37 Burst results for "minnesota"

Fresh update on "minnesota" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:48 min | 13 min ago

Fresh update on "minnesota" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"I Mike Rossio Biden Vaccination goals. I'm Tim Maguire with an A P news minute. President Biden says the nation has hit another pandemic milestone 300 million shots in arms and under 150 days. That's an important milestone that just didn't happen on its own. Or by chance, Biden could fall short of his target to have 70% of people in this country at least partially vaccinated by the fourth of July. The president says he realizes some people are reluctant to get vaccinated. That's okay. You still have questions. But Act act now Act. Now the pace of the new vaccinations in the U. S has dropped significantly from a high of nearly two million a day. About two months ago, A Minnesota man faces federal charges of transporting stolen vehicles in at least seven states FBI agents arresting the man earlier this month in Georgia. He's accused of stealing more than 60 golf carts. Over the last several years. I'm Tim Maguire, female soldiers in certain states face a higher risk of sexual assault and other misconduct at their military bases. Than women at other locations across the country. The RAND Corporation studied incidents of sexual assault, harassment and other misconduct at Army bases and finds female soldiers at Fort Hood and Fort Bliss in Texas face the highest risk, particularly those in combat commands, field artillery or engineering jobs. Other bases with red flags are Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Fort Carson, Colorado and Fort Riley in Kansas. The review follows last year's death of Army specialist Vanessa G. In at Fort Hood, which led to criticism of military leaders for not adequately dealing with high rates of sexual assault and harassment at that base. Jackie Quinn Washington A P news. I'm Tim McGuire. President Biden expects a summer of relief from the pandemic AP Sagara Madani has more as he touted 300 million vaccine doses administered during his 1st 150 days in office..

Tim Mcguire Jackie Quinn Fort Hood Georgia Fort Carson Sagara Madani Tim Maguire Fort Campbell Colorado Fort Riley 70% Fourth Of July Kentucky Fort Bliss FBI Rand Corporation 1St 150 Days Vanessa G. In U. S Minnesota
New Trial Not Merited for Derek Chauvin, Prosecutors Argue

Chris Krok

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

New Trial Not Merited for Derek Chauvin, Prosecutors Argue

"For from Derek Chauvin that he should be granted a new trial Foxes Rob Dawson has more on that. The state of Minnesota says the proceedings for the former officer were fair and Derek Chauvin was found guilty by an impartial jury. Chauvin's team wanted to hold a hearing to question jurors about alleged misconduct. Defense attorney Eric Nelson says intense publicity before the trial misconduct by the prosecution and some decisions by the court made it impossible for sure open to get a fair trial. Prosecutors say Nelson is trying to undo the verdict. Just Peter Kale still needs to make a ruling.

Derek Chauvin Rob Dawson Chauvin Eric Nelson Minnesota Peter Kale Nelson
Fresh "minnesota" from Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:19 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "minnesota" from Rush Limbaugh

"To Fox News From the cremation Society of Minnesota Weather Center. Mostly cloudy, passing storms behind the mid seventies. Today, clearing sky later tonight, Low 55 cooler and breezy Tomorrow with Sun Upper sixties I'm meteorologist Mace Michaels on Twin Cities. New stock Am 11 30 current Hey, In.

Mace Michaels Today Twin Cities Fox News Tomorrow Mid Seventies Society Of Minnesota Weather C Am 11 30 Later Tonight Low 55 SUN Sixties
Invasion of the jumping worms

Unexplainable

02:17 min | 4 d ago

Invasion of the jumping worms

"Worms jump anwar. Yeah what's up with these worms. They are a big news story over the past couple of months even few past years now and they're all over the mid west kansas missouri wisconsin minnesota even as far east as new york state. And they're kind of a big deal here. Why why are they such a big deal. That like news is covering them. I mean first off worms are just cool. I don't know where you've been but these jumping worms there really weird. There's there broncos the weirdest worms you've ever seen and we really don't know that much about them their mysterious they're moving fast and they're changing our ecosystems so it's okay so so the weirder thing sounds a lot more fun than the invasive part. Let's start with the fun part about the fund what makes them so weird Yes so i talked to bernie williams. She's at the wisconsin department of natural resources and If you a worm problem. She's the person to call. We had a homeowner in a really urban area of madison. Give us a call on friday afternoon. You know when you really just wanna go home from work. She's very upset. So it's like us share houses drive by on my way home and she had millions literally millions of worms just pouring out of her landscaping covered. Her driveway they were all up and down this street in the gutters just rising for some people that might be really unpleasant. Thin you would. You would run away. But i was really intrigued. Like wow look at those stomach worms. They can grow to be or to eight inches long. They move like a snake when they get startled or harassed a fresh around almost like a snake would. I'm hoping joke. He was jumping all over. The place seem now move like a snake to these worms. Actually jump that jumped. They wriggle basically you think of like a normal worm. Just sorta like scrutiny around in the dirt these guys come up across one of them they like freak out and start wiggling all over the place jumping out of your hands. They're hard to hold onto and they're a lot more monthly than you'd

Bernie Williams Wisconsin Department Of Natura Broncos Missouri Wisconsin Kansas Minnesota New York Madison
Enbridge Wins Minnesota Court Ruling on Oil Pipeline Permit

Native America Calling

01:47 min | 5 d ago

Enbridge Wins Minnesota Court Ruling on Oil Pipeline Permit

"The minnesota court of appeals has up held approvals of permits for the line. Three oil pipeline. The move is seen as a win. For enbridge energy the company behind the project but indigenous groups and their allies. Fighting construction are not backing down mike. Mohan reports in a two one decision. The court said state regulators acted properly when giving their consent align three which is being built to replace an aging oil pipeline that runs across northern minnesota winona. La duke is one of the leading tribal advocates speaking out against lying three. She says the state including governor at him walls has let them down. I am so dismayed by. The court of appeals and we will stand in resistance with thousands of others. This summer is young. She says the ruling will result in more people arrested or heard with opposition surfacing along the construction route last week. Protestors held their largest gathering yet resulting in arrests after people locked themselves to equipment. Meanwhile the duke says they're pleading with a biden administration to intervene canada-based end bridge says lion three creates thousands of jobs that high degrees of safety are being applied to construction and maintenance installation of line. Three is nearly sixty percent complete and the court noted its presence while troublesome too many groups and tribal members is less of an environmental risk than the current line. But luke says it's a direct threat to natural resources. Tribes rely on watersheds are now subject to bridges aggression and destruction. Even if this decision is appealed to the minnesota supreme court opponents. Worry that would take a long time before a ruling is issued. They say that's why they want. President joe biden to take action with construction moving forward now. is mike moen

La Duke Minnesota Court Of Appeals Enbridge Mohan Biden Administration Winona Mike Minnesota Duke Canada Luke Minnesota Supreme Court President Joe Biden Mike Moen
State Appeals Court Upholds Approval of Minnesota Pipeline

Here & Now

00:16 sec | 6 d ago

State Appeals Court Upholds Approval of Minnesota Pipeline

"The line three pipeline by Enbridge Energy is designed to replace an older one that can only run at half capacity about 1000 people protested against the pipeline early last week. You're listening to here and now

Enbridge Energy
Police: Vehicle Plows Into Minnesota Protesters, Killing 1

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 d ago

Police: Vehicle Plows Into Minnesota Protesters, Killing 1

"A woman is dead and another person injured after a car plowed into a group of protesters Sunday night in Minneapolis police say the incident occurred in the uptown neighborhood where a black man was fatally shot on June third during a robbery attempt the driver was pulled from the vehicle by protesters and was taken into police custody he went to a hospital for treatment but there's no word on his injuries a witness says the suspect was driving an SUV at a high rate of speed when he appeared to accelerate as he got closer to the demonstrators the driver's vehicle hit a parked car and that car then hit the protesters investigators say the use of drugs or alcohol by the driver may have been a factor on my campus

Uptown Minneapolis
Mudcat Grant, American League’s First Black 20-Game Winner, Dies at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | Last week

Mudcat Grant, American League’s First Black 20-Game Winner, Dies at 85

"People have had Major league pitcher of the 19 sixties, has died. I'm Tom 40. His name was Jim Grand, but he was much better known as Mudcat during a near decade and a half long career in Major league Baseball grants. Best year by far was 1965 when he became the first black pitcher to win 20 games in the American League. In the process, he helped pitch the Minnesota Twins to their first pennant, after which he was a star, though in a losing effort in the World Series. In addition to the Twins, he pitched raw number of other teams, the longest for the cleavage. And Indians. Jim Mudcat Grant was 85 Tom

Jim Grand Mudcat Major League TOM Twins American League Baseball Jim Mudcat Grant
Police Say Nearly 250 Arrested in Minnesota Pipeline Protest

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:52 min | Last week

Police Say Nearly 250 Arrested in Minnesota Pipeline Protest

"People turned out in pretty large numbers in northern minnesota this week. More than a thousand people there to protest the construction of a new multi-billion dollar oil pipeline a pipeline that among other things would cross through the delicate headwaters of the mississippi river. The protesters are trying to block that new pipeline and all the environmental hazards that it brings with it. A separate group of protesters made their way into one of the new pipelines pump stations. That's currently under construction. They piled a whole bunch of stuff including a vote at the entrance way so nobody could get in or out. The demonstrators then started locking themselves to the construction equipment bodily at at that site that had the effect of shutting down all work on on the pipeline for the day. Eventually police showed up. They started dragging protesters through the dirt to arrest them. About two hundred. People were arrested just at the pump station but the response by law enforcement wasn't just a local one in terms of local minnesota police officers. Look at this. This is a helicopter belonging to the federal government. Us customs and border patrol cv. Pista flew this helicopter. Really low dangerously low over this pipeline protest using the rotor wash from the chopper to blow dirt and debris all over the place apparently to try to get those protesters to leave see. Bp now says they are investigating the use of that helicopter. You're not supposed to use a government helicopter like that even if it is against protestors especially if it's against protestors this pipeline which is called line three it's pipeline by a company called bridge it was approved greenland under president trump. The protesters are pushing for president biden to suspend the permit for the pipeline before construction on it finished about two hundred. Protesters are camped. Out along the pipeline. Saying we won't stop pushing. They're not saying they won't leave

Minnesota Mississippi River Pista Federal Government BP President Biden United States Greenland
Zhou Yusen Filed for Vaccine Patent Before COVID-19 Outbreak

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | Last week

Zhou Yusen Filed for Vaccine Patent Before COVID-19 Outbreak

"Up dead. I want you to go to this piece. Everyone, please. You can check it out my newsletter or you can just go right to it. By my friend Kyle Becker and Becker News. Here. Is that the headline in the piece? China game Wuhan lab secret military activity. Led to a February 2020 covid vaccine, patent report finds Again. If you were going to make a bio weapon, you damn well better have a vaccine first. Here's the first quote from the peace and it's quoting some research by an Australian newspaper called the Weekend Australian. It says, quote there talking about this woman Zhao use N It, says Zhao, who conducted the research in conjunction with the Wuhan Institute, University of Minnesota and the New York Blood Center, was the first to file a patent for a covid neck Covid 19 vaccine on February 24th of last year. According to documents obtained by the weekend. Australian This was only five weeks after China admitted there was a human to human transmission of the virus. What were they doing? Building a vaccine and spending all this money on a virus that they had said Don't worry. There's no human to human transmission. Does that make any sense to you only if they were lying. The holder of the patent. The piece goes on his striking Zhao use end is listed as the lead inventor on the patent application lodged by the Institute of Military Medicine Academy of Military Sciences of the People's Liberation Army of China. The report states folks again When are these media types going to remove their craniums from their rectums? And say, Holy Moses? This sounds

Kyle Becker Becker News Zhao Wuhan Institute New York Blood Center Wuhan China University Of Minnesota Institute Of Military Medicine
State Seeks 30 Years for Chauvin; Defense Wants Time Served

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

State Seeks 30 Years for Chauvin; Defense Wants Time Served

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the state seeks thirty years for the former police officer convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd according to court documents filed Wednesday prosecutors are seeking a thirty year prison sentence for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin who was convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd but defense attorney Eric Nelson is asking that shall then be sentenced to probation and the time already served Sheldon was convicted in April of second degree unintentional murder third degree murder and second degree manslaughter for pressing his knee on Floyd's neck for about nine and a half minutes as Floyd said he couldn't breathe under Minnesota law he will be sentenced on only the most serious conviction second degree manslaughter chauvinist Gadgil to be sentenced on June twenty fifth hi Mike Rossio

George Floyd Mike Rossi Derek Chauvin Eric Nelson Minneapolis Floyd Sheldon Minnesota Gadgil Mike Rossio
Lawmakers Continue Police Reform Negotiations

NEWS 88.7 Programming

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Lawmakers Continue Police Reform Negotiations

"May of last year, lawmakers in every state and the District of Columbia have introduced more than 3000 police reform bills. The National Conference of State Legislatures reports. That's double the number introduced in 2017. Theo U. S Department of Justice is investigating the Minneapolis police and other departments. And brought civil rights charges against Derrick Show. Vin and the other former officers involved in George Floyd's burger Cities and school districts have responded to Minneapolis public schools, joined districts across the country and cutting ties with police. And Minneapolis City Council members made headlines when they promised to defund the police. That's provocative shorthand for rerouting public safety dollars to social services that can reduce crime. And it's also something we have really heard from the general public. I asked my colleague, Minnesota public radio reporter Brandt Williams when he knew something was different. Well, I guess Anjo like many people, when I first saw that bystander video Usually there is a situation between a police officer and somebody there's a officer makes a split second decision where they fire a weapon. It's over in a second, but this happened Over nine minutes. We heard George Floyd pleading for his life, and we saw the reaction of the officer Derrick Show Vin, just not changing his expression, and he kept the pressure on. So I think that's when I knew as a boy, You know, it's gonna be really hard for this just to be pushed under the rug or just kind of forgotten about. During the next news cycle. And Brant the response from city officials that was swift as as well different than than what we've seen in the past, starting with the quick firing of officer direct Children. Right that that was different. I mean, usually there's got to be an investigation or there has to be due diligence done here before we make any disciplinary decisions. But this was the next day chief Mid Air. Arredondo came right out and said that this officer is no longer A member of the Minneapolis Police Department, and he fired the other three officers involved as well.

George Floyd Theo U. Derrick Show Minneapolis City Council Minneapolis National Conference Of State L Brandt Williams District Of Columbia Department Of Justice VIN Derrick Show Vin Minnesota Brant Arredondo Minneapolis Police Department
Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

Climate Cast

02:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

"I'm standing underneath a wind. Turbine in chaska minnesota on a windy spring day. I'm npr chief meteorologist. paul hutton. Her this is climate. Cast this wind turbines middle. School educates students about renewable energy and generates electricity for nearby homes. It's operated by the minnesota municipal power agency or m. pa matt quota. Har- sqi is the group's chaska chair or standing under a hundred and sixty kilowatt Wind turbine that was refurbish. Here from palm springs california and one of these resides in each of the twelve member communities. And what does mpa do. So mvp is twelve member counties that basically represent municipal electric Users that we basically get together both to generate our own electricity for all communities or to purchase it off the grid depending on the pricing of one. Electric has a give time. What are you trying to accomplish. So basically our goal is -ccomplish having a very reasonable electric creates our goal is to have power that's cheaper than xl energy As investor owned utility. How is it going deeper. Yep it's going very well. We're on a residential level. We ten in chaska to be about eight to nine percent lower than xl energy. These swishing blades above us help adults and their pocketbooks and offer a learning opportunity for students. Amy feet teaches. Fourth graders at saint. John's lutheran school in chaska. She leads her students on field trips to see renewables action. It's a great opportunity for students to think about how they use energy on a daily basis. We think about what are some ways that maybe we could cut some of our energy use and maybe not us quite as much energy. Our we may be wasting energy. We talk about how our use of energy affects the planet and all the people around us as well and then we also when we get to favorable energy park We they put us through. Maybe we'll ride a bike and we'll try to power entire home and how hard that is when we have lots of different things on in our home versus when we have maybe one thing on or two things on We'll go to a different station where we look at the solar panel. We'll go to a different station where we look at the wind turbine We'll talk about how we use non-renewable energy and also renewable energy the differences in those and how they actually affect us and how they actually affect the world around

Chaska Paul Hutton Minnesota Municipal Power Agen Matt Quota Amy Feet NPR John's Lutheran School Palm Springs Minnesota California
Fiala, Wild Force Game 7 With 3-0 Victory Over Vegas

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Fiala, Wild Force Game 7 With 3-0 Victory Over Vegas

"The wild scored three goals in the third period to break a scoreless tie beat the golden knights three zero and force a game seven cam Talbot made twenty three saves for his second shutout of the series as Minnesota got goals from Ryan Hartman Nick bjugstad and Kevin Fiala Fiala he's ready to head to Vegas we won two in a row now so but we've got to regroup you know its it all starts at zero you know so we gonna realize that and have a great story you know and anything can happen in game seven so we're gonna be ready that's wild winger Kevin Fiala while battled back from a three one series deficit they force a game seven it'll be Friday night from T. mobile arena Kevin farmers St Paul

Cam Talbot Ryan Hartman Nick Bjugstad Kevin Fiala Fiala Golden Knights Minnesota Kevin Fiala Vegas T. Mobile Arena Kevin Farmers
Creating Awareness Without Advertising

The Schmidt List

01:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Creating Awareness Without Advertising

"Thank you for taking the time to join me. Thank you so much for having me. I appreciate you being here. So tell me about the work you do. And who do you do it for. Yeah a big scope. That's so we have over the years. I basically create harnessed without advertising. And what we mean by is that we we do digital branding for a variety of blue chips and new chips. So i like to think they'll work with some big brands. american express ameriprise western union. And then we've also had the pleasure of working with the world champion minnesota. sports as well as the united way did a groundbreaking campaign for them. And then we've also worked with some really cool startups specifically in the technology sector An-and we've also we've had our shot at creating some step for beer of craft beer companies the whole gamut and i guess the main thing that we help people do is we like to think that you can create awareness without spending or giving away money to bbc to the thanks and we like to same branding without big tech in that happens to be in the zeitgeist guy straight now and imagine a lot of interest in in our work.

American Express Ameriprise We United Way Minnesota BBC
Reflections on the Year Since the Murder of George Floyd

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Reflections on the Year Since the Murder of George Floyd

"Attorney general ellison welcome to washington post. Live great to be with you jonathan. Thank you before we talk about the derek chauvin trial and the killing of george. Floyd have to talk about some breaking news that hit just about an hour ago. Your office released a statement acknowledging that you are taking on the prosecution of kim potter. She's the former book brooklyn center. Minnesota police officer Who shot and killed dante. Right on april eleventh. Why are you taking on that prosecution. Well we've been asked to take on the case and we're willing to do it because we're public servants and win. The public needs service. We step up to do the work we're called to do and so we're going to handle the case with seriousness with all due regard for the precious life of dante right And you know. And we're going to seek justice in an affair trial and let me just note for everybody can potteries presumed innocent given that you were the prosecutor in the derek chauvin trial. Is that a template for how you will proceed against can potter because every single case is unique cases are unique as fingerprints. All of them are different in many different ways. So we will. We're our approach will be tailored to the case itself and i don't want anyone to expect that because we did one thing in one case we're going to do the same thing in another case what people can expect as we will bring the same level of urgency and commitment and fairness and professionalism after that anything could be different

Derek Chauvin Attorney General Ellison Kim Potter Brooklyn Center Washington Post Floyd Jonathan Dante George Minnesota
Bashaud Breeland Is Unhappy About Something

Arrowhead Addict: A Kansas City Chiefs Podcast

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Bashaud Breeland Is Unhappy About Something

"Is a real fire here. The shod breeland d like he went to go visit the minnesota vikings. There has been nate. Taylor who i love. Nate taylor of the athletic has put it out there. That like saying there's really real sort of indications that the cheese have been interested in bringing him back and he wants to be back. So like i mean are you reading these tweets thinking they are all based on the chiefs and and maybe some things up there. I i'm reading it based on a guy who has played really well if you look at some of the underlying numbers that put him in. I don't wanna say elite although the numbers have actually been elite but we're not going to say he's but put him in that bottom end of the cornerback one top in cb two range and he's getting paid for the past multiple seasons as if he's on a one year proven deal. I think he's just realizing you know what eventually had to stand up and say how many one year prove it deals. Do i need to take before eventually. I'm going to be too old and in the rest of my career is going to be one year deals. i think it's just. He feels he deserves to get a. And i'm not saying a ridiculous contract but he does deserve to get some security. Whether that's a three year. I don't know twenty million dollar contract. I think he has earned that. And i don't blame him for being sick of one year deals. I guess that's where i'm coming for. As i i would understand that when you're looking at some of these numbers and ought to pull up the stat. And he was above like to gilmore and somebody's great cornerbacks. You're like the only thing you can say is penalties at some point. You have to pay for how good and solid. He has been.

Nate Taylor Minnesota Vikings Nate Taylor Chiefs Gilmore
Minnesota Celebrates Bob Dylan's 80th Birthday

Morning Edition

02:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Minnesota Celebrates Bob Dylan's 80th Birthday

Bob Dylan Celebrates 80th Birthday

The World and Everything In It

01:32 min | 3 weeks ago

Bob Dylan Celebrates 80th Birthday

"Robert allen zimmerman was born may twenty fourth. Nineteen one who you might ask in college. Zimmerman adopted a stage. Name bob dylan. He celebrates his eightieth birthday. Today brand is blowing in the way. In addition to musical chops the minnesota dylan became an artist writer producer and nobel prize laureate. He dropped out of college and moved to the big apple where his lyrical skill began to shine. He wrote blowing in the wind in just ten minutes and his song showed a deep complexity that caused the new york folks team to turn its gaze to the up and coming songwriter he told. Cbs is sixty minutes in two thousand and four that his creativity came from a wellspring surprised. Even him tro this there's a magic to that and it's not Siegfried and roy magic. You know it's a different kind of penetrating magic near fatal motorcycle. Accident in nineteen sixty six led to a long recovery the night shift in his music from folk to rock dylan reinvented himself over the years musically and religiously he grew up jewish then profess to conversion to evangelical christianity and nineteen seventy-nine. Then back to judaism again over the course of his sixty year career. He's been named many halls of fame and received many awards including a presidential medal of freedom. Tin grammys a golden globe and an academy award

Robert Allen Zimmerman Dylan Zimmerman Roy Magic Minnesota Siegfried CBS Apple New York Golden Globe Academy Award
'General Hospital' Actress Risa Dorken Reflects on Her Theatre Beginnings

Before the Break

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

'General Hospital' Actress Risa Dorken Reflects on Her Theatre Beginnings

"How was it being in minnesota with high school with the community theatres. That did you have anything going on where you were or did you have to just bust out of there. Go go where the work was. Yeah i grew up in the theater. Community in apple's I started doing professional theater around sixth grade so k. Well we've said twenty-six okay that's awesome. Yeah so i started doing singing and dancing and theater around sixth grade Got involved her house in eighth grade butter. I it's fine. that's amazing. okay. I involved at the children's theater of minneapolis and actually i did a production there. Which was why. I ended up. I ended up being so involved in theater in minnesota that i had to go to five years of high school because school so i was very heavily owner community and to your to your teachers. You should've said you know what. Just be happy that i'm finishing this thing. I could be long gun.

Minnesota Children's Theater Apple Minneapolis
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"She discusses her diagnoses of Anorexia chronic major depression, panic and anxiety, disorder and post traumatic stress disorder PTSD. This. Conversation is focused on her experience using cognitive behavioral therapy CBT. Similar to part three of this series, the last episode with Dani Evans in which he talked about exposure therapy as type of see bt Lisa also talks about exposure therapy for some basic information and facts about CBT. Please take a look at some of the fact. Sheets published by NAMI MINNESOTA, which are available for free at Phnom E. M., N. Dot Org. Go to the education slash awareness. Menu Tab then click on fact sheets. You'll see cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment section, which is the third section of the fact sheets you may also want to read the fact sheet on obsessive compulsive disorder OCD which includes a brief description of exposure response therapy ert. If you, WANNA listen to some of that instead of reading it online, go back to the previous episode with Dani Evans and listen to the intro before our conversation begins. This conversation was recorded may fourteenth two thousand twenty. Thanks so much for being with us today in recording this conversation. Let's. Get started by telling listeners a little bit about your connection with nominee, Minnesota and and your involvement tells more about that. Well I after experiencing a little Liz for about. Thirty five years I was looking to give back to make a difference to. Fight the stigma and I began looking for the right outlet. NAMI was by far the most inclusive, the most wide ranging it had programs were unprecedented. In Minnesota. United suppose nationwide, but I started at. In, your, own voice speaker, and shortly thereafter the speaker's Bureau and joined the Legislative Committee. I also was just so impressed with our executive director. Sue after holden that I N programs coercion the opportunities to make a difference. I was very excited to be a part of the nominee organization. Awesome and had you happen to I don't know if you've. Lived in other states, and had nominee exposure in other states, or is it all been in Minnesota? I have lived in Minnesota my entire life, okay? How did you end up trying CBT? Well actually a years ago. I was in a residential treatment a facility for Anorexia. And it I learned about T.. They had some worksheets, but it was. It was more of a class. It wasn't really. Practicing or implementing that therapy. Years later when I saw a very confident psychiatrist, who also access my therapist. did not. He knew I was very wary of therapy. So he did not actually. Say, that's try see bt, but in a very What would you cut subtle manner? He employed all of the. You know. He employed that sort of the models. Yeah, it's. Andy. Actually see bt without naming it if you will. That's something that have been curious about different people's People's different experiences like do they even know they're receiving that model of therapy, or is it just sort of happening behind the scenes? So That's interesting to hear. Yes. and was it was it focused on Anorexia was it focused on other specific. struggles that you wanNA share, or is it just general? We started with my. Struggle with the disease of Anorexia because at that time I. that's that's all I could think my mind. Twenty four seven was about food, weight shape and thought I was my disease. But, as we you know, and it actually took years for me to change my way of thinking and. You know identify situations be no wasn't given in touch with emotions or feelings so any again. Thinking as I said, but I also experience chronic major depression. And Panic and anxiety, disorder and PTSD. Again needs the same steps in CVT. Help those situations as well. How would you as a person receiving? The therapy. How would you describe it to someone else? Well, I would describe it as. Almost imperative to. Changing the way you think about certain situations that are traveling especially within a mental illness it is. For those who. I was delusional in my thinking. And, so I couldn't even reshape that inaccurate negative. Way, of thinking. And I would highly recommend as a find it. Evidence based, which is very important to me. evidence based care and it would be a big reason. Why would make that referral? At what point? Did you. Realize. The model therapy that that was being used to say it was sort of like behind the scenes being used. Did. When did you come to understand that it was more specifically see bt? Well it that's very good question because What I was introduced to exposure therapy I said you know you're. In a very late, hearted manner I. Said What what's your? What's your mode here? And he did mention cognitive behavioral therapy. And you know I tease him saying you really pulled on me. So. I was really into Authenticity. Let's figure this out by the those are the that's the steps that he did use CVT. So the exposure therapy was sort of down the road in the in within the therapy, and that's when he spoke Monroe CBT. Correctly. and am I correct that exposure therapy is a type of CVT. Has that right? Part of it. And that was it was it was it was part of? It is definitely a guy said after years of. because of the length of I disease. It took years for me to get to that point. Could you say a little bit more about that. In terms of were the obstacles along the way for you. To obstacles along the way was really identifying. My delusional thinking and my. I thought I couldn't. I was so my thoughts were instinctive. There was no. Here's a here's. Be here. See, what do you do about it? It was you know breaking through. Those The inaccurate thinking, even that even convincing me that I was having inaccurate thinking. And it often, we had to work on that work on that Intel I could identify. Any often used you know. What would you tell your friends? Would you ever talk like this to your friend? which was very helpful in reshaping may think he now. That's interesting. Yeah, yeah, and I think we're. We'd probably be nicer to our friends than we are ourselves sometimes. Oh definitely definitely. Like I said earlier it with because. ANOREXIA is.

Anorexia bt Minnesota Dani Evans PTSD NAMI MINNESOTA anxiety OCD Phnom E. M. Legislative Committee Intel executive director Lisa Liz United Andy Sue holden
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Actually just went to play yesterday Paranormal brothers. If you haven't gone to go go to. It's really bad. Yeah so what I'm hearing is that you know self care for you is breaking down to why what what makes you happy happy as opposed to like what's can as opposed to the narrative that's been share which is like pampering yourself and you know that right but I think a lot for are different people. It means different things for example for me it means how do I preserve myself right. How do I make sure that I'm able to put maximum output to my community Marie so that I can make an impact and be able to sustain myself as my former self care? I am for you. It's your former self care is being able to just be happy right and during what would you like to do in order to be happy being with people being with people and being with people I love. I've also found that you know not just you know just because you love someone does mean. They're healthy for you. You know Case in point family honestly Yeah so for me. It's like being being with people that I enjoy being with and Doing things that I enjoy doing lake. I there are lots of things I enjoy doing like going to movies. Movies going to plays You know hanging with friends going out to parties and stuff like that In doing that more you know but not doing it responsibly. Though because I do it there's a fine line you know Yeah I feel like you're also touching base thought the fine line between like. How do you socialize with people in in order to be in the community as opposed artery socialize people in order to distract yourself from your own? Yes right that's a very online to like to be. I want to thank you for like surfacing that because I think oftentimes you know we talked self care while like doing things. Thanks for yourself. But there's things that you do for yourself are healthy and there's things that you'd reach for yourself that may not necessarily be healthy and long terms and things you really like brought auto so other lasting that you want to share before we close out this episode for anyone who is thinking about were wondering about antidepressants. It's not as scary as people. Make it out to be if you feel you need it. Do it for yourself for additional no resources related to this episode. Please check the podcast show notes and visit Nami Minnesota Online at Phnom E. M. N. Dot Hort. You've been listening to wellness and color on the mental health in Minnesota podcast produced by NAMI MINNESOTA..

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"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Your podcasts and now here's your host Nami Minnesota staff member Caroline ludi welcome to wellness and color. They give much for having me. Thank you our guest. Today is one thousand nine hundred a university student Salyan Bay and again so I thank you so much again for being here Just because before we go into our conversation demand for just introduce you know. I'll go ahead great. Thank you so growing up in South Korea and current aren't Minnesota Sayan Bay says relationship with mental health is both love and hate fear that others would think that she was quote crazy or quote ill. We're always initially present yet. She was never afraid to seek help and sought therapy with the support of her family. Ultimately changes incremental and her views towards mental health have been shaped by her time spent in the US plans to shift opinions of mental health. Not only within herself but also within her culture which drives her to constantly reflect on her Own Journey to knowing but flipping the status quo in order to de stigmatize mental health issues. So a couple of words form who are sponsor is these. He's efforts were supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number You L. Won t r zero zero zero two four nine four. The content is solely the responsibility of the author's isn't necessarily representative official views of the National Institutes of health. So so so in just a couple of questions here. Initially you tell me a little bit more about yourself. Yeah sure I grew up in South Korea. And it's a very competitive especially like stomach wise and I think got a lot of pressure from the society my family and myself and I think the biggest components that like Triggered me in like thinking about mental health in the first place was the dynamic pressure and the experience of me getting bullied by classmen when I was in school and like a bunch of other stuff having related to Self esteem and lacking love for myself. So I think that's like the initial reason awesome why I started to give up mental health and like I'm not healthy as in like my heart is not healthy and and I was like okay. I should get help because I don't think I can do this by myself. And then I was very lucky enough to like Have a family that I can talk to. And they're very supportive. When I brought up the concept of going going to counseling office or seeking their are free and yeah? That's when I started therapy. I was in sixth grade. I think and then I went to therapy for are two and a half years and then it became like a rotten wound that I couldn't not got got anymore so during tenth grade I went to my school counselor and I asked her like. Oh this these are the the things that I'm feeling at that time. It was kind of different. Because I wasn't experiencing bullying it was fine like a cadet wise but I was more of like. Where do I go with my life? Like what do I WANNA do. Is the school right for me because it went to a special high school foreign language high school. It's where are a lot of competitive students come to go to a very prestigious universities which is which makes the atmosphere even more competitive and Edison South Korea. Yes and it was like very I felt like I was out of place I feel like I was one of the students were like can devoting their lives to go into a great college. Because I wasn't and I didn't think like oh I'm like all right place I felt like I was in. I was taking someone else's place so like there's like someone who can do much better in this school and this environment where I'm just taking their resources into his taking their time and then I went to therapy for a couple of months. I think eight months or six six months and then like okay I I feel better now and I think my meaning in life is to like become a therapist vest myself and try to help people who go through the same thing. I went through so sorry the when did you come to arrive at that. Decision was after the show eight months of therapy that you thought AH therapist. I think it was like the first time that I went to therapist which was like in sixth grade. I was like okay like there's a person who you like helps people through their hardest times in life and I was like okay. That's really cool. Maybe I WANNA be comes therapist but then I was like okay. I Want Congress service but then I have to study a lot like what do I do. It was kind of like a vague idea in my head to become a therapist but then after I think in the process of that my second their therapy I was like okay. I'm sure that I WANNA do those like I'm so sure to this. So that's why I was like okay. I need need to become a therapist to become their pets. Need to study hard and I was like okay. Maybe this is the right school for me because will pressure me to study even harder so so I stayed there. And that's how I ended up in Minnesota and now majoring in psychology. So talking about just going back to when you were growing up you talked about the pressures but then as you were progressing in highschool those academic pressures kinda faded but then in terms for your mental health. How what challenges were present at now at that? Time I think there were a lot of a problems that I didn't address like my first therapy which was like underlying problems with like Relationships with family and how I view myself and what my values are and one of the things that I still struggle with is. How much do I value my parents? Perspectives of. How do I want to like? Meet their expectations of me. I think. Not to generalize. But that's that's like a lot of problems that I know like a lot of Asian cultured people go through because like you have to be respectful to your parents have to listen to what they're saying and I think for some reason I have like a very big pressure that I need to become like a good daughter. You're just a child that I would do whatever my parents want me to do like. I'm not a pushover. Well like I'll try my best to do that. And I learned that I didn't really have a very ideal relationship my family growing up so that was like like a very big part why I was trying to police my parents because they just want it to be accepted and love which I didn't feel as a child and I think after that my parents guide like had very long conversations about leave where we're going and that really helped with like getting to figure out what what I WANNA do in life rather than just thinking about what they want. Appreciate you sharing that because you know I guess the family dynamic in any culture you you know as always kind of so sensitive so fragile and now you're you know you're in your own words. What would you say you were at at that point when you did tell your parents you know this is how I feel but it seems the same time they were there to support you I always felt like I wouldn't be supported if I tell my family about like oh I think I am depressed or I like feel sake of my my head so I was really scared and I didn't tell them because I felt like they would take that. I'm like crazy quote ill so for the longest time I held how did but when I actually like had the courage to tell them something thing they were very supportive and I was amazed by and I think if I didn't have support of wouldn't have been the same with like along the process and everything 'cause like even though I know that it should not be like taboo to go see a counselor search. Seek help in my mind. I had that idea that counseling is for people who are like week or who were not normal normal quote which is not at all true but I just had that sick mutation in myself so if I didn't have like support from outside I wouldn't have been able to let myself think that I'm okay. Hey I seeking help and I'm okay for feelings and things that I was feeling so now now then how would you say your own cultural and racial identity infuses with the own understanding of your mental health challenges and now of course the journey they run. I'm one of the biggest things that I've learned here was people. Were very open about mental health issues. And I don't know if I was like in in a very prestigious or very fortunate group of people that I talked to but I was in a program where people were very considerate about helping other people and who liked to be like Go into medical fields in the future and I think generally just care about health and mental health is like a very big component in health general. Because I think mental as important as physical health and I was just amazed by how people are like. Yeah I have depression. And I'm I'm taking medication to help me get through it and there are so many people people who are actually dealing with their mental health not like trying to shut down and trying to have it and the cells AC- actually seeking help or talking talking about it. It was life changing for me because I know lake. It's changing rapidly in South Korea but still there are a a lot of topics that are voided when people are talking about mental health. So what came here and see just everyone talking about it freely. The and like they're happy about it. I was like okay. This is what she do and I just saw hope in like people's respectively they can change in South Korea. People are changing. I like how you said that you know your treatment on this as any other physical in this of course why we always say here at nahmias nominee as well because that is very true An you talk a little bit more Abo- The language of mental illness because you want to go into advertising as part in psychology background but so specifically now than in South Korea. How is the language of mental illness described versus? Now that you live here Minnesota Minnesota. You talked about here. It's much more open there. It's more taboo. Of course even closed off in the sense but it's it is there is a progression of understanding. But how does that differ as in like when someone says they're dealing with depression or anxiety which are like the one one of the most common illnesses that people go through people. Look at you like look at you with such sadness like they would just. I don't know it makes me feel like they're kind of feeling bad for are you but in like a looking down way so like all your. Your mental is so weak that you're actually going through something that's consider as an illness which is a for me is just kind of bizarre because I think everybody experienced a certain amount of mental illness in their life like nobody is happy. One hundred percent. Ah Time and when someone says they're experiencing a mental illness they look at you with someone like they. Just look at you in a different way so in that sense you you have the support of your parents and so then we're able to you start humanistic Castillon your own as well too. But so.

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

08:53 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Of i've differences in what people go through in general and for me i would say it was also weird to that coming to minnesota. I remember my first few years. I felt very outcasted and i went to go seek advice. Some people advised me to join the chinese cultural club and stuff and that was weird to me because although is perfectly great advice i i never had to seek out a chinese cultural club to feel accepted back at home but then i have to here so it's just it difficult for me to adjust to this place but i've also found great things about minnesota that i can never find in california and and i'm really grateful that i came here because i feel like i've learned about whole different perspective and a whole new side of our country that i can now use in my future when i'm helping my future clients because i know i'm going to be meeting people from all different walks of life and all different areas and it truly differs the culture shock is definitely real and i only hope that people will do more to try to connect and learn about each other's cultures rather than sticking their bubble because i noticed that kind of thing to hear i noticed kind of a bubble of just being being raised and born and raised in the midwest and you kind of just wanna stay here in the midwest. Don't really want to branch out. I noticed that within a lot of my friends here and the mindset in california's quite different so i really just hope that everyone is more accepting and willing to understand other cultures cultures more and in just you said talked a little bit more about <hes> <hes> to cultural makeup of minnesota and california would say for california really the family is a network but it's not you know the the central yeah. It's that's a good way to describe. <hes> versus minnesota is so how is that factored into your support of uh of your your mental illness. I'd not gonna lie when i first came here and started noticing these differences i had a lot of jealousy and and almost slight resentment that <hes> there's such a different type of lifestyle here and i feel like i almost felt like i grew up with the lack of love compared to a lot of the families here in a lot of the typical kohl way children here were raised <hes> and when i went back home over breaks and stuff and discuss this with my friends back in california. They also definitely noticed that difference in general. It's taught me that. I need to be more proactive myself in getting the help i need. I feel like the differences it plays a huge role but <hes> at the end of the day like we are given what we're born into. You can't change anything about that and <hes> seeing the differences princes at i was pretty hard for me and <hes> i took it pretty negatively but then i realized that there are from when you were in california to where you are now minnesota what has been the most than single influential support in your own mental illness journey <hes> i have always kept in touch with my therapist back home. Even though i have a new his here in minnesota <hes> i think that would be one big source of help because he's known me okay since my hospitalization days and so having someone that's been with me for that long <hes> is really helpful full while adjusting to a new place because he's able to give me help like through perspective that is not like a newcomer like therapist purpose here having to start all over again. It's it's pretty tedious. Link just developing that therapeutic relationship it takes time and i am since i already had one back in california. <hes> we agree to stay in touch through skype and i would say that that was something that's helped me a lot through transitioning xinning between the two states to talk about to now they were your perspective has kind of remained has remained constant because of the connection with therapist or has it changed my perspective on on your own understanding of your your mental illness. <hes> definitely i think changed <hes>. I think it's changing the biggest way <hes> through my idea of i always thought mental illness like i knew it was not curable like permanently but i always thought like you know after going to therapy. It should be almost pretty much gone but i think the biggest thing that i realized within these past few years is that it is not something that will ever leave my life. It's more of something that i just have to learn to cope with <hes> and once you learn how to cope with a it's it's totally possible to live a normal daily life with these disorders so i think that was the big shift going from a mindset of like wise this still prevalent in my life to more of i understand it's going to stay in my life and that's totally okay and there are ways to deal with the so so you said now that your mind ship has shifted <hes>. We don't talk about you know the family dynamic. <hes> in your father was with the accepting however just in terms of your cultural racial identity <hes> how is that you know put into perspective again your understanding of the <hes> your own mental health <hes> and just disappoint poor structures now that you have in place yeah definitely different <hes> <hes> i would say even just <hes> <hes> after time has passed and with years doing therapy. It's kind of just become more normalized within my family. Which is why. I think it's so important horton to start somewhere like to start treatment somewhere start talking about it somewhere because as time passes it will become less awkward and less stigmatized stigmatize and i think that's definitely what happened within my family <hes> for example to in terms of medication my first year after being diagnosed i i was suggested to take medications but my parents refused until a year and a half later. They realized i was not getting any better better and they thought okay. We have to try medication. At this point. I know so many people in the asian community that struggle with mental disorders orders but are not accepted by their families or not comfortable discussing it <hes> and i think the more we talk about it within our culture and the more other families realize like oh if your daughter also has this. My son isn't like he doesn't stand out that much then <hes> <hes> or it's not as unique absurd as i thought it was because it's truly not it's such a common thing we i. I think my parents it took them a lot to learn about mental health and and i would say i think that's one way that i feel happy to have been diagnosed. A sounds pretty weird saying in yet but i'm honestly.

minnesota california chinese cultural club kohl horton
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

11:01 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Totally fine in and free and then after that they required apparent signature and i remember i brought the form home and my parents refused to sign it so i couldn't receive anymore accouncing after just one session and so that's where things started to kind of go downhill. <hes> i face is a lot of family difficulties. <hes> my family was pretty broken around a two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen <hes> my mother mother left us for about a year and a half so i lived my father and my brother for a while just us three <hes> it it was just a lot going on and <hes> a lot of abuse both physical and emotional and at the same time i was not allowed to get any sort of help <hes> and also in chinese culture there is a huge stigma on like saving face and like like making sure that there is no shame within the family. I'm sure we've all seen that within like milan or something but it's actually very real <hes> so my parents were very adamant about never ever speaking about these problems outside of our household <hes> which i know is it's pretty common in many cultural <hes> families <hes> and i did because i was in a very very bad place to the point where i wasn't allowed to cry at home because my mom saw that as a sign of weakness and just of not being a normal person which is obviously not true at all so i would often cry at school because i had nowhere else to release that pain pain and teachers started noticing and that's kind of how the whole process started of me realizing i do you need to get help and it took years to convince my parents but after years of battling through that <hes> it got ought to a really bad point where i was hospitalized and it was actually after the first time i came out of the hospital that is one my parents finally agreed to start some sort of treatment and so that's when i started <hes> psychotherapy for the first time so he said the counseling session the one in <hes> to place when you're in seventh grade and then after you know you hospitalization then you were able to receive treatment after your parents guests <hes> okay so how new year's thought what was there was about four years between <hes> because i was hospitalized the summer of my junior year of high school aw oh actually no. I'm sorry it was sophomore. Year of high school was about three years in between but since then i've been receiving therapy so since that <hes> i kind of support structure was in place after <hes> you. You said you were hospitalized. How did your parents react in the now. How were your how was your own mental health diagnoses now anyway i guess in terms of how was it being recognised. Yes and how did you feel yeah so my parents found out that i ended up in hospital from the hospital calling them. They didn't bring me. I know that's pretty common. Some parents bring their children to the hospital to keep them safe. I was found by the police after my first suicide attempt so they actually found out i was in the hospital little by coming to the hospital and seemingly there which i sure it was very difficult <hes>. They tried their best supportive. My dad tried very hard to be supportive. My mom kind of freaked out but <hes> which i know is pretty common for parents in-stat are noticing this in their children for the first time it's kind of like out of nowhere and they don't know how to deal with it. They don't know how to help their children but my dad starting from that day on he definitely changed a lot just his mentality and mindset towards towards mental health to he realized like this is something i need to take seriously now for my daughter's own wellbeing and life if anything <hes> so he was onboard pretty much after that my mom it took a a bit more time to convince but <hes> the hospitalization is truly the turning point and so actually when i first entered the hospital i was about fifteen i think sixteen and i was actually diagnosed with major depressive disorder and panic disorder so those reminder original diagnoses back then and those were definitely the disorders that i suffered with at that time i used to have panic attacks daily <hes> i had to stop school and become homeschool because i'd have panic attacks everyday in class so after i was diagnosed with that <hes> the hospital when you get released from there they also set you up with like a plan for the next steps. What are you gonna do now to keep yourself safe and so they kind of forced forced my parents to follow that plan pretty much and that's how i started getting professional help so the next few years were really tough if i i thought things would get better but if anything it definitely went the opposite route <hes> as i said mentioned before i had to leave school become home schooled i ended. I attended a outpatient program at a hospital nearby my home and every day from eight to three i went to the hospital and then at night i would come home and do school <hes> so it was very much not a typical high school school life but i think it was absolutely necessary for me to go through that treatment and go through all of that <hes> and and as the years have progressed <hes> i've gotten so much better with dealing with my panic disorder and they've lessened each year and now i only get one. Maybe once it's every three to three months compared to back then every day so definitely a lot of improvement and once i got to minnesota soda i had to find new treatment so i went into m._c._p. Minnesota center for psychology and i had intake assessment mitt and that's where they re diagnosed me because it has been a few years since i had been diagnosed and here in minnesota is where i received the diagnosis houses of borderline personality disorder p._t._s._d. Which is much more fitting to me now so i also learned that like mental disorders can shift in someone's life and your symptoms can change and honestly my depression has been a lot better i i. It's almost not even there anymore which i'm really thankful <hes> but it's definitely shifted towards different sort of issues that i've been dealing with so the treatment that you received in california now you're of course a student here in minnesota each currently going to <hes> m._c._p. Uh-huh ep can you describe had those two. How is the treatment differed at all yeah <hes>. It's definitely been different. <hes> i've struggle the law trying to transition and adopted minnesota <hes> i i think the biggest reason is because i grew up in such a diverse area coming here was very different. I also notice i mean and it's not there's no blame for anyone. It's not anyone's fault but just because i feel like there is less diversity here in minnesota. It's harder for most people to understand other cultural perspectives. I noticed that things that i wouldn't have to explain explaining california. I'd have to explain here and that became and it became hard to when people do not understand me in the way i was used to being understood and but i do notice that people are very willing to learn and i think that's why it's important and for minorities to speak up and talk about how they feel because it's not that people of caucasian people are not willing to learn. They are it's. It's it's just because for me. I never had to think about these things growing up because i was just naturally exposed. It was just a part of my everyday life. I didn't have to go out of my way to learn about other cultures. It was just around me all the time so coming here. It was extremely difficult. I definitely felt outcasted pasta often even within treatment. I'd say i tend to therapy group and i noticed that things that people talked about in group. I no longer could relate to <hes>. I feel like over here. Family is a lot more. There's a lot of importance in family here and i think i really admire that and that's something that i've always wanted in my life. So i just notice there are different types of issues that people go through between these two states in minnesota family. Structures are quite prevalent and well set. I feel like people here have pretty strong family structures. That's actually not something that i saw common in california so it was almost weird for me to come here and see my friends like being so close to their parents because in california that's actually not common a lot of times. <hes> and i think it has to do with in white families. They really value like being a tight knit family <hes> and in other cultures. It's a little bit more separate. <hes> it's more about focusing on successor yourself in a way <hes> but i just noticed.

minnesota california milan Minnesota center three months three years four years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"If i were to leave people with one last thought it would just be really just to listen to one another other and empathize with one another. It's not a competition. We're all struggling together so what's important is to just listen and and to accept and i think if you do that then the person next to you will respond that way to welcome to wellness color on the mental health and minnesota podcast produced by nami minnesota the national alliance on mental illness wellness in color is a podcast series that explores perspectives on mental health to reshape the cultural language. Each of mental illness visit now minnesota online at nami m. n. dot org subscribe to the podcast and listen on the nominee minnesota website or wherever you get your podcasts and now here's your host nami minnesota staff member caroline ludi welcome to wellness and color on today's episode. We're speaking to university of minnesota student jasmin quinn jasmine welcome. Hello nice to be here. Thank you thank you for being here. Some talk a little bit more about <hes> jasmine's background here just before we begin our conversation living with borderline personality disorder and post traumatic stress disorder twenty one year old jasmine quin battles the two worlds the rigors of student life attending college in minnesota while also navigate her cultural background. We're talk of mental. Illness remains heavily stigmatized today. She talks a wilson awesome color about the barriers she has faced both personally and culturally going up first generation chinese american working hard to knock down personal and cultural barriers she shares oh years of mental health treatment and support has given her a brighter outlook on the future of a wellness journey tug a little more about our sponsor here. These efforts was supported by the national center for advancing translational sciences of the national institutes of health award number you l. won t r zero zero two four nine four the content is solely. The responsibility of the authors is not necessarily represent the official views of the national institutes of health so jasmine just telling moore more i just about your own story here <hes> kind of starting to start with now that the mental wellness part i so now you're you're terminal twenty one years old and you're currently a college student new so you can live with b._p._d. Barn precise our in addition to push my stress disorder but what how how were you able to support your own illnesses in terms of your own own healthy wallis well starting from junior year of high school. Actually i've been receiving treatment for my mental health and i've continued that up until this day <hes> and i think that is one of my main ways of staying on track and in coping with these because i've learned to live with it except instead of like trying to push out of my life but <hes> i go to d._b._t. Which is dialectical behavioral therapy. That definitely helps with my borderline a ton <hes>. It's a pretty intensive therapy program but i highly recommend it to anyone who's going through b._p. Sorry <hes> and and <hes> it's twice a week. <hes> there's a group aspect and individual therapy aspect and i think it's a perfect mix of enough therapy for for you to learn and at the same time practice your skills and so now that you're kind of on this pathway to own support <hes> you just talk a little bit more about know your background as first generation chinese american as well to living with a mental illness yeah definitely so my parents are both immigrants from china. They both became american citizens fears after they arrived here <hes> and then they had my brother and i in california so i grew up there a pretty diverse city. I grew up in san jose. <hes> it's a huge city as well. I think the the populations over a million now which is insane but my parents up until about three or four years ago we're definitely clean not accepting or understanding of anything that deals with mental health in chinese culture just does not exist in china. It just does not exist in general there is no treatment centers. Mental health is honestly thought of as like a taboo or joke just <hes> they just don't find it a series thing and not legit to them either so growing up. My parents had that mindset concert and i actually started having difficulty starting in seventh grade. I believe middle school. <hes> and i remember going to counseling thing for the first time just in school just the school counseling services and <hes>.

minnesota nami minnesota university of minnesota china san jose caroline ludi wallis california official moore twenty one years twenty one year four years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"To help you get better. Thank you for that Kim, you just speak briefly about the design of the device shore. Yeah, we saw the bracelet. If you look on our website, it looks very much just like a an activity tracker. And we we did design this purposefully because you know, I hit it for twenty years. We want to make sure that it's on your terms when you share about your behavior. So we designed it to be discreet and to blend in, but the beauty is that we're seeing more and more people, you know, just as we're talking about mental health today. More and more people talking about mental health more and more people talking about specifically hair pulling disorder skin picking nail biting, and you know, sometimes just leveraging the bracelet as a way to to say to a friend. Oh, you know, it's it's because I have this disorder, and it's helping me take control of it. And just it's been really exciting. When people come back to us and say, oh, I told a friend. They thought it was cool. You know, like the reaction like we're so afraid of what other people think sometimes? And and that's why we hold it back. And that's why we hide it. But sometimes I think we have to recognize it. Everyone's afraid of what of everyone else is thinking about them, like even when I'm sitting in a meeting, and I'm pulling my hair, and I'm thinking, oh are they looking at me. Are they seeing me? The reality is they're also sitting there thinking is my hair. Okay. Is my you know, my notes, right like whatever like everyone's so in their own minds. So hopefully, this helps you build awareness of where your hands are. So you can take control you can hopefully then have enough confidence in yourself to start sharing your own story and releasing the baggage because like I said that baggage just feeds itself and that's our goal. Our goal is really to help people learn to love themselves. Caroline noticed that I end all of my emails with love strength awareness. Love yourself. Be shrug enough to go after what you want and to be aware enough of what's happening around you. So that you can make the right choices. Thank you so much fearing an I agree with that too. Is so important that you know, we he said before big h other up by as while we recognize that everybody is dealing with. No, their own internal strife, so it's appreciated. Yeah. Shared your story. Thank you for additional resources related to this episode. Please check the podcast show notes and visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI dot org. You've been listening to wellness in color on the mental health in Minnesota podcast produced by NAMI, Minnesota.

NAMI Minnesota NAMI dot org Minnesota NAMI Caroline Kim twenty years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"I would say that talking about mental health reinforces in my mind. At least that I have to take care of myself and that it's important to take care of ourselves. And we can't take care of ourselves. Welcome to wellness and color on the mental health and Minnesota podcast produced by NAMI, Minnesota, the National Alliance on mental illness wellness, listen color is a podcast series that explores perspectives on mental health to reshape the cultural language of mental illness. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI N dot org. Subscribe to the podcast and listen on the nominee, Minnesota website or wherever you get your podcasts. Your host for this episode is now me Minnesota staff member Caroline Ludi your co host for this episode is Maritza steal a member of the nominee. Minnesota multicultural young adult advisory board. And now, here's Caroline. Welcome to wellness and color before introduce our very first guest Catanzaro. Mattel and guest host Murtagh steel hike to share a wellness in color began our multicultural young adult advisory board helps me Minnesota and providing education and outreach to build positive relationships with Minnesota's multicultural communities over the past year board members have engaged in discussions of their personal experiences and those of their community when seeking understanding or help for their mental illness. Many of the discussions we build the discrimination that community members faced in their search for information or help a little bit of butter guest. Guitar Ellie, an educator artist in international published researcher Catania's shares her wellness and color story about living with postpartum, depression and her road to mental wellness after immigration to the United States originally from India geek, grew up in a variety of cities and has a deep. Appreciation for different cultures before coming to the US. She taught postgraduate English literature at Panja university. A strong advocate for social Justice gay is currently studying community health at Normandy college. These efforts were supported by the National Center for advancing translational sciences of the national institutes of health award number. You L one t r zero zero two four nine four the content is solely the responsibility of the authors in does not necessarily represent the official views of the national institutes of health Murtagh, take it away. Thank you. Caroline. Good morning. Thank you so much for being here with us today. Yeah. Good morning. I just wanted to ask you just to get the ball rolling. What does healthy mean to you for me healthy is a balance in your life, which is I know pretty hard to achieve these days. But definitely something when you feel mentally Haley physically healthy and spiritually healthy too. And it's a state where you are happy. And you think that you have control over some of the things that you want to do you can organize your life. And lead a life that you want to sometimes it won't happen. But at least, you know, that you have tried and you don't feel bad about it. And you keep on going. Okay. Thank you for that. And you talked about maintaining this kind of balance in terms of being healthy. How do you go about that? Yeah. Like you said it's not an easy task because every day. There are circumstances that you may not have foreseen. There are things that may happen. Sometimes it's your own physical health that might come in between. Sometimes it's your state of mind, your mental health that might interfere to maintain that balance physically you're should be in a good health. So that is the first thing to do. I would say, but at the same time, you should also pay mentally healthy. You should have. Good state of mind about yourself. You should value yourself, which is pretty important. And when you will you yourself, you know, what you want from your life, and you can make an effort to achieve that. So to maintain that balance. It's really important to know your own self to know, what you want and how you can achieve and once you make an effort towards that side, you know, you can achieve it and you'll make an effort and you'll definitely go towards that. Even if you feel sometimes you would keep on moving because that's your dream. So once you have a dream, you'll definitely move towards that and to maintain that balance. It's more like to take control of your health physically and also to work on your mental health at the same time. And I will also add that spritual health is equally important as far as I'm concerned because once you have. Faith. It helps you and it also helps in your mental state of mind because then you are not afraid of the coming circumstances that you feel that you can do what you want to do. They white beat events. There might be things that might be coming into your way. But definitely you'll keep on

Minnesota Caroline Ludi NAMI Minnesota Murtagh advisory board NAMI N NAMI National Alliance United States Mattel National Center Panja university Haley Ellie Normandy college official Catania researcher India
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

12:12 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Welcome to mental health in Minnesota produced by NAMI, Minnesota. The National Alliance on mental illness, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and adults with mental illnesses and their families. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI M N dot org. Hi, this is Brian Jones with NAMI Minnesota. Here is a short episode with k king nominee, Minnesota staff member discussing programming related to exile in older adults you can contact Kate king via Email at K king at NAMI M, N dot org. So it's her first initial k and then K I N G at NAMI M N dot org or call the office said six five one six four five two nine four eight. Here's K welcome. I'm k- king the older adults program coordinator and community educator for adult programming at NAMI, Minnesota the national lions on mental illness, I have a series of five programs under the umbrella of gray matters. And today, I'm just gonna briefly tell you about one of those five programs what you need to know about aging and anxiety. And this program is particularly it is an hour and a half program. If you take the programmer, if you have the presentation scheduled at your nonprofit, or at your church or at your workplace, and it's an hour and a half. But today, I'm just going to highlight some of the parts of this particular program. I'm exiled disorders is the most common of the mental illnesses. It's three times more common than major depression. But it also has high correlation between having Zaidi disorders and also living with major depression, the correlations about fifty percent. So we're going to talk them about exile symptoms risk factors in older adults in this presentation. You learn some different types of anxiety disorders, you also learn a little bit about treatment management and recovery. Little bit of discussion about suicide, although I hope you'll. Consider taking some of the suicide prevention classes that we offer at NAMI Minnesota a good one, for example to take would be a one and a half hour class called Q PR question persuade refer. It's a gatekeeper class that's taught nationwide, and it's really helpful to learn the basics about suicide prevention, I'm and then also in our anxiety on older adults learn about resources to support older adults set live with anxiety disorder and anxiety disorder. I'm really has an early onset. Actually, the average age of onset is eleven so half the people who are going to develop any signs and symptoms of anxiety disorder in their lifetime develop them by age eleven and then the other half is after h eleven so that's really what brings down, you know, the mental health figures too early age onset, anxiety, really contributes to having that be such a low age on the statistic is at age fourteen fifty percent of people who are going to have signs and symptoms of any mental. Health issue in their lifetime will have those by age fourteen by twenty four if you're going to have any signs of symptoms anytime in your lifetime of an end mental illness, you'll have those by age twenty four and so the exiled disorder average of eleven really does bring down those figures. Now, can you developing Sidey disorders as an older adult for the first time? Sure. But it's not as common someone who perhaps has developed some signs and symptoms earlier. But the beauty of getting older, and there's a beauty to that beauty getting older is that you learn to manage a life managing illness. So, you know, you raise your kids you work. I'm you go to post secondary school. You keep learning. You have a vacation home you live life. And so I'm excited disorders can be mild. They can be moderate they can be really severe and like all illnesses there really are ebbs and flows to mental illnesses. It's really rare for people to be symptomatic all the time. But the same thing is true with other. Illnesses. You know, if you have multiple sclerosis MS, you typically are not symptomatic at a high level all the time you have ebbs and flows to it. If you have lupus you have ebbs and flows to it the Parkinson's disease you have ebbs and flows to it. Well, the same thing is true with the mental illnesses so with anxiety disorders. It's really I will anxiety is natural. It's something that everyone experiences. I would have to say that my experiences at the greatest fear few asked our general population with their greatest fear is they probably say public speaking. And for someone like me, not a problem. But the majority of US citizens don't like doing public speaking does that mean you live with an anxiety disorder? Absolutely not that is normal fear anxiety are essential for our survival. You know, it's built into our DNA. If we see a bear on the superior hiking trail, I think we're gonna turn around and run his fast as we can away from that bear. And we're going to have the palpitation. Heart, and we're going to have the tingling in the sweating and all those sorts of things does that mean that you live with an anxiety disorder? No means that you're normal. So executive though again, if it's over an extended period of time, and it affects your -bility to do your skills of daily living. You know, then it's time perhaps to get into see a doctor and with older adults are with people of any age. It's really important to get in for just a good workup because so many other things in life can look like a mental illness. So, you know, their medications that have anxiety a side effect. So you could be taking medication for something else. And all of a sudden you develop some some things that look like anxiety disorder. You could also have something happen in your life. It could be something traumatic that could happen, and perhaps that triggers what looks like anxiety disorder, but it's really good to have things checked out. So you go to your general practitioner. And then of course, if they suspect that it might be something related to anxiety disorder. Hopefully, then they're going to give you a referral to a mental health professional, and that mental health professional might be, you know, psychiatrist psychologist, it might be a licensed marriage and family counselor. It might be. You know, any or all of those those folks, but it is important that general doctors and nurse practitioners practitioners. Learn a little bit about the mental illnesses because I think that's where most of us start. And that's a good place to start because it's not always mental almost that. We're seeing could be something else. So, you know, going back to my point about you know, that fight or flight that's built into our DNA that doesn't mean you live with a majoring Zaidi disorder. So what makes a diagnosis usually occur is at your reporting your signs and symptoms. And if those symptoms are persistent, if they're excessive if they're life altering, you know, that's when a doctor or the first health professional you see perhaps makes a referral. So what about aging, you know, makes us anxious? Well, there's lots of things I'm a death of spouse's death of friends. What happens is that? We tend to have people our own age as our friends we tend to marry tip. People that are close to us in age. So that means that you're gonna have a fair amount of deaths at the same time. Lots of good friends may die because average age of life expectancy in Minnesota's eighty one. Also, you might be dealing with an illness or a medical condition as you age, you might hear that you have dementia. You might hear that you have macular degeneration losing the center vision of your I I'm your more isolated typically because perhaps you're retired. You don't have something that you do every day for eight hours a day. Like go to work you could have some hearing or vision loss that's pretty common as we age. We could have changing financial resources. You know, I think most of us thought we'd never lived to be our eighties. So we've saved but we haven't been able to save enough. Am I going to have enough money to last until I'm eighty five or ninety or I'm a hundred we also can have a change in physical independence. It could be because of disabilities. But it also could be maybe that we're not driving anymore. And consequently when you live. In greater Minnesota. And there's not public transportation readily available. You can become pretty isolated fact we live in Minnesota where our weather's not always the greatest in the winter, we have ice, and we have snow you could be quite isolated in your single family home because of the weather then also just leaving the home of many years and having to make a transition as we get older some of us end up moving closer to relatives. So we might move across country to be by our kids or we might move from four bedroom. Home of many years where we raised our kids and now move into a high rise one bedroom apartment, and so it's not so much that older adults don't flex with the change. It's that those are a lot of losses in snot just the loss of the physical structure of your house. It's the loss of the neighborhood kids next door. It's a loss of the church. That's just a mile away where you've gone for a long time. You'll find another church you'll meet other people. It's. It's just gets harder as you're older. And it's just a lot of changes at one time. So I'm not gonna talk about signs and symptoms now. 'cause that's why we'd like you to tend the the hour and a half class. But I do you just need to mention that we sometimes overlook late lights symptoms as we don't do it. Maybe this much with young kids or as much with twenty year olds and thirty year olds. But you know, an older adult may not want to share some things that they're experiencing because their fears that their family will see them as incompetent or perhaps a family will say gosh, if you're experiencing this you can't live alone anymore. So by divulging that kind of information, you know, they're fearful that, you know, their kids may cause some change to occur like a move or that their kids are going to see them as not able to be independent anymore. The other thing is that you know, the greatest generation those folks that are from that World War Two era, don't openly talk so much about mental illness. They really believe that they should be able to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. That's true for all ages. But you particularly get it with the greatest generation, they may view, you know, mental illness or anxiety as evidence of a moral failure. Maybe they didn't pray enough. Maybe it's a physical weakness that they don't think they have or they don't wanna own up to there's so much stigma about mental illness that they may feel shame about it. The fact that they might have an emotional problem. So there really are a lot of resources for people that are struggling with anxiety disorder, and there are some older adults specific resources. So you know, that we have some direct service providers in Minnesota that work directly with the older adult population. And so one chance when you hear presentation on older adults name Sidey is elaborately. Get some tangible places that older adults can get some help for anxiety disorders, perhaps major depression and some other mental health issues that may develop. So you can go to our NAMI website now Minnesota you can put that into a search engine or you can go to NAMI M N dot org. You also can make arrangements for a presentation with NAMI Minnesota. And you can also do that by filling out a request for presentation form on our website. If you wish one of the series of gray matters to be presented for your organization is it NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI M, N dot org.

Minnesota NAMI Minnesota anxiety NAMI NAMI M NAMI M N depression National Alliance programmer Brian Jones US Kate king coordinator vision loss Sidey executive fourteen fifty percent
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Substance use issues, we can get at that. The other thing is that, you know, as you age, you know, you develop many disorders, and so I think that makes it hard to see one practitioner who understands all of the parts of aging person. We don't have enough geriatricians which are people who've had internships and residencies in older adults specific we have very limited geriatric psychiatrists. You know, a psychiatrist already has an internship in a residency in psychiatry, and then they would have an additional residency or internship injury attracts, and so you know, as you get older with your mental illness. Ideally. You be seeing geriatric psychiatrist. But you know, we have so few of them. The other thing is that, you know, we do have resources not as many as we'd like, but there is an older adult version of mental health first-aid. It's an eight hour class that can be taken by people who work with older adults an older adult themselves can certainly take class volunteers at work with older adults can take the eight hour class. Also, NAMI offers a series of classes in general called gray matters of which the substance use disorder classes part of there. Also are geriatric inpatient units in Minnesota. And so again, if someone has acute symptoms, they can go mental health issues. They can go to geriatric impatient unit where they will have people that understand the aging body, you know, as well as mental health issues for substance use disorders, you know, much of the treatment for older adults is done is day treatment or is done as outpatient treatment. There really is only. One impatient. Specific for seniors. And that's Florida. However, there are impatient. Treatment programs for substance use disorder that have all adult ages and soldier adults would be mixed in a in a impatient. Setting with eighteen and older. There are a couple of programs in the twin cities though that do very specifically work on an outpatient basis with older adults that are struggling with substance use disorder. And so, you know, we'll talk about those if you take the class. So I encourage those folks that are managing a substance use disorder. They may have been managing it for many years in may increase, you know, as they are now older in the same token, it may actually improve as people get older, but it is never too never too late to get help for a mental health issue a substance use disorder. No matter what your age. So if you want more information, you know, about the gray matter series at NAMI, Minnesota, you would go to our. Now, knee Minnesota website and there you'll find the information under our older adults section. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI M N dot org.

NAMI Minnesota NAMI Minnesota Florida eight hour
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Improper use or overuse of these substances. And then talk about some age related changes that can elevate an older adults sensitivity to their facts. And we're gonna learn about, you know, co-occuring disorders, meaning a mental health condition co-occuring with a substance use disorder, and then again, some older adult resources in Minnesota that people can tap if they're concerned about a family member or concerned about themselves or a friend another program and the final program in the five part series. I have under gray matters is understanding bipolar disorder schizophrenia, and borderline personality disorder in older adults and that's a two hour program. We'll talk about risk factors and the warning signs of those three disorders again, BI polar disorder schizophrenia, and borderline personality disorder in older. Adults participants in the class will learn about treatment management recovery. Learn some strategies for working with someone who has these acute symptoms or maybe they have emerging symptoms and learn about suicide prevention and other resources that are specific told her adults. Now, those are the five programs that are under the gray matter series. In addition, there's a national course called mental health first aid. It's taught nationwide in every state. They're in different versions of that mental health first aid class. It's actually an eight hour certification class, and I've taught adult mental health for stayed for many years. But there is. An older adult version of mental health first-aid it uses some of the same core course material from mental health first-aid for adults, but the examples and the work groups and the statistics and things are related to older adults. So that class a suitable for senior workers, I'll give you some examples people that could take older adult mental health first aid could be working in nursing homes. They could be people that work in assisted living. They could be people that work in senior housing, independent housing. Maybe it's housing services. That's fifty five. Plus, they could be people that are volunteers with churches. Sometimes they're bef- render programs at churches that of gear their outreach to older adults. It could be oral care staff. You know, were they have folks that their synagogue and mosque and church that are older adults, and it could be part of their visitation program. It could be people that are meals on wheels. Volunteers, you know, not all meals on wheels are delivered two. Older adults, but the majority are so be volunteers at work in a meals on wheels program, it could be people that work in a senior center. You know, some of the cities and counties have senior centers it could be staff that works in a social security office. Where many of the people that are coming to that office are there to sign up for benefits and things like that? It could be people that work in a health clinic. Again, if the clinic has a large population of seniors as their patients, you know, it could be someone who works at the front desk. So just a wide range of people that are senior workers. So that's the audience for older adult mental health first aid. Is it NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI M N dot org.

NAMI Minnesota Minnesota eight hour two hour
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Welcome to mental health in Minnesota produced by NAMI, Minnesota. The National Alliance on mental illness, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and adults with mental illnesses and their families. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI M N dot org. Hello, everybody. This is Brian Jost with NAMI Minnesota. This short episode was recorded in July two thousand eighteen with NAMI, Minnesota staff member k king discussing briefly an overview of the older adults programming offered by NAMI Minnesota. There will be two other episodes coming up soon. Also short one about substance abuse in older adults and another about anxiety and older adults and those will both be with cake king also an entire about the related programming. You can contact K king either via Email that k king at NAMI N dot org. So it's just the letter K and then K I N G at Phnom EM in dot org or call the office six five one six four five two nine four eight. Here is K. Hi, this is Kay king and the older adults program coordinator and community educator for NAMI. Minnesota my background with Nahmias I've been with NAMI for nine years. I previously managed a large retirement community with independent and assisted living and also managed a home healthcare agency at NAMI, besides I'm doing programming for professionals on topics that relate to older adults and mental illness. I also do adult education I have a series for professionals that work with older adults. Sometimes we call folks senior workers that has five programs that fall under a category called gray matters the first in the series of gray matters is understanding depression in older adults and it's about one and a half hour program again for professionals it suitable also for older adults themselves, and it's also. Suitable for family members of an older adult, but primarily written for professionals, and you know, feelings of sadness loneliness and grief, they're really normal. However, when the sadnesses intense if it's felt for a long period of time their fears with our ability to get along with others or to carry out, the activities of everyday life. Then it could be depression. So in my presentation, we talk about risk factors for depression warning signs, some stigma treatment recovery and some resources for depression in older adults and suicide prevention resources are also discussed although we also at NAMI, Minnesota have a wide range of suicide prevention classes, depression is not a normal part of aging. A second part of the gray matter series is understanding anxiety and older adults. And that's also a one and a half hour program. And we talk about anxiety. Orders and older adults. You know, it's primarily a disorder that starts young the average age of onset, Franks -iety disorders is eleven and so typically older adults may manage it throughout their lives. So again, learn symptoms and risk factors of anxiety disorders of which there are quite a few different types of anxiety disorders, which is one of the things that you learn also treatment management recovery, and then again resources specific to supporting older adults at live with anxiety the third program in the series. And these are not successful though. I do suggest that the depression one be the first in the series. If you're going to have someone from NAMI, speak more than one time. We also have a program that's called mental illnesses co-occuring with dementia, and that's about a two and a half hour program. And I do that with an educator from the Alzheimer's Association, we do jointly, and I want you to know that, unfortunately, those people that have severe mental. On this is not mild not moderate, but I'm really severe are at much greater risk as they age of developing dementia than the general population. So together, an also Alzheimer's Association educator and myself, we together talk about those as co occurring disorders. Another program under the umbrella of gray matters is understanding substance use disorder in older adults and quite frankly, substance use disorder. Also is sometimes something that you age with. And you know, we're gonna talk a little bit about the abuse of alcohol abuse of prescription drugs and the abuse of street drugs among older adults. And unfortunately, it's one of the fastest growing health problems in the US, we're going to talk about, you know, the negative consequences of the improper

NAMI NAMI Minnesota depression Minnesota Kay king Phnom EM Alzheimer National Alliance Brian Jost US Alzheimer's Association coordinator Franks nine years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

08:46 min | 3 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"They. Welcome to mental health. Minnesota produced by NAMI, Minnesota the national lights mental illness, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children in adults with mental illnesses and their families. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI helps dot org. Hello. And welcome to another episode. My name is Brian Jones with NAMI Minnesota. This episode comes from part two of four part wellness series hosted by NAMI, Minnesota you heard you may have heard episode twenty three with grant the pharmacist. This is episode twenty four from the same wellness series event. This was the second speaker Arvind nyc who talks about mindfulness and meditation Arvind is with the science of spirituality meditation center in Columbia heights, Minnesota. Thanks for listening again to the podcast in joy this episode. Gonna shift gears here a little bit. So I would like to introduce Arvin from the meditation center as so he's going to be talking to us a little bit today about meditation. So give him a big round. We'll pause. How's everybody doing? Terrible. Hopefully, you'll feel better that was a great conversation. And thank you, Dr grant. Grant. Yes, I learned a lot as well. And it was very educating. So we'll continue the the process of learning. I'm an engineer, by the way, I'm not a doctor, and I have a history of mental health then concerns in my own family. And so I felt very connected to this mission off NAMI. So thank you for giving me the opportunity and recently, my son who's a teenager is seventeen year old he organized, a mental health symposium to school high school. And that was a even I was myself like could you do it? And he said, yeah, I'm doing it. So that he waited a couple of senators and he invited the professor from the university. And I was it was very hard to see that the young kids of today, they can do so much. They already thinking about what I never thought it, and he's h so, and that's how I met NAMI the organization. And I came to know about them talked to wonderfully about the mental health and everyone of us needs to be healthy physically mentally emotionally in. Also, I'm going to talk a little bit spiritually. So mindfulness meditation is is very very powerful tool to be completely healthy to be to be completed holistically healthy Jonah, just physically mentally, and what can meditation do I think many of you already probably meditate selected? No. But before I do that. Let me tell you a small story about how meditation is impacting what makes me do this. Because you must be wondering. If you're an engineer, why are you teaching meditation, and I've been practicing meditation for last fifteen years, and before that I had no idea what this is in whether exist or what is do. I knew that some people like to close their eyes and set for a few minutes or hours, and I had no idea what why they do it. But but then they came to know about it. I'm fascinated that such a such a great tool exist out there for all of us to practice. So how it impacted Cerise? Bentley me, and my wife, she is she teaches meditation to children, and we go to this shelter home. There's a big shelter homegirl like bunch of families. Stay and she teaches two children and one of the moms came to her just yesterday and said, Hugh don't know how much difference you're making our life. And she said my daughter who's who's probably ten or eleven year old is is suffering from severe depression. And she was worried about her daughter and her daughter quietly started coming to meditation in the shelter, and then all of us and the doctor commented what happened to her? She's all of a sudden looks happy. She's getting better. What are you doing differently says the only thing I remember doing is she is going to this meditation class, and she really likes to go there and enjoys it. I don't know what that is. And so in doctor, you should find out, and maybe even you go and find out what's what's happening to the daughter. So she came to the class yesterday, and she was a Mesa. She wanted to meet my my wife. And she said thank you for providing meditation to my daughter. It has made a whole lot of difference to her. So and we do this free because we we have armed profession edition teaching is not our profession, but we have been benefitted tremendously is transforming. So we thought we share as much as we can. That's all I go to laboratories reestablishing last ten fifteen years meditation center. Now, we got about hundreds of people come I reworked meditate, the center free, no charge. And we were able to do that. Because some people who are benefited where able to contribute enough to to make this running, but we provide free of charge to everyone. So I'm here to tell you what is meditation and people have different understanding of meditation and holiday, do it. Do I have to say or do I have to stand on Cedeno beach and a certain posture and really one of the benefits I'm here to deal. Defy some of the the technique, and we'll actually practice at how that okay, we'll practice meditation. So you go home some practice done. So before I go into the details. I also want to tell you one more thing is that I come from a science background. So the meditation can be seen as mobile as practice for health holistic hell for focus for the benefits for the for the mind for the emotions, and it's also can be practiced. Religiously some people practice as part of the religion. And I'm here only to cover the science aspect of it. I'm not here to cover the religion or fate. Although I welcome you to explore that in your own own ways and found mazing that meditation has been practiced by pretty much every religion. So it is a universal. So universal tool. It's not like only east. I know that some of some people think, oh, it must be Buddhist people meditate, but that's not true. Thank you look into the history of mankind. Meditation has been there throughout the war is just that it prospered on one place more than the others. Okay. So let's let's go to the bottom question. How many people here already? Actes meditation want two three four five six seven about half the class already practiced. But addition commercialisation straight now, how many people this is the first time, you're meditating. One two three. Okay. So that's kind of ratio. I see they're they're more and more people are aware what meditation as you may not have been practicing. Some people have heard about it might have been tried a couple times. And this will be a good introduction. To those your first time you're in for a ride putting grind? So. All right. So first thing we need to do is everybody. Okay. Be ready for the next light. Relax. Why are you relax because it's all learning in a relaxed way. This is a way to relax ourselves to relax in the sense of not just physically take a deep breath. Just let go of any pressure, or what am I going to learn gonna learn is going to be useful? Don't worry just enjoy the conversation, and whatever comes to your mind, you'll filter ask anytime, we'll hope that when you walk out of this room. You have learned something on a mcelwee. And when you relax your ability. Learn is higher true. Except for Dr grant, I'm just saying because he has to remember memorize those pharmacy names. I can't even remember my own for medicine. I don't know how you remember all of them. So well, but meditation does improve your memory. So we'll talk about that. Okay. So how many people have to list? Many of you have to list while we just talked about one to list medication, and that's an important one. What we have thousands of other things right along to the list.

NAMI Minnesota NAMI Minnesota Dr grant engineer Arvind nyc Brian Jones Arvin Jonah Columbia heights Cedeno beach school high school professor Hugh Mesa ten fifteen years seventeen year fifteen years eleven year
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Hi, I'm Kay king. I'm a community educator eight years for NAMI Minnesota. I'm a family member who was born to a mother lived with mental illness in my only sibling lives with bipolar disorder. I hope you can join us get to know NAMI. It's a session where we talk about education support Naveh cosc- at NAMI, Minnesota at the session, you'll have a chance to learn about classes and programs that we provide you'll have a chance to hear about our support groups and our help line. You'll also have a chance to hear a little bit about the legislative policy first-person, language and other advocacy programs that we offer we have daytime and evening sessions available when hour in length, please go to our NAMI, Minnesota website. Nami helps dot org to see locations times and dates of our programs. Hope you'll join us. Nami Minnesota champions Justice dignity and respect for all people affected by mental illnesses to education, support and advocacy. We strive to eliminate the pervasive stigma mental illnesses affect positive changes in the mental health system and increase the public and professional understanding of mental illnesses. Nami Minnesota vigorously promotes the development of community mental health programs and services improved access to services and increased opportunities for covering call us that six five one six four five to nine four eight or Email NAMI helps at NAMI M N dot org. Nami Minnesota's website is NAMI helps dot org outside of Minnesota. Visit NAMI dot org to find your state NAMI organization.

NAMI NAMI Minnesota Minnesota Kay king Naveh cosc bipolar disorder eight years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

04:02 min | 4 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Amazing. What would you say it is meant free personally been involved with the work of NAMI? Can you ask such in depth question? What does it matter to me? Personally, it how many different ways could you answer? How many different ways it has just? Gave me like I said, it gave me hope gave me an it was like an anchor when I felt like I was. Adrift? It helped me stay. I guess it just helped me stay period and not just give up and it. It helped me put one foot in front of the other take one day at a time realize there is always steps forward. Try not anticipate be too afraid of the steps back it so. That's what it helped me. Do. It just helped me to stay into not completely fall apart. And it helped me I think. To always be there for him. You know, no matter what. And, you know, even when there was a time not a year or so to after he had been diagnosed, and he he was his behavior was was ruining our family just just ruining it. And so finally, my husband, and I said you have three months either get your act together or get out. Because you're taking the rest of us stone with you. And that can't happen. You know, we will never not love you. We will never not be here for you. But you can't live here. If you don't get your act somehow together, you know, or at least start. And. He didn't. And so he did have to leave. And there were times. I didn't know where he was not a lot. I mean, we never lost complete touch. But as he started to heal. He would look back on that. And said that was probably the best thing you could have done not to to just say, you know. Yes. I know you have a problem. And I love you in all always speak here for you. But no, you can't take us down with you. That's just. So I think it gave me the ability to help me find the strength to do that. And to always always be there for him. Because there is a hopeless hope, and it wasn't his fault. I mean, it wasn't like he was he didn't like it either. Right. Right. Right. Yeah. Yeah. So I thank you for coming in. And having this conversation today, really appreciate your time. Again. Good to see you mean. Minnesota can't be Justice dignity and respect for all people by mental illnesses. Your education, support and advocacy. We strive to eliminate the pervasive stigma of mental illnesses affect positive changes in the mental health system and increase the public and professional understanding of mental illnesses. Nami Minnesota vigorously promotes the development community, mental health programs and services, improved access to services and increased opportunities for recovery. Call us at six five one six four five to nine four eight or Email NAMI helps at NAMI M N dot org. Nami Minnesota's website is NAMI helps dot org outside of Minnesota. Visit NAMI dot org defined your state NAMI organization.

NAMI Nami Minnesota Minnesota three months one foot one day
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

07:45 min | 4 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Welcome to mental health and Minnesota produced by NAMI, Minnesota, the national lights mental illness, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and adults with mental illnesses and their families. Visit NAMI Minnesota online at NAMI helps dot org. Thanks for listening. Everybody. This is Brian Jones to be your host for this episode. We have a longtime, NAMI volunteer and supporter sandy with us recording. We're gonna hear Sandy's personal journey with with NAMI. And this is this is another story to help celebrate NAMI Minnesota's fortieth anniversary sandy can we get started by sharing what brought you to NAMI? What brought me to NAMI was a. Was fear. I think actually I. It's been a couple of decades ago. My son was a senior in high school. He had been having some issues where he wasn't. Orcas behavior was unusual. But I have to say I think I'm the Queen of being able to bury my head in the sand and deny what I saw and passed it off to the fact that our family was going through a rough patch, and you know, that can be that bad because we were all seen a therapist to kind of work through this rough patch. However when during the spring early spring of his senior year in high school, he had a complete psychotic break. And there was just no. Even I couldn't deny that something was drastically wrong. He was hospitalized. And didn't I can't remember the details of those those years that he was so sick. I call the dark years, and, you know, thank goodness. They are now light years, which is something. I will I can get to in a in a bit. But the the dark years when he was so terribly sick. We're we're just so frightening for me. I just. It's not like I didn't know about mental illness because I'm a registered nurse. I I know some but after say when I was in nursing school. Which of course was eighteen years twenty years before he got sick. I didn't like my mental health rotation. It just kinda. It's scared me. It made me sad. It twist like we really don't have much treatment here. How long was that rotation three months, and we were at a state hospital? And this was now back in the late sixties? Let different a whole lot different. Just a whole lot of it. And it shows. It was it was really a hard rotation for me for whatever reason. And one thing I really didn't like so what's the one crisis health crisis in my life. You know, if it's if a health crisis is going to hit your family when it hits your child. It's devastating. It's just so I think fear brought me to NAMI fear and. I was so afraid of losing him. And I felt like I did lose him. So how did you actually hear them? I can't remember is that the oddest I get that. I I have an idea of how I was introduced to NAMI. But I'm not confident that it's it was like, I don't know. Exactly who told me. I I think what happened was when we were visiting him in the hospital. I must have seen something some wear that. Because I'd never heard an army never heard of it. And they offered what they now. Call family family, right? And they at the time it was called journey of hope. And I I like that myself, and we had greeted Lancaster that remember which guest we had on the episode. That was talking a lot about journey of hope when it was called that. When you know and for listeners right now, we're talking about journey of hope becoming family to family, and that's the class that is pure led by two family members. And it's so the whole classes people who have loved ones with mental illnesses twelve weeks. And it's phenomenal. It is it. So it's one of it's a class that NAMI Minnesota offers family. I I can't there just aren't words for how helpful that was for me because I felt so alone. You know, I felt like nobody had I didn't know anybody who ever gone through this, and it's different from physical illness. When people know that someone you love and care about especially when it's your child has a significant mental illness. It's different, you know, did you so for your family member living with a mental illness after you took family to family who is there a difference in how you interact with your loved one. I you know, I can't really say that with any certainty, but there was a difference in how I perceived. What was happening to us? I had perceived it as hopeless. You know, he he was lost to us and. In. I just I had such a terrible time coping with it. And I didn't really feel like I hit anybody. I could talk to that would get it. Sure would really get it until we found the journey of hope and that was just a. A lifesaver too. I've heard sue Hansen describe it as she felt like arms were just in folding her when she was at that class. And and I just felt like you know, I was offered to. A new chance or something. You know that all was not lost. There is always always hope. Yeah. My parents went through the family to family class because I live with a mental on this end. And it was amazing for them. And and I can remember them telling me that one of the last classes where person came in and told their personal recovery story that that that's that was the first time they thought things might be okay. For me, you know, hearing that. And I'm trying to look up that episode that that were it was really disgust about journey of hope and famine of family try to find that. We'll keep talking. Okay. So.

NAMI NAMI Minnesota Minnesota Sandy Brian Jones Lancaster sue Hansen eighteen years three months twelve weeks twenty years
"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

Mental Health In Minnesota

02:58 min | 4 years ago

"minnesota" Discussed on Mental Health In Minnesota

"Floor. So that's just been fascinating to learn and hear other people's vulnerability and stories as well. People share some really personal stuff. Yeah. So back to the walk team, the the NAMI walks and your team captain team in our own voice is possibly if people are searching for a team to join. They can search for Enron voice. Right. Or maybe I over. He went win. It's registered and everything. It will be we're we're doing the the the next training is coming up here. I believe in June. The next inner own voice speaker training is coming up here in June. And I'm actually I'm presenting at that training. So. But they wanted to bring an ask me to wait until after they were all trained in in order to start dealing with walk related stuff. So eventually yes that will be on their please come join us. We'd love to have you. So then eventually your name will be in the NAMI walk registration system as team captain can look for Gemma Ericsson J E N N A, if you're searching for a team to join or donate to even if you can't walk -solutely cool to have you is there anything else on your mind that I didn't ask that you wanna share? No. I just think this is this is such a wonderful opportunity. Wonderful. Thing that she says are the tickets are doing with the not only getting getting the word out with the podcast, but the forty year end of cursory getting to hear all these different stories been listening to some parts of the podcast, and that's been just so so wonderful to hear and I'm really excited to hear all the the stories of the other folks that come through some really excited about that looking forward to more volunteering with NAMI. And and we'll see what lies ahead. Well, thank you so much for being part of this project and coming in and having this conversation. Absolutely, thanks for having me. Minnesota champions Justice dignity and respect for all people affected by mental illnesses to education, support and advocacy. We strive to eliminate the pervasive stigma mental illnesses affect positive changes in the mental health system and increase the public and professional understanding of mental illnesses. Nami Minnesota vigorously promotes the development of community mental health programs in services, improved access to services and increased opportunities for covering call us that six five one six four five tunein four eight or Email NAMI helps at NAMI M N dot org. Nami Minnesota's website is NAMI helps dot org outside of Minnesota. Visit NAMI dot org to find your state NAMI organization.

Nami Minnesota NAMI Minnesota Enron Gemma Ericsson forty year