21 Burst results for "mongo db"

"mongo db" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

08:38 min | 7 months ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"You built or work still exactly exactly. Is this interaction by. Interaction layer part of the open source. Stuff that you have out there absolutely. Everything is open source. Yeah yeah we'll probably see a blog post coming fairly so you don't how bill because i think it is like a really nice simple appreciating this kind of thing and i'm pushing a huge huge westbound. That's kind of a big reason why we're using it and so i'd love to see people taking this approach to building is like cross platform cross language. Rust calls the awesome grammy throwback to you with a business question. Sure yeah so we've been talking about how cool it is open source and yet we start off the conversation saying you guys started the business two years ago. I'm really fascinated in admire companies that are able to make legitimate meaningful open source things and then use some interesting extra thing that you get more if if you support them or if you buy some product or service from them and it sounds like that that is the kind of thing you all are building as well right because the the library in the debugger in the ripple and all that stuff is open source get help people can forecast today and and that's that right absolutely okay. So what's the story. What is your specific. Plan here yeah so in the near term we're focused on open source and the reason for that is we believe that the right way to build this company in the right way to build this community is to put enough weight behind the enough weight behind the body of people who are actually writing code in polar and giving them everything that they need to be successful and so that's like the focus for us for the next year or two years plus when we think about obviously we're company and we have every intention of being around for the long term and so the way that we need to do that is to create a sustainable business so the way that we think about doing that is by offering a path for teams that want to run insecure also in production and giving them things that make that really viable and easy. So give you some examples. You know right now. Osos packaged as the library. Imagine a scenario where you wanna run a bunch of oso libraries in a micro services context and we had folks already asked us for this today. So now you've got a bunch of libraries with different policies running across a bunch of different services. And you a way to ensure that. Those always have the most up-to-date policy the most up-to-date version of the library. And you're doing that and they're properly version and so on and so forth so i know so service that would handle something like that is one way you could imagine monetize ing right because if you're one of these complicated share point sort of organizations their stuff everywhere everywhere and it's so easy for like one apt to get its policy out of sync with the other. And how do you know you've got them all. Just sounds like a nightmare. Yeah or security teams. Equally have assessed Also being a library on the critical path of every request puts it in a unique position to be auditing requests. Which is something that you talked about back at the beginning and this is something that a lot of security teams surprisingly really struggle with. It's not an easy problem to solve. And but it's something that this particular piece of software is in a unique position to do and so you can easily imagine. Also providing auditing capabilities security teams in the future showing them who was authorized to do what at what point and because we're making authorization decision ourselves we can actually tell them why they were authorized because they were in this role because they sit in this department and they report up to this person stuff like that. Yeah that's super interesting. Because you're right you are already in the middle of all those exchanges so it's easy for you to add that visibility. Yeah so i mean for us. As i said like the philosophies relatively clear we want to give developers the tools that they need to be successful with though so period and that technology will always be open source the way that we think about the technology that will use to sustain the commercial side of the business will be the sort of organizational pieces that larger businesses rely on in order to be secure compliant run large operational teams and applications in production. Yeah well i think that's a it. Sounds like a pretty solid idea. You've got this legitimate open source thing that's meaningful and useful and grow that and get the companies that got the deep pockets who are often unlikely or unwilling or incapable of contributing back to open source. Give them a thing that they'll pay for that will indirectly basically give back open source absolutely as an example. Before this i worked at an open source company called mongo db and over for for many many years and over that period of time we invested several hundred million dollars worth of rnd into the database product. Which is directly straight from the companies that were providing revenue to the business through the paid products. So it's very clear tie between you know the company's paying money to the company building the product itself. Yeah i was going to ask you about mongo. Db as well as like what inspiration there. Because i think one of the things that were start at least me and the folks who i've spoken to are starting to realize is that it doesn't matter how much money a company has. They won't donate the idea of a donation is like i don't know where that goes into the accounting spreadsheet it doesn't make sense I can't tell my shareholders that we donate a million dollars to django. Because i don't know it just doesn't make they can't put that into their structure right but we pay for service level agreements. We pay for additional services. We pay for better support like that fits into their accounting software. And i think that's the story that's going to work and so if you can offer them something more they're very likely to pay for it to get that like you are. Yeah absolutely and i think for us again like whenever there's books upon books on books written about this topic not in the context of open source software but like in the context of like philosophy over lunch in the sixteenth seventeenth eighteenth century. You know people writing about tragic the comments. This is not a new topic like in the world but in the context of like open source our philosophy is. We need to give something. That's good enough for someone to be able to use on their own where they wouldn't feel like they're going to be held hostage if they're not gonna pay money. That's just not a sensible thing for anyone to do. We try to put ourselves in the shoes of our users. We would never adopt a product where we felt. We'd be at risk of being held hostage but but instead give them an opportunity but hey here's something that you can that you can take advantage of that you can get value from and that if you find yourself in this other scenario where you think you want to want to get something like auditing you wanna get additional visibility. You want this way to run something at scale than we're going to be there for you. We're going to provide a commercial product for you in that situation as fantastic. And i'm a huge fan among a db i told you this earlier before we record but all of our stuff runs a mongo and its has for by six years. It's been beautiful. I actually just looked at the stack. Overflow developer survey from twenty twenty and under the most won a database. Mugabe is five percent above post grass than it's like those are the two that offering so pretty neat. What lessons did you take your time at mongo. Db that maybe you wouldn't have otherwise brought to this venture by far the number. One thing that i learned there is focused on the developer. And i mean if you look at the mission and vision of our company we put security in the hands of the makers that is all we care about. We have a singular focus on developers if you woke up anyone on the team and shook them at night. And you ask them. Who is the number one focus of this company. I guarantee you that anyone would say developers and that has been clear from the beginning and will continue to be clear for us and that was definitely the main thing i took away from my time at. Db yes super cool. All right awesome. Well i think we're about out of time but what any project and wish you guys. Good luck with a. Let me ask you the final two questions. Oh before you get out of here graham. Sorry i if you're going to write some code but editor do use these days said you do some not a ton but if you are what are using it was definitely. Vs code all right right on as popular. I think that's pretty. Because of my is forced it on crime yes by stanford i went through. His computer uninstalled wasn't as well. You gotta edit something here you go tech senate has gone. Sorry.

Osos mongo db grammy Rust Mugabe graham stanford senate
Marketing in times of crisis with Meagen Eisenberg

The SaaS Revolution Show

05:26 min | 8 months ago

Marketing in times of crisis with Meagen Eisenberg

"Welcome to the revolution show. Megan Eisenberg's actor factions welcome Meghan. Thank you. Thank you for having me rates. Have you looked costs for the for the first time we had you speak at a couple of suspects. Now I think being Dublin twice once with Mongo DB A. Trip back trip actions I miss. It may say it would be well, obviously would be next month right ends. Yeah I mean. Everybody's not just not just saying that a lot of the conversations having the moment because I think it's impending at, it would be next month. A, lot of people saying all It's one of the top two events that went missing this year and. We're definitely failing fading that. Make do without the online. Brings. US, up, a line in different. but. Certainly we're trying to bring a lot of that fatty online but us, you call events in that is against the pumps up. Missed the Guinness. That's it. That's a great on on the PODCAST. For those that don't know you, can you tell us a little bit about yourself? WHO's mega noise? Sure. I am CMO trip actions. I've been here almost two years prior to that I was at Mongo DB as their CMO for four years took them public in October, two, thousand seventeen, and just prior to that I was at Docu sign. That you signature company. That's both doing quite well in the markets right now for three and a half years running demand Gen. Your base in the US area with just chatting about Louis. Flyers. S. airy sad to see and the air in the skies have been orange. So yeah, we're hopeful that the firefighters get that out sooner than later. In. The Bay area. So I was born in, Texas? So and lived in Minnesota in Illinois for a brief amount of time. But most my life I've been in California live in Belgium for year as a nanny. For Two kids are I guess and then I lived in Japan in Tokyo for a year during college raising. Up. We. Want a little bit of about. The I guess the Addington, two factions and leading Moxie. During What is being much challenging year. We. Can Certainly, the the travel industry as as many as the events industry You know we we've had a very. Difficult moment. Don't try to find a way You Know Karma through this and. Understand how are you guys done it and the and and I guess. I mean. Tennis. Just a little bit about through factions. What it does a little bit. Why did you join trip actions when you see among a DVD? And you you know you to join trip absolutely better. Yeah. So trip actions is a full travel management system from bookings expense. So you book your travel than we have travel agents that support you while you're on the road, and then we have a product called trump actions, liquid that corporate card for expenses and and managing anything on the road or even at home you know some of our companies are using it to expense office supplies, stuff like that and software I joined. Last year weather reside is one it's a massive market I think One thing when you're looking at companies to join is to look at their size of the market it's a one point, five, trillion dollars just business travel online as one point, five trillion even if we cut that in half with Cova, let's say it only comes back to half the levels in the next year. That's still an eight hundred, billion dollar market, and there's a lot of legacy players in it that haven't really innovated in a long time. They were all born before the iphone they weren't there in legacy technology and infrastructure outdated models. They're dispirit systems They're not designed around the traveler, the user, and they don't usually have very people don't love those solutions typically. So I love going to a player that's very disruptive. That's modern that was born after the IPHONE and designed around on new technology is very similar to to be born after the iphone they went after a very large forty, five, billion dollar database market that was growing to sixty billion and they're taking on a large incumbent which was. Oracle and they were bringing a whole different way of doing it and tractions doing that it's a very, it's one platform. It's just a very different model than what's out there, and so I was excited to join the company and we were growing quite fast. We added a thousand employees last year until we had to hit the brakes with covid and that definitely was a punch in the gut I, think for the entire industry and we've had to make a lot of pivots and moves in order to adjust for this environment. But we know ultimately travel will come back. Businesses are reliant on meeting in person and accelerating deals and so I'm here to help us get through this external. Event with the pandemic and build the right product and support our customers and what they need now, and then

United States Meghan Dublin Megan Eisenberg Oracle Tennis Texas Japan California Moxie Minnesota Louis Tokyo Belgium Cova Illinois
Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

Full Stack Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

"I guess maybe the best place to start would be. How do you describe what Dynamo DB even as if someone was just GonNa ask you like? What is this thing for? What do you use it for? Yep share so it's a no sequel database like you were saying and and that's not super descriptive because it basically just says what it isn't right. It's not a relational database. That a sequel. But you saw a lot of these sort of no sequel databases popping up in the last ten or fifteen years and one common thing about all these relational databases is They were they were built for larger scale you know as as he's sort of. Internet enabled platforms are happening where you have thousands or millions of of users around the world Like the single instance relational database just wasn't keeping up As well so polices started building these no sequel databases and I think one thing in common with most of these. No single databases is that they they charge your data across multiple instances so rather than having like this one monolithic database. You know you're you're my sequel instance. Your postcards instance. You'll have you know maybe five different shards of Mongo DB or with something like Dynamo DB there starting that behind the scenes sort of transparently to you Across a lot of large variety of machines The big thing that you need to do there with a no sequel database. Then is that data's going to be sharded and you need to make sure you sort of design your data correctly so that you're only hitting one Charlotte and doing efficient query rather than queering across like four or five different shards and having network calls. So that's that's a super high level but Yeah okay that makes sense so the the my sort of exposure to Dynamo. Db guests has been almost like guys have rightous alternative in a lot of situations. So I see a lot of times. People use read us for like a cash just like a key value store and I see people using Dynamo. Db FOR THAT A lot. If you're hosting your stuff on Amazon because a lot of the tools designed to work with us in that way can also interact with Dynamo. Db In that way But it sounds like a lot of people are also using Dynamo. Db is like their primary data store as Australia. Replacement for a relational database. Is that true in your experience. Yeah absolutely I think you know. A lot of people think it's only used for key value store like type Type Actions Media Session store and you can use it for that. But you can. Use It for highly relational models. You can handle one to many relationships. Many Dominion relationship all that in Dynamo. Db I show how to do that. And and there's a bunch of people doing that at a pretty large scale If if you're talking about like Amazon. Aws any of the Amazon retail. Any of the AWS stuff they. If it's a tier one service at one of those places which means if it's down it's losing money they're required to use. Dynamo. Db and they have relational models there. They have shopping carts with items in them and they belong to customers or or they'd aws stuff. That's all relational as well. So you can definitely handle these. These complex relational models not just a key value stores. Yeah cool that's really interesting so I think it'd be cool. It'd be sort of get into I. Guess like just understanding some of the core concepts and stuff around this technology. What some of the terminology is how some of it may be maps. Back to the relational database world for people who come from that. Same background as me. I'm familiar with the old tables and columns and rows model. You know what I mean. So what are some of like? What are the sort of terms and concepts that you have to understand but Dynamo DB to even get started with in the first place? How do you build like the right mental model for what it's doing? Yep sure so I'd say the four or five basic terms you want to start with and I'll just compare them to to relational houses. Well first of all. There's the notion of table which is going to be similar to a table in a relational database With some differences that get into on such as holds all your all your data in it and then each record in a table is called an item sets a row in a relational database or a document in Dynamo DB but just like a collection of data each when you create your table. What you're GonNa do is declare a primary key for your table and each item that you put into that table must have that primary key and it needs to be uniquely identified by that primary key so so there is that like is that is that auto generated by the database for you like it would be like sequel or you always have to provide it from the client yet. You need to provide it by the client. And it's usually going to be something meaningful as well. Like win a relational database. You know you might just have an auto incremental primary key like you're saying but this is GonNa be actually something meaningful life maybe username or In order ID or or something like that but you can actually use to identify that particular item because that primary keys actually gonNA drive your access patterns as well. You're going to be queering directly on that primary key. Okay interesting so I think. Like in the relational database world the advice that. I've often heard it's been like the opposite right like don't use your email column as your primary key in your users table because it's it's going to be inefficient or whatever in different ways compared to just using an auto implementing. Id but in in this case if as long as there's some existing unique identifier for the record the best practice leverage that don't add like some additional unique identifier. Yep generally and sometimes you might want to use something like a you. Id or or similar like if something like an order. Id you know you don't really have Anything meaningful about the order. You can generate a unique unique. Id and use that. But then you'll probably also refer to that that d like in your url path or whatever to help find that they'll be accessible to the client. If you needed to go do that look up. You know if someone goes to slash orders slash whatever that idea is then. Then you're back in knows. Hey this is order yet. I need to go fetch from the back end.

Dynamo Amazon Australia AWS Charlotte
MongoDB with Emily Giurleo

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

MongoDB with Emily Giurleo

"Emily. What is your specific experience with Ruby on rails so I've used ruby on rails at a few jobs I had an internship while I was in college where I did a bit of rails. I don't think I really understood what was going on So I'm not sure how much that counts But then when I started working at Code Academy I was primarily doing back in development and primarily using rails or sort of rails adjacent services And so when I had the opportunity to go work at Mongo. Db On the ruby driver and rails. Odiham object document member It was kind of it was very. Meta because those are the tools I was using at Code Academy to implement the platform for our learners and so I thought it would be a great kind of Change an abstraction level to work on the tools that I had been using as a developer. I love seeing that pattern in your career. That basically you use these tools you love them and you look for ways getting more. It's it's such a neat way that you've gone about your career. Yeah and it's really fun to get Tickets from users now who are using the ruby driver or Mongoloid and to know exactly where they're coming from because I I was the developer using these tools encountering these problems and having to figure out how to fix them. So it's a it's a really nice way to cement everything that I learned. I could catch me so I'm personally really interested in what it's like working at Mongo. Db What does a typical day in the life? Rio sure so I think the first thing you have to understand is what I work on and those are the drivers now. A driver is a library that allows you to connect your project to the Mongo. Db Database and my team implements those libraries in many different languages. So I personally work on the ruby and rails Drivers but my teammates work on swift rust. See et Cetera So my day to day is primarily coating working on the driver. But it's also really cool job because I have the chance to interact with people from the community by checking stack overflow answering questions or getting user submitted tickets and then seeing if they've found a bug or if they just need some help figuring out how to use a certain feature and so. It's a really awesome combination of coding and community Community Development. That I think really suits me is all of your work and public facing yes. All the drivers are completely open-source. That's amazing I mean that's a dream job for a lot of people to be able to work in open source full-time so how closely do you watch the Ruby and the rails repositories in order to see? What changes are making? So you know what kind of changes you have to anticipate doing whenever they released new versions very very closely and since I started up Mongo DB about eight months ago I haven't really had much of a chance to experience this. So that's something I'm actually really excited for But one example is as they're rolling out. Ruby version three. They've changed some of the tax around Keyword arguments for example. And because we test the driver on a whole range of Ruby versions. We immediately catch that that stuff because it breaks things in the driver or in the libraries that we use and so we really have to be up to date on the latest changes in Ruby and even in rails because we want to update the object document member to reflect the most recent patterns from the frameworks. That are developers are using.

Developer Code Academy Community Community Developmen Emily. RIO
Pareto Product Programming with Philip Poots

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Pareto Product Programming with Philip Poots

"Has ruby on rails been the focus of the majority of your web developer career yet pretty much so since since two thousand seventeen I go to a job in two thousand nineteen so actually in the North. I was in the In Scotland I and then I moved to the northeast of England and it was actually pretty difficult at that point to find a job in rails in the UK. He either have to go down to London which I wasn't very keen on am or what I should have done is like applied to somewhere in America like twitter or get up before they were huge right so so I started dot net job. And I'd never done anything apart from rails so during the dot net job actually gave me that experience of high horrible and Terrible. It is to program without rails especially at that point right because we're talking. I duNNO WINDOWS ARE. I don't know what don't that hot at the time they didn't even have a speed on. Nbc was literally Web view as it was it was just a mess and the things I was building I was like. I could do this in a couple of weeks with rails. Why am I spending like three months so I quickly got out of that fund? The job with a company actually started very early with the pre one version of rails but I think the version at that point was one point two point three and until I worked in that for a couple of years then. I moved to sage in accounting company. That's where we did like the real to reel. Three upgrades moved to give a like a funding platform for charitable enterprises and that was mainly rails. The only thing there was we moved from like postscript to doing Mongo DB and then moved very quickly back again and then moved to funding gets where it was back in amber jazz from Dent. And I'm where I am not club. Collectors also Manley rails. Yes Oh so pretty much ten years of reels with little ventures here and there to other things I think that's a really fascinating background and I love the fact that you have prior experience with different language and a different framework. You can truly appreciate all that rails can give you. I'm at the point where I think I'm going to have to start producing patches for developers who've done the rails two to three upgrade the rails three to four upgrade. Just because I feel like it's a badge of honor at this point and luckily we're very spoiled now. As Ruben developers were. These upgrades aren't nearly as tough as they used to be. Absolutely so I got to ask you a little bit about this in person when I met you a pair of Srb but I'd love to hear all about club collect and what your role of a VP of engineering means to you. Yes sure so. M many ways the rule of VPN engineering is at club. Collect is is very much a dream job for me so I actually started a club collectors. As a developer in in in the river tame 'em Very grateful to two atom pulse. Eric co-founders so eric was the CTO on 'em he decided to take a step back from operations he loves being involved in companies at the early stages am and he asked me to to to basically step into his position 'em so he's still acting CTO when he's still like assigning board but then I'm like handling day today operations within the engineering and the reason I like. It is the reason I'm always attracted to startups is to be in an environment where you're wearing a lot of different hats and you're in a lot of different things with the goal of seat to have a big impact is possible this versus you know. My experiences in smaller companies are sorry in larger companies. We have a smaller role in a smaller impact. And we really frustrates me. When you get you know m specs through from someone two or three people removed from you with things in them where you think you know if we just change this little bit and not little bit we could have this done in a couple of days but the way it's written it's GonNa take two weeks and then to suggest it and to get the answer back. No this is the way we're GonNa do it at that kind of whist an eliminating. That waste is why I really like working in the startup environment. And so so the you know the day today is is very very an 'em anything from talking to the rest of the management team of the leadership team. You know sales customer operations at customer success am The CFO you know by long term strategies by short-term things that we're going to be Dang 'em to like the nitty gritty of domain name. 'em STUFF FIGURING. I like D mark and all the security stuff that comes along with the role but but really the thing that I love the most about being. Vp of engineering is. Is the

Developer Vp Of Engineering CTO America London Scotland Twitter NBC England Web Developer UK Dent CFO Ruben Eric
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Like if I want an https fully encrypted traffic both ways between myself and the web flow site that I'm accessing you need to have global distribution of the SSL certain for structure and in order to propagate that across. That's the world you have to have global replication of the certificate data infrastructure and. So you have a lambda. That's listening every time was every time the certificate is every single time when Dynamo. DB table gets added to modified or deleted. There's a lamb that job up that listens on life cycle events that Dynamo DB table to essentially perform that particular action across other regions that SSL terminate in those Megyn Dynamo DB tables so it's essentially a primary secondary type of you know setup but he ws has a good amount of hooks that make possible right you're all on aws pretty much muse fastly for some stuff but all of our compute news on aws and then astray for storage so and you are not doing anything with containers right. You're just VM's no we. We are one hundred eight percent on Kube using you. Chaos were using tariff arm so we have infrastructure as code for like ninety percent over infrastructure. I really credit the team for pushing for that had several really influential engineers on the team that that really pushed for that like Chris Smelly. He's no longer with us. But also Nathan on the team like these were engineers that saw the value early on for automating eating a lot of the infrastructure and and then building it like we actually just started with chef. Chef was great but at certain points of no either the learning curve and also just kind of how weird chef is sometimes in a knife in. I remember all these other tools and from the early days days like it it was. It did the job but you know it was pretty clear that the future was going to move container so not not just our web APP. It's not just our web hosting but also our Oliver. CI is on top of coup as well in their setup on Zano pod auto scale errors so that you know we essentially only run one machine when it's the middle of the night so we can scale really quickly our stock from one all the way up to I think two hundred and fifty nodes to to support our C. I.. Needs what do you need tear for a tear forms for a lot of like the configuration and topology of our infrastructure. So we have you know things like S. three buckets that we describe Gripen tariff form we have the connections that we describe and tear form a we have a lot of difference compute resources so essentially essentially like when I say topology. It's like you can literally understand the entire web flow infrastructure just by reading the tariff our phone fake files so you understand how requests flows more or less you can understand. How are Cuban eighties settings are you? I can understand the different firewall rules out. We have in all of that is just makes our lives super simple. So let's say for example. We wanted to set up a brand new. SSL Termination region in New Zealand or Brazil. We essentially take the convicts eggs for. Let's say E. U. S. or U. S. West. And then we just change some variables to support Oshii Hannah and boom like you run tariff form apply and you have a running. SSL Termination region in Oshana which is not something that devops could do very easily before Tara for the ATS. Pure equivalent is cloud formation is is that right I think so. Yeah there's also a beanstalk and they'll do you have any idea what the qualitative difference. Our formation I believe is Jason Maybe they have have a yellow version but in typical like aws fashion. I don't know if you've tried to like modify an Arn like a like a aws resource name like those things are super obtuse. So like there's there's some things about the aws stock that are kind of weird and not very friendly that maybe just turned us off so and then also we didn't want to be Super Lockton tatum. US as well like so are terrified. configure can easily go to G. CPA If we need to realize you don't feel like that ship sailed terms of being locked into aws Lamm does Dynamo DB backend infrastructure. That stuff doesn't sound that they're pretty swap -able if you think about I mean cloud functions. I mean there's a war going on in the arms race Of Cloud is still alive and well so I think it's a good thing if you're a engineer in this day and age given that you have you know these massive companies that are competing for your business. It's GonNa come down to what you're familiar with and then also ease of use honestly. I actually think ease of use in the devops and developer communities not something that companies really think about when they're approaching developer focus his products. I think a lot of cloud products or products out there. Think that because you're like their user base technical engineers that they they won't necessarily value ease of use and ease of use common Sony. Different ways right. It could be like a really nicely. BUTTONED-UP CLI package wjr. You could be docs. It could be just like simple things like what you name your variables or like how you yeah like whether you choose Yemo versus Jason so like some things like that. I think you know are quite subjective but I also understand it's really hard right because aws has is to pander to enterprise accounts with a specific profile engineer. Probably not the engineers that are listening on this like podcast Asta might be or scrappy or modern. There's through honestly engineers out there that are still writing a lot of jt. Ee Applications and like Jarvis still super popular you know C.. Sharp Dot net stacked is super super popular. So like you know. It's a really hard thing to do right. If if you're a cloud provider to make sure that you know your products can satisfy all engineers and all all developers. Yeah when I think about ease of use of aws versus Google like the aws's views flavor is everything. Is there everything you will ever want is in the gigantic buffet of aws services may not be great. But we've got chicken wings. We've got pizza. We've got cheesecake we've got everything is a Mungo and aws version of Mongo like when aws launched their version of Mongo DB document DB. Yeah Yeah Yeah like I thought Mongo. DB WAS GONNA die like as a company because like Oh yeah like all like Mongo like atlas cloud like why would people use battling cloud versus documentary vs. It's just like all these things. But he argues over we're moving to atlas using hosted Mongo provider called 'EM lab. Oh Oh yeah. Love him live. Oh yeah huge user great will fire acquired by Mongo wills. Great Angelo's great over there. They've been it's great product so dialed in the U.. I look so like it. Looks like it's from the nineteen eighties. Nobody cares. It's because the product quality so so good and people with a Roku so good right right and also underestimating support as well. 'cause I remember when we're going through crazy scaling issues at at vondle and we just started emailing them in. I remember Angela was like all right. Well I highly discouraged you to think about charting before you do this. Have you checked your connection pool sizes. I think you guys just need to up your compute compute instance and we just followed her essentially they helped us scale and that's why I chose them again when we're building on top building I think lead flow so great. Great people over there. I hope now that they've been acquired that able to transfer some of that like. Hey we're not not like a vendor where your partner mentality over to to outlive us with Alice. In full disclosure sponsor. So it's a little bit pitchy pitches but a hit speaking objectively if I was a company that actually had the skill that needed like a Mongo DB provider other than M lab that idea the whole atlas stitch stack sounds pretty useful. It sounds like what you would want out of a Mongo. DB PROVIDER ELSA sounds non trivial to build so like document DB being the nail in the in the Mongo DB coffins like not so fast five people at aws. Ed probably five hundred. But I don't know I have a tremendous amount of respect for Elliot over at Mongo. He's taken taking a very similar approach to the way I suppose I've built my products at companies in the sense that he just focused on what the users really really wanted. For example example like when Mongo one point zero or one point six one point eight came out tons of issues right but you Kamanga as a concept no sequel provider it. Just did one thing really really. Well which is the developer experience and then also piggybacking king on the rise of no and like how seamless it was to have like a back in node framework worked so so easily with your database provider. Her that's what I mean by ease of use developer experience. That's that's when we're going to when I look into. I don't know my really dirty crystal ball twenty twenty money like I really hope. There's companies out there that are really thinking long and hard about the developer experience as we are about the visual developer experience in their Thinking through like okay like this is the way things work today but this is how could work tomorrow. So there's like things out there like dark laying saying I don't know if you've probably yeah so like you know there's really exciting things out there. I think it's going to be tough. Because if I was dark laying there on such extreme stream side of the spectrum where. They're trying to do everything I think. There's going to be a level of Org Oregon rejection that they might run into where like from adoption standpoint. Join site like you're trying to convince a developer to change everything and that's I can be really hard right so I really admire the mission that they're on. I think Paul is incredible technical mind. I think you'll figure it out but I'm rooting for them. But I just think from like a go to market or go to customer standpoint. I don't know there's there's some more thought there being on call is hard hard but having the right tools for the job can make it easier when you wake up in the middle of the night to troubleshoot the database. You should be able to have the database monitoring information right in front of you when you're out to dinner and your phone buzzes. Because your entire application is down you should be able to easily find out who pushed code. Owed most recently so that you can contact them and find out how to troubleshoot the issue. Victor ops is a collaborative incident response tool victor Brings Your Monitoring Data and your collaboration tools into one place.

aws engineer developer Mongo DB Mongo wills Chris Smelly Dynamo Jason Maybe Kube US Oshii Hannah Angelo Oliver Nathan Oregon Oshana U. S. West Victor ops Sony Jarvis
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"On a monthly basis right whereas we only have twenty million programmers if we bill had the limitation of like you had to do the kinds of things that spreadsheets enable you to do to have a programmer like we wouldn't have entire companies created we wouldn't have like people I just had a plumber come over to my house and he had like this whole like excel model for doing estimates it was it was he could like he could click something zero point five percent of the world is programmer you think in objects with Mongo DB so does your database Mongo DB is the most popular document based database built for modern application developers and the cloud era millions of developers use Mongo DB to power the world's most innovative products and services from crypto currency eighty two online gaming iot and more.

programmer five percent
"mongo db" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Doc today at mongo DB symbol MVP open source database software is the bomb this dot. Company. How about Steve New Jersey, Steve? I know you're no longer endorsing oil stocks. However you recommend it recommended MPC by Kenya. We Hello that style. One of the reasons why was so frame to be able to use point four percents, the best friend, the industry, and nobody cares. Nobody cares at all. And that's what happened to the oil stocks end that. The lightning round is sponsored by TD Ameritrade. For years. We've heard about the skills gap. They don't have enough workers with the right skills to get the kinds of jobs that are being created, but you rarely hear about solutions to the skills gap. What's called the new collar economy swishes, like p tech pathways in technology early college high schools. These are public schools for high school and the first two years of college. We can get into social science technology, engineering and math. Get this at no cost earlier today. We checked out the original P tech school in Brooklyn, which is a cloud ration- between IBM, New York City. Oh, yes. And New York state. So take a look. My name is leeann Charles, I'm a senior at pathways things like nausea early college high school. I'm director of girls love stand this world really needs diversity. So, like, why not? Bring those women are cog. Full women can shake up the world's. You see people like Michelle Obama Oprah Winfrey billionaires like why not have more women at the front is doing changing the world..

Steve New Jersey TD Ameritrade leeann Charles college high school New York Michelle Obama MVP Steve New York City P tech school Kenya MPC nausea Brooklyn IBM director two years
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Whether you work at a startup or a fortune one hundred company chances are that some team or someone within your company is using mongo DB for work and personal projects now with mongo DB stitch, you can build secure and extend your mongo DB applications easily and reliably mongo DB stitch is a service platform for mongo DB. It allows you to build rich interactions with your database use stitch triggers to react to database changes and authentication events in real time automatically sync data between documents held in mongo DB mobile or in the database back end use stitch functions to run functions in the cloud to try it out yourself today experiment with ten dollars in free credit towards manga DB's. Cloud products. Mongo DB atlas the hosted mongo DB database service and stitch you can get these ten dollars in free credits by going to mongo DB dot com slash SE daily. Try out the mongo DB platform by going to mongo DB dot com slash s daily get ten dollars in free credit. It's the perfect amount to get going with that side project that you've been meaning to build you can try out service with mongo DB services is an emergent pattern. It's something that you want to get acquainted with if you're a developer and getting that ten dollars free credit to have a service platform right next to your mongo database is really a great place to start so good a Mungo db dot com slash SE. Daily claim that credit and thanks to mongo DB for being a sponsor of software..

mongo DB services developer ten dollars
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Whether you work at a startup or a fortune one hundred company chances are that some team or someone within your company is using mongo DB for work and personal projects now with mongo DB stitch, you can build secure and extend your mongo DB applications easily and reliably mongo DB stitch is a service platform for mongo DB. It allows you to build rich interactions with your database use stitch triggers to react to database changes and authentication events in real time automatically sync data between documents held in mongo DB mobile or in the database back end use stitch functions to run functions in the cloud to try it out yourself today experiment with ten dollars in free credit towards manga DB's. Vowed products mongo DB atlas the hosted mongo DB database service and stitch you can get these ten dollars in free credits by going to mongo DB dot com slash SE daily. Try out the manga DB platform by going to mongo DB dot com slash s daily get ten dollars in free credit. It's the perfect amount to get going with that side project that you've been meaning to build you can try out server 'less with mongo DB services is an emergent pattern. It's something that you want to get acquainted with if you're a developer and getting that ten dollars and free credit to have a service platform right next to your mongo database is really a great place to start so good among db dot com slash sl. Daily claim that credit and thanks to mongo DB for being a sponsor of software..

mongo DB services developer ten dollars
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Copy clones that each of our noticed can make and then when there's no work to be done. We can shut down the machine and give it up without using all the data because the data is still in the cloud, which means either in as your or an ashtray storage. So this is what I mean by saying cloud native architectural if you compare it with other database systems, like take for example, if you compare mongo DB or elastic search or even a new so they're the strategy is more like replication. So if you're a piece of later replicated three ways so that you can handle harder failures. So. So for Oxtobwy cloud and attract said, we don't do application for far giving you durability of data. We do replication only if there is a requirement serve your queries for performance reasons. But if there is not much query extorted and ask three and there's no need for us to make three way replication, so we are anywhere. So think about the cost effectiveness of the system, right? If you compare it hoop or elastic search or mongo DB, there's three replicas of life data, whereas in rockstar, be cloud and rock said, we only wonder happily guy if nobody's using that data less. So we are already like two or three times more cost effective for the thing workload. This is what we internally refer to as cloud native architecture for data processing engines. Okay. I'd like to get into rock set in the remaining time the company that you guys are building. Can you give me your perspective on the company? How got started because I know you were both at Facebook and you're working on rock St.. And then something happened things happened you got traction with this project project, and you had ideas for products. And then next thing, you know, you're you're running a company can you describe what happened in between the the point at which you started rocks. Tv and what made you want to start a company around it. Yeah. That's a good question. So I have been working on the rocks Davey project for a white at Facebook before I left, and what I saw was that the be project was successful because the project tried to leverage a new piece of hardware called a flash devices. So there are very few other data storage engines, which was leveraging the power of the SSD's to give better performance for storage engines, but then like maybe in the last two or three years, I see this trend where a lot of data processing software is moving to the cloud. And in my mind, the cloud is a different hardware design where if you Bill. Software. Only runs only on the cloud. You are probably five to ten x better and give better features to an application because you're built only for the cloud. So my focus at that time was saying that how can we build a software infrastructure for data processing on the cloud. That is very destructive to assisting pieces of software because it's not not a port of assisting softer, the cloud. It's softer build natively for the cloud..

Oxtobwy cloud rock Facebook three years
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Engineering daily. I love mongo DB. I use it in most of my projects, it's just the database. I wanna use thanks to mongo DB. should the CIO's role. Be more of a curator of software. That is bottoms up at a company that is naturally making its way through a company rather than a selector of top down pieces of software. So you think it's almost I almost have a bar Bellevue of this on one side of the barbell to CIO provides the environment. Where teams can choose the technology for them and implement, and it's more of a meta role. So it's not a technology selection role. Not even really technology role is kind of a medal for infrastructure for the use in deployment of technology within the regulations and policies of the organization, which I always find CEO's to be much more about regulations and policies and information much much less about the actual kind of nuts and bolts, the other end of the barbell is organizations. Get stuck in local Optima, right? I mean, one of the classic examples of this. This is what I used to deal with all the time is there was a certain way of doing that. Working for example. And all the practitioners. Listen like, they would have they were. That's all they did was they learned a certain CLI in a certain way of doing networking. They've got credentials based on that, Mike, and it was very difficult for them to see how you can do something else because they're stuck in that local Optima, they know all reason by something else wouldn't work. So for really dramatic drastic change. I think you need someone like a CIO to that. So I think for the most part you set the infrastructure for again, it kind of bottoms up and then on the other side, I think that if you need to do something so dramatic that requires basically top down pressure. The CIO comes in. I think anything in between tends to have some sort of dissonance between the CIO role in the actual people that know what they're doing. There are some companies that are selling larger solutions with larger contracts into an enterprise something like a red hat or Mazo sphere in. There are companies that are selling more point solutions like a Kong or a Hashi core selling..

CIO Optima Bellevue CEO Mike
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Use. Whether you work at a startup or a fortune one hundred company chances are that some team or someone within your company is using mongo DB for work and personal projects now with mongo DB stitch, you can build secure and extend your mongo DB applications easily and reliably mongo DB stitch is a service platform for mongo DB. It allows you to build rich interactions with your database use stitch triggers to react to database changes and authentication events in real time automatically sync data between documents held in mongo DB mobile or in the database back end use stitch functions to run functions in the cloud to try it out yourself today experiment with ten dollars in free credit towards manga debate. Cloud products. Mongo DB atlas the hosted mongo DB database service and stitch you can get these ten dollars in free credits by going to mongo DB dot com slash SE daily. Try out the mongo DB platform by going to mongo DB dot com slash s daily get ten dollars in free credit. It's the perfect amount to get going with that side project that you've been meaning to build you can try out service with mongo DB services is emergent pattern. It's something that you wanna get acquainted with if you're a developer and getting that ten dollars and free credit to have a service platform right next to your mongo database is really a great place to start so good a mongo DB dot com slash SE. Daily claim that credit and thanks to mongo DB for being a sponsor of software..

mongo DB services developer ten dollars
"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To use. Whether you work at a startup or a fortune one hundred company chances are that some team or someone within your company is using mongo DB for work and personal projects now with mongo DB stitch, you can build secure and extend your mongo DB applications easily and reliably mongo DB stitch is a service platform for mongo DB. It allows you to build rich interactions with your database use stitch triggers to react to database changes and authentication events in real time automatically sync data between documents held in mongo DB mobile or in the database back end use stitch functions to run functions in the cloud to try it out yourself today experiment with ten dollars in free credit towards manga DB's cloud products. Mongo DB atlas the hosted mongo DB database service and stitch you can get these ten dollars in free credits by going to mongo DB dot com slash SE daily. Try out the mongo DB platform by going to mongo DB dot com slash E daily. Get ten dollars in free credit. It's the perfect amount to get going with that side project that you've been meaning to build you can try out service with mongo DB services is emergent pattern. It's something that you want to get acquainted with if you're a developer and getting that ten dollars in free credit to have a service platform right next to your mongo database is really a great place to start so good a mongo DB dot com slash SE. Daily claim that credit and thanks to mongo DB for being a sponsor of software..

mongo DB services developer ten dollars
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"It's like an SDR. That's automated says not chat we have drift for chat, which I think is amazing. But it follows up on leads, and we have over two hundred thousand leads a quarter that's way too many for our SDR team. So it's able to catch up and when someone asks a question or interaction away that says they're ready for a meeting, then we either send it to the or the SDR. So I like that a lot we have in fluid as well, which has been great on the customer advocacy side, and then a ton of just web technologies. So yeah, it's g mentioned about the doors. A lot of thought seems to be moving towards automation, at least or at least the first torches. How'd you see that evolving over the next couple of years? I don't think it can remove people completely. I do think it's much better to have a response. Interactive response. The none at all I think you potentially risk the sales like oh being longer because at some point you need to do discovery. Otherwise, you can't put people in front of sales, which is very expensive resource without having them properly qualified or ready to close. And so I think it's going to be a blend. I think it's going to help do high repetition because Ashley Austin are conversa- ref. She's you know, she can do ten thousand conversations or how many ever conversation. She does a day where someone may be can do fifty a person and to get us quickly into the people who are ready to buy or have a conversation or talk with a rep. Then I think it's worthwhile. And they're learning different. Languages like Spanish allows us to get another geographies faster. And if someone has support question, you can route them to support. So I do think it's a very cost effective way to triage. And I think also it's worth recognized that means that ST or is kind of, you know, focus on higher impact work as opposed to just repetition work cobija. Also, I think most jars will call three times E mail and move on. And all the studies show us right like inside sales com. Seven eight nine times that it actually takes. So if you're moving on fast, you're leaving money on the table where the conversa- will keep reaching out in interacting and doesn't just give up after three. As we sort of look into Q four and also today's nineteen or any sort of particular trends that you're excited about going forward. I mean, certainly, I think for so long we've been trying to do everything digital and online, and I feel like, and maybe it's the stage of the company I'm at right now, we're shifting to more relationship building and being back in the field and that customer experience. And so I think you're going to need you're going to need to maintain both and that customer in the field experiences more expensive. But I think the returns at least for enterprise business and B two B enterprise matters a lot for your sales team. So being able to serve both is gonna matter certainly conversa- with the machine learning and the artificial intelligence, we see a lot of trends that weighs a lot of talk around ABM, which I think has been around forever. But it's more facilitating automating that process and coordinating between marketing and sales. Okay. We'll make thanks for joining us w thank you for having. Cheers. You've been listening to the inside intercom podcast for more episodes. Visit soundcloud dot com slash intercom atheist like to subscribe, six for inside intercom in items for Stitcher, and for even more great content. Checkout blog dot Entercom dot com.

Ashley Austin marketing and sales customer advocacy enterprise business
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Now, what should I be buying now versus you know, I'm a twenty five person company versus one hundred versus four hundred. So there's definitely I see a lot of pattern recognition advising these types of companies. So they're really looking at people technology process to put in place, there's models. You know? Okay. What's typical nurture program? Like, what's a good lead scoring model? How do I partner with sales better? I'm trying to hire someone in demand gen what are the skill sets. I wanna see him. Oh, what should what question? Should. I be asking chide you a press release around this or not just a lot. I do see a lot of repetitive questions and different steps along the way to scale. One of those questions, you just raised in terms of when to bring in a CMO Duva particular opinion as to win startup should really think about bringing a CMO. I think you bring in a CMO when you've got a sizable team where you're scaling your sales organization. I mean, I think you do it at any time. I think the people that you bring in though when you're twenty five percent company are probably not the same. That's going to be there at four hundred or even a thousand unless they can evolve quickly say I would say at least one hundred two hundred people before you're bringing in a CMO. And I think it depends on your business yourself serve you're going to do that a lot earlier than if you're be to be. And it also depends on the talent whether someone's willing to take a director of marketing title versus a VP title or CMO title. We mentioned G tube credit here. And one thing we a lot about on. Our blog is also thought, you know buyers today are more educated than ever like they're doing a lot of research going to places like GD crater Cup. You know, talking to friends going to core sort of crowd sourcing, what specific products they actually want to buy strikes me that buyers today are a lot more very much in the driving sees yes. Thought impacts marketers on sales teams today. Do you think I mean, it definitely matters. So we have about twenty eight different technologies running. But we've bought thirty five in the last three and a half years, and I will tell you. I have not really bought anything from an Email, right? There was no Email or tweet or anything. It was coming to a conference and talking to vendor in person it was talking and networking to other VP's of marketing and CMO's that social proof really matters. Certainly it's looking at reviews am I doing the right thing. So I think gee to crowd is definitely onto it. They're open platform, you know, the older legacy vendors Gartner and forced her that's a closed system, and they tend to target fortune one thousand and you've got to have a budget that just. Doesn't work today. Right. I want to go pick a restaurant. I go to yelp. I don't wanna pay someone to provide me that inside even away to get on the phone to talk to someone or to get a briefing from someone I want it immediate. And if I can go and see what peers are doing that's much more powerful. That's Jimmy mentioned about your tech stock and how much she bought over the years. I think you mentioned in your bottle today that it's currently up twenty eight. Rex. Yes. Which is quite a day. Fifty that. I should be right Pretty credible. credible. I mean. I mean in terms of like if we could pair that Diana's like what will be sort of like your three most starting to see him. Oh, yeah. So it really starts out for me, a marketing automation platform, so we have ele, and then demand base is our personalization platform, and I've got one I've really loved recently conversa-, it's it's a automated communication..

VP Diana GD crater Cup Duva conversa partner Gartner director of marketing yelp Jimmy twenty five percent
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Let's bring it back to the thirty year career where you're obviously come from quite a technical background who has helped you as marker and gentlemen. Imagine. It would be useful in a company like mongo to be. I think a lot of what I learned early on as IT, engineer and development is problem solving. And that there's typically a few answers, you know, when I left college, I went to Cisco and I program for master schedulers because I was in manufacturing IT, and I got APEC certified because that was the methodology they were using in their day to day lives, and I need to understand the business side of it. And a lot of that things like bottlenecks and L lead comes into one system and transfers to the next if it didn't get there. Whereas the broke, you know, where did it break and really mapping that out? And so when I entered into marketing just took that approach map things out. I looked at the flow. Shoot when something's not working and not being intimidated by the product. I think matters a lot and also just thinking about the buyer as an IT person. How would I have looked at the product what would have mattered to me what were my buying criteria? So I think it allowed me to understand the buyer more. You mentioned there in terms of not being intimidated by the product how sort of regular basis to use sort of stay aligned with where with products very much any selves our business. I say self service marketing and product aligned and be to be as Martin sales the line, and we have both. So you've got to be aligned very closely with those organizations because it's experience you're creating whether it's in the field on your website or in the product. And so very, you know, same goals understanding the experience mapping that out in the hand off and a really important to have a feedback loop. And you're also an adviser pretty well known. Companies like crowd is one of them. What are some of the challenges that you're hearing about a companies like this on a regular basis on sort of what's the advice to giving them? Yeah. So a lot of startups are trying to figure out what's the team? Look like who to hire next understand technologies that are out there that are in their price range..

APEC engineer Cisco Martin sales thirty year
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Trying to learn about what's out there thought leadership, whether it's micro services or something and blockchain they're out there learning, so we've got to create that type of content that brings a men and helps us be the domain authority around it something I've always admired about Mungo Deby's marketing, specifically is community driven. So could you maybe talk me through this? Strategy there. Yeah. So we definitely have a thriving community. We have over one hundred different mugs, which are among be user groups around the world. We've got slack channels. We've got an influence hub where people are doing challenges and socializing we have a master's program for those that are just strong experts in the space, and we have a customer advisory board full of our users as well. And of course, they're social they're out on stack overflow Cora engaging asking questions and a lot of people just with manga be certification that are working on different projects around the world. I think to eighteen has been very interesting year for open source specifically to be is an open source company. And also we've seen the likes of elastic go public, you know, huge huge Asians. What are your thoughts on maybe advantages that you know, some of these open source companies right now, sure, I mean, you you get a huge base contributing back to it. You don't get vendor. Lock. We are. Atlas product runs on Amazon AWS at runs on Azure. GCP? You can migrate between the cloud vendors. You've got a lot of information out there. A lot of people learning the skills people are creating their stack. They want open source in that. So I think it's a huge advantage from just awareness in the market and getting users who love the product, so talk me through maybe your time a line because I think what particular interesting about Kobe serves a very traditional sort of beat. Market. So your son companies in the BBC base. But also, I would imagine that it also serves as sort of very large sea segment as well. If pretty much anyone over the age of eighteen that needs to sign a document, right? My mother used it through Morgan Stanley. I use it to buy my house people use it to buy tesla or Harley Davidson real estate agents were really where we came up huge volume there. But the financial services companies really all industries, so as a marketer, we started out really targeting sales and sales ops people trying to get sales contracts, and and that's spread into procurement. People who were doing traditional DHL or FedEx today, taking forever and spending twenty five dollars, a doc could do it instantly through Email and higher security and more timely HP did a big study with us around the savings of just being able to send document out for signature, and then that goes beyond to HR and on boarding and. Facilities and legal. So when we tried to do personas, we we started with a few and then expanded to so many we had over one hundred different nurture programs based on your title and role alone. Which just tells you all the different ways of using it. And what mattered was the use cases how they were using it. You couldn't send someone in procurement a sales ops case study, right? So we did build a lot of content to make sure when someone came into the funnel. We did really. Well, around inbound marketing, making sure they were like, this is the product they all had similar things. Like is it secure? Yes. Is it legal? Yes. Making sure they're educated before sales even talk to them..

Mungo Deby Morgan Stanley Amazon advisory board FedEx BBC Kobe Harley Davidson HP tesla twenty five dollars
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Marketing, your demand, gen your field marketer. All those different skill sets was web and system. So I'm definitely asking questions that would indicate domain expertise. And then I wanna marry that with good problem. Solvers good attitude, and then do they match the culture of the company and what we need to do. So in terms of specific buyers of mongo to be at the moment. I imagine there may maybe or maybe quivalent so it's a blend. So we do we are the fastest growing databases the service with our monitoring atlas product, and that's direct to. Developers. So we have a ton of work and education out in the market around the developer. We have a corporate team inside sales, which may be more line of business head of IT, and then our enterprise team is working with that are doing digital transformations or just modernizing their legacy sack databases have been around for forty years. We were invented at the time of the iphone when all this, you know, mass amount of data is out there. And there's a variety of loss at a pace never seen before. And so we're disrupting a lot of the old database vendors, and so when you're marketing to developers like manga doing videos doing. How does that influence the specific channels you're choosing to market? Yeah. So I think developers on all these channels. I mean, they're definitely online reading blogs matter, and they wanna see a lot of code. They are social we've gone from seventy thousand social followers three years ago to five hundred seventy five thousand we just crossed a million people on our university. So they're coming in their taking free courses to learn about the product and how to work with it. We've got Email marketing just like everyone else. People do still respond to Email it's targeted and at the right time where they are in the life cycle of your funnel.

developer forty years three years
"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"And we grew from one hundred and fifty people to over thirteen hundred with thirteen million people in the platform to fifty million and then join manga Deby little over three and a half years ago as the CMO and we went public year ago. So just this week we've been public for a year, which has been awesome, ride and. And you know, went from will under four hundred people now to over twelve hundred so bene- fund ride Intech. Absolutely. I can imagine. I mean, it strikes me the last week busy work for so donkeys. I'm mongo to be obscene such incredible growth rates in terms of employees and users on the platform. I mean, what's the sort of difference the fan between joining COPA Neal's, maybe one hundred or two hundred people to work at a company over a thousand people. What are the biggest differences that you find? Yeah. I think when you first join a company, you you need to do a lot of interviewing and understanding to see what what's missing, and what you need to put in place because it's a critical time when you're going to hire the right people, you're gonna put the right processes in place and the right technology and through that you scale. So you're looking for your leaders that have expertise and the different pillars that are going to help you hire the teams that are going to lead the company through growth, I suppose as a marketing leader water, some of the biggest challenges that you're gonna facing on a on a table. Day basis whether out of a small company like donkeys when you joined or manga to be in your current role. So I think no matter what you are always trying to figure out the customer the buyer. What's the best way to get in front of them? There's a lot of noise out there. Whether it's your competitors or just others in business trying to go after the same persona. You're trying to go after say you've constantly going to Enervate and be creative. And how you get your message in front of people and making sure you're understanding the influencers, you're products of all Wien. The use cases are volving. I think challenges are certainly with talent everyone's trying to hire. And so, you know, you hire where the talents at, but it's it's competitive. And so you've got another only hire great talent. But then you've gotta give them compelling projects and stuff to work on. And and do a great job just really growing your team jer. So we'll see what what are your first few key hires than which is if you're joining new Cabrini? Yeah. So I think the key things in marketing is you need a product marketer. Someone who has the product core messaging, the differentiation pricing packaging that can really understand product market fit. So I think you definitely need that. If you're not that talent you have to have that. I think the second thing is okay now, you've got the messaging and that kind of content. You gotta get to market, and that's demand gen person. So I would say someone who's really I call a workhorse doing webinars doing Email marketing, they're doing social, yes. Yeah. And then you need to make it look good. When it goes out the door. So you need some sort of creative element everything you do in marketing has something creative. Whether it's a button online. It's a website. It's a field marketing it's boot that social media and then your weapons systems so web developer. Is there anything specific in terms of qualities that you look for in kind of it's that you're gonna fresh off panel here all-stock and you were talking about the negative quality which call Vic Went mentality. through a little bit. Yeah. So I certainly I want people who are solving problems. So when I'm interviewing I'm trying to figure out are they gonna come in every job. I hire you because there's problems to be solved, and there's roadblocks I need someone to come in that can work with people that don't report to them that can figure out what it takes not unlimited money. So can you do it for low cost be creative and get everyone on board to definitely looking for that. I think in marketing there's so many functions. So whether you're product.

Intech COPA Neal Enervate Cabrini web developer
"mongo db" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"mongo db" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"As you mentioned obviously you've got Maria DB, you've got mongo DB, you have, Cassandra you have open stack right you've, got now at all, the way at the edge you've got Kerber Cooper Netease and containers Right Talk a bit about these different components and where the action is these, days because I think in, particular has the potential to literally transformed the entire landscape of enterprise IT I and I agree with, you and I think that there is a little bit more of a nuance to. That I think a lot of people look at containerization and micro services as kind of this new. Thing when from an architectural pattern, perspective it really. Isn't we'd Ryan since the sixties that modular. Development I think the difference is that to be able to do micro services work at scale and to allow things like ephemeral workloads and the city we needed a better tool chain need more automation needed a better deployment. Strategies and so we've gotten to a place now where we have this type of stuff we've got like for, orchestration we have Jenkins for Docker for ephemeral environments where we can execute our. Tests so micro services, architecture for, instance is really kinda. Useless if you don't have the ability to scale the independent individual parts of the systems very rapidly Truly. This? New this new tooling and stuff that, that that's allowed this to become possible but. When you look at, something like, a container and you really pick apart what it is and you see what its origins where. Only look at things like, Selena zones are we look at things like the Aleksey project in the next awhile ago on these, are all things that laid the groundwork for tools like Docker but trying to get. A container environment in something like a windows implementation is extremely difficult it wasn't until recently that we. Were even able to do that, with the way. The containers work it's just a file system. Trick really but it relies on an operating system that treats everything is a file light Lennox so it's you know one of the things I love to talk about is how so many of these projects have kind of. Builds off work that was done in the past when you look at something like Apache web server and Pearl, is very common in the late ninety three people to CGI applications that evolved. Into PHP right which, evolved into, frameworks like no jaaz. Which got us better monitor model be that but all of this you know builds on the In the past when you hear. That statement, standing on, the shoulders of giants right you know that's kind of what that's kind of what we mean by that you also brought up a really interesting point too. About the importance of keeping this technology open and, not under the purview of just a single closed. Group it's important not just for making sure open. Source? Development continues to be what it is,.

Ryan Docker Kerber Cooper Netease Maria DB Lennox Jenkins Pearl