all good. I'm I'M GONNA show that's great and then all the sudden months or a year later it's like hey breath is a door like what's going on like I'm such so much more aware of what's going on in my life and it's like Yup. Yes you are this neat because I agree. I've been teaching breath to SPEC OPS cannons. And you're right. You have to up in teaching as you guys are where you have to break it down and make a very practical for most people and so it's gotta be about physiological benefits. I was GonNa make you better for the seal Kenneth Sahadi Maccabi a better warrior. And how's IT GONNA affect my strength training and my recovery. You know all that kind of stuff but then experience really very quickly. They begin to experience the arousal. Control effect the energizing effect and the mental clarity effect. Right and you can point those audits teachers just like okay. So so this is what you're going to experience after this training session when you breathe like this. And they're like him you're right. I was incredible right and then once they once they get at that then you know then they can take it to the next level the next level next level. And you know like you said Rob. It's it's an endless journey. Right is a gift. It never stops giving you know and every rabbit hole I explore. It opens up three more on like. Oh there's a whole nother sort of like microcosm here that I didn't even know that was connected to breathing right. I have time. Yeah maybe for the end of the five because we come back to some of the more esoteric aspects breath. It's obviously passionate mind. Yeah but I think most people listening. I'm like like okay guys. Attendance Rabbit Holes. I actually talked about and I hate you have some fizzy. Here's some status. It looks like like there's a couple of things and no particular order that I know some things but I really want to hear your perspective. One is like why breathe. Why libraries the nose versus the mouth was the big deal? What are DYSFUNC-? What does a dysfunctional breathing pattern? Look like versus a functional breathing pattern and also like for a broad beginner. Who just listening to this? Maybe driving their car. What's the first thing you teach people now in terms of how breathe effectively and you know where they go like what I would do a seminar? Maybe start there. And then we'll what's the first thing the rest of the stuff that will come through talking about is in the practical application. Yeah I mean I think when it comes down to brass tacks like if you are in your car listening to this just pay attention to what's happening that's the first step cap is attention. Most of take what's going on with our breathing search for granted and less. It's taken away that the simple act often times of just just beginning to pay attention to it will start to have an effect. You know. It's a it's an automatic thing that or it's I should say better like this making recommendations to each other like. Oh you're manny look stressed. I'll just take a nice deep breath like we know that that's a way and that's not a protocol okay. Take a nice deep intervention. Yeah exactly but you know if you're in your car sitting in traffic and it's going slow. Most of us are are aroused. Arousal state is getting more and more stress than more and more sympathetic. We're getting more and more wired rather than hey. This is an opportunity. I can check in just slow things down and pay attention inch and that's a easy for step without having to worry about any on a fancy protocol or anything. Just start paying attention in a love that we used to have are not used to but the three breath room heard about that you know so like I had to employ that last night hold into my community chance to get a community and I was trying to send a voice. Text wasn't on the highway. I was in my community so I thought it was going to save but I still couldn't quite figure it out all right so there were four parking spots in front of the pool and I just Kinda like pulled over parallel park like halfway in them knowing that I literally was going to be there for twenty twenty seconds and as I did that little started. Sending the voice Texan three seconds later. Get this wrapping on my window up above and it's the president in a major way and he's like barking debate does and I'm just looking. I'm like where he didn't and breathe out. I unhappy say that because I practice yes looking. I'm just looking man this someone really this guy's cat today like I'm just like looking at my mind is processing. I'm breathing everything and I'm still speaking into the voice tax and then he's like move now. I kid you not like like this is like this seventy year old guy. I'm thinking very upset dude. You're going to move on on on that news life so much going on like my twenty year old self really differently. You know what I mean. Meet me five six years ago breath but I think that the impassioned Pachauri sorry that you're feeling so bad that that is the actual importance of breath practice though it's not. Hey I'm sitting down for five or ten minutes and going going through some brawny Alma. It's the reality that you connect right and go. Oh I got this thing. I'm now in control of of what's going on. Like versus like rock reacts that doesn't react that conditioned reactor is what gives you the control back. Then you have choice again. Yeah I think from a fundamental layer. Is that every day question. How do you want to respond? Come back to the breath and that's what you're saying. There is no spoon. There's yeah there is usually the matrix. Oh right yeah right impossible to bend the spoon. Bend your remind. And that's it but I think from a fundamental layers well like and principles is basically what this is about about teaching. It's not hey wim Hof method you know some sort of crony Obama. Yes not a technique. No no we wanted. I love you know when people get excited about Wim Hof in that least. They're breathing then. I have to give him the old warning signs like okay. That's one technique and it's very very aggressive restive and depending upon who you are that might move some energy that you you already to have moved and I've observed that on Asia very large I spent I spent considerable time all okay and I've We've done a lot of work together. He spent some time with me on. You know but I've seen groups of people and things and that was one of the connections that actually spearheaded the movement that we were like Oh people. Oh there's like I'm seeing a a girl. Cry a rugby player cry. I'm seeing this guy get popped up pissed off on seeing this like I was seeing different reactions emotional reactions to this entire thing in a group setting and I'm like this isn't like we're not all reacting and we're not all getting the same thing from what this thing's doing and so there's this this energy movement going on and I'll do the physiology is doing things. The brain is set up like rod is a very different person than Brian. And who's this is very different person from mark but we can all get along and do things but emotionally there. Are Things going on. We'll just so happens. We now understand that things that Yogis Gore saying that all of this connectedness that there are actual paths that cross with emotions and respiration Adams. And so if I trigger something that you know is getting into something. I'm not prepared for it. We've got something wrong and I so I was like going from zero to hero leading doing wim. Hof is like taking someone off the couch and having them do like a five hundred upon dead left. They haven't ever lifted before you know it's like maybe you should to do some preparatory work. Yeah I asked one of my mentors is a yoga. Teacher named Gary Crafts. Go who his teacher was Chris. Macharia was was ear and goes teacher and Pataki Joyce Teacher Yoga and I asked him at a podcast. I had I had him speak at our on bill on summit like here's a job speaking in our summit really what does he got to teach us. Standbys standby it was a phenomenal presentation. But I asked him on podcast. I said you know. I've been teaching Singa box breeding and it's very very simple and safe. You know just kind of pulled pork and on Hook and people responded to do it. What do you think about that as begins practice? He goes you know what he goes. I think it's okay but if it was me very could not criticize me. Yeah but if it was me I would literally just teach them to inhale slowly an ex hill slowly through their nose with complete awareness. Ac what you just said because even for some people even the holds could be ANC causing anxiety it was like yes. I know that could point. Well like something that that I've witnessed with clients that I've had who have no extraordinary anxiety. The the clinical anxiety problems and any pause in the breath cycle date yet. Triggers letras anxiety. Is the this person in particular. told me that it felt like she was going to die as that was her sense Holding her breath refocus Breath the breath hold essentially is mimicking death. Right it's it's a you know. That's quite so profound but you have to be ready for it right. See trained a little bit for that but in the The in hell hold has the sense of an energized. Death and the suspension has a sense of relaxing in or surrendering and so that's could be terrifying for people who haven't learned to examine that. That's so which is is one of the math is so so true because I got people who think they've got the breathing down and it's like. Hey semi over. You know. We're GONNA work on some co two tables because that's what we're trying to employ a lot of different things and you start playing some guidance but you know you you've got to bring the science into it for people to one hundred percent one hundred percent and it's like thank you got somebody who thinks they've got it. Hey semi over your Amac's breath whole yeah just relax for five minutes and just hold your breath as long as you comfortably can and when it gets too stressful breathe breathe. Just tell me what that number is like thirty three seconds and it's like Whoa. That is a lie. That's you're you're stressed or Rasco like like there's some experience with your through your work. What do you think a healthy functional duration for breath? All this everyone's different. I'm not talking about navy. Seal diving breath. I'm talking about someone who's like listening to this and be like I'm curious so they at least breath hold but we we have an actual test that we're taking that we stole from a comfortable breath. Hold Right. Not whether you're getting the yeah. Yeah yes not getting contractions But we have tested. We actually stole from the free diving world on that we've now called. It's a MAC sale test they use it to set up apnea apnea tables things like that right. Well we're calling it a co two tolerance task because we've found with three fold reason for its application and and if you exhale after relaxed and it's you do a full inhale exhale as long as slow as you possibly can right and this is showing us a mechanical. How well how much control you actually have on sale and then be what's going on with? The physiology is the CO two builds. How much can can you tolerate? And then see what's going on at the mine. Where is the connection in the mind with that hi sue Tallinn's because co two is actually that reactionary thing thing that we're seeing in things where it's like if I take somebody let's have you hold your breath right here outside of water hold breath as long as you can now? Let's get in the water. I'm just GonNa hold you Marin during your hold your breath as long as you can. What do you think's GonNa happen that number? Because the mind's going to start being causes some anxiety beings is as a requirement energy the energy you can suck off and so there's this triggered this happening Kema receptors up in the brain that we're seeing with things reactionary mechanism mechanism to breathe right. So if I have somebody hold their breath for minute but they were only capable of doing it for thirty seconds. They're gonNA freak out but what's what's going to happen from physiological standpoint. They're perfectly fine Nothing is the the C O Two that triggers the Br- The yes that you called it a gags. What does the term for when you do that? That's a that's gotTa Vasil Response Response to says I need to breathe and of course the breath hold diving and sealed training. You know we learned to kind of push through the first chancellor three of those on your like you fall back into the settlers. Yeah there's actually enough oxygen your body can't hold up the new s Yup right yes causing that response the oxygen. You're actually heading your your body's actually actually starting to use up more of the oxygen. That's inside that red blood cell so it's starting versus and this is going back and extra out is the how does that. So let's talk about the science. How does that create a build up of co two because you're releasing because you're breaking the bond of the oxygen exactly case I see in anaerobic and aerobic respiration? Co Two waste products of of the use of oxygen yet and so it builds up at the longer you're without fresh oxygen the higher the level. Yes the only way to get rid the get that oxygen molecule off the Iron Air Hemoglobin. The with the iron molecule is to create an acidic environment and rat acid is carbonic acid which when co two is in the blood. It's carbonic acid. Yeah Okay and then it he byproduct of that is and the trigger for you actually three when you're in a conscious state is co two nine unconscious. There are levels what we what we started to figure out was there are levels where it becomes too so you will start to see. See you like if you watch or wife all sleeper. Your kids or anybody dogs. Like I've seen this in multiple different animals as a one the reading pattern that starts the happened when we fall asleep. And it's this and it just is all out of exhale and it pauses just hold and that gets deeper Bert and deeper and deeper to where that hold goes longer and longer and longer and boxes low to is what starts to trigger some of the breathing in our deeper stage of sleep sleep But beyond I mean this is ABC is like if you're if you're a sinuses are blocked or if you're not Block that's extreme low. Yes John Down down down then. You're like Yup Yup yes harassed and this is where kind of nose starts to play its role diving. You know what. Let's do that as a segue. I WANNA come back though. Let's just make a Mental Yorker to come back to the physiology of creating homeo- stasis through the breath In terms of the level of oxygen carbon dioxide knows plays right into the Yeah so linked. So why nostril versus the government and start. What where did this? This negative the connotation of being a freezer come from. Because I've heard that for like thirty years operator. It's not a conflict. Definitely your caveman your mouth. That means you're right. There's a lot of wisdom in that like Doumbia mouth breather totally and so I mean if you just look at it from a structural standpoint. The knows it's not that you can't can't breathe with your mouth. Obviously he can but structurally your nose is built to deal with processing air. I'm right we have. There's hair and that's their to filter out articulate so they don't go into your lungs right. Your sinuses have a lot of important responsibilities. One being mucus yes which releases t-cells into the air as it goes into your long. So if there's an antibacterial there's an anti viral humidifier the air as it goes in which lends to more successful diffusion of oxygen into the bloodstream out. Your nose is a natural at about two natural antibiotic First Line of Defense the air. It's your only I. Yeah to other than skin for skin but the air that travels into the body This is the line of Sentinel Rights. Let's get a little bunch of there's something wrong sneeze. Oh like it's reactionary. Yeah and also we can. We can actually control much better from a breath. Practice standards splits the two instead of one big stream dream going through this giant gaping hole where he got to smallest dreams are and then there's more and more scientific evidence that lends itself to lots of dysfunction But is part and parcel of breathing the mouth so for example. There's a really good book that just came out this this last quarter hauled jaws which is came out of Stanford Stanford Press and. It's really interesting because the amount of Like facial Jaw dysfunction and they're linking a lot of that up to mouth breathing because when your sinuses aren't functioning properly the MAXA in your face doesn't grow in the right position Asian and as a result who John is set. Okay remember that that Character James Bond. You're like yes do. Yes the teeth detail. He used to bite metal and massive like style John and his name was jaws jobs he was mouth breather. Well definitely definitely fine. He could probably would. You doesn't doesn't have an effect in your heart is absolutely absolutely early because if you're not if you're having inefficient. Absorption of oxygen. How much harder does your heart have to work? In order to get the oxygen. You do have the chemistry behind that or the physiology behind that is actually breathing through my mouth and more observing. This were literally launching. How many I'm like three studies right now kicking off like we're literally involved in stuff right now to show what we're seeing what we're actually seeing through testing subjectively but what we're actually seeing on in medical great equipment that the difference between me just standing here going or is a very different metabolic profile and thus I'm reading myself more? Co Two making it almost an impossibility to efficiently use oxygen in any capacity. When you breathe through your mouth your exhale too much you can also you can off offload a so much more? Co Two. It's an but the big kicker here is there's no real real difference in how much oxygen on actually getting in on the intake intake regardless different aspects of the regardless. Yeah Yeah Guard licking the volume. UH-HUH I can just move faster and this is only with like effort because most people don't breathe with that type of effort and lesser exercise totally. And there's a time and there's an alignment. I do this drill like think about like to get people to to recognize the difference between just know unconscious moth breathing and unconscious nasal Britain. I'm not unconscious. Because I'm x factor than asking them to pay attention to it but for the average person more listening can do this like like just just breathe kind of a little bit through your mouth like you would normally be breathing first of all. You're you're just basically using the upper part of your launch not activating in in the muscles of diaphragm is disengaged. And you're taking in about thirty to forty percent in lung capacity so in order to get a full lunch. You have to work at it. You know like you're in an endurance event. You know. But when you breathe the knows it activates the diaphragm which then polls auction deeper into the lungs unless your diaphragm is frozen and a lot of people are have frozen diaphragm because of the way they sit in the Manga. This emotional pattern absolutely and so like you know at least in in the approach. One with teach. There's these three pillars that we talked about and their state mechanics and physiology. So what's going on your mind. The position that your body is in how you moving through vase. And what's going on in the chemistry and those are completely interchangeable interconnected and read. That's exactly what you're just making doubts each other they influence each other And you can only focus on one at a time. Usually but they're all always always getting in flow through practice you can align the state and the and the The posture exactly. which then I'll have a positive benefit or you know recruit over time of positive? His illogical balance homies. They say and it gives you a lot of you feeling you feel like like I got the flu like right after Christmas and I shut down for like three or four hours in my sinuses and that was the first first time I had really slept and like fell asleep at any portion in the last few years where my mouth through open read right and I was so I wasn't I didn't sleep. I wasn't sleeping I was just blew up and I was like dry mouth and I it felt worse. And you you start to feel that stuff in and through a performance standpoint you you will learn that if you spend time with this that you cannot hack your biological and physiological responses meaning if I cannot cannot operate in an aerobic capacity well enough breathing through my nose. You're going to be operating with a mouth open which the worst rating your perform which means were no longer operating in aerobic capacity interest. And so you're trying to hide from the fact you're trying to hi from your own fitness your real ability because anaerobic rainer banging through. Let's say a twenty minute Amrop yes and you you just have to open open your mouth and suck the air. There's a mechanical problem right. So you need to slow down mostly. It's a mechanical and physiological problem. You actually are blowing through something something that you are incapable of doing and runs the normal one hundred percent too. Many people not slobbering minute through their mouth. I don't see many runners in the question cruising on the street like I don't like this is what we do. I just see this in any any exercise. This is I mean forget crossings cross's easy look at it and just go. Oh my God like this is why we see a lot of people who have the metabolic problems they do right like in. That's where burnout redline adrenal fatigue. Things like that and that's not crossed it. It's the individual not playing the realistic role of. Oh I can't I'm not actually operating in an in a high aerobic capacity right now I'm actually operating in a very anaerobic place. I'm burning through sugar. which is a limited resource and a very costly resource to us? That means so when I do switch over mouth breathing I should be under costly in terms of of its deleterious effect on the body highways the smart endurance athletes. Of course everyone you know. The heart attack started happens. People started to look look diets. And maybe you know Pasta's and the right thing to eat all the time but I think it's equally breath that may be I will now donald that the that the breeding is probably the bigger culprit right. Because you should be able we. We're just talking about this on the drive down here as we weren't efficient machine like we can take a lot like go to Vegas go. The People reported off out there well but they're pulling off and they're doing some back the hierarchy smoke right alcohol. You look at my dog and my dog's been eating the same type of food their entire lives and they're pretty Dan healthy like we talk about diversity in food and talk about all this stuff with nutrition. It's like dog. See the same thing and he's healthy right like well. Why shouldn't we why? Why do we fall apart if that had the food or is it? How we're actually absorbing has no right and I think yes I'm not I'm not trying to say go to McDonalds and any I need like one of the control groups right right the big Mac and briefs year knows the other people eat the big Mac and breathe through your mouth of course take us years to kind of get to the I? I don't think we need to actually pull that study together but we can pull this together study that does Shohei mouth breathing versus nasal breathing. What's going on? What the health implications of this? What's going on from stress standpoint? Because person breathing through the mouth from what we're seeing. Those are stressed individuals. Those are high stress people. Those are people who are. Actually how do you recruit Kurt. Those people you say okay. You're doing it wrong. Don't change a thing. Oh now we want to study and then we just say hey. We're GONNA put you on a bike. You're going to do this work out. And you're GONNA the Three Mile Home and then you are going to go. You're not you're not but it doesn't matter how they breathe before they come to the training. Well we can measure what's happening in that in that moment we're we're gonNA baselines in in the some of the analyzers like the breath analyzers were using to do the preliminary work on this really accurate and I mean you can Z.. We could see it in real time where you know. We'll be not even necessarily on a bike sometimes just sitting still and doing breathing through the nose and you can look at things like respiratory exchange rate right which is how what's the volume of oxygen going around versus the volume of carbon dioxide and that equation literally tells you how Aerobic Aerobic argue. How anaerobic are you? And just opening the mouth immediately you know things that thing towards anaerobic by large percentage manage points and there's not even any work being done soon as you open your mouth your respiratory capacity becomes far less efficient now. That doesn't mean that there's not a time and a place in so again that brings us back to the question of what we want. You know you brought up like doing a twenty minute amrop kind of workout and if you're doing that training session with the goal of developing your aerobic capacity then you absolutely need to keep your mouth closed but if over the course sobat twenty minutes. You're trying to see how much crap you can get done no matter what the cost is then by Al means but hey you you have to know what it is. You're getting out of that session and to me thinking about trying to win the workout. Every day is kind of like being the tallest midget right. It just doesn't matter it doesn't matter so so you have to know what why you're there and and what you're trying to get out of it and if it's like hey I'm trying to improve my aerobic capacity will then I gotta I gotta eat a little dirt here a little bit more aware and be a little bit. More aware might also lead to fewer injuries over time as well. I think there's a tissue response right. There is one hundred percent like you. I mean look the difference between nose and now I'm I para sympathetic dominant. I'm sympathetic Donna. Okay so what. What does that mean for my life while you wake up in the morning you get the kids ready you go and crazy yellen or whatever whatever you know you go work out you know and that you know mouths open and then I go to work and I'm not in front of a screen and I'm not like enjoying what I do like? You're sympathetic all day long. You haven't dropped out of that. So this is where that fundamental plays like. Hey how you be breeding throughout your day. Just chill and try and keep your mouth shut when you can. You know. This is kind of a little bit of a sidebar here but when we all be better off people kept their mouth. Shut So you can't you can't you. Dear knows breath when you're talking to your culture right hump from I mean really hard. You're not like but you start to look at your committee. The committee you come from the martial arts communities you start to look the Yoga community. Did you start to look. Oh let's look at native cultures right like George Caitlyn wrote a book in eighteen sixty nine and he was a guy that came over and he was an attorney came over from England and observe Over a million indigenous people in North and South America and be biggest difference that he picked the only reason he wrote. The book was was. I'm here's why why. They kept their mouths shut. They hunted with their mouth shut. They slept with their mouth shut. They were in the other. The other name they gave to the civilized man other than round. I was black mouth and that was where we were if we start to look back on things. What's happening to jaw? Oh Weird Mc jaws always open alcohol's around all the time like these things that caused massive stress like the don't fix any of these things are actually imple- cool. Yeah implicating. A lot of Canada Western man gets so unhealthy mean global warming thing everyone from some native native. Try though. I mean we've heard about all this evening. The Vikings were malpractice. They might have been potatoes and taking take another people shit they were very need. Were like even we. Just don't we're real good at learning. I think about history. And that's what it's four and I mean that's why we are you the only guy I bring up the blow warring shirt global warming. All this stuff you know is going. It's terrible like there's stuff going on but this is all like we were told a long time ago that if we don't treat this place this this planet birth in a more respectable way like who sets up cities Masson cities in floodplains. We do we do we do. We're going to set up a place. uh-huh called Houston and we're going to put in a flood plain and we're gonNA literally just hope or we're going to build place and not finish the dikes and dams in New Orleans audits below sea level and just call it home like no native culture would have ever done that. Yeah so if the white men had learned to keep their mouths shut and bree they would have had a little that more awareness. More wisdom accrue to them through the breath practices and they probably would have made different decisions. Yeah anyways unfortunately. Wisdom awesome is not retroactive wisdom in a true statement spoken. There's a few more things about breathing through the nostrils. We haven't quite finished model right. What about nitrous oxide? Absolutely absolutely all of that works so nitric. Oxide is Vasil as a dial later. So that's released by the apparent as an sinuses. So as air passes through that molecule attached to oxygen and as it travels into your ally VI ally it actually causes them to open up and makes diffusion much more efficient and give them more auction to your cells. Exactly right you get more oxygen oxygen to hemoglobin to human which then goes and works as long as the cellular environment like Brian was saying as long as there's enough carbon dioxide in the cellular environment than the oxygen gets released to the tissue. I said and then Brian mentioned it in passing but nostril breathing stimulates through massage of the BAGEL nerve. The Para sympathetic response. It's Paris response. But it does not it actually is indirectly influenced by the by the vagus nerve but it enhances Vegas tone because it intrinsically slows your breath rate down and because of that the mechanisms that go that link breath rate and you know psychological state that about two way street you soon as you're reading slows down. It's a signal to your brain like. Hey everything's Are you suggesting that neuro chemical reaction reaction to slow breath or some sort of physiological thing. That's going on from slowing down the breath. It causes watts both so it simultaneous right right so as you start to slow your as you start to slow your breath rate down it. There's A. There's a physiological reaction for shore. Things things like BUFFERING VAZ ACIDIC products. Your entire metabolic. Cascade is moves closer to home. Yeah stasis and as a result all of those layers of signals that tell your brain how to react. The environment respond differently. And that's what it is is that your body has all these redundancies Aziz in place so that you can understand what's going on in the environment and how you should be reacting and there's an epic I mean there's a ton of research already out on control slowed breeding and how it calms the brain that calming effect. Put us in more of that in the importance importance of pera synthetic tom the specially for an athlete becomes. I'm no longer here or an operator. I'm here. I see everything going on. I'm in a creative space. I can learn. You aren't learning and high synthetic town you aren't you're just reaction it's crisis crisis you who likely we don't need all athletes in that position that's like until let's game day or that that moment I don't like training going into that is like I think that the human body unless you're you're meditating you're sleeping you're not meant to be like in total sympathizers well there's no other pets navy seal going into combat is using the breath to to control the internal environment and to create more awareness but a lot of people in this is a common misunderstanding when I was teaching feel can it's like you you know that's great but I need to be able to laser focus on my target you will be able to because you're going to still have right sympathetic response it's going to really sharpen your senses but you're also modulating that with the Paris of response which is expanding your awareness you're going to be able to see was that not you don't get tunnel but that guy that might pop up over right you're going to be able to gauge this target while you see this guy or parasitic tone means there's never an off switch for either war Arthur all both working it's just it becomes that Oh hey wet where my actually learning what am I mean. What's the process of what I'm doing doing now? And that's where I think we see things with a lot of the athletes especially where the learning curve just goes. Oh okay like the control my breathing respiration and this was something I'm working on. This is this goes into like our gear system that were really at the energy system in control thing is there's actual gears to understanding where I'm at metabolic and I can actually control where I'm at and what I'm doing and when I've lost control troll of that I no longer I on toast like it's time to figure out to get back you control so that I can get a hold of the situation. Yeah you know for the Bio hackers who are listening who want you know love the muse or the halo then you can reduce everything to a device with the the EEG affect the electrical You know yes stimulation. Electrical currents run through your brain are also affected acted by the brethren. So if you WANNA put your brain into kind of a High Alpha low bid estate which is ideal for learning than breath your nose slow down. Pay attention need a halo or we looked at that. I've looked at that and we've dived it with two buddies mind who are engineers both were from NASA and we look at this stuff on amuse and they were flabbergasted as to what was going on with my brain waves as opposed to theirs and the only difference in what we do or did is how much training I have with breath practice what I've spent time and what they had And they just didn't have the formal the type of breath practice. I had a very deep understanding this and how to where the control is what I can do it. And how my brain was actually operating much more functional Hassett. So it's very it's very. I'm I would be certain that you take people who are high level breath practitioners and you're gonNA see some. It's really interesting things. He I remember my friend. Stu Smith Did a national geographic thing. I I forget what they call it. Remember what they call that thing. We'll anyways they put him into a ice tank at him for an hour not submerged I mean he was obviously breathing I think he held his breath for an hour talk. That would be impressive. Can actually sitting up to his neck and you know and Yeah they didn't really tell us what he was doing or anyone. What what he's doing and then he got out in a mealy picked up you know went through a obstacle course and the picked up a rifle and shot a target and hit two? Three shots hit bullseye. Now they did pre-test where he was. Warm- warmed up ready and he did better back after an hour on the ice tank. And what was he doing breathing. You really to mow to drink practice. Attend your percent. Unawareness radically slow in hill slow. Xl brats controlling body temperature but also getting his mind and a perfect state of like neo neo at the end of the Matrix the bulletin in and then when obstacle course came he was like why we moved over to like files with all this. Bryce all all this is stuff that everybody's doing now. It's like you know it's cool but it's also like what are we doing this for like what are you doing this for like and and what's your outcome so you can just walk up short then the moment that we started applying all his midget on top. Yeah exactly let's let's stressor and then controlling Show me ten brass than you get out all ten recipe thirty seconds. This is because humans are we so often have the fallacy that achievement means understanding and it does not just the lack of under one hundred and so just because you can sit in A. I am not saying anything against the ice thing. It can be it extremely valuable. Yeah we know you know you feel. When I do agree? Awareness awareness mechanism to absolutely certain aspects about the physiology and how their mind works in here and there has to be underpinning understanding of why AM I. I'm doing this right and it can also become a hiding place like any anything that you know right. What's the 'cause it's it's a peak state you know I had Jamie wheel come talk at our summit and we'll talk about it in my opinion. Jamie Jamie make. It wasn't just flow but it was about conflicting flow with development. Does that make sense. So a peak state is a peak state right so when you breathe thirty Wim Hof breasts and jump into the ice back. You're going to feel amazing all all sorts of things going on but it's not gonNA evolve you as a human being. No it's not gonNA change anything except make you feel good in the moment and like we talked earlier actually might cause was some women motioning. Rods women doesn't actually do that when he gets in the ice right like if you watch him break the world record occurred like for an hour and fifty two minutes and ice. He's sitting there. Doing a touma like Brandon I since locust controlled slow like controlling has gotten ice bath with Joe Asana new podcast that kind of question breath and I was like I was comfortable wii going. Could we get out of this thing. Now you're on my turfing out you can give me up on one of your obstacles and laugh at me out when you stop asking. You know the the colds great but what I think people really miss about it and this is why we teach we teach an exposure clinic and it's not just even though we use ice and he'd it's not about the ice and he writes exposure right. What's expose right through a broad range of experiences? Exactly Apple's audio working in what is that big thing you can use and it comes back to. Oh you're breath the moment I've got control of my breathing breathing I'm in control my physiology. I'm in control of what's actually happening to my mind. It's safe to say this. The single most important leadership tool also because again. It's going to be what's going to keep you from embarrassing yourself in front of your team or it's going to allow how you to give the presentation with absolute authenticity presence. You know I can't tell you how I can't tell you but you're gonNa tell me right back. I mean you've been on this train man on this train for long from a leadership perspective bright because if it enhances awareness by we're so passionate about it because personal experience we're not coming up. This is like scientists studied. Maybe you are. But you're also practitioner absolutely partition of first right. Yeah so my introductory wrestling US was yoga. Actually right that was my first. Introduction was through yoga practice did It's amazing power stuff but I would say awareness means perspective so ramone leadership standpoint having a more broad perspective also allows you to navigate difficult situations per and personalities alleys peeled through organizing. People is one of the hardest things that you can do because intervenes are so unpredictable and so being able to maintain perspective active allows you to manage those situations with some grace and not returning to or like a cutthroat you know utilitarian were just like this guy to new. I wanted so right off so we have probably wrap up pretty soon here. What is like the seminar? You'RE GONNA give tomorrow and San Diego what would be like the beyond setting up the stage with your lectures and all that when you put people either on the ground a chair okay. Now we'll do our first lesson first practical exercise. What does that look like when we start the day with our very first practical exercise so before for any lecture we want people to feel it because being able to feel it is not been? You ought to take my word for right so we do a protocol first thing in the morning that directs. Everybody's focusing awareness out of the gate And it takes about five minutes and it's a combination of a slow-breathing protocol a fast breathing protocol to get kind of in a sweet spot and arousal where nobody's GonNa feel over stimulated but they will be drowsy early in the morning either so it's kind of like a half calf dragon. will be disappointed but the people who aren't aware of it will we'll be like. Oh Yeah Yeah and Every community that we this protocol particular step up and it's kind of like finding a sweet spot in your arousal spectrum and it helps people get really attentive and focus and there is a palpable shift in the participants and the instructors notice it and they notice it not only in themselves wooden others you can feel a change. Between sort of the CHATTY NECE and sort of unsettled nature of not knowing what to expect. And who's GonNa talk and you know how to do. I have the right t shirt on and all that stuff to who is this in front of me. And what information will I get And it makes for a really positive start to the day that's awesome that's awesome restart every of our everyone in our training with the except for the Corre camp. That's a different. Let me start that with. Bullhorns is unbeatable. Mind trading the track that there is a model breath trading and I just got an email from someone like I Graduate Choral forty three and extraordinary life changing things blah blah blah. But one thing is always puzzled me said I always experience like delayed onset. Soreness soreness an official term for that. You know I go out on one hundred Mile Rockin for a week and everything and so I just expected that. With Kirk oral camp. I would have this. I'm up for fifty hours doing in this enormous amount of work physical work that I would have delayed onset soreness ernest and be sore for a month and he didn't use up about the next week. which is common? That's the more common experience is Kinda like seals. Go through Hell Week and we're back training Monday. After seven days of non-stop physical training and I really think it comes down to the breath. We're teaching them how to breathe. The breath is constantly you know basically helping to rebalance the body and to eliminate the toxins that are causing the sewing quite possibly could be because there's probably other factors the hydration. I the constant. What about the prep that you send out for people prior to coming to crude you send out a wrapped event? Yeah and I'm probably betting that prep is something new to one of those folks to getting the tissue in the body ready bought I do. I'm of sound line because my own experience that the a change of reading and understanding my breath work and understanding my breath practice and what it is I do for exercise has changed all of that. You're changing the PH of the body. You're changing how acidic it gets right right so you're changing health and is moving energy which is moving up toxins. You WANNA burn. You WanNa burn more a few one of them. Burn more sugar that is gonNA mean you're probably GonNa Bring on Don's a lot sooner. Those types of things are are probably connected pretty he well. High intensity anaerobic effort is the add six hours in the ocean. Yeah which is going back to recovery at all the hydration which now most people think they hydrate but they don't yeah but when you sending someone for throughout fifty yards drink drink drink drink and actually stay pretty hydrated traded. I I you know. I didn't want to sit interesting thing to think about is like Oh yeah but to make clear about like what we're saying with lot of the stuff and you know if you go in anaerobic but it's that's it's not bad like it took me a couple of years but in two years I can operate it. Roughly Ninety five percent of Max ouray knows only absolutely like so. That is a possibility for anybody to do in. That means almost any work out I do. I can operate just choosing that to a large degree until the end. If I want gas more I can do throw Daghir in and go. You know I do know that for long term. That's GONNA the bigger cost. Yeah if you just want to get a little taller yeah ask. That's all right. Oh man talk about this forever but you're you're seminars called called Arda breath yet. Yes scrape all of that. So we've got the regular Arctic breath on Saturday and then the exposure on Sunday. Yeah and audio a website for this business that you guys have organized an off power speakers so that our home the home base and seminars that we offered this is the one seminar we offer and he so so people can find out more at power speed endurance dot com correct word slash ashort of breasts forward slash breath. And how like if they wanted to reach out and talk to you in person. Is that possible yet. Go through said citing INFO at Info at indoors orders Yup dot com slash now if power dot in college slash. Get Taller Gas. Come the tallest MIDGET IN EUROPE DOT COM. That would be a great. The nineteen fifties tagline right. Do you want to become the tallest midget your organization sign here. Okay often guys. Thanks so much for your time today. It's really important work doing. Thank you as yours. We're whereas it has inspired very much. So yeah no kidding and what it's like it's a little bit selfish because we get to breathe breathe when we teach people breath. Yeah and we get to earn money doing what we love to this right so sit and someday with this all be kind of commonplace and we'll have to have something else to talk about. That's the goal. That is the goal of all. And where do we go awesome appreciate very much. Thanks thanks for coming by she. Thank you very much up so folks that sit on bill mine. PODCAST appreciate you. Being here. Her breathe through your nostrils. Slow it down be aware and check out the artem breath. Power speed. DIRT'S DOT COM dot com slash autograph autograph heart breath lash tallest midget. We gotTA Melby. We gotta make that into something. It made it so much little people young make sure you get more dots by men of the occurs.

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Breathing Essentials That Will Change Your Life  James Nestor with Dave Asprey : 751

Bulletproof Radio

1:00:25 hr | 7 months ago

Breathing Essentials That Will Change Your Life James Nestor with Dave Asprey : 751

"Station high performance you're listening to radio with Dave asprey. Today is a show that I am so excited to do because it's something that has been a core part of the the bulletproof lifestyle. And something that I've been interested in for years. But something that I felt like maybe we haven't talked about enough in the world of biohacking and in case you're wondering why I'm sitting here looking really weird. We're talking about nothing other than breathing. And, there's all kinds of times I've talked about. Maybe doing a box breath I've even taught some breathing meditations in some online challenges I've done but going really deep on carbon dioxide on nitric oxide on oxygen levels is something that I learned about Oh maybe twenty years ago fifteen years ago with device that I'm wearing right now if you're watching on Youtube I'm actually holding up a cap no trainer which measures the amount of carbon dioxide and co two I'm going to take this little nasal Kanye off because it's irritating. and. When I tried this up I, didn't really know what I was doing. This was at the very beginning of my journey on this. But I've done out of living for a long time. Yet there was something missing from the story from the physiology I know that they're superpowers from breathing and there's so much weird information where it sounds good but it doesn't work and all that, and I recently read a book that blew my mind by a guy named James. Nester. Who is a real bio hacker? He's a guy who's a science journalist and author a surfer of free diver adventurer after and super into breathing the book is called breath and. I will tell you right now this is one of the top five books of the year that you want to read if you're into biohacking living longer performing better, just feeling good and his book convinced me to do some stuff that I've talked about on the show before that I wasn't doing reliably that I am now doing. So I already, Oh, a debt of gratitude to dates gas to you said a word yet. So James Nestor. Welcome to the show. Thanks a lot for having me. At your new book breath, it's called the new science of a lost art had all the best seller list La Times, New York Times Wall Street Journal odds with already successful But I feel like you had a very long half to get there. I mean you you talk to all the crazy people around the planet. You went to visit them. You have you know crazy Swedes hang out your house. And before we get into the nuts and bolts of breathing I WANNA know. What made you so interested in this one area of ancient wisdom when there's so many directions, Meka be gone master. So deep wide breathing versus any other PAT. Hey guys I want to tell you about a new hack for breathing and silence and meditation that I found to be really effective. And I try a lot of different stuff. This is something that definitely makes the cut and it's called. The mode silent mode makes something called the power mask. It's a hundred blackout sensory deprivation experience and I'm calling an experience because it is a mass, but it's got all sorts of electronics, deliver frequencies but. Importantly, it does beats blackout and breath work all the same time. So if you find, it's hard to follow all the different breathing exercises that I've been talked about on the podcast. This is a mask that has it all built in. It is really powerful. We're talking about reducing resting, heart rate, lowering stress and anxiety making me sleep better and more energy and focus. So check it out. Go to silent mode dot com slash Dave they're going to give you fifteen percents off your entire cart and they'll give you a six month subscription to the breath bionics APP. That's silent mode dot com slash Dave use, Code David Checkout. Never. Set out to write a book about breathing it's just kept stumbling upon research and stories over several years. Until finally, there were enough of them to convince myself that this was something worth exploring really started when I went to an art of living course. Oh Yeah, and I did the follow up course. So the course was was cool I enjoyed it. I didn't feel too much from any of breathing techniques and then I did a follow up course when I was really stressed out a house falling was rebuilding my house job was stressing me out. So, I wrote my bike down to this old room and sat cross-legged in this in this cold room with a twelve other people saying around the circle and I started breathing along with with shree and just in this rhythmic pattern nothing really special and I broke it with retreat in the room or via a cassette tape. For. Some reason that they love cassettes I love the his along with that analog is some breathing along with them just. Can't wait till the zone with go grab a Burrito. Grab. GonNa GonNa grab a beer and broke into the sweat that was the most extreme sweat a ever had in my life far more than when I was working out jogging boxing whatever my hair was sopping wet my t shirt was sopping wet. I'd sweat lodges on my on my jeans. So other people class saw this and afterwards they. Would happen to you and I was unsure what happened I asked the instructor and she said something about pronouns our energy. But I went back to my doctor who who actually she was the one who told me I should check out breathing class because I've been having so many respiratory problems Monja bronchitis. And I asked her what had happened and she had no idea. She said I must have had a fever or I must have been wearing too many clothes and. She had no no clue and she didn't really want to understand it so. As a journalist I filed that experience away that didn't know what to do with it. I wasn't going to write a memoir about reading how how lame would that be but it was really until I. I met free divers who showed me the true. Potential of where breath could take us and really opened the door. and. EANET divers this isn't book but you met them I'm guessing because of the work you did on whale communication and and all of that in Predator other science journalism works you connected to the diving community that way Yeah, I went out with outside magazine to write a story about a free diving competition and Greece and I didn't know too much about this even though it spent most of my life in the ocean surfing or swimming body serving. I didn't know about free diving I'd never done. It didn't know anyone who did it and I watch these people. These were ordinary looking people. So small people tell people large people whatever various walks of life that had used the power breathing to hold their breath for six seven eight minutes at a time in dive down to three, hundred, three, hundred, fifty feet but just a single breath of air. And this completely blew me away would they told me was breathing cannot only allow you to do this, which is considered scientifically impossible can also allow you to teach your body up when you're coal and allow you to heal your body if you're sick of pretty outrageous claims but I had seen what free diving could do i. was there looking at thought Maybe there's a larger story here so. Saying, and you tell a parts of the story in fact, very effectively in your book and just as a as a fellow author my compliments on for the job you did just in terms of making the book accessible I played it with my kids when you get an eleven year old thirteen year old saying what's happening you know Daddy I'm going to take my mouth closed when I go to sleep. Thank. You hear very often by the way if you're listening to going what the Hell we're going to get there and We need a big caveat before we get into that. Don't call the cops yet. Okay. Exactly. It wasn't duct tape. And for longtime listeners, we've actually had take a breathing guys on the show maybe about a year ago talking about that kind of breathing. But for new listeners and there are lots of show is is really growing and it reaches a couple of million downloads a month now. So it's it's big but if you knew this, just stick with it because there's going to be references to stuff. That's in your book or stuff that I've talked about at various episodes that you might not have heard and that's okay and if you're saying you're repeating yourself. Yeah. That's because you've listened forever. So you guys are going to have to deal with that. So you both ways then exactly. because. This is a really complex topic. Your book is. The preeminent book on breathing that I've come across and I mean I wrote the Foreword Shrieks head trainer for the art of Living I. Did this is breathing exercises for five years and like you I couldn't explain it and I'm regretting after read your book about maybe five six years ago against Chris if memory serves who's afraid retail like four or five, hundred, Dave, you need to talk to free divers. You got to have someone on the show for that and I just never got around to this is interesting but like there's so much going on and when I was like, oh. Man I missed that one but you landed on it and he went so deep. So you started out with a question mark as a science journalist like why did this happen and you filed it away and it percolated for a while similar in in some cases to outside of Mount Kailash in bed I'm like, why do I feel different after this weird butter thing and eventually something came of it so You, you connected with the free divers. You saw superpowers in action. You saw lots of people and had some experiences sweating, and that drew you into this but I wanna talk about sinuses because you open your book with that and I have maybe never said this on the show I was three days away from scheduled sinus surgery when I figured out what to do on cleaning out my sinuses and avoiding the surgery I it was a book called Sinus survival but it wasn't about breathing through my nose and walk me through what you did. especially the measurements of the thickness of bone in your face to fix your sinuses before we can go into the rest of the breathing stuff you did. So I just WanNa be very clear. Some people absolutely need surgical interventions with their nose. They're completely messed up but from what I learned from the top researchers in the field is most of us don't. So when an an t says, okay, I've looked at scan you have a deviated Septum, we need to put you right into surgery right now seventy five percent of the modern population has a Septum that is clearly deviated to the naked eye. So you should maybe step back and try some less invasive techniques. That will be less profitable for for them, but but could save you from a from a lot of trouble. So I start working with the chief of Reynolds Research Stamford Guy named Dr Jack Nyack had several interviews. Stanford's pretty close to my house here in San Francisco. So who's down there we'd have these three hour lunches and he kept telling me about all of the wondrous things that the. Knows does. So it filters air humidifiers, air pressurized air, and it's really our first line of defense and he also told me something that was pretty shocking to me. Was that about twenty five to fifty percent of the population that's on the higher end, our chronic mouth readers. So we don't use our noses either because we can't because there are always plugged up or we just choose not to. So I asked him I said we know that there's so many problems associated with mouth breathing. I'm the science is very clear on that increased risk of respiratory infections crease risk of snoring sleep out the goes on changes the shape of your face if you do it too much and when you're young so no one's arguing that but nobody knew how quickly it came on and so I asked him I said, but one or two year at Stanford man what are tested and he didn't know how. So he didn't. Have money allocated. So I mentioned well, what of what of I get myself and one other person to do an experiment? He was all game for it. So we spent ten days with silicon up our noses to just be breathing through a mouse and the point of this wasn't to do sorta jackass super size me stunt it was just a low oursel- position that. So much of the population was already in. so much of the population mouth breathing different was we were calculating exactly what was happening to our bodies Every minute of every day, not every minute of it. Often three times a day we retrieve the amounts of data. Yeah. Crazy amounts so. That that was it. We knew it was gonNA suck No one was was kidding each other that this was gonna be a pleasant thing but we didn't know it was going to suck so so hard so quickly. So my blood pressure just within a few hours shot up about fifteen to twenty points just off the bat in the series stage to hypertension. So that was bad. Then I went to. Bed that night I started storing and I had not been snorted all few days. Later, I was snoring for about four hours throughout the night I had sleep apnea. We're totally stressed we can focus on anything. I mean our heart rate variability was just in a gutter. It was a complete disaster to the point that after about five days I looked at Anders Olsen, who was the other participant in the study. I don't know if I can do this for another five days, but but we did and it just got worse you know it got worse when I read that part of your book was like man, you just explained my childhood I grew up in a basement that a toxic mold. I had sinus infections every month for fifteen years I'd gone antibiotics for them which. God. But So I I remember also I would get these chronic nosebleeds must have been maybe ten and when I say chronic I mean every day my nose bleed and I became a little bit paranoid because you're like sitting in class and there's like blood coming out your nose it's just not cool so. I'm I just decided. I'm not gonNA blow my nose anymore as a child would do So I went for at least a month with a clogged sinuses but I didn't know what that was doing for my teeth and for my jaw and even for my brain, what happens to you when you do not breath your nose at all for a period of time like that just walk listeners through through that So when we're breathing through her mouth, you can think of the lungs as an External Oregon when we're mouth breathing so they're just exposed to everything in your environment. If you live in a city like I do that means pollution that means pollens if you're in an enclosed space with with black mold or other problems that means dust. So our noses have all these hairs and Sylvia and different structures to filter gunk out. That's what they do and by. Reading like that you get none of those benefits of filtration. So that's that's the first big problem. But what it does immediately is is mouth breathing. You're going to be breathing into the upper part of your chest, which is much less efficient, which means you need to take more breaths to get less oxygen. So your Your heart rate's GonNa go up. You'RE GONNA place yourself into a sympathetic state where you stress levels are gonna go up in all of this as a downstream effect on your ability to think on your ability to exercise on your ability to basically do anything because we take about twenty thousand to twenty, five, thousand breath every day on the upper end can take that many breasts today. And if you're taking those breads inadequately or inefficiently, it's going to catch up with you. The body will compensate for some of that time. Their bodies are really good at it. That doesn't mean we're healthy and after a while it's just gonNA break you down. So it's so many people have chronic. It's like twenty five percent of the population. So many people are out breathing. So many people have asthma that we've accepted this as completely normal and it's not in the science is very clear but damage this is doing to us is a population. So. As we said that I opened my mouth to take a breath I when I record podcasts I spend all day pretty much on on video audio and I've become more aware of breathing into my nose even when I'm when I'm doing that you just WanNa sniff into the microphone. it's it's something that. After your. Listening to your book and Reading Your Book, I, did both. I did become much more conscious of just consciously during the day breathing through my nose and. I experimented after I had the Boutique. Oh. You guys on the show I experimented with a lip seal tape I actually sent it in a box of do like a box every quarter curated Dave asprey box of just cool stuff that I find the people get a discount and I sent it out to people but I only used it three times because I knew the science, but it might not always been a little bit gunky. It's pretty good but it was that that reinforcement and your storytelling that got to go you know what? I'm just going to deal with it that the nozoe. Up in a way that I had heard on the show but I just hadn't executed in my own life. So I will tell you that for the past maybe three months now I've just take my mouth every night when I go to sleep which sounds super crazy. If you're listening to this, I'm not kidding read breath and you'll understand why or listen to the other episode and listening to this episode. And it it has profoundly improved my sleep quality in a way that is weird but you talk about. How. Mouth breathing is bad. But you didn't talk about teeth and facial structure. What did, what did you find breathing did for teeth develop and as adults and what did you do to your own teeth and sinuses to change them So first of all, with the sleep tape thing, the sounded I just WANNA address this real quick this completely sketchy to me and then. I went on Youtube and it looked even more insane. I said, there's no way I'm ever GonNa do this. But then when I was at Nayak's lab a win across the hallway and saw breeding therapists. And current doctor speech language pathology at Stanford. I was talking to her just shooting the stuff about various things and she's asleep taper. She prescribes it to Oliver Patients and she told me that she was slated for nasal surgery and because she's like I've been mouth breather my whole life I can't breathe it all and she thought she knows about the knows she looked at various people twenty different people who learned Jack Amis behold drilled in their throat and notice from two months to two years. Their noses were completely clogged one hundred percent. So she knows as a lose it, use it or lose it Oregon, and so she tried using sleep tape herself. My God after ten days she could breathe through her nose. Now she's an Obliga- Zal breather and is and is really preaching this. So after I talked with her I talked to Dr Mark. Burhaniye who's been prescribing this for for you know years and years to all of his patients in in so many other people so don't go on Youtube don't look at what people are doing talk talk to the experts in the field but it's unknown thing you breathe through the more you breakthrough knows the more you're going to be able to breathe through your nose and that has massive benefits so as far as our teeth and our faces are concerned. You know you start off researching a subject and he think you Kinda know your way around where the research is going to lead you I when you're writing nonfiction book, Pro. Bowl I said I got this thing figured out and then you're thrown such like this hard left turn and I did it about six months research because I learned that. So many of the problems that were suffering from from breathing aren't just psychological their anatomical and they've. Happened to us in just the last few hundred years, and now that seems crazy because a lot of people think that evolution is just progress progress progress survival of the V, it's totally not evolution means change just look at the human face and human skull and you can see what I mean I I spent months looking at ancient skulls and it will really spooky you out not only because their skulls but because they all have perfectly straight teeth. They have these very wide jaws, these very flat or very pronounced faces, wide faces, and by having those faces in having these pronounced jaws, they had larger airways. So the reason why humans have crooked teeth this is something I had never thought about everyone I knew had crooked teeth, braces extractions, all that crap because our mouths have grown. So small the teeth have no word grow. So they growing crooked having a small mouth also means we have the smaller Airway which swan the main reason. So many of us suffer from sleep apnea snoring and other breeding issues is because our mouths are so small so. My upper palate used to be much smaller than it is my lower jaw was further back than I didn't have a square jaw after I figured out the bulletproof sinus rents and I ten times a day I was washing my sinuses out and really focusing on this I've found a guy named white jennings who is one of the first couple of hundred people on on the show. And he went in as you describe in your book he made a custom splints that allowed expanded my upper politics about two years. I wore a twenty four seven and allowed my lower come down relax and move forward and it opened up my palate and restructured my face without surgery. Now. I, didn't measure the thickness of bones in my face the way you did but I've talked about this even in my last anti-aging book and I've always felt like such a crazy person saying, no, seriously the shape of your jaw and how your teeth hit affects how long you're going to live but I didn't have the connection between nasal breathing. I should have put it in my book, but I didn't have it down in shame on me because I had heard about this from the potato guys. I just didn't know the connection between breathing through knows and having a big palette and having straight teeth and I'm so grateful I get to teach my kids this now and what did you do to fix your face given that you and I both were were not nasal breeders when we were young. So yeah. I wish I had known this stuff growing up to would have saved me a lot of grief. But what I did is I took a cat scan and nyack looked at it and start cracking up, which is not something you want a doctor to do while looking at escape he's I you are a complete mess a broken my nose like three times deviated Septum like all kinds of problems he's like your perfect candidate for surgery. Let me fix you. Know want to try to do this another way. So there's a lot of confusion as to why having a plug nose or or different growth patterns in the face would affect nasal breathing like why would have an a small mouth affect your nasal breathing and it turns out that this upper palate if you have a clean thumb in the age of, Co, bid use a clean thumb. You can put up to the top roof of your mouth, the Upper Palate And that Palette should be pretty flat. If you're like me, it's not flat at all. It juts way up. So that is called a v-shaped Palette okay and high arched palate nickel various names, and when the Palette doesn't fall correctly when you're younger which did not my face, it stays up to high, which can impede the flow of air coming in through. knows. It actually interrupts the flow of air into your nose. So it if you have a ridge down the middle, that's essentially the bottom of the V. So it's higher on either side. That's what you're talking about. If it's if if there is a large indentation when you're looking at on either side are in the middle right in the middle. Okay. Got It. So and and it's interesting. You look at ancient skulls and it's almost flat. Their upper pilots are almost flat extremely wide. You look at modern skulls and they're very very high up as their faces are Maoz are so thin now. So this is something that Dr Mark Brahimi told me. So this is so important when you're younger, it's really easy to change this right correct oral posture chewing other correct breathing. This can all affect how your face is gonNA look. So if you don't care about your health, a lot of people care about how they're gonNA look that. Maybe. Maybe pay attention to that. But when you're older, it's hard. You're an adult like you know youth was was a million years ago for me what can I do? But I managed to meet some people who had sort of taken a very old technique and used it for more modern purposes what I mean by that is the first orthodontics. Functional orthodontics weren't meant to crane teeth in they weren't headgear they expanded the mouth. The problem with having a mouth. It's too small for your face faces the teeth grow and crooked. So to me, it makes perfect sense to expand that mouth that upper palate. Make more room for the teeth to grow in straight. You also make more room for the airway you breathe better. So they've taken this technology or this philosophy and have used it for for adults and us one of these devices of just curious I'd seen the scientists the science had seen the case studies, dozens and dozens of case studies of huge. Airway growth in these people after a few months. So I wore this device for every single night. I won't say it was the most pleasant thing. The world on my upper palate had a little dowse screw in it, and it very slowly opened up that upper palate. There's a suture right in the middle of that upper palate that can gently split open and even in adulthood and not only does it increase your airway size, but it can also add bone to your face. We're told after thirty, we can't model new bone wrong. We can in our faces. If you read superhuman, you know how important it is to manage blood glucose spikes. 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This is one of those innovations that causes stuff to happen in your gut that gives you the result you want Pendulum Life Dot Com twenty five percent off using Code Dave twenty five. You can do it elsewhere to to have to have the right stimulus and it involves bone fluctuation with raises bone Morphou, genyk protein, and your little dowell was flexing the bone. In my case I had a custom made little metal thing in every about four weeks I go in and he'd remake it and just keep pushing. And you know. I think it was one of the things that turn my brain back on. It was an important part of me a recovering from other toxic mold exposure. What I didn't know until I read your book though was the. Of that in combination with nasal breathing on oxygen and the brain because even though I fixed all the holes in my brain with the Doctor Dana and brain scans things that are caused by toxins I still have less blood flow, my brain than like and in your book you talked about changes in oxygen and changes in blood flow to the brain just. From nasal breathing and presumably from having enough space in your palate there how long does it take for people to see brain change from either expanding their powder just from breathing in their nose I? Don't think has done any studies on looking at brain blood flow and palatal expansion because this stuff is still considered fringy, it won't be ears prom a promising, Israel? Yeah. Moving in this direction, you let the cat out of the bag I mean any doctor who reads your book and there are lots of doctors listen to the show in seriously guys you have to read the change of practice. is going to look at the hard data that you put out there and say wait maybe I should look at this. What as we haven't, we don't have the studies on expanding the. Palette. But we do have studies on breathing through the nose and option in the brain. What are those studies say? Will breathing equivalent breath through the nose through the mouth will increase oxygenation about twenty percent. You get twenty percent more oxygen, and that is a combination of nitric oxide because we produce a profusion of Nitric Oxide in our noses, we can increase that fifteen fold by humming and it's also the because it slows air down a lot of people think well, why don't want to slow down I need more oxygen. When you over breed like this, ever contrive this breed like a pervert for a little while. You're gonNA feel some some teaching lane in your fingers. You might feel something leaning their toes you're going to get lightheaded that is not from an increase of oxygen to these areas is from a decrease of circulation. So the idea that breeding more is going to bring more oxygen to your hungry cells is completely false in need to breathe in line with your metabolic needs, which almost always means reading less than you think you should and breathing slowly. so by breathing through the nose. Right, there's a vacuum going in positive pressure coming out you're slowing down air you're increasing the pressure you're giving your lungs more time to extract oxygen you're also. Breathing lower in the lower lobes of the lungs have more blood in them. Blood has gravity dependent. So In those areas you can extract more oxygen as well. So a people have known this researchers have known this for for decades we've known that having the right amount of carbon dioxide and oxygen is essential to be running most efficiently and handle anderson at Yale was doing these studies one hundred years ago. But what was so bizarre to me is to stumble across this all of this science which nobody is refuted. Okay and then you bring it up to a pulmonologist, my father-in-law's a pulmonologist so he was with me along. This entire journey we were passing studies back and forth. He'd never heard of any of this stuff and this is not pointing fingers. He's amazing at is jobs, but he's dealing with pathologies is cutting out stuff from lungs. He's dealing with people with empathy seem he's dealing with people who copd he's not looking at people who are trying to maintain health in certain ways and even the breathing patterns that I was mentioning do almost look look at what what happens a circulation look what happens to your heart rate your variability. Breathing in these surveys, this was completely news to him because in his profession it's are you are you breathing or not? If you're breathing, that's good. If you're not, that's really bad. And they're great at what they do same with EMT's of the transform. So many people's lives. So again, there's no finger-pointing, but it's not binary medicines not binary if you're looking to maintain health and prevent yourself from getting sick at any time, breathing has to be considered SA- core part of that long with what you eat, how you sleep and how much you exercise. I would I would absolutely double down on what you just said and By, there's a couple of different directions we can go here, but you talked about nitric oxide and breathing through the nose. Tell me about the weird connection I did not know about between your sex organs and your sinuses. So. This another thing that I stumbled upon that, I, just was not predicting in this long strange journey of writing this book. So it turned out that there's one oregon more closely connected to your genitals than any other, and it is your nose because our noses are coated with erectile tissue the same erectile tissue on her nipples same erectile tissue is you know where they? ACT The same way so are rectal tissue and our noses and gorgeous with blood so or it becomes flaccid and opens up. So throughout the day, there's something called the nasal cycle every about thirty minutes to three or four hours you will be right nostril dominant meaning that that Nassir will be more open and breathing we'll be more easy or you'll be left nostril dominant. So I am. Much. More right nostril dominant right now. So our bodies do this automatically is this amazing thing one nostril opens as the other closes sometimes they both feel like they're open is very subtle but other times you'll notice throughout the day that is pretty pronounced. One will really be be closed up and that's not because of congestion as because of this erectile tissue. So they were doing Freud was all into this stuff. He thought sexual neuroses were tied to the nose. So he would have Haitians go in and drill out their noses some pretty gnarly stuff but some science that did not make it into this book because it sounded too sketchy as they used to administer cocaine to women with series pms they felt great who who had a guest but sometimes they they would remove some tissues in there and they would suffer much less symptoms of. Of PMS and they did tons of studies on this stuff but that was just getting too far out in the weeds which do need to knows everyone has this erectile tissue and it's definitely serving a purpose, which is one of the reasons you should be breathing through nose and not through your mouth because your mouth has none of that stuff. So you breathe through your nose increases nitric oxide, which increases Vasil dilation which increases erectile tissue both in men and women in the sex organs. Yeah and if you look at Viagra, what does biogra- do it releases more nitric oxide, which grades more Vaso dilation and you can release a lot more nitric oxide in your nose by humming I don't know if there's been any long range control studies looking at harming and sexual performance. Good luck getting that one funded, but it would it would be interesting to see. Fifteen full increases is is not small is not minor and I. There was one study. This guy did who had chronic sinusitis which has caused by virus or fungus, and he hummed for a select amount of times of every day it. Would for few minutes a day and he was able to completely get rid of his chronic sinusitis. This is N. one study. So don't don't run out and start humming and saying that this is the prescription forever sinusitis, but it is it is interesting that nitric oxide guess what it does it interacts directly with viruses and bacteria, and with funguses, it kills them, which is why Lewis Narrow who won the Nobel Prize in the nineties whereas work with nitric oxide believes that just breathing through the nose that nitric oxide could help stem some of a huge viral load of covid and another reason to do that. I got a lot of crap when I, post on instagram this thing called mask mouth because when you have a mask on even just in ninety five or one of those cloth masks that actually doesn't do anything according to the latest research. But they cause you to naturally mouth breathe because there's more pressure to suck things in anyone listening to the superior mask right now are you reading through your mouth? The odds are almost certainly high that you're doing that. So you have to really consciously remember nasal breathing mask. So they're seeing more cavities, more sinus issues, and one of the studies shows that especially cloth masks which have more back pressure and less filtration increase your chances of getting. Respiratory illness quite a lot. I think it's because you're breathing through your mouth not through your nose and I thinking that of your book to be perfectly honest. Well, we know there's direct links between mouth breathing cavities, dentists who have been working on this. Again, I'm going to quote from Dr. Mark. Brahimi Heath. He believes the number one cause of cavities is mouth even beyond diet in beyond sugar because if you're breathing for a third of your life. which fifty percent of the population is doing you're gonNA, make this environment so acidic and it becomes a breeding ground for cavities. So if you're breathing through your mouth through a mask that is bad news across the board for so many reasons, it's to me I take the mask as an opportunity to focus on my breath to breathe slowly debris less into breathe through. My nose, and if you're ever doubting that you're not getting enough oxygen, you can buy one of these things for about twenty bucks on Amazon for those people listening I'm holding up a pulse ox similar and no matter what mask I've worn. No matter how I was breathing in that mass cow slowly was breathing my stats were were completely fine I o. two sat was. Ninety eight ninety, nine percent, but oxygen the way you'd expect exactly so. What people are reacting to when the breathing through ask they say I'm not getting enough how to I can't breathe. They're reacting to an increase of carbon dioxide. It's not a lack of oxygen for a long time. I traveled with a pulse ox Senator and I fly a lot because I did before this whole pandemic. And I would really not enjoy how I feel when I landed. So I finally got to the feel exactly like myself when I land but part of that exploration was, what is what am I doing? They would go down to ninety, four, ninety, five on airplanes and one of the things that I noticed made a difference was if I drank carbonated water, give me the club Soda Not Normal Water which has carbon dioxide in it. Why did I feel better and have an increase in my spo to in my blood oxygen levels when I drink carbon dioxide, why would you think based on all this stuff you now? You know I went deep into that hole and talked to several researchers about it. What I found it was it was not conclusive what was happening with with with drinking up because I felt the same thing and I would see it too. I said Oh. This is very interesting if I drink a leader of carbonated liquid, is that going to increase my? To delivery. I think if someone were able to study with this, it would have to be very closely controlled study. You have to watch how people exactly how they breathe because breathing a little too much little too less. We're really so it's almost impossible to do this, but I think it would be fascinating but nonetheless having more carbon dioxide in your body for the vast majority of us is not a problem. It's a benefit because having more co two will allow oxygen to detach? From those red blood cells hemoglobin into Hungary cells so oxygen is able to dislodge in the presence of carbon dioxide, and so we've known this for one hundred, ten years. Now it's called the the BOHR effect. So breathing more slowly allows oxygen to come more easily into our organs or tissues and everything else, and this is something that so few people recognize or appreciate, but again, the scientists so clear no one's really refuting it just not a lot of people are doing. So we know that increasing carbon dioxide by the way you breathe. It increases acidity in the body. And how does the body reverse that? So you WANNA be balanced. You don't WanNa be too acidic. Any don't want to be too alkaline in your body is GonNa at at all times you WanNa stay at some point four P. H.. So because that's that's where all the magic happens throughout your body. So if you're going to low or if ever you going to high becoming to outline the body immediately adjust. So when we become more acidic our bodies, our lungs do a lot of this work. Right? We're forced to breathe bring us back back in line back in balance when we become more alkaline or. Kidney Start doing this work they start offloading by by car and that's for temporary times like that's not a problem. We have these these mechanisms that allow us to stay in balance. But if you are constantly over breathing over weeks over months over years, this can have such a deleterious effect on the health. It can actually impact your bone density. It can cause increased risk of bone fractures osteoporosis, and so many other problems because when you offload by car, you're taking with it essential minerals, magnesium phosphate more and more, and so you see this with as matic's or people with. Populations traditionally read way over the amount that they need to that they can suffer from these problems, and again I never thought the breathing could be associated with with bone density but but it is, and again, the scientists very clear on that when I was doing work for superhuman my anti-aging book and I was going through just finding all of these substances that are shown in studies to extend human lifespan. And it turns. Out Baking Soda. Is One of them. So having more bicarbonate present in the body so that you don't have to suck it out of your bones probably helping people rover breathing. Because it does extend life. In fact I. Find The potassium bicarbonate is a better choice as long as you don't get way too much of it because too much potassium does bad things to you but not enough does things. So I take potassium bicarbonate on every night before I go to bed because I figure why would I want suck it out of my bones Keep my bones right. Right. Want them. And it it's tied to breathing. There's no doubt. Eating differently taking different supplements these can have a profound effect on your health, but the body does so many amazing things. If you keep it in balance to do those things, it can heal itself in so many ways. So I prefer to to start with my body of my body can't figure it out then I'll move on to this other stuff. Yeah. Not immediately to move move into surgery like put nasal surgery i. Again to be clear some people need surgery absolutely need it. There's nothing wrong with surgery or drugs or any intervention just don't do it I. Yeah. Yeah and it's like Western science that this isn't a west West versus east thing to meet Western scientists frigging amazing I am a huge fan of Western medicine. But if you look at something with with especially if your noses messed up why not start with Netti Pot why not start nasal breathing why not start? And try that for a few weeks. Why not start with always breathing out of your nose with some sleep date these things basically costs nothing and as you've seen as I've seen so many other people have seen. They can have a really huge benefit to your ability to breathe clearly how much humming do I need to do to get benefits? Another study I wish has been has been made We do know that humming does increase that that all by by fifteen fold. I. Believe a couple of minutes just a couple of minutes because nitric oxide lasts for about two to six seconds you know. So it has a bioavailability very short so but but it's extremely potent and I don't think it's a coincidence that they're now eleven clinical trials looking at giving nitric oxide to patients with serious symptoms of of Covid and from what I've. Heard there it's having tremendous effect. Again, our bodies can create nitric oxide. We can do by breeding. We can do it by eating different foods but this humming thing it's you know it'd be hard to home for a few hours a day, and maybe that would just overload you with the NFL. I don't I don't know if anyone's done it but if you. Look at traditional chance. If you look at traditional Mantras, all man, what are you doing at the end of that? You were humming a low frequency, which is very good at releasing nitric oxide. So again, I just wish somebody you know that wasn't me or or you could do long range real controlled studies of this stuff because it could benefit everybody and maybe. Someone listening right now will be intrigued and want to do that. That would be wonderful news you talked about a specific number of breaths in the book would, which is funny because the standard box breath for the navy seals as five seconds but you had a more precise number what is the ideal number of seconds for a breath and where did it come from? So I'll have ever do this, and then I'll explain what's happening to your body's while you're doing that. So you can just calmly xl. Inhaled to account about five or six don't stress if you're a little off. So one, two, three, four, five, six. Two six to just do that on your own just very calmly don't don't push it. This is a competition. So some Italian researchers about twenty years ago they brought onto subjects into a lab and they had them recite the Maria and then they had them recite all money pod home, which is famous Buddhist Mantra and they noticed that both of these prayers locked into the same respiratory rate but five six breaths per minute five and a half seconds to inhale five and a half seconds to exile, and they noticed what happened to their bodies when. They were residing these prayers because when you're exhaling your vocalizing, then you have time to in hell very slowly is their bodies entered the state of what they called coherence everything was working at this peak efficiency. So oxygen increased in their brains circulation increase their heart rates, lowered blood pressure lowered, and their brain brainwaves, and this was the was found in later studies were able to enter this this state of synchrony where everything was was working at again at the state of coherence were everything could function more efficiently. So the second that these subjects stopped praying. Stop breathing this way it all went to hell. So spontaneously talking just like we're doing my heart rate variability probably not going to be very good you know blow to probably not going to be very good but you don't need to pray to do this. That's what they found out. You just need to breathe this rate. So about five or six seconds in five to six seconds out, and since then Dr Richard Brown at Columbia has used this for patients with anxiety depression and erects nine eleven survivors on and on and on because it allows you. To enter into that para sympathetic state where your body can naturally heal itself. So many of these populations are breathing too much. So it seems so simple that people probably like there's no way this is going to do anything get your pulse ox out, get your heart rate variability out, get your blood pressure monitor and take it before and after and see for yourself. So so many psychiatrists, psychologists and doctors are now using this very simple breathing method. You talked about the amount of time for it to go in the amount of time to go out. But? So. Many of the Yoga classes. So many of the techniques that I know of even with Wim Hof there's okay within hold breathe. For at least some of it is there an ideal hold time or? was going on there. Well. So this this guy to six seconds and I call it five point five, my book. So five point, five, six, five seconds out this five point five per minute liters of air. But then I've gotten so many e mails of people stressing out there half a second off and they're all worried about I'm like Oh God. So I'm just saying five to six seconds anywhere in the in that ballpark people it's fine. You're going to be okay. Don't be so anxious. So with other breathing exercises whether it be running avas or create Sudarshan Credo with half exercises. Can Be viewed as as almost way training for for breathing. Okay. So they have profound benefits. We should not be weight training all day every day, which is why we should not be whim hop breathing all day I'm talking to whim tomorrow about this and he would he could not agree with this more the bonkers I mean anyone who does that kind of stuff including Stan graph would tell you try your. Breathing all the time and see what happened is not good. No, it's. It's awful in some of these should only be done every couple of weeks or maybe holographic. Three hours of breathing with loud music now, and I don't know if you WANNA. Do that as we have of acid everyday you don't WanNa do that exact I mean for some people my my really dig that good luck with it and we know it's so so therapeutic these different things and that's what some people have written. It said well, Wim Hof said, breathe really hard and then you hold your breath of course that has benefits because it's a cute. I'm talking about habitual breathing right should be slower and lower and through the nose. But in the last third of the book I focused on this it's like, okay here's the foundation of healthy breathing at rest right so where else can breathing take us and I did Hala Tropic breathing did Sudarshan Korea that Wim Hof and so many of these different breeding techniques these more intensive I call them breathing plus techniques because they build on that founded foundation of healthy breathing. They're all doing the same thing. They have different names, but you're breathing really fast and then you're breathing really slow or you're holding your breath. So it's just like weight training with with these repetitions. So it's making you very alkaline that's making various. So your body can remain flexible so that you can willingly place yourself in a state of stress, which is what Wim Hof what does Sudarshan create does. Know this very well so home. So so you're putting yourself in a state of stress, but you were controlling with your breath and then anywhere controlling a a state of relaxation with your breath and you're allowing your body to recognize that you had these tools that you carry around with yourself all the time you can make yourself stress, but most importantly, you can make yourself relaxed. So I'm a huge fan of whims braiding cullet to mow caught Wim Hof method. Call it whatever I'm a huge Darshan Chrea I try to do the long version at least once a week I'm a huge fan of breath holding the all there. So many benefits to these things but but again is a difference between something a technique that you practice for short amount of time in how you breathe for for the rest of the day it the first time I met him, Hof. It was unexpected. I was holding the the biohacking conference. I do. Every year and Rick Rubin who's been on the show as well. Texted me and Dave I've got Wim Hof here and the audience can come up on stage. It was completely unplanned. It comes up there and he has me do is breathing technique. Okay. I'm hosting a three day event for thousands of people and he hasn't been doing this and I'm sitting there going Oh. Crap. This guy has me I'm going to start trip involves like I'm kinda seeing stuff around. The edges, which is what happens during hold tropic breathing and I've also done events was Dandruff and I've I have very profound experiences when I do that. So I'm sitting there going Oh, man, you know I have no idea it was going to happen but I got a function the rest of that very highest level and I love him he's been on the show because you know he's so passionate about it but I was going I wonder if I'm going to be Be for the rest of the day from the sports that we didn't do it too much and I did a whole bunch of push ups and you know it was it was a cool thing to be able to share with the crowd. But yeah, these are powerful and I can't imagine doing it all day. It would be ruinous and I've had a few people even who do. I'm like art of living exercises. They warn you don't do these for long periods of time each day you know it's a fifteen minute set of exercise in the morning because you become. Almost ungrounded if you do aggressive breathing exercises for long periods of time like you, you become odd for lack of a better word kind of smokes way too much pot or something. Well yeah to me. This seems so so obvious you're not gonNA sit around and do curls for sixteen hours a day you're going to destroy your body just because something is very good for you at a short amount of time doesn't mean it's going to be. Great for you if you do it all day and this is just such. The Western thought this is how we think about things. Well, I'm going to kick this this breeding practices s I'm going to do it twice as long. But breathing doesn't have to be like that and I think it's it's frustrating that people view this as a competition. How long do you hold your breath? Bro My breath for three minutes. Stop it do go go bring that competition somewhere else but but breathing should be something to nurture. Two centers and rebalance us and that's what it does in the more you recognize that and the more you start using this in your life think you're gonNA feel huge benefits. The great thing also is there's no side effects beyond feeling better. So there's nothing bad that's going to happen to you and into me I've seen people absolutely transformed by this I mean people who were in serious trouble series asthmatics, Emphysema copd they're no longer on inhalers they're no longer on oral steroids they're. Completely transformed and there's hundreds of these studies they're. They're not select things and makes sense to me. This is what happens when your body's imbalanced when it's able to do what it's naturally designed to do We've talked about people who are anxious that they're breathing the wrong number of times per minute. We've got people who are obsessed with you know I can hold my breath longer than you I. Think we invented a new term just now I'm GonNa name, it oxy wreck Zia. And it's kind of like. Like people were afraid that they're eating the wrong food even though it probably isn't perfect but it's okay. So we have people who are afraid of not breathing the right way and to your point what you've already said there's GonNa reiterate that. Be Thankful you're breathing at all so you can start there and then you can improve it by breathing through your nose. But if it's only four seconds, you'll probably live right and and just take that mindset with everything you do whether it's food whether it's reading whether it's exercise and all that stuff to to just bring that into your awareness as a as a listener of the show don't don't fall for all my God I took a breath through my mouth. I'm a bad person that's just bad programming. I completely agree with that. You know you see some people who are. So into wellness that they're miserable 'cause they have to adhere to so many things the point of having your body well, and healthy is to enjoy life. So if you're not enjoying life at the end of this wellness road, then then why do it and so much of this anxiety around? I'm not eating every single thing the perfect amount of food I'm, not, breathing, not. Right that damage any benefits you're getting to doing these things is going to be countered by the damage you're doing by being stressed out about it. So Ruth breathing with anything else chill out if you can't get to that six second inhale and xl two, four seconds in four seconds out and get to it eventually, the point is to relax yourself. Yeah that that kindness towards yourself a lovely. But that is there such a thing as fasting from breathing? Yeah. It's called breath holding and it's it's been around for thousands of years. One of the earliest definitions of Yama was trance induced by holding one's breath. So breath holding practices, we know there's innumerable benefits to it. You can. If you do it regularly, you can increase people which can increase your red blood cell count. You can increase an synthase You can increase I mean so many benefits, which is why it's been used in athletics for for decades and decades and mark my words very soon people are going to start to incorporate series breathing I. Mean it's already happening breathing breathing therapies. elite athletes have been using this for a while, but they're going to be doing it even if you're so. So so I think that the cessation of breathing breath holding whatever you WANNA. Call it It's all doing the same thing where it's increasing your flexibility. Respiratory Flexibility is a phrase I've used before, and we all know that flexibility is one of the most if not the most important thing to your to your health, you want your body to constantly be flexible so that when it's faced with the challenge, you can be flexible enough to overcome that challenge. If you think of what the body does to make energy, it's food plus air equals electrons. And you've talked about diabetes, which is basically you suck at turning food into electrons and almost no one is talking about that notion that error is the other side of the equation and if food is so important, why isn't air equally important and I have a new book called fast this way that's coming out in January and we just announced and it just went up for preorder and all that and it's funny I'd written a brief section of the book on well, even fasting. From error is important because I was talking about just the very basics breathing, and then I came across your book I'm like this is amazing. You actually talked briefly about fasting premiere as breath holding so I I love that mindset. But if briefly withholding food from yourself can have such a profound effect on your biology. Doesn't it followed that briefly withholding error from yourself could have the same impact on your biology just makes sense and based on your research it seemed like it does. Of, course because you're making your blood more sick, which makes it will which will make oxygen more easily, it can more easily disassociate from hemoglobin. So. Just, holding your breath like that increasing tolerance for Co two has some so many but we won't get into the laundry list of benefits for that. But if you look at populations of people with asthma anxiety, they can hold their breath optum for about three or four seconds and they go on. So. We know that increasing your threshold for Co two whether again whether or not you're a marathoner or your deep sea diver or or you're an asthmatic or someone with emphysema can have profound benefits. So this should all these different tools in the toolbox we used at different times. There's so much more stuff in your book. Where's the best place if people can connect with you? So I, think the best place to connect with me I'm trying to get better the social media thing is still pretty much suck out on Instagram at Mr James Nestor that's my handle across the board and my website at Mr. James Dot Com has breathing practices has all of the references has a whole bunch of interviews with experts just specifically about the benefits of healthy breath James. Thanks for your work in the world guys you need to read this book. It's so important. Have a beautiful day. Thanks writing this. Thank you very much there shaking. Bulletproof radio was created this hosted by Dave Aspirin the executive producer Darcy himes podcast Assistant Bev Hamson. PODCAST is for information purposes, only statements and views expressed on this podcast or not medical advice. This podcast including aspirin the producers disclaim responsibility for any possible adverse affects from the use of information contained herein. But of guests are their own in this podcast is not endorser accept responsibility for statements made by guest because podcast is not make any representations a warranties about guess qualifications or credibility individuals on this podcast may have a direct or indirect financial interest in products services referred to herein if you think you have a medical problem, Consulta licensed physician. PODCAST owned by bulletproof media.

mouth breathing Youtube Dave Wim Hof erectile tissue Dr Mark Brahimi James Nestor Dave asprey La Times Nester Meka Mount Kailash chronic sinusitis Anders Olsen Oregon
Yes, its that time again yikes!

Xtra Xtra Presented By VDG Sports

15:04 min | 8 months ago

Yes, its that time again yikes!

"Extra. Extra. Sports, I'm your host, Vince Douglas Gregory, no filter or very c-h-a-d sued. You can rate and review in share extra extra wherever you are consuming this please rate and review extra extra web you consume and you can also follow extra extra on twitter machine extra extra the DG Extra Extra v D G Now that that's all out of the way that at this out of the way. I like to say I like to I like to say this. One day is gonNA come time. And that time is very very soon. In fact. It's it's a couple of days. Away is a couple days away and I am on edge. It's a couple days away in im on edge edge edge, not the edge of my seat. I am just on the edge in all of my own my rigs not referring on I'm talking about all of my. nonverbal communication peeps. You know what? I'm talking about two and a news you have Z. rubble clue. noobs you have zero clue a what what the discussion is, what I'm talking about what I'm referring to and all of that but don't worry don't Fret as I always say you can count on me. You can count on me you can trust me if you want to but hey. That's not a requirement. You can trust me if you want to. That is not a requirement I'll just say this I'll just say this the peeps made me leave them out. Read is four reason to people said, hey, you know you should be deleted. You should be the one who lead of leader lead. That's what that's what happened. That's what occurred so. I can't who am I? Who Am I to tell the peeps know who am I to refuse now I know what you're thinking I know what you think it. What about what is they want me to stay what if they don't want to leave what they want me to hold down his position for life or forever which everyone comes first whichever one comes first and know that does not mean admitting Denim robot does not mean Denim Bidding desma robot is just it's just that I'm saying. Forever. Or never leave hey, it doesn't actually mean the same thing. There are two different two different choices two different adventures, two different moulds chaos. Though a potential chaos. That's not. That won't be an issue in might be paid. Let's not. Let's not. Concentrate on net jess yet let's let's move or let could one foot in front of the other. Walk possibly run or how about this how about this how about this? which. is going to make sure. We're thinking about it but. How about? There are other. There are other things that we have to be concerned about before that. There are other things that we have to be concerned about before that. That's why I'm not too not too. I'm not too worried about it yet, but it is something. It is one of the many things that keep me up at night. It's one of the many things that definitely keep me up at night and see. I just. Hanging on this new. Just, don't worry about that. There are other there other things. That's right in front. In plain sight in plain view at the worry about I. And I spent enough time on that issue. Back to initial point back to the thing that the loop still don't know what's happening steeled on what's going on, but I like to say welcome news. Thank you listening. Thank you for consuming. Thank you for possibly watching. I don't know I don't know what you know. One right now my mind reading gain isn't that strong. My mind reading game is very, very strong when it comes to driving when it comes to. Driving in my g ride singing dancing in making my chest pop doing all the things that make me feel good with with in the car that. Anyway, so here's the thing noobs. It's almost that time for me to get petro it almost that time for me to get few eighty is upon almost it's it's a few days away. It's a few days away in I am on edge I'm bracing myself I am preparing because. The couple the last times it's it's been extremely extremely. It's been so much chaos I mean. It's just been. I've had my. IDENTITY ATTEMPTED TO BE STOLEN There has been. Multiple multiple arrest that has been people who Work at. Different. Petro stations few stations gas stations that think that we're best ease best buds BFF's or whatever. The cool peeps are saying these days I don't know because as you can see I'm not one of. Definitely. Not One of them. I'm just a leader in I'm just a mouth breather and that makes me to leave the mouth breeze because you pay. You chose in you said that I have all of the qualities that will make the best. In yes I said best this on purpose. The best is. Mouth breathing. Leader there ever ever walls. There ever will be. Yes. That's that's a lot to live up to. That's a lot to live up to. But. I understand my responsibility understand my job titles understand what I have to do in. You'll be proud. That's why. As something that's not keeping me up at night this petro get an his few debt is because the adventures that journeys Here Kate AAs. I I've had enough chaos this. Chaos in in fact. Everyone pretty much. Had enough chaos. We we don't want chaos anymore we want to we want to. Leave the chaos behind we want to. Possibly do something different something new. Yes do to better. Or? I'll even I'll even go out on a limb and say. EPIC journey doesn't sound too bad or even even adventure. Even an adventure doesn't sound too bad one, it's compared or. Slide by side next to chaos. It's chaos. It's chaotic. It's. Chaos. But there's one one thing I can guarantee I definitely can guarantee and I can say as a matter of fact. I'm GonNa keep the promise that I made to myself not that promise but it's another promise. newbs. It is another promise that I said, Hey, you know what? I have to maintain his promise. I have to make sure that I keep this promise to myself. I can't be singing dancing in g rod doing what a do make him a chess pop and making everything. Feel good. and. Definitely singing my favorite songs singing by favorite songs my jelly. Like voice. It'd be hard for me to do that. It'd be hard for me to continuously DUDEK. If. I am out of few if I'm out of few if I don't have any petro, if I don't have any gasoline, you don't anything to make the G. Ri-. Go I. Sing and Dance Energy Rise that simple. It's like one plus one is ten. It's that simple. I can't sing and dance in the G. Rod. I mean I can breed really channa. Serious question. Serious question. The JHIRAD has to be in motion g rod has to be making or help get from point a to point B and possibly see in maybe de all back the a eventually the Jira makes that possible possible. Without that being possible I can't be off in girod making my sounds got the sounds of Lao mottos going and just happy. Happy happy. Happy. Joy. Joy. Joy. Experiencing all this happiness in all his joy while Innogy, Rod? and. Mine reading mine reading because I have to keep the mind reading game strong I have to keep the mind reading game strong but a simple fact that. Sometime, you just have to guess sometime, you just have to make an educated guess in some time you have to rely. On your brain sometimes you have to rely on logics. Yeah. I know I know. I'm not too proud to say I'm not too proud to admit that but don't. Don't get it twisted. Don't get it twisted. Yeah shoutout to pop. West saieed. Is the thing. Has To be in motion. Jira has to be going for me to sing dance make my chest pop in. There's no gasoline of there's no fuel in it I can't do it. And I made promise to myself long ago because the last time I ran out of petrol to last time I ran out of fuel that walk of shame was it was it was pretty intense deadwalkers shame with something debt i? Really wasn't prepared for I don't think anybody is actually prepared for the walk of shame especially when you are walking to the. GAS STATION WITH A Gas bottle or petro bottle of or petro container or gasoline contain something to hold it in. Make sure if you happen to free advice if you happen to. Not keep the promise to yourself that keeping to myself. Close it on the ground I Indian insert in pomp. Don't do this in the air don't have no combination of. No. That's some free advice in that is that is serious that that's something serious in I'm not charging anything for that I just WANNA, make sure that everybody's safe in everybody's going to be okay in everybody's well being is all too good. So yeah, just sit on a grou- I indeed go about doing what you gotta do sitting on the ground i Indian go about knowing what you have to do. that. Experience was rough that experience was something like no other. Definitely something that I was an. Say is. It was dad bear it went so wrong they things were so haywire in. That I had to force of promised upon myself. So I cannot. So I cannot also, I can never ever be an `situation Agai- I. Don't want that experience again I don't WanNa go through that up. Shame. Pain. And unhappiness again. Sure there are other occasions there other times might. Push me along that path or bring along data outcome. I just want to come for driving in running out of petro especially with all of the bells and whistles within a car, not actually bells and whistles peeps. How this alerts all alerts in the car with all of the. Automatic alerts manual arts. The visual alerts the audio audio alert. There's so many different alerts going off signaling saying, Hey, Moron is time. Hey, moron. Don't let this happen again. So it all let happening all let taking place what I'll let on. I can just pay attention. Right Yeah. That's why. That is why. That whole promise came about. That's why I hope promised came about and that is also why I'm just GONNA. Petro again, just not going to let it happen. Long story short point is it's almost dead time again media petro. Shoot.

petro Petro twitter Vince Douglas Gregory Mouth breathing G. Rod girod jess Kate AAs West saieed JHIRAD Agai G. Ri Innogy Rod one foot One day
238: Youre probably breathing wrong | Brian Mackenzie, human performance specialist

The mindbodygreen Podcast

56:42 min | 10 months ago

238: Youre probably breathing wrong | Brian Mackenzie, human performance specialist

"Welcome to the my Buddy Greene podcast, op, Jason, walkup founder and Cosio of my buddy, green and your host. Hey Everyone Jason here hope you're all doing well. Today's episode is brought to you by US and the product I. Am really loving right now as it's saving my sanity, are hemp multi plus product. It is a huge relief for me from everyday stress, and that stresses realized my wife and I are trying to run the company together at home while working from home without childcare and two little girls, so it is definitely stressful and what? I love about this formula for one. The hand is certified organic from the European Union highest standards in the world, and then you throw in potent botanical Rosemary Hobbs Black Cumin seed. It is amazing for the Endo cannabinoid system, the master system, which regulates everything from stressing Ziobro mood, and then vitamin D. one of my favorite vitamins. You throw that in which is great for immune, so this formula is definitely saving me right now. it takes the edge off helps me be a little less reactive, and that's that's definitely something I'm focused on at the moment with the little ones so I hope you check it out. Go to my buddy. Green dot com slash hemp. That's my green dot. com slash head. Thanks so much. Brian. Mackenzie is the best selling author of numerous books including one of my favorites titled Unplugged. I first met Brian as he spoke at our twenty seventeen revitalize event about the power of our breath. Since. Then I've been hoped on his instagram. As he is quite simply one of the best in the world, when it comes to harnessing the power of our respiratory system to accelerate end, raise both mental and physical performance, he's worked with world class, Olympic and professional athletes top executives, and he's also here to help those suffering from various chronic and pathological issues and today. We're going to go deep on the power of our breath. Brian Welcome so good to see you and hear Your Voice Jason Pleasure is all mine and I'm glad to be here so I've been thinking a lot about you. In the context of Covid nineteen and the importance of breath, work and breathing in a mask, which I just am not good at and and we'll. We'll segue to later. Of You know, so let's start with breath work and your passionate for breath, work and You know how you evolved from Crawford Endurance to. was a hot word right now I know. God nother conversation. But, but I think so. Many people tend to think that we think about like being fit we. We think about you know being physically fit. Okay Running Gym Yoga. Cross fit what hobby you now being mentally fit is entered into the conversation with the mental health crisis. People are meditating. They're practicing mindfulness. But. We're not really talking about our respiratory system, so you know why. Why breath work? For you and talk about your your passion for the power of the respiratory system. I think the easiest. Way To look at it is I saw an opportunity twenty years ago with with passion right like. I was like I had so many different jobs like I mean I I I was detailing actually swept floors for jetski place, and then I was like I detail cars with a friend was in the restaurant industry bus tables waited. Tables managed a restaurant like bubble. Blah, Blah. I took a class on exercise science, and its Spin my head in the opposite direction. It was the first time I really cared about. Like school in any capacity I got cs on purpose like I did enough school to just get by right. So I got an amored very early on with performance, but that forced me to understand biology. Now. I don't have a degree in biology so I don't find. Tune it down to that much, but I have a global pretty good understanding and have studied biology. For twenty years to some degree and I was first introduced to. Like. Just spinning things on their head or really going in pivotal opposite directions very early on in my career is somebody challenged what I was thinking about injury, and what I thought about that, and how I dealt with it and changed in one weekend, and so I was enamored with human movement in that. Just by changing the dynamic of what we do with movement, things would change. Move this along. To about seven years ago where somebody handed me a training mask. And I laughed because I had already been studying elevation for quite some time and trying to understand how we adapt to higher elevations, because I was involved in endurance sports and getting things adapted that way and I knew that the masked although the claim was. Training Mask. was about elevation I was like that doesn't change pressure, and so I knew that oxygen levels weren't really changing. But I put the mask on anyway when I put the mask on I, did this. I sat up. Where I was sitting and I sat up because I organize my spine so that my ribcage had access more access to my room. And in that split second, my entire world changed again because I understood that applying resistance against the diaphragm four forced my system to self organize in to do something so I entered into this world where I was just enamored with breathing at first because I was like. Wait a second I could just put an athlete in this or client. And I wouldn't have to yell at them about changing their position. Because they're just automatically like change position, so they can breathe. And so it it just it, it just started, spin me out, and then I started studying the physiology of of ventilation. And how that directly impacted respiration which refers to cellular respiration, right and then I got more involved in the neurobiological standpoint of things because I continued to get challenged on things, and it pushed me to go understand and learn more and then I i. just. I invested myself in this so much that I i. Played with varying methodologies, ideas I had a background in Yoga, although I never paid attention to the fact that at the foundation of the Yoga, all yoga practice is a breathing practice. So it's not only the oldest movement practice, but it's one of the oldest breath practices right. And what were they saying? They're in Sanskrit in. You know all of these things that were. Like kind of compounding into this world that I had existed in nobody. That I saw or or dealt with? was talking about this and I was like. Wait a second. We're missing something here. Like fundamentally like these yoga. People have been screaming this for like five thousand years like you follow your breath into position, and this is I'm like. Oh my God like it just started really like. Making more and more sense than than when I really started extrapolating things that are used maybe in yoga, or even in martial arts to some degree, because those like Tai Chi and. Martial arts also use BRA. Breath control it became. Very obvious that there was this thing that was impacting people that we weren't. We were very dysfunctional with. It makes sense because we're dysfunctional arm movement patterns, and so breathing became for me. The epicenter of everything everything about our life. Revolves around breathing whether we like that statement or not. and. It does because the deal was made two point five billion years ago for oxygen and multicellular organisms, organizing to use that and the only way that we are able to use that system. Ninety percent of our energy is convert is is used with oxygen right through a process called Beta, oxidation or aerobic metabolism. Gay. That is dealt with by the air that I move in and out of my lungs. I have no other way of doing that, and so my movement patterns have to organize such. My physiology has to match what is opt what I should be optimally doing, and then my neurobiological component of it is, it just so happens that. My respiration set my ventilation. Centers are all set up in the brain stem, so there potter. They're part of this automatic system that sends out signals and is right there, and we have control of that system, and it's only one we actually have control over. And so as we think about. Her physical health, our mental health. You'd say respiratory health. Is the greatest of all of them because it directly impacts your physical health and your mental health, and can make you better better fit Would you. Would you agree with that statement that if we're going to focus on one thing, it's like I used to say for example years ago, I would say hey, if you. If you don't have time, you'll have time for one practice. I suggest yoga. Yoga's the best of everything in my in my humble opinion years ago. What would you say something similar about focusing on respiratory health and breath work? Es to now. They're subtle like look. By the time the world catches up to this and they're starting to. Where we're going to move past it. 'cause there's there's something there's there's something more to it like breathing's not ventilation, and like our breathing is not. The answer is just a tool. Right. We're just so removed from what's out there. Meaning the wild. That, we call it nature. When we are nature. We we we forget that and we use it in our language. And that really separates us from really coming back home to what we really are, which is, we're a part of this entire ecosystem? And just because we built houses and buildings and things in cars, and all that doesn't mean we're not still connected, but the fact is. We're dysfunctional in that our lifestyles and we can all attest to this. That we've taken on. We sit too much. we decay convenience of food options the convenience of our lives. All of these things have consequences. I'm not saying they're bad. They just have consequences, and if we get wrapped up too much in that, things become dysfunctional, and so by and large. That's why more than eighty percent of the population we'd suggest has A. BREATHING PATTERN! So when we look at any sort of disease in research that has respiration or ventilation. Rate attached to it. You're going to always see double, if not triple the amount of ventilation rate that is going on with somebody and disease. So that intern eludes to the fact that this Dall- breathing. Is The answer okay? That is not what I'm saying. Breathing is a signal. And it's instantaneous. Whereas heart rate is Kinda late to the game, and we're very enamored with heart rate right like hearts great, but heart reached an intensity marker. It has nothing to do I mean how many of us are looking at our heart rate to to to garner calories, right and heart rate actually has nothing to do with your calorie burn. Nothing. So. Eighty percent of us aren't breathing properly. Roughly APP, so it begs the question that this is where it was. Where with you know. I brought up coveted a mass I'm like on June log I. Hate the mass like talk talk to. I gotTa talk the Mackenzie June article about this, and so, how I at the highest level our? What are we doing wrong? And then how should we be breathing just in a daily basis walking up and down the street then we can talk about like. Yeah, we. On fundamentally the easiest thing we can do and and look, there's there. This is what's frightening. So good friend of Mine James Master. Just put out a book breath. And the lost art, I. It's like the lost art of this of this. Thing that we missed right I. It's fantastic book, and in. He's done as much work as I have except from journalistic standpoint to a large degree, and there are so very few people, even in the medical world that are actually that actually truly understand this. It's frightening right, but the nose was designed with the respiratory system in mind. The mouth is a secondary system so fundamentally to answer your question. Let's start with understanding that difference. What I didn't say was. You can't breathe out of your mouth. But. I would I can confidently say. That at least eighty percent of your day, even your training. Should be through your nose only. And there is so much compounding research that is now alluding to this. It has in the past, but nobody's connecting the dots, but I mean if we. If we're doing Meta analysis on all this stuff, I could solidify what I'm talking about, but the fact is i. don't have the actual time to do that. We're working on a lot of this stuff, but it's so evident, and now I mean look the with the latest research especially on on the nose microbiome coming out, it's like look. I deal with people who have sinus issues and things in trouble dealing with this, but the reason we harp on. The idea of this is. The fundamental issue. Is What we what we believe is. How we handle co two. Because Co two is at the heart of why we breathe. We have a lot of dedication in the system to carbon dioxide, sensory their kachima receptors. On the brain stem, we have multiple regions that pick up carbon dioxide levels. By and large, most of those detection systems are from the a Arctic and the carotid. Arterial systems like not well the. Arteries right? So the karate kid and and a Arctic. Have these systems. That's important to understand because our arteries. Is Nutrients going out. Okay, so blood flow is going peripheral. This suggests from a brain perspective that our relationship has to be developed to this molecule. Because, it's prediction system. It's not actually what happened system. So as my brain detects carbon dioxide. I'm signaled to breathe. What's at the heart of why we take a breath carbon dioxide? What happens if I? Have you hold your breath too long? You go into a panic. Switch right. This is every single human being. Has this panic switch it? Just? It just means the like how tolerant we are to carbon. Dioxide tells us when that's going to happen in and we vary, but by and large, we are a society globally that is co, two intolerant, and we which which creates an a reactively so with inside the physiology it signals for me to breathe with inside the psychology. It also signals from me when to breathe, because when I have thought that crosses paths with things right and goes on. We'll when I. have an emotional response to a thought that triggers a mechanism that is very deep lying in the neurobiology and. Creates that relationship towards how I breathe? So it's an it's a mechanical, physiological and A. neurobiological. Issue so at the highest level. What's so bad about breathing through your mouth, and what's so good about breathing through your nose like? It up. You're in the elevator with someone and you're your. Don't breathe that way. This way here's why. Higher stress. You're going, so it's a signal or sympathetic tone instantaneously right so sympathetic tone, meanings, survival, mode, fight, flight, freeze, and in today's modern world. That means I'm right. You're wrong fight. Kerr light! Ghost I go stir I'm dissociate dissociates right. I Exit I don't know I just I don't even have shut down, and then you know being sheep like I just get in line and follow along, and like I don't have an opinion submissive to the whole thing, right, it's not. There is a bear around that. Right, although there are plenty of people who experience those in the wild, and do these things that is kind of where we're at within our world, and so when I breathe through my mouth, that is a signal for more sympathetic tone. And that is a signal that is set up in the brain stem right, and from a physiological standpoint I off load. Large amounts of carbon dioxide, so if I'm breathing through my mouth, if I offload carbon dioxide. I don't actually that is unnecessary, okay? Don't look at. This is like I'm doing some sort of you know. Maximum amount of push ups right now and I need to breathe through my mouth. There's a metabolic demand that's associated with that when there is no metabolic demand associated with needing to mouth breathe. Instantaneously switch my metabolic state over to more carbohydrate and more anaerobic process, which leans more towards sympathetic because the oxygen is no longer bioavailable when I offload excessive carbon dioxide. So when you're when you're breathing the news, you are more likely to activate the Paris the Paris empathetic nervous system, the relaxation response or you're just going to be in. A better less reactive more relaxed state. If you correct correct, you give your para sympathetic nervous system, the opportunity to come online, so the inhale is sympathetic nature. Right. That is sympathetic. The exhale becomes. Inhibition of sympathetic, which allows for that para, sympathetic tone to come on, but the it's that extension or longer exhale, it's also coupled with the fact that here's the difference between my inhale and exhale or inhales with nose and mouth. Right. Very fast with that mouth. Right. There's not a whole lot of difference in absorption rate doing either one. Okay when I do that now when exile. exhale with my nose. Here's one with my mouth. Oh. visit big difference. Massive difference. And that is where it is. Because the Yin Yang now comes into play. If I want to use oxygen. Through Beta oxidation or aerobic metabolism. I, have to have enough carbon dioxide present in the red blood cell in order to make it. For it to leave and to PERF- fuse the cell to be used with inside the Mitochondria. When we over breath, which is most of us are buying large. We don't give that an opportunity, so we leaned the stress side of things more here. Some people naturally do this. They just shut their mouths and mouth closed all the time like you're doing right now like you're you're? So self conscious. You know what I do own for you Brian like. With the mouth closed. Simplistic and that's unlike look so this is how easy breath practices to start. Let's first start at the foundation. Let's understand the difference between nose and mouth breathing. Be More aware of shutting your mouth throughout your day. You really want to take this to the next level all exercise all movement strategies anything. You're doing yoga cross fit I. don't care what you're doing. Shut your mouth for the next four weeks. joente allow yourself to go any further. Once you've done that then start to understand where the intensity factors play into that, but the fact is is that's where you can take that to a new level, and it's like now when I'm in situations that might get heighten I mean there's. There's a good damn reason why I'm when I talk. I start to turn on. Like I am offloading. There are there are consequences for what it is I'm doing? I get into a heightened arousal state right, and then when I stopped talking. I bring my breathing back down. So, it's as easy as just being conscious when when when you can be a of how you're breathing. If you notice hey breathing through the mouth, tight it up another seven forward, and just, and just as you go through your day, my breathing through my mouth, and my breathing through my nose, and if you notice okay, no big deal, let's bring it back to the news. Bring it you lying aid. Do I need to actually breathe through my my mouth right now and I think the biggest the biggest difference here beside co two tolerance is the fact that this is the greatest filter of air we have. This is the first line of defense for the immune system. This has very very few immune system. Plays with it, so you bring up two interesting points One is immune system at end, and then you can't talk about the immune system, not talking about Co vets, and so I'll start with the first one where we're where I started to think about you. Quite a bit was covid nineteen world gotta wear a mask and I hate I hate wearing the masks, but their new reality. and. I was struggling breathing like I. Just don't like this then. You were putting out some great stuff on your instagram about breathing through mask. So can you talk about? Why are people having challenges breathing through masks? And how should we breathe through, ask? Yeah. You know unfortunately for a lot of us. It's like coming to the gym for the first time and and wanting dead lifts four hundred pounds right. It's like hey, if we just start somewhere, it's going to have an effect there. There are some hacks that we can work on and talk about here, but. The reason, many of us are having a problem is because of being co two intolerant, because the mask like that training mass that I I put on. What those do is they? Trap Carbon Dioxide. So when I inhale air, there's twenty one percent oxygen most about. Oxygen comes back out when I exhale most of it. So it's not a lack of oxygen that's coming in becomes carbon dioxide. That's now mixing in the surface. There? It's really difficult. To create a toxic environment with a mask. With carbon dioxide, but This is a dose dependent thing. Meaning, if I am see, it very co two intolerant. I am going to probably be dealing with more of a toxic shock to co two. Then say me right. I've got doctors I got. I've got some people who fish finished up residency that I mentor I work with who have never expressed any problems with wearing masks, and they wear them all day long right then I hear about others who do and and you know I. Don't know what their daily practices like, but I can. I can validate that I don't have a problem wearing a mask. At all I don't like wearing it, but i. you know I I. Don't have a problem wearing it. It does seem to be constrictive, but the fact is that that's part of that system that's going on on the brain where the relationships developing towards what I'm doing, and this is where the intricacy of understanding psychology and neurobiology and physiology intersect is, and that's what we really are teaching people, and that's why I was suggestive of when people catch onto the breathing thing, we're gonNA move over, but the fact is. It's intersect, so let's get. Let's get down to the foundation of this and understand. If I have a problem, wearing a mask and I'm starting to have panic or I'm starting to have difficulty. The best thing you can do is get outside somewhere safe. Remove the mask. And take a few or many deep breaths through your nose. You will instantly come and calm back down. I mean there's a reason why we used to hand people paper bags when they were having panic attacks to to breathe in. Hey everybody! Thanks for tuning in. We're just GONNA take a quick little break to hear a word from our sponsor. This episode of the PODCAST is supported by Seymour meats and veggies, Seymour meats and veggies. Sausages combine humanely raised me with up to thirty five percent fresh vegetables, making it super easy to sneak more veggies into your family's meals and cut down on meat consumption without giving it up completely. I love that. This woman owned business is laser focused on the whole food ecosystem, which includes people animals, and the planet Seymour offsets all of their carbon emissions from production and delivery, and is one of the only meat companies to do so. They're not afraid to show you how the sausage gets made visit. Eat See more dot Com. That's EA. T. S. E. E. M., O. R. E. DOT COM. So Visit E. Seymour more dot Com and use the Code Seymour. Fifteen to get fifteen percent off your order through October twenty twenty. And now back to the podcast. Well, it's I'm glad you mentioned the psychological aspect to this, too with masks because I'm coming after US which a lot of people's I hate them. Ask Yeah, and then so you know there's something going on mentally buzzing. Have hate the mass atoms and GonNa. Taking taken off. but but to, but to be clear. You shouldn't the same breathing technique though when you're wearing the mask. Try to try to keep the mouth shut. Breathe breathe through the nose. Breathe through the nose. So on Covid. He. How could you not talk about how covert and and not mention immunity, yeah, and immune function, so let's talk about. Nasal breathing and the immune system. Yeah, Then the the nasal passages present the greatest opportunity. For Phil for filtering bacteria and virus. In the air. It deep the mouth has a couple the tonsils being part of that system, but there's a large amount of air. We breathe through the mouth that passes right through and goes into the lungs. This is why mouth breathing. At night and you're catching your mouth open. Your mouth is dry like drier air your lungs. Actually PR prefer high humid. Era Right so starting at the beginning. We have as many hair follicles inside of our nose as we do on our head. Yeah Wow, so that presents a very unique understanding of something that. Why would we have that many hair? They're that much hair, right? Well that is a Tau Particle. Grab on every single hair. That's in that knows. There is. A MUCUS COATING! And Mucus is is kind of like the honey badger of our, like Armenian system it's like it's like the most ofensive thing, and although it can be gross to a lot of people, the fact is, it's the most ofensive thing there is. And it instantaneously either collects and allows you to blow your nose. Pick your nose or get things out right. or And it also if there are if there are bacteria or viruses that it instantaneously. Launches a defense. Of many different T H, one T, H, two and Beta cells right like that are that are these long term memory cells that? Ten Years From now twenty years from now. They know what that was. That came in because it came in, and it's why you don't get the same virus or the same bug the same time again right so all of these things play an integral role through the mucus right, and so that mucus also can be. You would be very shocked as to how much mucus you actually swallow a day like. Like people who'd be just grossed out, but the fact is, it is a lot, and it's important process because that stomach in the stomach acid instantaneously kills things right so things either need to go out, or they need to be swallowed. They can't be inhaled into the lungs because there's there's not a whole lot of safe things in there, and so that's why it's like in a time of like. You know Kovin. What's going on right now? Respiratory Health is so important, and the fact in thing is. Is that the the covert virus the crown of it? The proteins hook onto these has gone to two cells with inside the membranes that line all of this stuff. Right inside the nose inside the airways inside the epithelial walls. All of these things and once that gets in there. If there's not a host of good mucus in there, you're. You're more prone to actually probably getting this thing. This is why a lot of people who mouth breeders. Sinusitis, Rhinitis. They. Get their constantly have immune system problems meaning people who get sick or get colds quite frequently. You know what I mean. these are all byproducts of things like that right, and that that's one of the biggest differences that people will experience is that their immune system completely changes? Even from an allergy standpoint, the amount of people that come back to me telling me about how they don't experience allergies. The way they used to or at all is shocking. While, so with regards to all the things in the nose. You also recently. Posted a study about the nasal microbiome. Yes, so talk to us about the we all. We love all things microbiome here in my buddy green, but the nasal acre vile was a new one for me. Yeah. and. It's new for me in that. It angers me to a slight degree because it's a DA. It's like. Of course. There's a microbiome in the nose. This is where everything's beginning like. This is where the Twenty Six thou- Twenty Thousand Times a day or more. I'm. Be inhaling primarily from. So I've got to have good bacteria here. What happened was is the group of researchers. This is just a recent study that came out I. Think the twenty ninth of May they finally released it. twenty twenty a group of researchers noticed there was a difference between family members in themselves and with Science Sinusitis Rhinitis common things that we see with inside culture, right people who deal with a lot of sinus issues. and. They decided to start taking a look at this and what they did was. They got a very simple. Bacteria, that is a healthy bacteria right? You'll in like yogurt. And they put it into a spray bottle. And they started administering it people who had the sinus issues. They also started taking samples of people who had sinus issues, and who did not have sinus issues. And they found in the two different samples of these people that the people who didn't have all of these sinus problems had a very healthy amount of bacteria that were good bacteria in the knows where the others did not. And this also leans into. That the amount of antibiotics and things that we go onto inevitably because they kill everything that were lacking the ability to like if I have a sinus infection. What do I have what happens I? Go on antibiotics and I shut to shut that down. What am I doing to get that bacteria backup, and that's why a lot of people will experience continued problems with that, but what the great hope is, and what they saw was with them when they administered the good bacteria with people that. That face they saw that the bacteria would start to clone, and it would start to grow, and then they would have to do it at you know after two or three days again, and then the, and they would have to continue this process to kind of re insert the bacteria into the nose and the sinuses, and that they actually have the. There's a lot of hope that we they think that we can change this and that is a Duh to me because I understand the got. To a large degree and supplying that with healthy bacteria, and what goes in my mouth? I love it so also. With regards to studies out there. You know we're talking about two, and in one of them's more about the macro and the others, the micro and on the macro level. You talk about the Framingham study which Ashley said Greater Lung Capacity Equals longer life. which I thought was fascinating. Because we're all taught, you know they're all. We're talking about telomeres and the microbiome, intermittent fasting and all the. I, twenty eight vials of blood every quarter, but no one's talking to me about traitor lung capacity. Yea. I mean I'm I'm aware. Of this. Without under without even looking at that study. and the reason were aware of this is based on the fact of how important. Oxygen, actually is to the system. So. Lai Lung Bassetti like so a lot of people did like kind of took. This study is like well. You know it's it's got to be more than just lung capacity, and it absolutely is more than lung capacity, but the fact of the matter is is my ability to move like what one of the things that I've worked Dr Andy Galvin. WHOSE CO author last book and a good friend of mine at CAL, state Fullerton has done work on. Is Studying. how you know where mortality rates like what what parameter sit around. Mortality Rates in one of those parameters is the Max if it drops below twenty two. You're pretty much you can. You can guess you. You're on the way out. You're about to go down. And that's a fairly low vio to level so lung capacity can be predictive in that understanding how mean con constantly moving air, and if I have more space inside the cage in order to do that now? A lot of people think that it's the lungs itself, and it is not the lungs the lungs. If we were to pull them out. and. Dice them open right just. Ju- dissection we could stretch those things across a field that's like the size of almost a football field there so elastic that ask the tissue. It doesn't actually contract or anything, but you need to give that space, and so this would also allude to the fact that exercise and movement are pretty important. Okay and something like yoga is perfectly fine as long as we're actually understanding. Graph mechanics and movement something that has been a big problem with inside the Yoga community, and and. If the same thing with inside the performance, world is understanding movement principles, and what's going on the fact is is the organization of that spine dictates. How well we actually going to use that diaphragm, we all use it, but it's it comes down to how well and so it's really getting to full. Capacity of that breath. and down to the end where were moving? Say An exercise that allows us to keep that ribcage, optimal and size, which means my lung capacity is staying optimal right so? Just because somebody exercises, though does not mean they're maximizing that and I have personally seen I mean. I can't tell you how many professionals even world champions I've worked with WHO are working off a very limited capacity. We're just great at suffering regardless of what that suffering is. While it, all sorts was breathing through the nose every day. You know what would, that's what I love about. This practice is doesn't matter. How great an athlete you are! You just start breathing through the nose to racked every day. And that's it and that's that this is that. Take back to where I ran into like why breathing became so important. That resistance breathing device. We don't actually need that. We have one. It's the nose and the reason I'm so enamored with this as I, am I am really were really focused on delivering biology back chewed human race in that we have missed a lot of opportunities to understand things that have been barked for a long time, even when we look back on native American indigenous cultures in this country. You will see if you do enough research. These people knew this they lived by it. They understood the civilized culture and what was going on there were there were some serious problems very early on why their teeth rotted more crooked why their mouth became black. They I mean they used to call civilized man the block mouth. They would be terrified. They wouldn't let their children if they came off brest after breastfeeding, they would close the mouth of the child instantaneously enforce it to breathe through its nose. they were in fear of this, they would sleep with their mouths closed at night. They would hunt with their mouths closed. They were quiet. They could last longer on like if you go look at the Comanche Indian. Nobody could could hold a candle to how far these people could go and drive over time, and they just in why how could they just do that? OFF OF EATING BUFFALO? That was their main staple, right? How do you do that? Just eating buffalo and it's well. They're using an energy system. That is has allowed them to do that. And then when you look at historians who documented they're like. Hey, look these people. Were doing this. They breathe this way. They didn't their. Their languages did not allow for a lot of words they look they allowed for potent words right and they didn't speak a whole lot. They spoke very intently when they spoke. Let's back there. Let's get back there. It's all there man. So on the subject of of being stressful environments and Studies, you actually were part of a a pretty cool study that involved a six week slow reading program for high school kids. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah? Yeah, we Guy Scott Russell came to us who's a teacher who was really adamant about doing a pilot study on high school kids in an administrative. What was the best sort of practice? He you know we felt could be administered to his students on For stress, you know I mean it's. It's all we were all where anxiety levels being really high and we had. A guy out of Andy Galvin's lab pressing spear, do his thesis any and we're trying to get into Irbe now on the connection between Co, two tolerance and anxiety we, we know something's there and so. This study was more was pushing more towards that where let's look at high school. Kids who are who are dealing with a lot more anxieties days administer a breeding protocol that we know they could get through, but his slow controlled breathing and based on all research. We understand slow control. Breathing's going to them the brain down. And let's see how this intervention can work towards anxiety and everybody responded the way we thought they were so this just set sets up and parlays for us to be able to bring something like this to. The surface and then go. Hey, here's what we really want to do like. Here's of really big study. We'd like to do so we got got the easy one out of the way we. We were well aware that all this was going to happen. We still WANNA learn. We Still WanNA critique the work and understand where it's where it doesn't work and where it does right. See took these kids stressed I'm guessing if you were to do all sorts of testing on them would indicate that and they and they essentially were able to turn it around all through breathing. Just just a five ten five done twelve times, and then so at with regards the different methods. You mentioned the five. Box breathing there. There's what what I love at I. Think I recommend so so often. The people who this is just like a new language that was an inhale for two xl for four in Helfer to hold xl for four inches. It's that simple for for people listening WanNa get started his have the exhale be greater than the inhale tracked, and that's how you that's how you actually allow that para sympathetic nervous system. Come on, and why is that well? Real simple go watch anybody or any animal when they fall asleep. Watch what happens. You're going to see. A shorter inhale exhale. You're gonNA, see a brief pause up top, and then you're gonNA. See a diminish where there's almost this big huge pause at the bottom. Right. It's not totally getting rid of all the air. It's just kinda midway through the exhale just pauses and stops. And that eludes to when we calm down. The breath goes from. A goes from kind of an equal in and out to and to a shorter, inhale longer exile, and so what I typically do is a three three in pause six out, and just on their count, and just follow that, and if that doesn't help well the. And this is where our work really went. Is. Understanding that different protocols effect, different people in different ways, and so if I had a group ten people, I gave them all box breathing, which would be like a five five five five right like five inhale five hold five five hold. I'm going to probably have a number of different responses to that protocol meaning not everybody's GonNa. Feel calm and less reactive and the act based on the fact that everybody Co, two tolerances different and the patterning because of how the neurobiology is set up is going to have an effect on our psychology. And so. That's why we established a breath calculator on our website. So that people could actually do a c. o two tolerance tests for free. Put in their co, two tolerance, and they can look seven different types of protocols and find which ones support which sort of direction they wanted to go while I'm excited. Take that task. We have to put that in the show notes for sure for sure so to close. Let's go to our own mortality and yes, Yvette, some pretty powerful experiences and have described death is the great equalizer if you will, which many of us feel more alive in the face of death, and you know from experience, new voluntarily went and swam with sharks and also are. You have this freak accident at a playground were. You almost left paralyzed and so. Would you mind is talking about both instances and in how you felt and. Ultimately came out on the other side of this. Sure you know I've. Always been kind of I wouldn't say extremist, but. I. Do like to go fast. But I I WANNA. I don't WanNa feel out of control when I'm going fast, but I do. And this is also a metaphor, right? I, I don't want to be out of control, but I do understand. That with every step of how much faster I go on teetering on the edge something. That is that is right there. and. You know. Everything in life has consequences. And it just so happens that the closer to that edge I get. The more alive I feel. But that just means I have to be more prepared. And so you know I got I got a I've had a number of opportunities in my life, because of the work that I decided to get involved in in the people who I decided to work with You know and one of those Dr Andrew. Human at Stanford. Medicine who contracted me to come in and help with study on fear. and I got to do that He and I are very close friends now. But. We. He asked me if I wanted to come down and get some video footage with them off the island. Guadeloupe for great white sharks and there was a tad. There were three tags. He was taking one another buddy of ours. who was a who's a good friend? Took one and he asked me if I wanted to tag to get out of the cage and swim with the sharks, and I instantly was like yes, and he said okay well you gotTa, get dive certified. You Got I was living in Oregon at the time, so I had to get dive certified in a lake. And Erin I did it and went down. We did this. We did this journey I I've already I've swam sharks and WII before you know not great whites. I swam sharks. I understood sharks. I understand wild animals to a large degree I understand that you know. They're curious just like we are. But if you know if we act like pray, we get treated like pray. and. If you step into the ear environment in in a way that they they aren't cool with. That's the consequence you know. There is a consequence for everything so getting out of a cage at forty feet down below the surface of the water with four or five great white sharks. You understand that. You know life can end like that and there's nothing anybody can do. There's just nothing anybody there can do about a great white shark. It is such a massive animal it is, so it's like a car, and with with with just razors and you know. Why would I want to do something like that? Because I wanted the experience, and I saw that there were guys who actually pioneered something, and understood it and created an idea on swimming with them so that they could get footage, so everybody could experience that because I realized not. Everybody's GONNA WANNA go get out of the cage, and that's perfectly fine like not. Everybody needs to go shark diving. Brian got the opportunity and he did it and what I got out of. It was that you know these are curious animals, and if you do not act like pray, you won't be treated like pray you know. They it's it's odd, but at forty feet below the surface. They don't know how to handle something. That isn't running away from them or freezing right, which is what pray us? And if you if they do come towards you and you go at them with a camera. They turn away because they're like what does that I? Don't I? Don't know anything in my environment. That does that. It's not a killer whale right so. It was a it was a great experience. It was it was a it was life changing experience that was where the work came in I had to control I'd learned really control my breathing specifically like we running data while we were there on everybody even people who were just staying in the cage but it was. It was so interesting just to be involved in this and. And see it happen and understand it and know that through breath control. I was able to manage a lot of situational stuff going on you know, and then the my my accident happened about a year later after that where I was just, and this is life. This is how it goes right. This is life is consequences and we don't know when those consequences are going to happen. And we behave the only creature that behaves as though it's just we're. We're were immortal to a large degree. And you know I've done that a lot, but you know just playing tag with my nephews on a jungle gym I went up ladder and got about eight feet up and didn't see a bar above that eight foot marker that was at about eleven feet. And so there's a gap right and I went up and I went to crossover something because my nephew is coming at me, but I went directly into a bar at the top of my head, which compressed my spinal cord and I dropped. Onto that ladder at about eight feet, and then flipped off the Badger backflip off the back from what they told me. And I landed on the ground. And woke up. and I was like Whoa like I just I was like what happened, but I remember. The stars I remember getting knocked out. And And I noticed I couldn't really breathe. And I then Kinda looked down. And my feet were crossed in one of my shoes off, and somehow my hands were laying across my body and I couldn't move anything, and so I instantly knew it I had probably broken my neck. in I, just kind of looked at. It is like well here we are. Not Oh. My God Oh my God Oh, my God and I think that's. That's kind of a testament to the work that I had been doing up until then. On. I didn't feel sorry for myself at the time. I don't know why. And I and I instantly went into okay I've got my nephew's three of them. My niece one of them, and then my sister and my ex wife at the time was there and I really wanted. Like I didn't want them to have to. Get, traumatized by what had just happened. Right and I mean I got kids? There I mean. I got eleven down. You know down to three and I. It was just like. Can you get you get Aaron Key, Kelly you can get them over here and then I just continued to breathe through in slow controlled breathing until the paramedics everybody arrived, and you know It turned out that I had compressed spinal cord I did not sever it. I, my arms. Kinda came back in about fifteen minutes. My hands and then about forty hours later, my legs started to come through on, and then about three days I was able to Kinda walk like Bambi on ice and then spent the you know next couple weeks before I had to go into emergency surgery to have a anterior. Dissect me. and to create space for my spinal cord because I had the options of no surgery or surgery and Did no surgery option was. You can't live your life the way that you have lived your life. The surgery option was I'M GONNA. Live my life the way I want to eat on A. I'm a proponent of Western medicine. It has its place in my life is here like I? Get my life the way it is because of that. You know I'm a big advocate of that. I'm also a big advocate of eastern thinking and indigenous cultures and things. We've missed to get back to our reality and I think both played a role in why and how I was able to. Get Back on the jungle gym per. Se I I. Don't have a fear of jungle gyms I. Don't have a fear of you know going out and and doing extreme things anymore. I felt like I dealt with what could have been a very traumatic instance very quickly. and I wanted dish I. I wanted to learn from that so much that I wanted to be able to understand it for other people, and so that's where my work even went. Deeper was to really understand the concussion aspect of things, and how I sped that process up, or what I believed, sped that process up on dealing with that, which was breath, control and exercise doing what I could so. Was All the process? But it was fun, and I turned it into a game instantaneously. I didn't feel sorry for self. I mean what could I do? There was nothing I could do about the current situation. What can I do I can change my attitude. I can change the way I'm looking at this. And I did both of those things and I think that's where we're missing opportunity with inside society right now. I love it will close there. Bryan. Thank you for all that you do I. Am so thankful for you and your work and I am so happy that you're alive and standing and walking and thriving, so thank you. I appreciate you guys to Jason I appreciate that man thank you.

Co Brian Welcome mouth breathing Jason Pleasure sympathetic nervous system sinus infection Mackenzie Covid Dr Andy Galvin European Union sharks Buddy Greene Ziobro US