36 Burst results for "morocco"

Fresh update on "morocco" discussed on Journey to Wherever

Journey to Wherever

00:36 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "morocco" discussed on Journey to Wherever

"So he describes being with these twenty four hour strike journey on the bus through the sahara desert and his car is going. Like two hundred clicks and our eat is not stopping. If you are too big for the bus you hang on the outside. How well for twenty four hours straight. And he explains about how holding onto a handlebar in getting muscle cramps in wanting to adhere to his muscle cramp. But he knows if he goes down. He wants sleep so he's all and then installed like if you fall off. It's too bad so in other words if you lend the sahara desert of dead in other words so eventually he gets to. Morocco is consistent attempts. I think it was like seven attempts with what they call a boat but in other words. I think it's just like a a a makeshift liferaft that they're to try and get through the moroccan military to try and get into spanish Waters so they can get rescued by the red cross. That's the that's the goal but in this essentially twelve months journey he goes through this constant battle of getting caught by the moroccan police military. Sorry when they get caught they get paid up big time they get thrown at a boss. They get driven all the way. Down to the south of moraga on the border of algeria get dumped on the desert and they start the journey alone and again and again and he does this thing like he did multi- multiple times to climb bob. Y fences getting cut open. Living in the moroccan forest. Eatings food scraps competing for competing for food scraps..

Sahara Desert Morocco Red Cross Moraga Algeria BOB
Off the Spice Rack: The History of Salt

Can We Health You?

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Off the Spice Rack: The History of Salt

"Okay. So the history of salt is fairly simple. Animals war paths to salt licks men followed trails became roads and settlements group aside them legit beside the salt licks. Yeah cassette beside the roads yet. Getting to the on these are these. Are these salt route so eventually and this is exactly what you just spoke about. Eventually the human menu shifted from salt rich game two serials. Like when crop started growing ray and some more salt was needed to supplement the diet when humans started eating more cereals. Okay so but cereals that you hate right. The modern day cereal grains barley right. Yeah those are considered cereals in times. Yes yeah i'm still. Yeah not not cereal boxes. Not fruit loops. Now that's when everything went downhill. The demise mandy but the underground the underground deposits started to become further away from the settlements and scarcity kept the mineral precious so as civilization spread. Salt became one of the world's principal trading commodities routes to the salt reservoirs. And i'm like showing you reservoir picture if you will of a slot reservoir leading to that reservoir. These routes crossed and trade centers crisscrossed the globe. One of the most traveled lead from morocco south across the sahara and timbuktu just a super famous spot to gather. You feel like that's the furthest point ever. I know yeah. This ships bearing salt from egypt to greece travel. The mediterranean and the aegean sea venice's wealth centuries ago was attributable to salt which venetians traded with constantinople spices when in in twelve ninety five marco polo delighted with tales of the value of salt coins. Bearing the seal of the grant genghis khan

Mandy Timbuktu Aegean Sea Venice Sahara Morocco Greece Egypt Mediterranean Marco Polo Genghis Khan
The History of US Presidential Transportation

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:21 min | 2 weeks ago

The History of US Presidential Transportation

"First us president of any sort to fly in an airplane was theodore roosevelt. It was rather short flight as airplanes at the time didn't have a very long range and it was probably one of the more dangerous. Flights ever attempted by president sitting or former come over after this short sightseeing flight. Us presidents didn't do any flying. It would be another thirty three years before an actual sitting. Us president would get on an airplane. The first airplane designated for presidential use was purchased in nineteen thirty three it was a douglas dolphin amphibious aircraft and it was operated by the us navy as there was no air force at the time. The co name. It was given was r d two. It could seat four passengers and there was a small sleeping compartment. The interior was custom made for presidential use with leather seats. It was stationed at the anacostia naval airbase in washington. Dc until nineteen thirty nine and during that time it was never once used by the president to be fair. Fdr was in a wheelchair and getting in and out of an airplane especially a small amphibious plane was probably something that he wasn't keen to do however he did eventually take a flight the very first airplane flight by a sitting. Us president took place on january. Eleventh nineteen forty-three when franklin roosevelt flew on. The dixie clipper was a commercial boeing. Three fourteen clipper which was operated by pan. Am he flew fifty five hundred miles to the casablanca conference in morocco to meet with winston churchill and charles de gaulle. The flight was done in three stages any flu rather than took a ship because it was considered safer than risking german u boats in the atlantic after the trip the army air force didn't want to rely on commercial airlines for presidential transportation. They proposed the president. Use a modified. C eighty seven liberator express heavy bomber. The plane was dubbed the guess where to when the secret service reviewed the safety record of the plane. They rejected it. For presidential use. The plane was used for carrying the first lady. Eleanor roosevelt however on a trip to latin america. But it never carried the president. The secret service then approved a douglas. C fifty four skymaster which was a transport plane used in the war. It was named the sacred cow ended. Had sleeping quarters are radiotelephone and a lift for getting roosevelt in and out of the plane in his wheelchair. The only time you used it was to travel to the yalta conference in february of nineteen forty five. This plane is on display at the museum. At the wright patterson air force base outside dayton

Anacostia Naval Airbase United States Theodore Roosevelt Us Navy Army Air Force FDR Franklin Roosevelt Charles De Gaulle Winston Churchill Boeing Washington Morocco FLU Atlantic Eleanor Roosevelt Latin America Douglas Roosevelt Wright Patterson Air Force
A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

Travel with Rick Steves

02:18 min | Last month

A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

"Let's start out today on the beaches of southern portugal. The all guard prejean offers one hundred miles of warm sun and a collection of charming resort towns. From land's end to the spanish border are guides are christina. Dorte and robert reich. They specialize in showcasing the highlights of portugal. And the all garb to american visitors christina robert boondi. Thank you together. So when we think of the algarve christina what does it mean to the to a portuguese holidays. Israeli go to holidays with our families knows and normally because the kids are in school until the end of june so everybody goes at the same time so july and august can be pretty crowded but if we have a chance and going out of july august it is a marvelous place to go wonderful beaches. Wonderful food very good offer of of places where to stay hotels and also houses that we can rent houses or apartments and june absolutely beautiful until the first week of july. It's quiet so that is interesting that there's a huge bell shaped curve of demand and in the summer summertime vacation. It's everybody's down there. Yes now robert When you think of the popularity among locals and you were local are the locals looking for a big resort or are they looking for the cute little little cove for the little town. That locals are looking for Just basically good nice relaxing beaches wherever they may be right because What christina was saying is it's kind of like when you go off season little bit off season You have to think that you can't go. You can't go to the beaches that are up north because the weather still not quite a good because there are good beach resorts north of lists. That if you're a little bit shoulder season he wanted to go south. Because you're guaranteed good weather down there by morocco. Now when you go to the south I'm sure that every region of portugal has some different cuisine. What do think about to enjoy the food scene when you're on the elgar food scene is fantastic. Because you're right there on the water. You'd every kind of fresh seafood you can imagine and i guess the the best expression of that in portugal is the is the dish that everybody goes there. Force the cut the planner. The planner is like just a big big mix of all this great seafood. Some potatoes juicy broth. it's just really like the essence of the

Dorte Portugal Christina Robert Boondi Algarve Christina Christina Robert Reich Prejean Robert Morocco
Smoke From Western Wildfires Has East Coast Gasping

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Smoke From Western Wildfires Has East Coast Gasping

"Prime ministers and even the king of Morocco. A dense layer of smoke from wildfires in the western United States and Canada has reached the east coast of the continent. In New York, health agencies warned the air quality have become unhealthy for sensitive groups such as people with breathing problems. In Western US

Morocco Canada United States New York
Shipwreck on the Sahara

Against The Odds

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Shipwreck on the Sahara

"It's september twenty third. Eighteen fifteen the morning sun rising over the sahara heats up the desert to eighty degrees by eight. Am but city hammett doesn't feel it. He's sitting in his tent thinking about the future and no matter which way he spins it. It's risky captain. Riley wants hammett to by him and his friends and deliver them to morocco. There he said a friend will pay big money for the return. One hundred dollars for the captain and fifty for each of his men. Fifty dollars is a fortune and the desert. But he's not even sure they can make it eight hundred miles. They will need to cross the desert. Get past the torek and other. Hostile bedouin tribes. They have to be strong. He needs to get a better look at the men. He finds them sitting outside his tent. There are three and all riley and two men called erin and clark he squats down on his haunches examining each of them closely l. race. Have any of your men died. On this journey riley shakes his head. None my men are strong. The aren't used to desert conditions but their health will improve gets better every day but hammett's not so sure the one called clark is skin and bones. His face is young but he's already bent over like an old man. His scalp is cracked and oozing with source will only get worse. Sarah son this one is sick. he won't make. It's not worth it. But the captain renews his please. He must come look at how much he's improved from. Just the drink of water. You generously gave us last night. What of your men been eating a- of camel milk day. We found a few snails on our own to hammett size. The sailors will never survive the crossing without more food. Feeding them will be expensive.

Hammett Sahara Riley Morocco Clark Erin Sarah
Biden Administration Announces First Guantanamo Detainee Transfer

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Administration Announces First Guantanamo Detainee Transfer

"The Biden administration has transferred a detainee from the U. S military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Morocco. It's the first such prisoner release since President Biden took office. The 56 year old Moroccan was held at Guantanamo for 19 years without charge. 39 detainees remain at the

Biden Administration President Biden Guantanamo Bay U. Morocco Cuba Guantanamo
What are Frontier Markets?

Money For the Rest of Us

02:19 min | 3 months ago

What are Frontier Markets?

"As i was doing the research. I was fascinated by the sheer size of frontier markets in terms of population. Two point two billion people. A third of the world's population yet the economic impact at this point is still small only about three and a half percent of the world's gross domestic product the monetary value of goods and services produced a third of the world's population produces less than five percent of economic output. This size of the stock market's even smaller frontier markets. Make up less than one percent of global stock market capitalization that's the size of the equity market as determined by the price of a particular company times the shares outstanding less than one percent. And there aren't even that many stocks there are three thousand stocks that comprise the msi all country world index which is both developed and emerging markets. There are fourteen hundred emerging market stocks yet in the mci frontiers market and xers only eighty one stocks the countries that comprise that in. And i'll just go through the list. Because i think it's helpful and instructive to know what's there is croatia estonia iceland lithuania kazakhstan romania serbia's slovenia other countries include kenya morocco. Area bahrain jordan oman bangladesh lanka vietnam the largest country within the index as measured by market capitalization or sizes vietnam. It comprises thirty percent of the frontier market index. Morocco is twelve percent. Iceland's eight percent. Kenya seven percent. Kazakhstan is seven percent in looking at ways to invest the primary. Etf i found for us based investors is the i shares mci frontier and select emerging market. Etf i'm not sure exactly when i shares renamed it but the largest wait in that. Etf is kuwait at nineteen percent. And as i mentioned kuwait was upgraded from my frontier market to an emerging market.

Area Bahrain MCI Kazakhstan Iceland Morocco Kenya Vietnam Estonia Lithuania Croatia Slovenia Serbia Romania
Building The First Black Woman-Owned Boutique Hotel in Marrakech

The Thought Card

02:19 min | 4 months ago

Building The First Black Woman-Owned Boutique Hotel in Marrakech

"Recently. Visiting marrakech morocco. I had the pleasure of sitting down with mary. Ann and learning more about her life as a hotel owner guests that stay at her hotel gets a take in the rich global an african identity that she has incorporated across the resort to encourage visitors and guests to experience the culture and traditions of morocco. Maryanne first degree may have been in law but her heart has always been in architecture design and the arts. This is maryanne wealth-building story. Hello my name is maryanne. And you're listening to millennial wells builders so. I come from a family where we would never talk about money but we would talk about education and studies and the key to a good lifestyle like fortunately our parents were able to give us was to study. I mean this was the thing was it was not even questioned. It was obvious that we would go to university and have a good job and be independent as a woman i was. I never considered that. I would count of on the income of husband it. I was going to be feared us. Fiercely independent and i think this was my only connection to money because you know you study. You have a good job and you have money but this is not the purpose. The first thing is to develop your own personalities through education well first of all. I'm an accidental auto-pay. It was not an objective. I came to being a two year. Because i love design and architecture and i discovered morocco which was america. She's three hours flight. From where i'm from paris lawyer and and i designed to house and then i had to get an income out of it so by default it became a hospitality project. And then to my own. How you say to my own amazement. It became a project where everybody wanted to go

Morocco Maryanne ANN Mary Paris America
Thousands of Migrants Swim From Morocco to Spanish Enclave of Ceuta

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Thousands of Migrants Swim From Morocco to Spanish Enclave of Ceuta

"The Spanish enclave of save ten North Africa on the border with Morocco has received over eight thousand migrants in just forty eight hours well some of the migrants were received with open arms by the forty percent Muslim population is receiving unless someone well come by far right groups he sees the flood of migrants as an invasion one migrants Mohamed Bangoura from Guinea says his situation has not improved since arriving on European soil it is complicated here and no one else comes to help us out in the street days no one is sold every test suffer here at the same time many Moroccan parents all scrambling for news of their children as a thirties confirm over four hundred miners were among more than eight thousand migrants who arrived and saved her from Morocco by scanning a border fence still swimming around it I'm Karen Thomas

Mohamed Bangoura North Africa Morocco Guinea Swimming Karen Thomas
 Spain and Morocco in Diplomatic Crisis After 8,000 Migrants Enter Spanish Territory

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Spain and Morocco in Diplomatic Crisis After 8,000 Migrants Enter Spanish Territory

"Inskeep, Spain. Is a European nation, of course, but you look at a map and you see, it's just across the streets of Gibraltar from Africa, and for centuries, Spain has controlled bits of African territory. Including the city We're gonna hear about next. So, Utah is on the Mediterranean shore, and it is attached to Morocco in recent days, almost 8000 migrants, a quarter of them Children have crossed from Morocco and the Spanish government has sent troops in response will discuss this with Associated Press reporter Or it's Potter, who is in Madrid. Welcome to the program. Thank you very much. Good morning. I guess looking at the map. I can see why migrants would be attracted. There's effectively a land border with Europe. You can walk from Africa into a little bit of Europe. What is happening in that that border in recent days? Well, yeah, felt on doll so the nearby Milica, which is also Spanish territory have always bean flash point for migrants trying to enter European soil. There seems to stepping stepping point to the European mainland. But what has happened has been extremely unusual. I mean, every year last year, there were 2000. 200 people more or less who crossed into certain illegal into this to Spanish enclaves in northern Africa. But in a matter of just 48 hours, we suddenly saw 1000 people swimming jumping, able fences. And even paddling on inflatable boats and reaching Celta on. This is extremely unusual. Let's think that this is the population off 85,000 people in this city. Which suddenly is getting 1000 migrants, most of the Moroccans but also from other countries in in Africa, Okay, and you mentioned paddling boats. It's a little peninsula. I guess some people might you get to take a very short water trip to get around to the

Mediterranean Shore Morocco Spain Africa Gibraltar Spanish Government Europe Utah Associated Press Madrid Potter Swimming
The Story of Musician Zohra El Fassia

Can We Talk?

02:04 min | 4 months ago

The Story of Musician Zohra El Fassia

"Was actually born zara hamou to a jewish family likely around the year. Nineteen o five in the city of steph ru which is in fez region in morocco in fez of courses the city that would eventually give her regional stage name alpha zia which means the woman from she was born to her mother naomi and father yahu and we don't know much about officias early life but we do know that her father was a butcher trade and a hudson or a cantor in his off time so we can guess that she would have been hearing in may be singing eden literature music from a pretty young age. We also know that she likely went to school for a little bit as a young girl. Zora was wed at a very very young age to a man from fez named don and she had her first daughter masa likely when she was around thirteen years old and she had two more children sam in a net and at the same time she also began to kind of scope out the music scene in fez going to hear to musicians who would hear her sing and encourage her to sing more which she began to do at private celebrations and weddings and even small venues. We know that likely around the age of eighteen she actually got divorced and eventually made her way to casablanca so her kids. Her first three kids mostly grew up with their father and his new wife in their family and in blanca. She starts a new relationship with one. Mr tapia long Though they don't get married They do have three daughters together. More net salons in suzanne who sadly died as baby

Zara Hamou Alpha Zia Yahu FEZ Morocco Naomi Zora Hudson Masa DON SAM Casablanca Mr Tapia Blanca Suzanne
The History of Muslim-Controlled Spain

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:53 min | 6 months ago

The History of Muslim-Controlled Spain

"In the early eighth century the iberian peninsula was populated by the visigoths who are dramatic people who entered and populated the peninsula after the collapse of the roman empire. During the reign of the caliph will lead the first general. Tariq iban ziad lead moore's forces across the mediterranean and landed in gibraltar on april thirtieth in the year seven eleven. This began a seven year campaign. Where the moore's brought most of the iberian peninsula under islamic control the term moore should probably be explained as i've used it here. In several previous episodes there really are no people called. Moore's the term more was used by europeans to describe muslim inhabitants. From north africa included people of different ethnicities including berbers and arabs. The term isn't too dissimilar from the term francs which was used by muslims in the middle east to describe all europeans. The term comes from the roman province of mauritania which is where modern day morocco is located. The current country of that name is not located exactly where the ancient province of mauritania is located. The invasion began a period where muslim rulers controlled at least part of the iberian peninsula for almost eight hundred years the moore's never completely conquered the peninsula however even at its greatest extent just eight years. After the invasion there was still a part of the peninsula that remained under christian control in the far north the kingdom of asturias remained independent and it was never conquered that being said one of the reasons why they had such an easy time is because they gave very generous terms to the people who they did. Conquer one example of this is theodomir the visigoths chief of america. He agreed to terms where he could still continue to be the leader of his people and practice christianity. All they had to do was pay an annual tribute. The entire region of iberian muslim rule was known in arabic as al

Iberian Peninsula Moore Tariq Iban Ziad Peninsula Mauritania Gibraltar Mediterranean North Africa Morocco Middle East Asturias America
Ever Given: The stuck boat that was both a crisis and a comedy

The Big Story

02:39 min | 6 months ago

Ever Given: The stuck boat that was both a crisis and a comedy

"Lori and morocco is the author of several books of shipping trade including trade war containers. Don't lie navigating the bluster and has been reporting on this every day for cnbc. Hello lori-ann let how are you. I'm all right. I hope you're still standing after being deluged by other requests for interviews about this. It's a it's been pretty crazy. So maybe recap for folks who have not spent the last week like most of us obsessing over a big boat What is the big boat. And and how did it get stuck in the suez canal while they're still trying to figure out the exact cause but we're looking at is you had A container ship known as the ever given. And that's considered a mega container vessel can have an upwards of twenty thousand containers so those boxes that you see when you drive down the road near near the porta. Palo facts or vancouver. Wherever you need being in canada those are the big containers at that That ever given a would be having on and so what happened was during a. It's a highly with. They're going through the canal There was a storm that hit. And when you look at a container vessel the higher up you go so this was about twelve to fourteen stories. High highly stack with these vessels are with containers. The higher you go you have sale effect just like a sailboat. So what happens is if you have a big storm and the wind is blowing like you had with a sandstorm and it came on hard. Came on quick and visibility was none okay. So you're blinded you're driving this cargo ship through a very narrow canal. The containers on the ship acted as a sale and it started to push the vessel. And so what happened was you are a pilot. You are blind whether you do you. Try to lean against the wind. So you are navigating and you're moving the wheel of the vessel against the wind. What a lotta people think. What happened is because a large vessel. It's not like when you're say you're on your pleasure bowed out in the bay or you're driving your car where you turn the wheel and automatically moves. It takes time. It takes a few minutes for The movement of your wheel versus the rudders of the boats. What happened was a lot of people. Think the pilot overcompensated and then ran. The bishop aground. And so what happened was you have this behemoth vessel loaded with an upwards of twenty thousand containers stuck in the sand

Cnbc Suez Canal Lori Morocco ANN Palo Vancouver Canada
The History of Spanish Africa

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:59 min | 6 months ago

The History of Spanish Africa

"I say that there are parts of spain and africa. I'm not trying to be tricky and play with words. I'm not saying that. Spain used to have colonies in africa. Although that's true. I'm also not trying to define the canary islands. Which are part of spain off the coast of africa as being in africa. I mean in the most literal sense possible. That part of spain is in africa. There are two very small spanish cities located on the peninsula which are on the african mainland ordering morocco and malia and their very existence as you probably would expect are due to historical quirks happenstance due to geography. Spain has always had a close relationship with africa finishes based in carthage in. What is today. Tunisia established settlements on the spanish coast. The roman province of hispania was part of a greater empire that included all of north africa. Which bordered the mediterranean after the roman empire fell islamic moors from north africa conquered and controlled spain for over seven hundred years. So there's always been a back and forth between north africa in the peninsula and malia both spanish territories in africa have different yet similar histories despite being about one hundred and thirty miles apart from each other. Sita is located directly across the sea from gibraltar. So if you ever want stump someone asks them. What country lies. Directly south of gibraltar and what country lies. North of gibraltar. answer is the same. Spain is on both ends. Sierra makes the counterpart to gibraltar for the pillars of hercules which the ancient names of the two promontories which guarded the strait of gibraltar. As with most everything in the region it has an ancient history. Carthage martina and numidians all control the area. Before the romans the you me add caliphate controlled it for centuries when the caliphate of cordoba fell in ten thirty one it was then passed between various north african kingdoms with support from various kingdoms in the iberian peninsula.

Spain Africa Coast Of Africa North Africa Malia Hispania Gibraltar Peninsula Canary Islands Spanish Coast Carthage Morocco Tunisia Mediterranean Carthage Martina Strait Of Gibraltar Sierra Cordoba Iberian Peninsula
The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

Jewish History Matters

09:33 min | 6 months ago

The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

"Joined today by johnny schnitzer to talk about the hitler. Haga a nineteen forty-three judeo arabic haggadah. Which tells the story of the holocaust the second world war and the allied landing in north africa through the passover seder. Johnny schnitzer is a phd candidate at bar. Ilan university with a focus on medieval kabbalah. His dissertation is focused on the fourteenth century. Kabul list rabbi. Joseph ben shallow ashkenazi and johnny is also preparing a critical edition of ashkenazis. Commentary on sefer itsy raw. Johnny also edited an english edition of the etc. Which we're going to be talking about today. The hitler etc is such a fascinating text in many ways even just the title is jarring. And you might think how can you use. Hitler's name in the title of this traditional jewish text and it draws you in to a tremendous piece of moroccan jewish history that reworked the traditional passover story to tell us about the experience of north african jews in the holocaust. I hope you enjoyed our conversation. Where we're going to dive into this text and think about how it can broaden our understanding of the holocaust to include the middle east and north africa in that story and also where we think through the important relationship between jewish roots and holidays with history and historical memory. Thanks for tuning in high johnny. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining us to talk about your book that you added. Thank you for inviting me. Lovely to be here. Absolute think this is such a fascinating text. Can you maybe tell us a little bit about it in other words like what is it that makes this different from all other hug adults. I think there are sort of two bombs that this text drops upon any re- debt guest that sort of feast there is on the hit laga and the first one of course is the title and this is what got me interested in this from the outset and that is this sort of sporadic this who has the chutzpah to do this at taking a jewish texts calling it the hit laga. That's the sort of bomb number one. Because you're not even sure what this is about. Who wrote this. But you know one thing you know that the author who is anonymous and we'll touch upon them in a moment takes to keywords. That every juneau's today every jew does not need to google almost haggadah writer passover passover eve where we read the haggadah we all come and we eat together and he takes haggadah and he connects to the other. Keyword that we all know about for a very separate horrific connotation. That's hitler and he puts it together. The first bomb is who has the chutzpah to perpetrate a text. And give it the title. Hit laga taking one of the most sacred texts and connecting it to one of the biggest mom's area if you like in jewish history and then you open the text and you realize that author has done something absolutely fascinating he is done with. The sages have asked us to do generation after generation and that is to see ourselves as if we left egypt red. It's to reenact. Redemptions to reenact. God saving the jewish people taking us out. And what does he do. He takes the structure of the storytelling bit of the haggadah. Right on passover. Eve we have the ceremony we have the blessings and then we reached the mortgage section the mugged section to section where we meant to mcgee. We meant to tell the story. That's what is about right. We tell story we tell the story of redemption. This also explains why passovers become right. This trend of everyone bringing own hug dot. Everyone bringing their own stories. Because it's all about bringing together different pieces of the puzzle. Creating this beautifully rich mosaic. So he takes the traditional structure of the haggadah which tells us about how we were taken out of egypt and it tells us about these different characters. Rabbinic figures leaving two thousand years ago. The told us to do this and told us to do that. And he takes out the content and fills it with a new content whereby he tells the story of the holocaust of world war two of the allied victory of the ex pows over nazi germany. And hitler and mussolini's italy he tells us the story of his generation rights yossi who has something to tell us in the traditional said. There's something about how. How would you meant to do something. All of a sudden becomes the speech of the dictator iosif stalin when we told them the haggadah that i god and not an angel. Not anyone else is going to take you. The jewish people out of egypt suddenly becomes. I shall the goal. I not level not the right none of none of the other vichy high commanding general's. I shall the goal which already tells us right. This is what's fascinating in the hitler etc and this is the second bomb if the first bomb is the title. We still don't know what it's about. The second bomb is when you discover that this was written by an anonymous jew living in robots morocco probably towards the end of nineteen forty-three as a result possibly inspired by operation torch. The allied operation led by the us on the shores of casablanca and algiers. And everything changes all of a sudden this jew living in morocco. Who's lived under a regime whether anti jewish laws jews around him have lost their jobs. Jews around you can't get a jewish education you become by night a second-grade citizen and so out author. It almost seems as if he's taking a text which it's time to write it when we don't yet know the ending. He doesn't yet know about the horrific six million who are being murdered. He doesn't know about concentration camps in poland. But he knows he wants to do something horrific any also is living in a time where his life has changed for some years and as a result of the allied victory he suddenly possibly is inspired and sees. I get the exodus. The story i meant to be telling i meant to take the passover haggadah until the story that i see and that's how the allies beat the excess power. And how in fact you know retelling the story of exodus mine new-fangled version. I think that the text itself is amazing in the ways in which it on. The one hand utilizes the story of passover very explicitly very specifically in when he talks. About how hitler. Enslaved the jews but also like you mentioned the way in which some of the characteristic aspects of the traditional aspects are transfigured and transformed new. Whether we're talking about the parable of the four sons the for children or the different rabbis plagues. What are some of the really interesting things that are happening in this text that really are utilizing the passover story itself and also the the characteristic aspects of the passover seder that people who read attritional seder would be familiar with but they give it new meaning in this context. If we take right this this idea of the four sons four daughters any jewish figure that we look at it and we want to understand. What is it the sort of a heart of their teachings you know. One of the tricks is to see if they wrote a commentary on the haggadah. What do they do with these. Four boys of for doors. What do they symbolize. And in the case of the hit da it takes us back in time to a sort of moroccan viewpoint of the the north african campaign. And so who is the wise son now. You know it's going to be an allied power. But you're not sure that england or is it america and you'll told the the wise son is england right. The royal air force acts cleverly. He's clearly impressed he he is probably the razzie stance radio. He knows about the bombings. He knows about montgomery and then we move onto the russia. The russia we know can only be one person. That's clearly hitler. Hitler the evil one. He knows that he's a know he. He's torturing the jewish people and yet it's interesting that if you read through the at that we're not quite sure what's going on in europe right off a thinks that there is a concentration camp in berlin so we're not yet show what's going on in the world and our author doesn't yet. Nobody knows that he clearly is evil that he's plotting against the jews there wearing yellow badges which also is interesting. Because we're not sure. If he's referring to the yellow badges of jews in europe or the yellow badges of jews in certain places in north africa and then who is the tam. The time is interesting. Because tom can both mean in hebrew complete simpleton the thomas america and then shane no. You're dillashaw and who doesn't know how to ask questions. The classic version says the fourth son is the son who doesn't know how to ask questions. The newfangled version is and mussalini. Who isn't with the avowed woods and this is very interesting because when i was speaking to holocaust survivors. Oh you know this. Sort of all degeneration and i spoke to people from algeria from tunisia morocco across the board there was a nickname from cellini mar. He was the donkey he was the s. This resonates with this passage whims lead author decides to change it. And say it's not. He doesn't ask question it's that we don't even wanna talk about

Johnny Schnitzer Ilan University Joseph Ben Shallow Ashkenazi North Africa Egypt Haga Iosif Stalin Kabul Rabbi Morocco Hitler Juneau Johnny Middle East Yossi Mcgee Mussolini Russia
Israel holds 4th parliamentary election in 2 years

BBC World Service

03:24 min | 6 months ago

Israel holds 4th parliamentary election in 2 years

"Has claimed a huge win for the right in Israel's fourth election in two years. The exit polls suggest he may fail. Secure majority in parliament. His campaign focused on Israel's world leading covert 19 vaccination program and his diplomatic success in normalizing ties with some Arab countries. But his opponents from across the political spectrum argue he should not remain in office while standing on corruption charges he have caused denies any wrong doing. Let's speak to Richard Peter. Off the person Israel Communications and Research Center in Jerusalem. Who's monitoring results as they come in Richard. He's claiming of victory. But it's a victory of sorts, isn't it? Because he will have to strike a deal with many people are raising concerns about far right groups. Tol have a majority. Good morning. Thank you very much indeed for having me Well, first of all, let's be clear that at the moment all these projections are based on the exit polls on so we don't have the actual results yet a tool on DSA The exit polls are suggesting a very slim victory to the pro Netanyahu camp. But I think we're going to need to wait even for a few more days for the picture to become clearer. Okay, So let's talk about what might happen then. Should he just get over the line but need he needs 60 seats for a majority looks that you might be around. 53 seats at the moment. They're all concerns that he's going to have to go it get into bed with ultra Orthodox parties Showers party, for example who have anti gay views and two women and two women views. They want to expel disloyal Arabs from the state. What are people saying about the kind of coalitions he may have toe Ford? So, yes, you're absolutely right with the person with the caveat that we don't have the results. The chances are that the parties that exception Netanyahu are the ultra religious after Orthodox on by the end of one particularly hard, hard right party that has some quite unpalatable views on those on those issues, thistles the nature of the politics that Netanyahu will try and kind of move. Move the government to a more centrist position on gay try and limit the influence off the moral order off the more extreme elements within his, but it within his faction, But it's no no doubt that he is reliant on those parties to form a government. Has his success in the vaccination program is is that why he has seemingly as you say, appreciates any exit polls, But he has done quite well. You know, Israel has led the world in managing to Vaccinated population. I think you were right in your opening comments that it's a combination off bringing the vaccine. I mean, he has devoted a large part of his campaign, emphasizing the fact that he personally did it. The CEO of Fiza gave an interview on Israeli TV a couple of weeks ago when he described in Tanya, whose insistence being obsessive over over it, which usually obsessive. This has Majority of overturned But in this sense, he was so so committed to bringing it that it has produced a dividends, and some people appreciate that on the full peace treaties that he's brought in the last year, the normalization agreements with the U. S A on bath rain, as well as Sudan in Morocco are significant diplomatic achievements, which Netanyahu's supporters definitely recognize and appreciate.

Richard Peter Israel Communications And Rese Israel Netanyahu Camp Showers Party Netanyahu Parliament Jerusalem Richard Ford Fiza Government Tanya U. Sudan Morocco
Turkey’s Lira Plunges After Third Central Bank Chief Sacked

Bloomberg Surveillance

02:11 min | 6 months ago

Turkey’s Lira Plunges After Third Central Bank Chief Sacked

"Now to what's going on in Turkey. The lira absolutely tumbling after what the eighth 10th 45th central banker dismissed by Erdogan. I believe he was the third in the past two years to be kicked out after having tightening policies to try to shore up credibility. In the Turkish currency. Evidently, it was not what Erdogan wanted and he was ousted. Damian SAS are joining us now, Damien. What's your sense of whether this will get remedied in some way from the political operatives around President Erdogan? Because right now? You got a currency problem? Yeah, well, I'm not in the wheelhouse of President Erdogan and new Central Bank cover Cappuccio Glue seems to be a critic of the rate hikes. I mean, he came from the crew of government newspaper Yeni Safak. So you know, he seems to be just another pawn. He seems to be cut of the same cloth as Morocco Whistle who was the central bank governor before? Most recent sacking of Nazi oddball somebody who basically thought that cutting rates was a good thing to do in the face of rising inflation. And this is really what we're talking about here, ELISA. The inflation impulse in emerging markets is far stronger than anyone's even realizing certainly more than we're seeing here in developed markets. And so look. I mean, you've got Turkish locals who have moved their money off short into dollars into gold. And then I'll bring you back on shore anytime soon. And that's a real risk. Alright, Gaming. So for the smart Institution. Investors that you speak with Damian is Turkey. To what extent is that even investable? That's a great point. It's not. It's not as investable is that once was certainly and you know, it's probably only 1% of Ah e m local currency debt allocation. If that, certainly on the equity side, I think there's a little bit more there. But you know, you see the horses stumbled down 10% today. I think the currencies off now about 8 8.5%. It was down. You know as much as 10% earlier on, so it seems to be snapping back. I think the real risk in the real question is What does this mean for the broader, um, complex or we're going to see contagion into places like Egypt, the Nigerian South African Right now, we're really not seeing that Paul. I mean, CBS five years spreads are double that of South Africa. South Africa's Haven't really moved in lockstep with the same goes for Nigerian Egypt in some of the other high flyers, So you know, right now things seem to be relatively well contains, but the verdict is still out for sure.

President Erdogan Erdogan Damian Sas Yeni Safak Turkey Damien Morocco Damian Egypt South Africa CBS Paul
Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

Chris Plante

01:24 min | 8 months ago

Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

"Harvard law professor emeritus. That's right, Alan Dershowitz that nominated Jared Kushner for the Nobel Peace Prize because, after all, he was able to cobble together four separate Israel peace deals in the Middle East with the United Arab Emirates and with Bahrain with Sudan and with Morocco, and if President Trump had remained in office, Saudi Arabia was next in line. But Biden will get back to bombing and war and dying because that's what the Democrats do. You know they inflicted how many things that they inflict upon us A whole lot of things. I think whole lot whole bunch. Unbelievable harmony. The um you know, they bombed the Obama. Biden People Libya into oblivion. It's a failed state to this day. Pretty amazing stuff. They bomb and bomb and bomb and they get the Nobel Peace Prize. And no problem, not a not a thing they target missed last night American citizens and they got the Nobel Peace Prize. The Trump Administration for Mideast peace deals Historic each and every one of them and in combination historic on an epic scale and was President Trump will have President Trump was nominated actually four times for the Nobel Peace Prize. Not by anybody in the United States, but good for Alan Dershowitz for doing the right thing

President Trump Jared Kushner Nobel Peace Prize Alan Dershowitz Biden United Arab Emirates Harvard Bahrain Sudan Morocco Middle East Saudi Arabia Israel Trump Administration For Midea Libya Barack Obama United States
"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

06:19 min | 10 months ago

"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Make it stop because it's absolutely perfect. You know you wouldn't take koby stake for example that's that's absolutely perfect and then at catch up to it. Tampering with food perfection. As i have on the world i'm carol hills. This is the world where a co production of gbh boston npr rex. More than forty states and the federal government are now suing to break up facebook. us authorities announced the groundbreaking lawsuits just yesterday. Here's new york. Attorney general letitia james by using its vast troves of data and money facebook has squashed or hindered what the company perceived as potential threats. They've reduced choices for consumers. They stifled innovation and they degraded privacy protections for millions of americans. These lawsuits could be the most dramatic antitrust action in decades. And not just here in the us but worldwide the world's lydia amman alito covers tech for us lydia. What exactly are. Us authorities alleging yes. Oh carol when we talk about facebook we have to remember. We're talking about this. Three headed giant. They own instagram. That's a photo and video sharing app as well as what's app which is a messaging tool facebook. Acquired these companies over the last decade. And now they've grown to become some of the most popular platforms all over the world all together. They have an estimated three billion users worldwide and federal and state officials in the. Us say that's just too big and that in the process it's abused its power to crush smaller competitors and through these lawsuits. They want to break up the company. They want to force facebook to sell off. What's up and instagram. This isn't the first time the government has gone after big tech. is it. yeah this is actually the second major antitrust action the. Us has taken in october. The department of justice the doj and several states sued google and the accusation. There was that. Google has an illegal monopoly over internet search and online advertising. So the experts say that taken together. These are the most significant anti-trust cases in decades worldwide. Not just in the us liberty as you know. Europe is typically seen as a leader on this issue. How are they viewing. What's going on in the us. Yeah i spoke about this. With thomas vigna. He's a lawyer in brussels. Who's been involved with several high-profile anti-trust cases against tech companies in the us and europe. And he said that. What's ironic here. Is that for several decades now. Some in the us especially on the republican side have been complaining about europe going after these american tech icons and now we have the us government taking four more aggressive approach than churkin's of ever taken and vanessa. That people in his circles in europe are really surprised about this. That many people didn't expect the us to go after companies so aggressively and he said there's also some envy so even though european authorities technically and legally would have the power to go after facebook and other companies to try and break them up. He said they would never actually do that for political reasons. Remind us what have european authorities done on antitrust. So the way they've gone after these companies is through finds just to give you an example. Google alone has gotten more than nine billion dollars in antitrust fines since two thousand seventeen. And that amount to you and me carol might seem huge. But for these tech giants. This is just the cost of doing business and there's agreement that these fines however big they might be. Don't actually change the way these companies behave whereas trying to break up companies like facebook which is what the us is doing. Could actually change some behaviors. Does this mean that. The us is now ahead of europe when it comes to antitrust enforcement yes and no so most people would agree that what the us is doing right now with these lawsuits that it's far more aggressive than what european antitrust enforcers have done But where the us seems to be lagging behind is on serious legislation on antitrust. So right now. Europe is in the process of hauling. Its antitrust rules. The european commission is going to unveil a whole new framework on antitrust on tuesday next week and people like vigna the lawyer in brussels they say that europe will be leaping ahead of the us in that front and really leaping ahead of the rest of the world. How is facebook responding to all this in general face because argued that it doesn't have the kind of market dominance that its critics claim. It has facebook. Ceo mark zuckerberg actually made this point that a congressional hearing on antitrust over the summer here he is. The fastest growing ads. platform is amazon. The largest platform is google and for every dollar spent on advertising in the us less than ten cents and he went on to mention other companies now in terms of the lawsuits this week. Facebook says that disagrees with the government's allegations and that it plans to fight this in court. The world's lydia amount alito. Thanks a lot. You're welcome carole. A few weeks ago oregon voters made a bold move. They voted to make their state. The first to decriminalize possession of small amounts of hard drugs substances like heroin meth or cocaine. A big step here in the us but oregon is actually pulling directly from the playbook. Another country portugal. The question though can portugal's experience translate the pacific northwest. The world's alana gordon brings us a story from portugal's capital lisbon the overgrown area office i wrote in the north seems abandoned at i. It's not right before the pandemic hit. I join our each from the nonprofit. Chris share that includes nash marino. A nurse and drowsy san appear as they spend their days stopping by different spots in lisbon. Where people may use drugs whether that's here under neath subway terminals to offer supplies like clean needles and health resources. They're part of the collection of services meant to support people who use drugs. You send says the goal isn't a force anyone into treatment but amino known phone. Soon when mccain move over regan. I i think it works.

facebook us carol hills Attorney general letitia james lydia amman alito europe department of justice thomas vigna koby federal government Google churkin carol lydia brussels boston vigna Europe Ceo mark zuckerberg
"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

07:52 min | 10 months ago

"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

"We have come here to let you know that change is coming whether you like it or not can turn this. You have no option. The only option you have is what we do now and in the next few year would profoundly affect the next few thousand years. I'm joined by denmark's climate minister. Dan jorgensen dan. What's the significance of this decision. Well it's it's a very big decision for us and then locked for decades. We've made a lot of money on oil and gas and it's been an important part of the funding off our welfare state. But we feel that we need to take this decision because climate change is here and we need to do whatever we can to fight it and forced to occupy with a credible voice that we actually lead us in the fight against climate. Change that we needed to take the decision. Now your energy ministry estimates this could cost denmark. Two billion dollars in lost revenue. How do you intend to close that revenue gap. Yeah we need a new strategy now full. How will we make a living in the future. Fortunately we already underway. We are in a situation. How renewables especially when the north shore wind is already a much bigger sexier than the oil sector so we plan to keep expanding our renewable sachse. We have planned to really ambitiously. Grow our offshore wind for instance. Shall we hope to make up. Not only for the nas revenue but also to create the jobs that will be lost in the oil sector. Have you received any pushback for this decision to stop issuing new leases and and oil production. It's obvious that not all companies in the oil sector guests sector. Were were happy about this. Obviously there's also been political forces saying that as long as there's oil down there we should put it off the ground and make money on it but all in all. I'm happy to say that. We have broad support for this. And i think one of the reasons for that is that we are doing this in adjust way. I want us to be just transition. Meaning that we really focus on creating jobs for the people that lose two jobs before was on having a plan for economic development that makes this also economically viable solution. There's around four thousand people who are employed by denmark's oil and gas sector. How do you make up for that many jobs. Do the current plans cover that or are you still sort of behind in terms of figuring out how to reemploy these people. It's a great question because very often in into debate about green transformation in general in in in europe people forget that okay. Yes as a whole The green transformation wound will give you flip more jobs than than you'll lose bought. It's very important for us that we find the right jobs for the people that were loose that the job festival is not something that we're going to do from one day to the next second important point is that we allocate funding to training a worker from somebody who works in offshore oil to offshore wind for instance the investments that we talked about earlier that we've made and we'll be making an offshore wind fried the mentioned twenty-fifty And of course. That's the date you're going to end oil production greenpeace-denmark is applauding this. Move and they're saying this is climate leadership looks like but you're also allowing three more decades of oil drilling of the current leases and production. That's going on to continue in the north sea and that's something that youth climate activists credit tune. Berg has criticized on twitter. How do you respond to activists who say thirty. Years is too slow for a phase out if we were to stop oil production tomorrow. For instance as some activists have argued that we should it would fundamentally change our society we would no longer be able to fund our welfare state hospitals schools roads education system. On of these things would have to go through sa- via savings so that in my opinion wouldn't really make us a front one. I don't think many countries would then look at us and say listen that's That's a very good example. Let's follow that. I think it's important to be Ambitious and i think also that the reason why we choose to do this as as the first major oil producing country and that is that we want to and hope to inspire others. But if you want to hope to inspire us then you also need to make rational decisions and you also need to think about it people in wolf for us. A just transition is keyword a key term. It's important to find a balance. And i think we've found that that balance a decision that we have made that's interesting so you're really paying attention to also kind of social issues and political issues of how population will respond and adapt to these changes. I think one of the biggest threats and obstacles to watch The green transformation that we need is if there's no public support if we see too many problems where we don't take into consideration the needs and opinions of the population both when installing renewable energy but also when making the transformation for one type of entity to the next that might make people lose jobs if we don't take that problem seriously and tackled in a way that that makes sure that weekend maintain and a society with a lot of equity and with no inequality. Dan laughing we risk losing the support that we need dan. Jurgensen is the climate minister of denmark. Thanks a lot for speaking with us thank you. We reported yesterday on a growing number of countries that are announcing they'll stop contributing greenhouse gases to the atmosphere by mid century. Another country just added itself to that list brazil this week it said it would do its part by twenty sixty the un that it would not strengthen its goal for cutting carbon emissions in the near term by the end of the decade experts. Say those short term goals are necessary to lend credibility to long-term promises. Kristen pourri from the nonprofit amazon watch calls the target unambitious. The announcement amounts to a baby step and one from a government that has proven itself willing to sacrifice the amazon. It's people's for quick profit including the prophet of illicit actors. Illegal loggers illegal miners and landgrabbers. Brazilian president jair bolsonaro has pushed for more development in the amazon deforestation there. This year reached its highest level in more than decade executive secretary of the climate observatory in brazil. Masilo strini says. The government's plan is a shame. Was yours lead. Their of these champion the past and now we are in the side of the problem on the side of the problem. Brazil's communication to the un also suggested that its target for twenty sixty would be contingent on international funding while a coronavirus vaccine is on the horizon of us are still a ways off from getting our shot in the arm. Masks and social distancing remained critical. So what's next in reopening schools and workplaces as part of our regular series of live discussions on the pandemic. Join us tomorrow at twelve pm. Eastern for conversation with harvard healthy buildings expert joe allen. That's friday noon eastern at.

denmark Dan jorgensen dan greenpeace north sea Jurgensen Berg europe sa Kristen pourri twitter amazon Brazil jair bolsonaro un climate observatory Masilo strini Dan dan government
"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

07:38 min | 10 months ago

"morocco" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm carol hills. And this is the world a lot of big news surrounding the middle east. Today we start off with a diplomatic breakthrough israel. Morocco have agreed to normalize relations. President trump announced the news today on twitter. He called it a massive breakthrough for peace in the middle east. Many would call an overstatement still. This is the fourth arab majority country to agree to normalize relations with israel in the past four months. As part of the deal the trump administration is reversing a long standing. Us policy by recognizing morocco's claims over the disputed western sahara region. Summit arizona is a phd candidate at the university of california davis writing about morocco. Since nineteen seventy five both democratic and republican administrations have not taking this step. The trump administration clearly has taken advantage of the last few months of. It's lame duck presidency to to really break from the past and put the biden administration difficult position ours. Zukis says it would be tough for. President elect biden to reverse the decision on the disputed area of the western sahara because that could sink the entire agreements israel. Morocco have maintained lower level diplomatic relations for many years. Still the israeli prime minister and king of morocco both heralded today's agreement. Benjamin netanyahu said this will be very warm peace king mohammed thanked president trump and he mentioned the special ties between the jewish community of moroccan origin and israel also today in the middle east a major development in lebanon prime minister hassan diab and three other government ministers have been charged with negligence leading to the explosion that rocked the port of beirut. This summer the blast killed more than two hundred people and left. Thousands injured joining me now to discuss. Today's developments is kareem chah-i-ab. He's a beirut based journalist and nonresident fellow at the therere institute for middle east policy. I asked him the significance of the charges brought by the prosecutor investigating the blast so there are several key points about why what happened. Today was extremely significant in the investigation. First of all This is the first instance of where ministers and ex-ministers were charged and will be interrogated as accused. We've had a handful of interviews and investigations of ministers and foreign ministers made. It's the blast. But there were all done capacity. Isn't i witness another big development of course is the fact that prime minister hasan was among those charged. This is a significant development. I don't think we've ever seen before. And what's interesting. Is hassan diab. He resigned after the blast. But he's acting as a caretaker prime minister so does that mean. He's basically still prime minister. A caretaker government is basically just like any other government but on neutral gear. They just keep things going as wild. Lawmakers tried to establish a new government so we haven't had a full-fledged government in four months since has the resigned after the last august. We have an incoming prime minister right now but there are still negotiations so technically a job is still in the ground sarai and the ministers are still there but just keep things going neutral gear. What's been the reaction thus far to today's news in lebanon to the fact that these charges have been brought. There isn't a lot of skepticism. In general about the investigation. You know lebanon's this year is not independent. Neither bylaw neither in practice. So there's a lot of skepticism a whether it's from citizens affected or folks weren't about how effective this investigation will really be at the same time. People were definitely surprised that the prime minister was charged summoned. But there's lots of questions about other. Senior officials will have not been charged. Jets for example. President michel admitted to the press that he was aware of the the monja nitrate any the judiciary the officials to do what they have to do. Prior to the blast there were a handful of ex-prime ministers proceeding hassan. Diab the five or so years of the ammonium nitrate was just lingering in the port. They weren't summoned either. So some people do think that hassan diab might actually be scapegoated but there's also skeptcism round the entire investigation in general. I think it's you think. Today's charges are the first step in tackling the political and economic corruption in lebanon. I don't necessarily think so to be quite honest with you. I think the ammonium nitrate case is an example of the various nefarious practices. That take place the mismanagement that negligence and the corruption of course but corruption and illicit profiteering oral and all sorts of bad comic practices. Come in all shapes and sizes through all sorts of a ministries and state institutions. and otherwise. we're talk about decades and decades of these very dangerous practices which led to our economic crisis which has led to the extreme deterioration however if the investigation is really independent and if it's really thorough and it really wants to get to the bottom of this. The ports is a big example of financial mismanagement and corruption in lebanon so the investigation is a huge opportunity to further. Understand this but of course give the on dependent given the power structures of the company. It's quite questionable. To what extent will be able to uncover it in our current framework kareem. Chah-i-ab is a beirut based journalist and nonresident fellow at the therere institute for middle east policy. Thanks a lot. Thank you for offering me and one more story. We're following in the mideast right now the. Us state department is on course to green light of big weapons sale there. The united arab emirates wants to buy a fleet of advanced stealth fighter jets and weaponized drones. An effort to stop the sale failed to win enough votes in the. Us senate yesterday. The weapons deal is seen as part of a quid pro quo. The uae get state of the art american firepower in exchange for its recognition of the state of israel that budding new relationship between the gulf kingdom and the jewish state is in the abraham accords brokered by the trump administration back in august republican senator roy blunt of missouri made the case for the weapons sale earlier. This month we have increasingly worked closely with the u. a on defense issues On the ground together in the air together in at least six. Different extended deployments the. Ua has been there. If the deal goes through the uae would be making an exponential leap forward in terms of military. Might the f. Thirty five is america's newest fighter jet it's built by lockheed martin in places across the us including missouri it's flown by the us military and some of its allies but up to now the only middle eastern country that had f thirty five was israel under us law. All american weapons sales in the middle east have to pass a litmus test they cannot undermine israel's qualitative military edge over its arab neighbors in a flurry of negotiations. This year israel dropped its objections to the sale of jets to the uae. The last step was to overcome objections in congress. This is the first time that we would sell these. Incredibly lethal incredibly complicated technologies into the heart of the middle east democratic senator. Chris murphy of connecticut is one of the lawmakers who supported legislation to block this weapons deal murphy says he agrees the uae is an important partner for as many places as we cooperate with e there are many points of division and those points division often involve the use of us military technology against the interests of the united states the uae has provided weapons. Some of them us made to militias in yemen and libya..

morocco israel hassan diab lebanon middle east therere institute for middle e western sahara carol hills President trump biden administration Zukis President elect biden king mohammed president trump prime minister hassan diab kareem chah prime minister hasan President michel Benjamin netanyahu university of california
"morocco" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"morocco" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And from Morocco we have is a forty five year old man he lives half his life in Morocco half in New York he's married his wife and child live in Morocco a year ago he had a seizure in New York use vice have surgery went home to Morocco to be by his wife and child he then has come back and he's got always follow up one of the biggest hospitals in New York so famous well they're getting an MRI is of the MRI showing progression of this brain cancer and he has the documents but the doctors of this big hospital offered him no options no treatment no options so what did we do we sat down got the history exam of the patient got the scans reviewed the scans and this is what we do we treat patients with brain tumors brain cancers he has a cleo model this is the kind of work we do we're able to target the tumor without hurting the healthy brain in general we have high success rates in controlling the tumor where we attack were the first to New York with brain radiosurgery when all the other hospitals and facilities and doctors but standard treatment for brain tumors and brain cancers is okay one doctor saw that pin point precise treatment was more appealing often more effective less side effects with no cutting no bleeding no pins of the head and was picked up by the dentist who comes to us of sixty one with gastric cancer had three years of chemo which never worked and our as a fistula in his stomach is a mass the stomach with the error in it from the cancer and from their treatment in three years of chemo which still are worth the cancer Kaplan progressing and he got more and more chemo the chemo didn't work and then they got more and more came of the people that are working got more more father the game from standard type radiation and resulted in and says to hole between the cancer and the stomach so he came to me wanting a fresh second opinion this is the work that we do we treat people was gastric cancer stomach cancers even if it's traveled elsewhere this man a stage four cancer our success rate in treating gastric cancers is about ninety percent where we aim to being with us in the stomach or the lymph nodes or the liver this is the work that we do every day this why were the first in America with stereotactic body radiosurgery I would have a sixty nine year old woman who has breast cancer with distortion of the breast of ten centimeter mass with cancer travel to the bones wishing only our treatment we try this mass in the breast which to store the breast of eight through the net Paul Richard the breast cancer Richard the cancer of the bone and now she is in remission she tried concoctions and vitamins for a long period of time they do and to work she refused chemo she refused surgery and really surgery would've helped her very much she received our focus beam radiation for advanced cancer of the breast and in the spine and is now in remission fully functional doing well happy about treatment but I'm such a leader men we have lots of information to send you you can call us at two one two choices that our day or night you can come into our office our phone number to get information or make an appointment is two one two choices two one two two four six forty two thirty seven.

Morocco three years forty five year sixty nine year ninety percent ten centimeter
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"But the reality is probably like I would probably get pulled over in arrested for driving with kids in the back of a truck without seatbelts or something. It's just not that way. Absolutely. But reality is probably your kid. It'd be on his phone taking it. Yeah. Right. Well, I mean, these are the things that kind of come up when you're a paradise. This is something that because we're trying to as we're limited in France trying to get also not only the American traditions. But also, as you know, I'm Rockin traditions kinda in our in our daily lives, really. But just kind of in our in our in our I guess our day to day. And so it is tricky kind of navigating that sometimes, you know. And it is hard to figure out like where he's going to get that bit of America where he's going to get that. But a Moroccan Nata rocking kind of. That bit of, you know, the kind of French culture as well that are all going to kind of wrap up into you know, what he grows up experiencing out, which is why two nights ago, my wife, and I viewed mister Rogers neighborhood was an episode from nineteen Eighty-one because she had never seen mister Rogers before. 'cause they don't have that intangible Morocco strangely F, and I grew up with Mr. Rogers, and I was like, you know, I kind of want my son to grow up with mister Rogers to Mr. Rogers is a good guy. It's actually, you know, you learn so much about the world at a quick side note this episode from nineteen eighty one from nineteen eighty one they were talking about electric cars. I'm this drawn. Okay. What's taking people? As so longer. That thing. But these are the things like early on where you're gonna kinda get your child. You know, what would you miss? What do you want to include at the same time? What are the kind of crappy parts about your childhood that you wanted to take out of there, you know, or the parts about the culture that you as he became an adult. You realize probably for the best. You know, we could talk about the over commercialization of Christmas and stuff like that. Which is happening right here in France as well. Here's well. But you know, you're not missing out on that. Yeah. I'm missing out on that. Right. They do a good job of brainwashing. Them early on. He knows all about up and allow. So, but you know, what can you do to curb that a little bit? And then. I'm just in terms of you know, I'm sure Norway has their own kind of winter traditions. You know, here they have there's, but how do you explain to a kid early on like now, this is what we do here..

mister Rogers France Moroccan Nata Morocco America Norway
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"That's great about that. But if people are looking to kind of connect more with that culture on a on a personal level. I think you're gonna find that outside of the cities in the countryside a lot more, and that can be you know, any number of villages. You know? I I I've taken hikes across the mountain more just kind of set off on a trail have come across. You know, a a group of Hudson. I don't know that word for that. They're just kind of you know, if if they weren't a city collies shacks, maybe or something like that. But you know, you come across these these these places where people are living and maybe a bit of a tenuous existence. Maybe they're really dependent on the agriculture of the region or some of them could be following. She heard some people follow that she return. And so they're they're shepherds that are very much attached to that style of living, and you know, you can hike across these regions in being violated in for some of the most delicious lunches, you'll ever have, you know, these one of these cultures where it's like, it's virtually guaranteed that if you go off in enough places, you're gonna get invited in somewhere because certain places are like that. Yeah. That's my feeling. You know, is that in the my experience it's been the experience of, you know, almost everyone of my friends at gone, you know, adventured out of it is that it's one of these places that, you know, you're you're eventually just gonna get taken in by the family you live in France. Now. Right. Yeah. I live in Paris. Do you miss living in Morocco? Yeah. I do. Yeah. Do quite a bit. Actually. I mean, I it's great. Don't get me wrong. I get to be a writer in Paris in. There's not a better cliche to probably live. Okay. Now, I know why on your Skype name. It says living the cliche cliche is guy. Say so. But there are I mean there are moments when I definitely do this live in Morocco. What do you miss the most about it? That's a good question. After a while. There's this hearted friendliness to it that doesn't quite exist. In Paris in the same way, you know, people are friendlier in Paris than I think most people give them credit for, you know, I find that regions in the French people in general to be incredibly friendly, really really nice. But there's just this kind of hearted spirit. That is Morocco that I found with my neighbor is that I found was that people at the local market in stuff said, you know, you don't you don't get elsewhere. I think and or at least not into many places, and I think I missed that. I missed being able to go outside my front door and experience that because as you know, the further up you go further north of the equator, you go that colder these cultures. Hey, you're treading on thin ice, not pun intended. Tended. It wasn't tended. Yeah. I'm just thinking about that and experiencing that every day in when you say warmhearted, I can't help. But think of this idea of just having these more, I guess deeper human connections in a way when it comes down to it and to have that as part of your daily life. I could imagine for years, and then that's that's gone. 'cause you're in a big city. Now like, you said and will be further north different culture and everything I'm sure that that would be hard to to be away from that. Yeah..

Paris Morocco Hudson France Skype writer
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"Is delicious. You'll be tired of it better than into your. Trip. But man, you will remember it for years to come. Do. Not miss having mom, you can do this in every major city in most of the villages, HAMAs like Moroccan spa treatment, you will come out of there feeling like you've lost layers skin, and you can breeze through your skin particles in. It is an amazing sensation. And something at the end. You won't forget anytime soon. Do not miss wandering says Medina the feds. Medina is a UNESCO world heritage site in. It's the world's largest pedestrian freezer are sorry car-free zone pedestrian only might as donkeys a few scooters here, and there one hundred and fifty thousand people or so still living that says Medina, and it's utter labyrinth. You will get lost there. And you're supposed to end. It's wonderful. I love it said just said it entire look like what medieval life was like not only Morocco been in a lot of spots around the world as well. So do not. Miss that. A do not miss a night in the desert. I don't care how touristy these packages silent night in the desert under the stars. You know, outside of hers zoo or something like that. It's incredible. Every time I go to in fact, I'm planning another trip right now. And one of the first things I look at doing this can I do a night in the desert gets at something not only do tourist you. But also Moroccans do as well. They know it's considered this kind of almost like a cleansing act by people so night in the desert for me, something you do not wanna miss. I mean couscous have a Friday couscous if you can get in with the family, if you can do any sort of family family dinner, whether that's a couscous her fits attaching. And you can have that in a family atmosphere do that. Well, I was going to actually get into that next is getting tips on digging into the local culture and interacting with locals in befriending locals in making those connections. You can go beyond the. The standard I guess tourist experience. So it's really hard to do this in the cities. I think in just the countryside's anywhere. You are. I don't care if it's a countryside in France or countryside. You know, I don't know in in California. It's a you know, when you get out of the cities in the country is that people tend to be a bit more kind of that salt of the earth type thing bit more friendly towards neighbors towards visitors porch travelers and in an Islam. They actually I find that in the countryside. They take this tenant at Islam a little bit more seriously where you should appropriate a certain amount of respect in talapity to your guest. You know, and I guess as anybody who comes into your town or village? So you find a lot of times at any smaller villages, Morocco, you're treated like a king. You know, that's tentative culture, you know. Israeli to extend the kind of put that in quotes, Royal treatment. But extend like, a very friendly, very familiar kinda treatment to you as if you were one of their family as if you were, you know, their their cousin or their son or their daughters that so to get I think to to kinda scratch the surface of the cold trip that more than two as you were saying to go beyond that kinda average tourist experience. Which I again, I think there's a lot..

Morocco Medina HAMAs California France
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"So it because I believe that is a, you know, it's kind of a what do you call it like a? When you when you start something off on the right foot? You're really setting the tone for your trip. And for me if you want to set a great tone start off on the right foot, and for me that begins from the moment. Your foot touches the ground another great tip for those. That are in Europe. You can take the ferry from Theresa Spain into tanger-. It's a thirty minute ferry ride as beautiful as all get out inner crossing continents across Gibraltar. You can see the rock of Gibraltar in the distance from the coast of Spain. You can see the coast of Morocco, and they're right there. You know, they're almost kissing cousins Mets it but ended ended it is incredible to see just in the space of seven miles or about fourteen kilometers. How different the world's can be how much they change. And also at the same time kinda how similar they are as well. You know, these just get thrown into high definition, especially that first time he kinda make that that ferry crossing. So for me, that's kind of the best ways to come in. Morocco, you know, either by ferrying tanger- or flying into any airport that isn't cause of Lanka. So I think I think that's a good start for the trip. And then you were saying if you had two or four weeks, what would you do a lot of times people built their travels around certain activities? They like our experiences they wanna have. And I know there are some traditional tourist types experience of experiences that you can have in Morocco. What some of those are what some of those might are maybe are worth it and not worth it, those even even better tip. Sometimes is the things that hey, you've heard a lot about this. But it's and of course, that's all subjective. But. Hit send them one. Hey, you've heard a lot about cousin. Bog don't go there? Right. Okay. Yeah. There you go. Sometimes it's the things that people say not to do that kind of paint a clearer picture of what to do. Sometimes I guess that other thoughts have traveling to Morocco are a, you know, I think about the seasons. I would not go there in the summer. Yeah. Summertime. You know, if you stick to the coast that could be okay in terms of temperature. It's not too hot. But the coasts are flooded by all the tourists from Europe all the tourists from Morocco. You know, everybody kind of vacates the desert stop that really hot core of the country in the day fled to the coast. And so even if you stick to the coast where temperatures will be nice, you know, the hot sunny, warm, he can jump in the ocean. And all that. It's it's almost too crowded to make fun. I think particularly in some places that are typically a little bit more off to be passed a little bit less, less traveled. That's that's true except for probably August, maybe July. So when are the best months to travel then? Spreading and fall by far the best, you know, I if chosen between between the two I'd say probably springs the best time to go. Because then you get you know, turn them in the mountains. You got all these beautiful, flowering plants everywhere. And you start to see the green, you know, really really kinda take root the coast are still great for, you know, taking the whole little swim in the ocean. It'll be chilly, but it's still really nice out. And then in the desert your temperatures during the day are bearable, you know, they're up to forty five fifty degrees celsius there like one hundred ten one hundred twenties, but this more going to be like ninety degrees out or so which makes you know. So you can do a day in the desert Jerry comfortably..

Morocco Europe Gibraltar Theresa Spain tanger Mets Jerry Lanka forty five fifty degrees celsi fourteen kilometers ninety degrees thirty minute four weeks
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"Like, I've Acuras no word. That's coming with me. So so pacman snowboards some winter gear just to be prepared. You know for the winter because I didn't know what it could find there. And then another kind of baggage is closing, you know, few capricious books and whatnot. In carry on stuff. And I was gone. You know, just like that. Unfortunately, after you know, we've all been through these flights where once delayed Mr. connection in all the stuff happens. So I had a series of that and get to Morocco. So by the time, I got to Morocco had spent a one night in an airplane in another night in an airport was just, you know, just sleep deprived? And I and says, and I just want to go to bed just give me into my new home. I just want to go to bed. The university was nice enough to send a driver to meet me. And I'm waiting and I'm waiting, and I'm waiting from a bags to show up in show up as all I have. I had it in my carry on. All I had with me is I have my computer. I had a couple of books street. I have one win fair change a closed at already had us on the trip over. So it's so two weeks for the airline. American Airlines, by the way are not American. Sorry Air France air. Air france. I've had the worst luck. They've lost three of my bags one of them indefinitely. My Christmas presents from last year of material son gone indefinitely. So I am doing my best. Not just like this guy's American. Just throwing. Yeah. Luggage track. I told you French people. So. Yeah, that I mean so in France, I'm gonna minor strike against at the moment. 'cause that was that was the first of three times that they had lost miss misplace baggage. But this one. Yeah, this one hurts. It was the just getting to Morocco and like really big trip overseas, and you're on your own, and yeah does nothing stare, you know, so so what do you do? So I I ended up handwashing my my my laundry in my sink every night for the first two weeks in Morocco. You know, before finally, you know, back did arrive, and you know, then the school year starts in in your kind of visit working in most of that works out. Pretty well. You said it was rough the first couple months just what will end up about it. Well, so the hand washing every night and get him washing every night. So I mean, I didn't have anything to wear released. Like, I I I did like all my quote, unquote, professorial sort of. Close at imagined wearing I had my little blazer, you know, at my like slack semi button up shirts. I ninety glance. Yeah. No, no. No, professor. I heard. Yeah. I am professor who heads and like a ratty t shirt. Professor oriel. I think yes. Maybe it does. So this is a this. Yeah. This is so other than that. You're you're paying the picture of the like, the Princeton professor, and this is more of the village. Professor, right. The the. Well, the thing with Morocco that I learned before it went is it is it is a bit of a hierarchical culture where there are kind of these standardized standardized norms a lot a lot of times when people are reading the first time on quote, unquote, traditional where Rocco it'll be like jellabas in caftans stuff like that. And yes that had its place in history and people still do that. But in professionals fears, you know, you're expected to wear a tie or a button up shirt. You know, I mean, you walk into Bank everybody there is going to be a button up shirt and a tie just as they are all over Europe or the US, you know, and so like just going into it. I wanted to fit in you know, makes good first impression which I didn't have an opportunity to do. Unfortunately. But beyond that, you know, there's some of the normal sort of struggles. Like, I ride on the first day of Ramadan. And I'd never lived in a Muslim country before I've never experienced prominent. I don't really know. What's happening, but what basically happens during Ramadan is everything shut during the day, especially in small towns. And so when I go out for grocery shopping in the afternoon, I couldn't really find much..

Morocco professor france American Airlines Europe US Princeton Rocco two weeks
"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"You know, these things in some ways that kind of date a guidebook, but on the other hand when traveling a country like Morocco or a lot of African countries. I'd say in particular where you don't always have internet and things can get confusing very quickly. It's nice out have something right there. You know, whether it's like, a PDF, ipad or something or paper copy. You know, it's nice to have some sort of reference said. To kind of give you that that a center, you know that? So sometimes we need when we travel, you know, absolutely. I I mean, how did you end up in Morocco, e because the only thing I know about your story, and which is very little by the way, which makes us really fun for me to have this conversation, and that was really intentional because I did some research, and I looked at your website. But I'm like, I don't want to go to deep on this guy. But it sounds like you have been a lot of different places all over not. And you were living in a small village in Morocco. You said you move there in two thousand nine why did you move to a small village Morocco in two thousand nine almost made? The better question is why did I move from San Francisco in two thousand. Okay. Why did you do that? So so. Myself. I live in San Francisco have been there for a couple of years. You know, like a lot of people probably that tune in to not only this podcast that you run. But also on the location indie podcast like a lot of these other people had I just wasn't very content with my office job. You know, I was, you know, put it into kind of my nine to five didn't see myself in that office culture too much longer. And so I was looking for something else to do. And I'm doing what were you doing there? I was editing. I had a job as additive for a wire service entirely boring job that basically means I was the last line of defense and the dark arts of press releases. Tell long did you work there? Two years added tears there, and it was okay job for an office job. But that's the problem. I was still in office job. And I wanted to do something else. And I had my master's in English by then. And so I was looking at maybe ten English somewhere and originally I was looking around the US didn't even really think about going overseas at all. But the only jobs I can find in the US where out on the ocean islands in upstate New York in Watertown, just awfully eerie some community college there. And I thought man if I gotta be this remote in the US when I'd be really remote the world. And so. My surge to South Korea Thailand, this whole kind of southeast Asia, and Ana unaware kind of a plan for one job in Morocco. And keep in mind, I've never been to any displaces before United Denver minutes out these Asia. I'd never been to Africa in the Morocco job looked really interesting if you know anything about Rocco, it's it's a short flight to Europe, you know, instead to our flight into in France. And I have a lot of friends already in France and size thought. Hey, well, you know, it goes really bad. For you know for a week or two. So. Yeah. So it took a job teaching there in this little village. There's a university that happens to be a Alaw on university. And it happens to run a cut of an American style liberal arts program the link of the classes are mostly in English. And so I took a job teaching literature and composition there. And which meant basically, I had some more time to travel as well. So not only did my day to day. Life was all of a sudden became a lot more interesting than you know, hanging out in the mission at some, you know, burrito giant win. I may but. This sudden, I'm like Livingston village where I don't even know how to order instable right in extreme difference. Right. So I mean when you did you find the gig on Dave's ES L cafe or one of those type..

Morocco San Francisco US Livingston southeast Asia France Asia South Korea Dave Africa Denver Europe New York Rocco Ana Watertown Two years
"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Welcome to the war nomads podcast delivered by wore Norma's the trouble lifestyle and insurance brand is not your usual trouble podcast. It's everything for the adventurous independent traveler Kifah cheating in my name is Kim and alongside me's feel. And in this episode we traveling to Morocco favor you exotic indeed, north African country, bordering the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Do you know is the fifth largest Arab country by population? There's over thirty three and a half million people in the country. Of course, it's nine, four predictably sand dunes, but also beaches, and markets and mountains. And it also feel forms the backdrop to many foreign films that have been entirely or at least partially shot in Morocco, which brings us to you quiz question name, three Hollywood movies that have been filmed in Morocco. And if you say Casablanca, you'll wrong that was filmed in Burbank was entirely. Yeah. We'll have the answer the end of the episode, but we don't have any Hollywood's styling, they sit beside fill the styles in their own pudding yourself. Only runs a business code red season. It's an all in one website for finding and booking combination to the based action sports had been shot in music festivals in the world. He's going to chat surfing in Marocco. We'll find out about capturing the base peaks with Ralph and Claudia woo Shia who story of who Tom of the family and it was around thanksgiving, which is a really important time to Americans, isn't it? Plus make the girls who were traveling to every country in the world. But Al I guest is married Braun. He was a gaming design. I e quit his job to travel. Now he runs the travel blow code indie, traveler and sharing budget travel gods alongside tips on packing and gear. And Morocco is one of the destinations that feature on the spot and Merrick has broken down of his the into three key areas. Yeah, I think what I did was probably so I spent spent a month in Morocco, and it struck me that there are some sort of tin routes that people usually might want to consider. I think there's sort of the standard trip seems to be Marrakesh the city of Marrakesh and the Sahara. Those usually go together in a one week experience where in the old city for a while, you know, exploring the markets, maybe staying in Riyadh. One of those traditional sort of. Almost palatial a little hotels with the courtyard. You go through the Sahara that's like one week, sort of classic Meralco experience. I would say, and there are two others have clusters of. Popular destinations went into north closer to Spain. You can even get there from Spain with the ferry and one further to south, which you can reach quite easily. If you fly to idea, for instance, which is kind of a resort, seaside resort place. Not using my kind of thing I like to explore and discover in the country, but actually it's really well connected. So from there you can do trip around to south very easily. Not many places where you can put sand dunes, betas mountains and desert into the kind of top five it has going for it. It's pretty unique. Yeah, it is. I think Morocco is great. Actually, it's it is a very unique this nation, and it is so close to Europe as well. I mean, I'm from Europe, so it's easy for me to get there. But auto listeners, we might be from Australia, the United States. It's a really great add on to if you're visiting Europe anyway. Because it's just so different you, you go there and just culturally. It's completely different and just visually as well on these desert towns and and these markets and everything is is a whole different little world. It's, it's I like to have these sort of immersive experiences when I travel, and that's really definitely possible in Morocco, whether he in the Sahara where it's just sand stretching out as far as you can see or you're, you're going through a little towns market place, and there's just so many smells and spices and different things going on there so much tippety. So that's just that's just I think one of the most appealing things about Morocco. It just feels like a very, very unique in different place.

Morocco Marocco London Atlantic Ocean Europe Scotland UK Sahara desert Bimbo popula golf Western Sahara Gaza Steph Paret US Cephas Australia manly beach Peru Phil Whitson
"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Adventure events and festivals where we showcase festivals worldwide. So it's everything from surfing events. I'm in Australia, the US to snowboarding festival, music festivals in Europe and got a whole variety of festivals, which we call anything that's read anything this right. But did you get into that because he bit of an adventure travel yourself? Is that how you gonna? Yes. So I guess my main particular post fifteen is. My my main sort of goal would would traveling was to do something predominate around surfing and action sports related, say surfing, snowboarding, mountain, biking, the sites now being not fatigued. Well, there's plenty on it, and obviously these cost is about Marocco. So I had a bit of a such on what is happening in Marocco outside of the markets and outside the Sahara desert. There are actually music festivals, and there's a big sifting coach surfing now that the module drought rather than serving in the two together, it's amazing of I'm originally from from from London and. We would always have friends and all I or golf on on satellite trips. And I'm, we'd plan and setting occasions wouldn't want not just in Europe, but the close to London and America the the capital of surfing tag is an academic is about four hour flights from London and on a daily flights that and it's a completely different world and sort of fest time I went there, there's probably about ten years ago. And then since then sort of being back numerous times and predominate just just to go surfing because it's such an incredible place is it Mediterranean say, so it's it's on the Atlantic on on the Atlantic Ocean. It cuts in on the north in in rotten edge of ocean in in the north of Morocco breaks into the Mediterranean. But the main sort of surfing is sort of base around the central central Marocco name now. I dare and then south from the Western Sahara all the way up. There's amazing waves. And yeah, it's w on some of the some of the areas are getting a bit more Bimbo popula. But yeah, if you if you take, if you take a drive, you can definitely find an empty empty yourself. So for those people that understand, sipping tombs, what kind of breaks out I us so breaks. I mean, I'd say it was the the disneylands of right hand point breaks in anywhere in the world of bane of Steph Paret about thirty five forty countries and. Morocco is yet is something special, stuffing give us a female countries. Then as Phil said, he's Joe dropped. When we put Marocco zipping in one sentence, did the puck hostile, Peru that's gonna massive Sieff in college does yeah. Me three other countries that you dine expected to be saving coach. So Israel is one. I couldn't believe it was out there and there was about one hundred people in the water. It was not big on manly beach. Pretty incredible. That's one where else I'd say. I'd say the UK in Scotland is got a pretty big sane it. It's cold. He'd have fairly thick Whitson thing. But yeah, we'll all around around the UK sort of homeland Devon in the in the south. And then yes, Scotland's. Amazing, Norway, got some incredible waves. And then now I guess this will be -cations which is sort of code will to surfing destinations that people are sort of licking today. Once they've done all the ones around the equator and all that tropical kind of location when you're in back to Morocco, when they won't, what's it like in terms of safety. I mean, there's one or two that patrol, but the majority of of the surfing spots. Yeah, you're left to your own devices. The other is much more safety, but if you'll, it's sort of this this plenty of sports for beginners, intermediate, Cephas advanced said as a variety of breaks speech breaks. And yeah, that sort of. There's there's a big infrastructure around the setting that now, so people can go and stuff camps on this people all over the world all every year, coming to Morocco, two weeks, suffering experience, and some of them sort of incorporated with yoga, and you stay in these amazing camps in places and normally sort of go out every day doing doing. So I think losses with with with local Gaza instructors apart from the Disneyland of right hand point breaks..

Morocco Marocco London Atlantic Ocean Europe Scotland UK Sahara desert Bimbo popula golf Western Sahara Gaza Steph Paret US Cephas Australia manly beach Peru Phil Whitson
"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Strict budget of fifty one dollars a day person which can be challenging times, but think invite like we've both wet really, really hard. You know, the time is anyone else to get enough money in bottom line is whipped pretty minimalists. We always have been with heavy with this. A couple of lactation out. Schultz news, wait, we travel with the carry on backpack. Also I came so good a Cape, it Kahlo sip a lot. It's the why Fullwood if especially if you're doing these many countries, we might two cups having a little bit again with Iran couple years ago that was just lighting. The most amazing experience. What was the rising about catch suggests that you've got to live in the homes of of locals the absolutely. And I guess because Iran has we also too long till you you visit in everything kinda happens behind closed doors because you cannot go out as novas. They still drinking. So the young people tend to young and old tend to meet all in a in the homes in the have little in laboratory Leverett Landrieu yet. Hope Lange rooms puts music on. So we started dating cassettes. Not really. There's no places you can dance. Yeah, it was incredible because we could. We got to know people in the more we, we play spin the bottle. We didn't even know what to not ask is that I don't want insult anyone. I really don't know. Like. Two point. You don't have that in the guy who got what you should not ask insane, the volume. Then I remember h we was registered in got age. I don't mind answering any questions, but other than I remember you asked the the other girl for team all. Did you ever kiss the girl and then I'll giggle practicing. So for nominal and in one of the guys, I'm not getting like fifteen of us. He asks his friend if you had to be with a guy like which one would you choose year? And he says, like on, you know, so. And so what his name was innocent from other is so open minded that was also a Nick because all of the places that they eat in the food was phenomenal. Right? Schmolly amazing, nine meds incredibly inspiring. Your own Newton, credible eventua-, and you guys are on a journey of a lifetime mom. And at the time of recording rights in modern Cyprus will have linked to the blog in shy nights. They can fully Ginny by the why Morocco. It's a relatively safe place for women to travel. It's headed bed reputation, but he's not too bad now, I'm well same sex relationships illegal for locals. If you're traveling as the same sex couple LGBTQ Morocco. You can't be punished by law, but take it easy done if anybody too much Tempe to over the top page scraped. Indeed. Now, photo enrichment adventures was founded by travel photographer. Autho an international guard Ralph Alaska. He runs cultural to is focusing on photography. Is that right? I teach travel photography and I call them cultural tours with a focus on photography. So photography is a part of the trip. These aren't photo workshops, which by definition is pretty much twelve hours a day photography all the time. And so our trips are about half day scheduled half day free time and photography's a part of it before we started chatting, decide that anyone that goes to Morocco in Texas Fidai seems to get it right. Is it visually stunning or away looking at, you know, Fudd is with a few tricks. No. I mean, it's a, it's a gorgeous place. You know, it's it's kinda hard to take a bad shot there, but obviously everyone does even myself. But to me, it's in any destination. It's about being out at the right time of day. So getting that better light Morocco has wonderful light. I say my number one tip is. Is just get out early and Patrick signs who's a photographer says, if you don't like getting out early, then be a writer. I love that one so that I use that often, and I think it's very true. Yeah, and look sign, many backdrops in Morocco to you really spoilt for choice. Now, it's a wonderful country for variety and what I look for in a country one or destination when I'm putting together my trips is variety and Morocco has that in spades..

Morocco Iran Schultz Leverett Landrieu writer Nick Ralph Alaska Ginny Cyprus Newton Fudd Tempe Texas Fidai fifty one dollars twelve hours two cups
"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Because that's the mainly in the pole to introduce by different ideologies, went troll and TV channels or other people who wait to Middle East. We are proud to be a native people of Marocco, but also North Africa, we have our own Islamic of practice, Tina, Marocco, very, very soft and very modern. Leaving on everyone's freedom and respect. Exactly. So strict as limit now. Actually, probably some confuses with the Middle East on a good example. Is there sweetie, which is more tribal Islam. So it's an Islamic of as we know it, the religion, which is a religion of of coexistence living in peace. But the interviews drive the ritual which is very strict and preservative and it is not the case in rural where the native people. I've always lived in peace and harmony and we had different civilization on our land that we would come them sometimes with a fight or sometime with the diversities our highlights, we are all different. But in the same time, one nation here is this who grew up in the Medina phase this ally. Do people come to Morocco? What's this thing off. Of course, Baptist sign, we have the beautiful weather. The landscape, of course, history history, and Rocco. Nice food. Nice people very friendly, and they see something exotic. That's not what you tell me before you say, people come to Morocco to see you. Of course, as his famous in all Morocco gets infamous the whole world. So they come to see me which you see. I mean to learn about from me to see junior jokes, I tell them about everything. You refunding man? Yes, thank you. Thank you down and he, we have Mohammed Muhammad. Why do pick who come to Morocco days? They come to Morocco for buying carpet and drink tea lot of mint tea. 'cause the maintain it's a for days yet and my wife. She told me stop Muhammed. No, Marvin t, I five kids, no more case number eight. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much..

Morocco Rocco Middle East Marocco Muhammed Medina Marvin t Tina North Africa Mohammed Muhammad
"morocco" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"We chased after him and we just hosed every location down and shot until they kicked out and ended up shooting all of it. Practically the Tom free riding on my infinitely infinitely more dangerous than the one in Morocco Morocco. He's flat out on a highway. Yeah, it's going into straight line going to Paris on cobblestones and bike. That's not meant to perform like that was very dangerous. So heart heart mouth time as a. I was convinced it was going badly there moments. There's a moment where the stunt drivers are trained to inch their lives. And I recall a counter Reeves while he was shooting speed and he was on the highway chase, and he was worried that he might hit some cars on when the stunt guy said them. These are the best drivers in the world. You couldn't hit them. If you try if you if you get in their way, they will swerve out of is the same with mission. You know, you have Tom who's highly trained, but he stunk there's a moment where there's a car spears into Eaton's path and he'd just swerves around there. Great. But there's also there were local guys in a language barrier? Yeah, and there was one moment where you know Tom is racing through cross traffic and it. There was a miscommunication and he almost was nailed the side of this car because the guy was just not where he was supposed to be right. That was that was very, very scary. Oh my God. Yeah, you would like to think that, but what you laugh. Yeah, no, since you said there was like. I don't know. I don't know what movie they were working on. Guys are the best, but no, they were, but they were very good, don't get wrong. They were the best and going around the arc Triomphe was very, very dangerous. Thomas able to do that very safely complexity only choreography must have been astonishing. But yeah, you know, it's it's when we, when we did something like the doctor Triomphe we get there in the morning and Wade, Wade, is there early with all of those cars in content, concentric circles, adjusting their speed and and developing a system of language with them so that he can on on a whim. The center circle can go faster or slower. Everybody's kind of very, very, very dialed in, but then a lot of it is with what we had to do. A lot of it was improvisational. We got there and showed up and said, Dr. What are we going to do with the St.. Amazing. One of my colleagues park out of the screening and the motorbike Jason particular think they, they're palms sweaty. And he said, there's no way that was all Tom, there's no way all. Oh yeah. No, there's no stunt writer anywhere or stunt pilot the only time Tom's not at the controls of the helicopter are when the helicopters carrying that payload. Okay, because that's another rating that we didn't have time to. Yeah. So when you see the helicopter flying up over Henry's helicopter, that's a different guy flying copter, but everything else Tom's flying driving skydiving. There is one shot in the movie where you can't see his face and I had a double do it because you couldn't see him. He'd gladly done it, but you could you and and he had he would have really risked aggravating his ankle injury. It's that shot rolling down the roof of the, oh yeah, the the one refute where he falls away from us and hits and rows away. That's Tom. But then the big wide shot that you shows them rolling down the roof. That's a stunt guy and that's and that's only because his ankle was broken and you can't see that it's Tom. Yeah. So I'm like, why are we doing this? Why would why would you do this stunt? Don't do it. I remember Thomas, I do it. Got dammit. Oh, and we were gonna do a stunt when he's running across Blackfriars bridge. He was going to bash through the glass of breakfast. Blackford bridge bounce off the roof of removing train and body slam a guy that he thought was Walker and it was Walker would have put the tracking device on this before we established that the tracking device was actually the thing in the neck eventually phoned us. We would have shopped this and then had to cut it anyway..

Tom Morocco Morocco Thomas arc Triomphe Paris Triomphe Reeves Blackford bridge Wade Blackfriars bridge writer Eaton Jason Walker Henry
"morocco" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"You know teenager who fights with them all the time and we we saw catherine who's who's in the film and and she was great but i felt like there was a couple of all the colors the needed to see and what did you feel at least is if you remember that she wasn't showing you at that moment i think it was i think she nailed completely the anger and i guess i was just wondering if they could was another a hint of something else to to to to to find but we were strangely when the way they saw a couple of actors who are all that to all the softness and the lights went back and how to look at catherine again she came in again and and i think i just kinda hinted that could be a touch of that and she showed that brilliantly to so but also comedy even in a scene of dark and angry as that it needed a touch of of of comedic timing to and catherine was brilliant any other parts that you also were were in terms of the offering a part to someone straight away sandy martyn who played san morocco's mom in the film she had a small part in seven psychopaths didn't make it but she was brilliant in that so i called the back for this and i felt like an idiot for even have an addition because at the end of like one line reading she she she nailed it and and was able to offer it to sandy there i think she's amazing did you tell her in the room yeah so there we have another example of a talk about rehearsal process particularly because that something you know well yep what about herschel process for all of you move or majors in seeing what you do in reversal process by talking about you were i i like trying to do as much as possible on this we probably didn't get quite as much because francis was quite determined that she wouldn't gross with any of the cops in the film so she wouldn't even though she loves woody insane.

catherine san morocco francis woody
"morocco" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"morocco" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"People in this country have it and specifically black people than in most countries but i mean better is not what is in the united states diversify aired too like i mean minorities are supposed to just settle for better what right that's right it's bet you've had it you've they want equality no but i'm saying that's that's part of this conversation low like that it's like well you've got it really guard and then you start you start going through like if if we were to go if we were to use that logic right i believe there are thirteen or fourteen countries where domestic abuse is not a crime of any time where america so we're doing it better right we're doing it better than other places but we doing it right no we're not doing domestic abuse right we should and just be sowing for better hope were doing better than i am i i think i've got that right i think there are double digit countries where domestic abuse is not any kind of crime none any kind of crime you can hit your wife so i brought up morocco anna this show ozarks that you were raving about a few months ago i decided on my trip to morocco i was going to watch that show so speaking of different countries having a different standards pornography is illegal and morocco there are a lot of graphic sex things and ozarks so i'm sitting in a moroccan airport trying to watch a ozarks an all types of nudity people go in eight ice police walking behind me immediate and terrify but also thinking like but i can watch this is not wrong so almost ended up in a moroccan jail on and i don't remember allies are having a lot of did ozark have a lot of only remember this is initially early on in the season marker ozark is good you should watch it did you like it you finish the season i was in joining except for just been nervous though i am that i was going to get arrested in and if you want to get scared guys you read read about what the penalties are in some countries for having marijuana on.

united states morocco marijuana america ozark