17 Burst results for "michael calorie"

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

09:19 min | 6 d ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Kovic summer going. I think we're really post hoven. Mike but i guess it's been okay. All things considered. Yeah it hasn't exactly worked out the way that we all planned. But we're going to talk about that today and the gradual return to normal normal. Can't get here soon enough higher one. Welcome to gadget lab. I am michael calorie. A senior editor here at wired and lowering dead senior writer at wired we are also joined this week by wired senior writer mayor and mckenna marian. Welcome back to the show. Thanks folks of course you are wired's public health reporter so our listeners may be able to guess that we are talking about vaccines this week in the second half of the show. We're going to talk to wired. Senior correspondent adam rogers about the latest news on backsied mandates. But first we have mayor and with us to talk about booster shots last month. The white house announced that the us would offer a third shot of the pfizer and maderno vaccines to any american. Who's already received two doses. There is some backlash to that announcement. Researchers and policymakers around the world of push back accusing the us a wealthy country of prioritizing itself over other countries whose citizens still haven't been able to get even one shot. now merrin. You recently wrote a story about this for wired and of course the debate continues so let's start with the biden administrations booster shot plan. What's the reasoning here. Well i think people would actually like to know that because it isn't entirely clear so part of what made that announcement in august. So complicated for people. Is that the the white house task force and the president just up and announced that we were going to get boosters getting in front of the health agencies who are supposed to make that decision that the that was announced with a particular date september twentieth. You're gonna get a dose in advance of the advisory committee that tells the fda whether something should be authorized the fda than usually blesses that and advance of the cdc's advisory committee which usually goes through the evidence and make sure that things are safe ineffective after which the cdc blesses that decision. None of that has happened yet. And there have actually been meetings of those committees since the announcement and they've actually pushed off discussion of boosters in what's taken to be a demonstration by people in the know that these committees are not going to allow themselves to be pushed around seto. Just start with the. This is internally controversial in the united states and it's also extremely controversial director general of the world health organization has been practically begging the united states and other western economies to not go ahead with boosters on the contention that it uses up doses in highly vaccinated populations that are needed in the developing world where africa for instance has only about two percent of its resonance vaccinated. So all of this has been tricky so there are obviously a lot of geopolitical issues to unpack here. I'm also curious about the physiological implications or requirements revolution shots. What has the research shown so far about waiting efficacy. If in fact that's what's happening in have similar or different from other booster shots. Many of us have gotten throughout our lives. So it's really great that you brought up the comparison to other vaccines because in other vaccines particularly the vaccines get as kids. We get booster shots routinely. You know things like how. Hepatitis b. In rotavirus diptheria a polio. All of those vaccines that we get. We get multiple versions of that shot. One two three sometimes four sometimes a fifth before kids going to school so the idea of a booster is not something foreign and we probably should have anticipated that in the case of the code. Vaccines that we'd have to be doing the viral equivalent of like setting up the ball and volleyball tennis bike. It over the net right. The question here is not so much that boosters inappropriate because they were perfectly well in the context of other vaccines. It's more kind of the promises we made to ourselves for. What these vaccines were going to do. It is good to remember that in the clinical trials that ended last december december twenty twenty and caused the vaccines to be approved. Well technically authorized. The one of them has since been approved. What they were tested against was whether they prevented serious illness hospitalization and death and they still do that really really well not necessarily quite as well as showed up in the trials because those were sort of perfect conditions. They were about ninety five percent protective in that. But still the real world Efficacy of these vaccines is still up in the high eighties. To ninety percent has tested like healthcare workers who are in a really stressful relief challenging environment. Where they're exposed to lots of virus that the challenge is that we do see some studies that show waning efficacy less protectiveness against getting an infection. Now in somebody who's fully vaccinated and infection might be quite mild or might kind of put you in bed for a couple of days the way the flu might but it's not taking you to the hospital in. It's not killing you but we did such a good job of telling people that these vaccines were just gonna be unbelievably protective that that sense that breakthrough infections are happening in that. Some people are getting sick and that protection against infection might be going down into maybe sixty percent has unsettled people. And that's really. What's behind the call for boosters. It's not that fully vaccinated people are getting sick and dying. It's that fully vaccinated. People are getting sick so that brings up like a really interesting ethical argument because you could give somebody a booster shot to keep them from feeling bad or can give somebody a vaccination shot to keep them from having to go to the hospital and possibly be put on a ventilator and possibly die and you know it does feel like this is a time in human history when global thinking really should prevail. I think that's the argument that the the world health organization that other other governments are making exactly and initially the world health organization asked that rich countries not just the united states other countries are moving ahead on boosters as well israel russia. Germany has advanced the idea. France has advanced the idea the. Who asked i to that. Country's hold off on boosters until at least the end of september just a day or two ago they asked that moratorium be extended really until the end of the year to make sure that there's the maximum available amounted vaccine distributed to loan middle income countries to boost vaccination rates. Now the white house which is still going after. The booster shots for americans idea has pushed back on. This is a false choice. They say we can expand plenty of vaccine in the united states and still honor our commitments to the developing world but the question is really whether the commitments that we've made are enough and and the second question is really even if we even put aside our ethical obligation to the rest of the planet. Do boosters really do what we most need to do in the united states if we've got lost track of the most recent numbers but let's say one hundred eighty million people in the united states have gotten to some degree of vaccination does improving their protection. Actually get a safer as a society or should we be spending those doses trying to get them into people who have been vaccinated yet for whatever reason. The people who were packing out hospitals at this point are almost all unvaccinated. If we spent those booster shots getting those people protected we could increase protection across the country. Reduce the strain on the healthcare system reduce the occurrence of other infections that are happening in the healthcare system as a result of people being super stressed in their jobs there and keep people from having to be life flighted across a dozen states because there aren't any hospital beds nearby so if the us were to give it supplies to poorer countries rate effectively divert the shipments add to people who need it like. How does that actually work. So i i think when we hear about this proposal to donate supplies we get this mental vision of those heavy duty. Labar cooler that we all heard of that. Keep things at minus million degrees right to keep the vaccine viable. I don't think anyone is suggesting that someone goes into the cooler in your local walgreens or academic medical center and takes out the boxes and puts them on fed ex and sends them to africa. That's not what's going on but what is going on..

Kovic hoven michael calorie mckenna marian adam rogers united states maderno merrin biden administrations white house cdc world health organization fda pfizer Mike Hepatitis b polio
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:58 min | Last month

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"How much would you pay to go into space. I would pay one hundred nineteen dollars per year. that's it. I pay the exact amount that amazon prime costs. Because according to jeff bezos my purchases helped send him to space and so he can subsidize my trip to space I don't think that's gonna fly. Pardon the pun. Hi everyone welcome gadget lab. I'm michael calorie senior editor here wired and i'm laurin good. I'm a senior writer at wired. And we're also joined by wired editor at large steven levy. Hello steven welcome back to the show. How michael and lauren and a always delighted to be on the show. And we're delighted to have you of course because today we are talking about space and jeff bezos as you probably heard the former amazon. Ceo and richest person in the world flew into space this week. His blue origin rocket carried him and his three best. He's out of the atmosphere where they floated around for a few minutes before safely landing back on earth. The event wasn't just about bezos also aboard the rocket were the oldest and youngest people ever to go into space eighty two year old former pilot wally funk and an eighteen year old pain customer who seat on the rocket cost many many millions of dollars the blue origin flight this week and the virgin galactic flight last week were significant steps for the commercial space industry and stephen. You've been following bases astronautical ambitions for years and you are in texas this week to see the blue origin launch therefore delightful stories about the event written by you on wired right now that people can read. So let's start with the big question. Why does jeff bezos want to go into space so badly. What's in it for him and part of me. I think you mean jeff. Space house well as interesting. There's actually two answers to that question. One is actually two parts of the question of employed one is why is he spending money. Space company and the second has wide as he want to go to space The company is because he's got this grand vision that human beings are by lord's going to live in space colonies not on planet earth. And this is something that he became a number of by reading the works of a gerald. O'neil who is a futurist through postulated. This and jeff is a high school. Student gave his valedictory speech graduation about this and has been passionate about this pursuing it ever since so. That's the grand goal and everything. The blue origin does is going to step by step ferociously which is its motto Move that plan closer into being now. Why he wants to go into space is because he's like a space nerdy once the adventure of it and he built his own company to take him into space and He actually skipped a couple steps in the step by step process by moving up his chance to go to space They never tested human flight before this. They did fifteen flights without humans and he wanted to be on board the very first one and take his best is brother with him along with the oldest and youngest people so it was kind of a spectacle which broke character for blue origin. Which have been trying to do things. Very very deliberately before that Let's quickly talk about the four passengers on the flight. I think we have to start with wally funk. Yes she she's unbelievable Eighty two years old and she was part of the mercury thirteen which in nineteen sixty. Someone got funding to train a group of thirteen women in the same way that the astronauts of the mercury seven. Who would go into space. They were officially nassir astronauts. They would be tested and trained and wally Her name is mary wallace spunk. Everyone calls her wally Did the test so well. She the standards of almost all the mercury seven astronauts but nasa Denied mercury thirteen. They actually had a congressional hearing and scott carpenter and john land. The astronauts testified that this isn't the place for women space. You really can't have women there. Places to support astronauts not the be astronauts and not a rejected the whole idea of women in space for many years and by the time they did accept women they had all these requirements that wall. We didn't qualify for like an engineering degree. Were military experience so even though she was a trained pilot and trained other pilots and Passed all the tests. She never got the fly in space she became with it and she signed up in two thousand ten for richard branson's program which for two hundred thousand dollars could give her a seat in the virgin galactic spaceship Jeff bezos in a very canny. Move newell this and plucked her out of the waiting list for richard branson and put her to the top of the list for blue origin and eighty two year old. Wally was on board raring to go. She's unbelievable she's a real sparkplug and her only complaint. Was you know well. There's not enough room. I couldn't see the whole earth and get me back up there again. You might say that. She got the the prime delivery treatment right expedited shipping very careful not to make amazon puns. Very good and stephen. Did you have the opportunity to talk to wally. When you were in van horn they were very salvi The only gave interviews to broadcast folks and while we herself. They're a little nervous about her. Because she's a predictable. So early interviews were in a group of four where exposure will be limited. Well i am super happy for mary. Wallace funk aka wally Let's talk about the other folks who were in the rocket with jeff bezos. There was also oliver damon. Who's the youngest person to ever go into space and then mark bezos jeff businesses brother. How did they end up on the shortlist. Well mark basis. I think i had a family connection. Yeah jeff describes him as my best friend. I know mark a little. You know we hang out at ted super nice guy and jump. As was his brother so that was his ticket on..

Jeff bezos wally funk michael calorie Hello steven amazon steven levy laurin bezos virgin galactic jeff Pardon mary wallace lauren john land stephen gerald michael richard branson neil
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Lauren mike lauren. Do you remember the dress. The one that was either blue and black or white and gold. Who could forget the dress. And i think i think side is blue and black. What about you. I saw it as white and gold. Lets yeah i know well. It was one of the most popular articles in wired's history and probably one of the most indelible moments in internet history and it is now spawned partially spawned a book that is entirely about color is written by today's guest. So let's talk about higher everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I m michael calorie a senior editor wired. And i'm laurin good. I'm senior writer at wired. We're also joined today by wired. Senior correspondent rogers adam. Welcome back to the show. Thank you always glad to be here with fellow seniors. That's us last time we had you on was During the mars mission to talk about the red planet today we're just gonna talk about red and blue and green and yellow and white and black and all the other things. We are talking about color. Because adam are guest you just published a book called full spectrum. How the signs of color made us modern. It's about how we perceive color in the world around us and how that perception has led to important societal shifts in human history in the second part of the show. We're going to talk about some of the mysteries of color science. Which means that. Yes we are going to talk about the dress. But i wanna start with the basics. Adam you make the case in your book that the technological advancements made by humans in an effort to understand recreate colors have actually driven whole civilizations so please summarise forest now. The bulk of human history. Yeah you have no idea how hard that was to do in just a few hundred pages a right. Yes do that. Case that was. That was very much more. Cleanly put than i than i feel like. I've been able to do it because it's such a complicated issue because of course when we talk about color were actually talking about a bunch of different things. There's like the objective objective genitive scare quotes with my fingers. It's hard to see that an audio medium but there's the physics of it you know. There's photon screaming from the sun and photons bouncing office stuff is the most simplistic way to think about what colors or wavelengths of light photons of energy levels that are also wavelength. So that's confusing already. But you basically they basically the same thing and then and then there's also the technology at the surfaces that human beings make we take things from the natural world and we we grind them up where we do kind of now tech scale chemistry and physics and we and we make stuff and those things have colors and we can apply those colors. And then there's the the color that our eyes and brains perceive and turn into something that we can have cognition about and those are all kind of related overlapping But slightly different things but it is the pursuit of new ways to make many humans eyes and brains perceive colors in a way that they haven't before that has driven things as as varied as for example coming up with workshops in in in tens of thousands of years old archaeological sites in caves in south africa to where they found abalone shells and stones that were used to grind and mix it with stuff like fat and blood to make the kinds of paints that you would apply to a cave wall. Let's say the you'd seen a place like the sco tens of years later or Driving the trade on the silk road for example so for like a thousand years of human history most of the action was between these two poles these to trade centers in the abbasid empire in what we think the world now and basically picking beijing and the that trade was driven by stuff like spices and fabrics silk textiles by ceramics and porcelain and by the colors that those two civilizations could apply us on those things like for a very significant amount of time the ability to get very very high quality beautiful white porcelain or very high quality beautiful green porcelain which made in two different parts of china was one of the things that drove that trade. That's what people wanted. It was like That was like the killer app because they wanted to drink tea. Which was the new fashioned thing at the time and that happens that happens again and again is this. The pursuit of things that have color becomes So driving that drives economies which then drives the pursuit of a new colors which then drives the science to try to understand how those colors can be perceived and how they're made and then the cycle starts over again. Yeah remember the. I read iphone. Everybody went bonkers for that happens. And you know the the the the relationship between color and industrial design is a really profound one one that i didn't understand well until i started reporting the book but a lot of the like the famous name industrial designers who who we think of actually came out of the world of broadway design in the early twentieth century. This the drive to new kind of engineering and new stuff. That people could buy like the engineers sort of couldn't keep up with a reason to buy a new refrigerator every year. A new car every year. New locomotive every year whatever but the industrial designers came in with training for broadway where they were starting to use electrified colored lights for the first time and said you know we could just make them different colors and then people are gonna wanna and it really drove a ton of the though the the drop the the movement away from cars being any color you want except black for example there were others but black. Was the fastest. Drying paint that ford to get a hold of but in general motors changed their technology for making paint and could provide a bunch of different colors that shifted the power balance in the automotive industry in the early twentieth century fascinating. Adam this is the part where i throw a series of like kindergarten level questions because i feel like when we talk about colors. It's impossible not to say things like but why is the sky blue so so my question for you is who i came up with the names of colors like why do we actually call blue blue beautiful about you. Constructed that as a kindergarten level question and in fact that question makes linguists and cognitive scientists and neuroscientists and color scientists absolutely insane. It has driven so much research over gotten Certainly depend you think about this either one hundred years or five thousand years of human history like why do we call that color that color when you call it that color or are you seeing the same thing is. I'm seeing when i call when or why do we have different names for that color. So i'll tell you a weird story from the advanced level of that instead of answering the kindergarten. One of that okay. You're what you're asking me about. Or what are called in the parlance of the of the field basic color terms. Those are the words that only mean the color. So you use blue gluten free hideously complicated. Thank you very much So you don't mean turquoise for example as giving you like. I was like oh. I'm going to go with magenta chartreuse but i'll just stick with easy stat chartreuse. Great surgeries is a great one to use because chartreuse is named after this this alcohol booze that the monkeys making it was one of the first like distilled spirits mixed with botanical. So the color chartreuse comes from the the stuff chartreuse chart house because that's where they distilled in may the stuff and there's actually two of them right there's the green chartreuse yellow chartreuse it means like a yellow green color right so if i say chartreuse that's a color but it's not a basic color term because i'm talking about the color of the thing which is confusing because there's a green yellow and that's fine green yellow yellow green. They used to be to crohn's and the big one twenty eight pack yellow green and green yellow blue green green blue anyway. But but if i say yellow or green those mean themselves to you and me now whether we mean the.

laurin two iphone Adam early twentieth century twentieth century one hundred years michael calorie south africa china five thousand years today two civilizations tens of thousands of years two poles tens of years later first time adam second part wired
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

08:38 min | 5 months ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Upskilling citizen led innovation and the workforce of the future lauren. Mike lauren would you say that. The ship has sailed on the ever given story. Oh mike i personally cannot get enough boat content. I see waves and click so my question. Now i guess is what is the future of shipping. Now that the ever given is free. I would have to say that. You really are nerd. I think we all are hi. Everyone welcome to gadget lab. I am michael calorie ori- a senior editor of wired. And i'm learning. I'm senior writer at wired. We're also joined this week by wired's transportation writer on marshall. Hello welcome back to the show so good to have you here. It's so good to be here once again so you might have heard about the big boat. They got stuck in the suez canal last week. It was only one of the biggest stories on the internet. The cargo freighter given was cruising through the canal when it ran aground drifted sideways and got stuck there completely. Blocking one of the world's major shipping routes the giant freighter stayed stuck for a long time. Six holt days that whole time no other could get past the ever given the shipping industry scrambled to figure out what to do and global trade was thrown into chaos. On monday of this week. The ship was set free. Trade started moving again and the flood of hilarious names on the internet is now slowing to a trickle. But i'm sorry. But the fallout of this fiasco will be felt for weeks and months to come so later in the show. We're going to talk about how the shipping industry might hopefully avoid this kind of silly catastrophe in the future. But first we need to bring everyone up to speed on the big boat. So arianna please. You've written stories about this and you've been reporting on it since it happened. Please walk us through. What went down in the suez canal and also arianna if i might ask gadget lab if you could please evaluate the ever given as though it is a gadget. Thank you very much cash. I wouldn't even know how to begin to do that. So so it was last tuesday egypt's time that these report started to trickle out out of egypt that there was a big old container ship stuck in the suez canal. And so we're not gonna exactly know what happened for some time. Probably and the reason for that is because there are so many insurers and lawyers involved here that they have to do a very big investigation but it sounds like what happened is that there was a big sandstorm. A wind storm around the suez canal and it basically is a gigantic ship. I imagine we'll talk more about this later. Containerships keep getting bigger and bigger and bigger and this ship. It's at least stories with all its containers on top of it really truly gigantic and it sounds like the wind just kind of caught the containers like a sale and just neatly wedged this thing into the suez canal and no one could get by in either direction ships having issues in the canals not totally unheard of. But usually they're able to sort of pull over on one side on the bank and people can sort of worked on them. That did not happen this time. It really got stuck in there in the sand and it took six days to get out and it was extremely stressful for a lot of people involved in this gigantic global shipping industry. So when something like this happens like who's in charge like who do you call the the canal cops or something. Yeah so there's a suez canal authority which is run by egypt and the up the other interesting thing. I learned about canal operations. While i was reporting on the story is that there is a canals. All of canal pilots that get on their ships and are in charge of kind of guiding ship through the canal. Clearly something went very wrong here but yeah there's there's like a body that's in charge of operating the canal and yes. They had to act as canal cops and construction people To to get this this ship out of trouble and what exactly was on the ship. It's not totally clear everything that's on it because these are private companies and they're not necessarily all scrambling to say like oh my shipment of golf carts a or whatever whatever is on their Got got stuck. We know that this ship was going from china to northern europe. It's next stop is rotterdam in the netherlands and we know at least some of the things that were on there so according to some records that an analyst i talked to got a hold of there was some ch- injure on there. There was a men's tracksuits center children's clothing but but you can kind of gas That was really everything that is made in asia which is everything Might have been on here. A huge mix of stuff. We also know that on the So many ships were stuck behind the ever given both in the mediterranean and on the other side towards asia There was livestock static. Living beings stuck on ships Which is really sad. There is at least one hundred hundred and thirty thousand sheep that we're supposed to go towards romania literally anything you can think of was at either on the ever given or on ships that were trapped by the ever given. That's pretty bad. No no no no okay. So once the ship get stuck and there are people or equipment to are sent out to try to free. The ship who ultimately pays for that. Where does that funding come from. So so that's a great question. I don't entirely know the answer to magic. It's the canal authority. But i don't know for sure i do know that. The canal authority had a lot of has a lot of things ready in the canal to deal with situations. For example they have a bunch of tugboats standing by ready to deal with stuff like construction equipment standing by to deal with stuff. There was at least twelve tugboats that were at at different points. Either pulling or pushing this ship so they you know they had some stuff ready. This minor incidents happened. Sometimes they're ready to deal with those but this was such a weird freak thing innovative call in a specialized salvage crew That you know people that specifically deal with fixing chips in place and i you know making sure everything is okay making sure the equipment isn't going to hurt anyone it's a. It's a whole sort of infrastructure. There are an industry dedicated to helping ships be their best selves. One of the responses that we saw the incident was earthmoving equipment because The ship ran into the sandy shore of the suez canal. They were digging up the sand And we saw this photograph of like an earthmover digging the suez canal with a giant ship. Standing right next to it and that birth a lot of memes There was also the egypt canal authority. Who put together these sizzle reels of showing like the officials to job. Yeah amazing amazing content out of out of egypt this past week but yeah they brought in dredges to to make the canal wider A lot of stuff. The sizzle reels of like a lot of guys in suits conflict with their hands on their hips. Look be like that ship is stuck really appreciate what was what was your favorite meme view camera. Any specific ones. My mind is like a cotton. I know swiss cheese at this point. I like the one that showed the boat and said it said covid nineteen pandemic on it..

Mike lauren china last week six days lauren asia romania monday of this week egypt northern europe mike arianna this week michael calorie both wired suez canal Six holt days first least one hundred hundred and
"michael calorie" Discussed on Get WIRED

Get WIRED

05:39 min | 6 months ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Get WIRED

"Game in a are but have you ever listened to a podcast in. What is what is that. Is that spatial audio. Maybe i'm not sure well. We'll have to fix that pretender headset. Now please hi everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I m michael calorie a senior editor wired. And i'm laurin. Good a senior writer at wired. We are also joined this week by wired's digital director. Brian barrett hello brian. Hi guys thanks for having me. I welcome back to the show. Today we are talking about a are also known as automated reality this week. Microsoft showed off a new augmented reality. Platform called microsoft mesh. It's designed to let people in different locations meet with each other in a space that blends a real environment with virtual avatars. Microsoft is in the only company thinking that ar is going to play a big role in the future. A few other big name companies are working on air glasses too and sooner or later. You might use one of these headsets to attend a virtual birthday party while you do the dishes or sit through a powerpoint presentation while you stroll around your neighborhood. Doesn't that sound nice. You've really sold us on those useless. Well we're not quite there yet. The technology has a ways to go. And what's available. Now is a little janke so later in the show. we're going to talk about more broadly. But first let's step into the hollow zone lauren. You met with microsoft this week to talk about. It's big news and you had some firsthand experience with the new holland software in the process. How did that go right so this new software is called microsoft mesh and i think the important thing to note is that hull has been around now for several years and it's in its second generation. That's the hardware but microsoft already had a mixed reality platform. That would run both the whole lens. And in vr headsets and it connected to azure which is microsoft's cloud service that it talks about a lot so that was just called microsoft mixed reality and this new thing called microsoft. Mesh feels like the next step in this software so i've had a few a are. Vr demos in recent months with other companies. That are doing this kind of thing to..

Brian barrett Microsoft Today laurin microsoft second generation michael calorie this week first both janke brian one lauren holland several years gadget wired hull zone
"michael calorie" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:22 min | 11 months ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"On ESPN. 1000 Florida in Georgia, 14 14 minutes in the second quarter, Oklahoma's off 14 Nothing on Kansas. 19 minutes left in the second quarter of that contest, the other games going on right now in the top 25 Marshall Big on U Mass 37 to 10. Six minutes left in the third. Cincinnati's upsetting Nothing on Houston. The five in Oh bear cats upsetting nothing midway through the second quarter and that one and then at the end of the first Oklahoma State re 14th in the country. They're losing right now. Kansas State Three. Nothing in the first quarter of that one. That's a top 25 scoreboard right here on Chicago's count. Still Gladiator with us here for a week. 10 for college football. Chicago's college tailgate here on ESPN. 1000 Crisp. Let John Hood with you, Adam Abdullah. With the Saturday off We're going to lead you into never dame footballs and take on Clemson. That is a 5 30 pregame at 6 30 kick right here in the home of the Irish ESPN 1000 every Saturday here on CCTV. We try to put money in your pocket. Let's go, too. Saturday Down South as well as the action network and talkto Mike Alibris. He joins us here on ESPN 1000, the ESPN Chicago APP, Michael, It's Johnson and Chris. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me guys. I'm flying high after hitting a liberty money line earlier in the day, So you're catching me a good time? It's good. We'll praise Praise. Be Liberty job against Cooper, Did you text Can you before we get into something very games. Anything in game that strikes you right now, as we're keeping our eyes on Florida, Georgia A Florida Georgia, I think, you know, given the weather conditions were supposed to be a soggy, windswept field there in Duval County, but it does not appear to be slowing them down. So I would keep an eye on that, maybe hopping at half time to go over a live number. For the rest of the games on the board. Right now, I think you know Houston, Cincinnati presented some opportunities happen if Houston was able to score first, just because Cincinnati has been so dominant, and I think that sports books have lagged behind properly handicapping their games. For the most part, they just kind of have a bland offense, and they've been all that explosive. But in this spot, I think up seven. Nothing right now. I'm gonna keep my money on the sidelines. The one I did have circled, though, before we hop in. Teo Later Slate. Penn State Down 21. Nothing at home against Maryland. I almost pulled the trigger at 14 Nothing. Now I need to see if Pennstate even has a pulse in this game a little bit shocking to see the Terps just boat racing up in ST at Beaver Stadium. It is almost and we're gonna ask you about the other games. But like at this point this season, you have to ask Which team has looked worse. Penn State our mission in to this point in season And what of motivation certainly comes into play with some of these power five programs. You have players who you know mentally there 1 ft. Out the door, potentially with opt out. I'm sure that agents have taken advantage of the down period and are chattering in their ear. So Motivation and how hard they're playing. And you know some of the combinations of personnel that they had a shuffle to the cove it it's really create situations where the preseason predictions on these teams have been totally useless. Penn State now looking like they could finish in the bottom third of the Big 10, which is something that if you ask the Penn State, and a month ago, they were more concerned about potentially losing Franklin. To another job or to the NFL. Now it looks like he's got nowhere to go. Michael Calories from the action Network Insanity Down south with Jonathan and Kristen Chicago's college tailgate on ESPN, 1000 and the ESPN Chicago APP, Michael Big game That's going to be on our air. The biggest game I think for us in 1000 this year is Notre Dame and Clemson. Where the Sharps looking I was having a flow of the week. First of all, and where are we now? In Notre Dame, Clemson? Well, first, if you'll just allow me to see the ball go through the hoop on this one. I'm gonna clear my throat here and pronounce Constance quarterback deejay. We angle a lay. All right. I got that one on my country will refer to him as big think of from here on out. I think there was an opportunity for this line to, you know, get a little bit closer into that three and four point range, which obviously is a key number. What is held strong at 5.5, and I think it's shown the Sharps community their faith and doubt those 20. This is head coach who during his career dating back to 2009, as leading man of the constant program is 32 in 18 against ranked opponents and 30 and 20 against the spread in those spots. So he's proven, you know, with superstar quarterbacks and with bridge quarterbacks that he's been ableto win and win big games, So that is a point spread and money movement. That didn't really surprise me. What has surprised me is that there's been an influx of money on the over yet it has not moved very much. It opened 50 50.5 right now. I think given the injuries and issues the Compton has defensively as well as the huge step up and quality that note Notre Dame's defense is going to be facing in this game. 15.5 I think is off by close to a touchdown, and this should be in the higher fifties. I think there's a lot of value playing the over There's only one outstanding team when we talk about possible candidates to get to the college football playoff, and we have got to see Oregon play this season. Tonight. They will host Stanford. Right now I'm seeing their their favorite by 10.5 points. How should we play this game? We have yet to see the docks, but a lot of people thinking that they're going to be pretty good this season. I was actually surprised to see this bubble up all the way to 10. I think Stanford's a live dog in this game. They've won three out of last four in Eugene. So they're certainly not afraid to go into the environment. As we know due to covert protocols. There's absolutely no home field advantage in our stadium. On top of it. I think the talent disparity is overstated. If you look at 24 7 talent, composite rating organs 12th in the country. Stanford's right there, 1/20 and with the opt out, they've lost five starters, You know, since spring practice, Oregon is now moving a lot closer to overall talent levels for Stanford, and then you throw in a new quarterback in Tyler Shock. A new offensive coordinator and Joe Moore had located on the East Coast. So I remember more heads back to his 14 days. His transition depends state. It's not an offense that immediately flips the switch..

ESPN. Chicago Clemson Penn State Cincinnati ESPN Houston Georgia Oklahoma football Stanford Michael Calories Oregon Kansas Notre Dame Beaver Stadium Mike Alibris Maryland
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Lauren Mike Lauren are you on Tiktok I am on Tiktok unsurprisingly it was my young niece who got me into Tiktok I- don't really post to it though and I think my accounts private are you talk That's a hard no as we all know but I guess it's a good thing that you actually downloaded the APP on your phone because it's fate hangs in the balance, which is what we are going to be talking about today. Exciting. Higher everyone into gadget? Lab. I. Am Michael Calorie a senior editor at wired and I am remotely by my co host wired senior writer Lauren Good I. Think you mean aspiring Tiktok Star. Lauren. Good. Center all yours. We're also joined this week by wired staff writer Louise Matsakis Louise. Welcome back to the show. Hey, thanks for having me again of course. Today, we are talking about Tiktok since the APP is owned by the Chinese company Bite Dance, there has been some concern that collects data about American users ensures with Chinese intelligence services. So in August president trump signed an executive order labeling both Tiktok and another Chinese owned APP, we chat national security threats unless they could broker a deal that would transfer control over to American tech partners. In if they couldn't, both APPs would be banned in the united. States that deal has not exactly worked out. We'll get into the issues about data collection and what China actually wants later in the show. But first, let's talk about the apps themselves and let's start with Tiktok Louise we've talked about tech came on the show back in July and please if you can quickly take us through the history to this moment. Okay. So the history with Tiktok starts a few years ago when this Chinese company called by Dan's, which is sort of like. I hate this analogy but maybe the facebook of China and a lot of ways. They bought an APP called musically, which was this lip synching at popular amongst teens and tweens. So a couple years later as relations between the US and China started to heat up, Congress took an interest in Tiktok and they said, hey, you know millions of Americans are using this APP. You know maybe we should be concerned about that for a while it was sort of like you know a little bit of interest here. There are some senators put out statements, but there wasn't really too much happening and then the pandemic happened. So once the pandemic happened obviously relations between. The US and China completely exploded and the trump administration decided that tiktok would be a great pond to us to deal with relations with China essentially. So as you said, trump signed these executive orders and then there was this great scramble to buy Tiktok. So a bunch of companies expressed interest from Google twitter to Microsoft which for a while seemed like the main contender but then at Tiktok decided to reject the offer for Microsoft and now basically TIKTOK has decided to go with. And Walmart. So Oracle and Walmart have said that they're gonNA make an investment in Tiktok, and that's supposed to resolve the national security concerns raised by the company's Chinese ownership. However, as you mentioned, the steelers of sort of followed falling apart, there's a lot of confusion. I'm sure you have plenty of questions, but that's a lot. So I'll probably leave it there to start. I'm wondering what the involvement of companies like Oracle Microsoft Walmart say. The way. This deal is going right because you would think you would be some of the younger. Social media companies that would raise their hands and say, this is a natural fit but we're talking about like these stalwart companies at this point. So what does that say about how this is all gone down? Yeah. So let's take them one by one. So I think it sense for Microsoft here because unlike Google facebook twitter, some of these bigger companies they have not gotten a lot of interest from regulators about antitrust concerns. So Microsoft is not one of the companies that a lot of people are worried about having too much power right now for better or worse. So I think that Microsoft realize that there wasn't going to be as much scrutiny if they went for this. On, facebook I think that immediately a facebook said, hey, we want to buy Tiktok the trump administration would be like absolutely not already have two of the largest social networks in the country we're not going to give you a third to resolve the national security concerns. Walmart might seem a little weird here. However I think that they're trying to compete with Amazon and they're looking at in China live streaming ECOMMERCE is really popular. A lot of people buy stuff from social media APPS. So I think that Walmart wants to replicate that with tiktok potentially Oracle sleepiest. Most. Boring. Dad Tech Company, what the hell are they going to do with Tiktok great question I think it's worth mentioning that Oracle is a big ally of the president. So I. think that's a big reason why they're involved here is that trump already likes them their CEO served on his transition committee. One of their co is a big trump donor. He actually hosted a fundraiser for the president earlier this year so that I think looks even worse give it. How much of a circus this has been that they went with an ally, but I think that's the reason that they landed on Oracle here it's not a company that has antitrust concerns about getting. Involved with Tiktok, it's also a company that the president already likes Super Weird. But that's where we are at the moment you have to wonder how many teens and tweens on tectonic know what Oracle is or what it does. I WANNA assume they're all smart, but you know it's it's a different kind of tech company I sure I think one thing that. Is Important to note is that Oracle has a data business where they're collecting consumer profiles for advertising purposes. So it sort of makes sense that they might be interested in consumer. APP that's already collecting a lot of consumer data for that reason. So they're sort of if you squint a little bit, you can make sense of this, but it's very strange and. It's definitely a result of how weird this whole process has been. So at first everybody was talking about sale, and now we're talking about is a partnership How did that happen? What's the difference? Yes. So let's talk about that for a second. So Microsoft, it seems like from all these rumors was more interested in a traditional acquisition where they would get. The APP. All of its user base here in the US and maybe some other markets as well as the algorithm right? which is the thing that makes tiktok. So unique it's I would say the most out rhythmically driven social network out there by far. Dan What happened is that the Chinese government said if you would like to export stuff such as a recommendation algorithm, you need a special license to do that. So I think that Microsoft said, we don't have that special in..

Tiktok Microsoft Oracle tiktok China Walmart Lauren Mike Lauren facebook trump Tiktok Louise Tiktok Star US president Dan What Lauren Good Louise Matsakis Louise executive Google twitter senior editor
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Messaging App Oh, it's aloe. I spent all of my time in Alloa. My knee again, what aloe is? I'm just kidding it's the it's the one that comes on android phone. Nobody uses it you signal primarily? Okay and that's encrypted. Right? It is. It's very encrypted. Is that why you're using it yes. It is the primary reason why use it and that's exactly what we're going to talk about today. Hi, everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired senior editor Michael Calorie Aloe. That are you saying elegant. We're also joined this week by digital director Brian Barrett Brian. Thanks for coming back on the show. Thanks for having me. Oh. My goodness you guys. Okay let's talk about texts or specifically encrypted messaging. Brian here wrote a guide this week on DOT COM and it was a guide to using the APP signal, which many of you have probably heard of, and we're going to get into why we think signal is an APP that you should consider using for your digital communications, and then later in the show, we'll talk about some of the debates and the controversy around encryption. But first, let's talk about how and when you should be using apps like these. Brian Signal give us a quick high level for people who don't know. What is signal and why should people consider using IT So signal is an encrypted messaging APP like Mike said, but it's not just encrypted. It's end to end encrypted, which means that when it goes from your phone to the person's phone that you're sending it to or desktop. No one can intercepted inbetween it's encrypted. Through which gives you that extra layer of protection and security. It's been around for several years now and I think the reason that it is a favourite to take the stuff really seriously are twofold one it is a nonprofit organization that puts this out. So they are not sort of trying to weasel their way toward making money off of you and to it's open source. So cryptographer have had every opportunity to dig through the code there look for flaws. Any that get found get fixed really quickly they're really responsive and it's increasingly been adding features that are you normal people like to use. Stickers and a reaction Emoji. It sort of piled on these extra features lately to make it a much more well rounded APP, than it was for several years and it was sort of the end of the cryptographic community. And there's a bit of background to the Signal Foundation that we should probably mention as well. Right Sure so well. which part of you go in for Laura well? I. I'm not wrong. It was started by Brian acton right? So Cigna started by a guy named Moxie Marlin spike who wired profiled several years ago and he's sort of anarchist group. Who Really Smart. Intelligent Guy a couple of years ago Brian acton former founder or he's always the founder of What's that but you left what's at after disagree with facebook and he sunk fifty million dollars into signal to help add those features and to make sure it was sustainable for a long period of time. So he didn't create signal What's at does use signals underlying protocol? So there's a lot of interweaving but basically, yes, it is in terms of how it is sustainable brand act sort of the benefactor that's going to keep it running for the foreseeable future so. People who take privacy seriously already know about signal and they use it. But why is it something that regular consumers you know people who maybe don't consider privacy to be high up on their list of things to worry about their communications? Using it. Well you know. Partly, because you're not giving up anything by using it, it's it's sort of you know y lock your door if there's never been any crime in your neighborhood where you can still lock your door, you know they're. And I think that everyone thinks that they don't have something to be concerned about until they do and I think we're not also we're not thinking only of you know nation state elite spies here we're thinking of you know any kind if for example. If an advertiser facebook wants to look in the contents of messages. Right. It could do that potentially it has the ability to do that. So looking for a way where it's not just your plane spy games, but you're just keeping your your you have security in the knowledge that no one can look at this stuff That feels like a universal good more than a niche Maybe I'll do crime someday and I need you need to keep people from finding out. So you mentioned what's APP and I think that later in the show, we're going to get into some of the disagreements that exist in the tech industry around encryption but from a user perspective, what should people consider when? Deciding whether to you signal or whether to choose WHATSAPP, which we know has a huge international user base. And I. think that's an important thing which is that. It's important not to get too caught up in. Having, the absolute most concrete if you everyone you know news is what's at that's probably fine. That's probably enough for most people because again, WHATSAPP uses signal encryption, it uses the same sort of encryption that that signaled offers underneath it You know where you start to get into trouble is if you're using that, you're texting someone who does not use what's at then that is no longer encrypted, right or if you are using I messages and some and the person on the other end is not. You know then you are no longer encrypted. So it's more important. That's eight to know that the other person at the end of the line is using the same at that offers encryption does you then? Being. So married to was that, you won't Flinch Brian You mentioned that this specific encryption mechanism that signal develop for its own chat APP is also used by WHATSAPP and I believe there are other. There are other APPS that use it to like facebook messenger and Google Aloe, which we love to make fun of they also use a signals encryption. What does apple us for its own messages platform? So. Its own proprietary CRYPTOGRAPHIC scheme, which is controversial. Generally I. Think. People who spend their time studying. This are wary of anything that you can't see the the saints don't really own Crypto is what he says which apple has done now that doesn't mean you should be concerned about using. Apple messages. You shouldn't worry about that necessarily, but it is the kind of thing where if you're. You don't have as much sort of built in everybody's poked and prodded, prodded and audited this as you do if you're using signals. So if you are eight journalists or a dissident Mike I know you're a bit of a dissident. It's good to. Have that extra security. I'm. Sorry I was caught a little off guard there but. Calling Mike dissident. Through me. I will I'm wearing a tee shirt today that says fascism. So you know. So, even though the APPS we're talking about right now offering end to end encryption I'm wondering if there are other peripherals to these services that people should consider, for example, signal has or had they may have eliminated it by now feature that would alert you every time one of your contacts joined signal, which some people complained wasn't very private because it just alerted due to the fact that someone else in your network was using signal. And so I wonder if even if the the core technology. Offers a lot of privacy. As.

facebook Brian Signal WHATSAPP Mike I Brian Barrett Brian Brian acton apple Signal Foundation Alloa founder Moxie Marlin cryptographer director writer senior editor Laura Michael saints Google
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Welcome to Gadget Lab I am Michael Calorie senior editor here wired Lauren. Good is out this week, so we've got a bit of a different show for you. I'm joined by Wired Service editor Alan Henry and wired senior writer, Adrian so so first Alan Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me of course your debut appearance. It's great to have you and hello. Adrian welcome back a multiple time returning guest star on the show Yeah Hey Mike. Yeah my kid is out today, but I'm here without her. Today we're going to be talking about the various things that are helping us. The three of US get through the current global health crisis. Right now the first week of July we are months into the coronavirus pandemic with over ten million cases worldwide over five hundred thousand deaths, and whether directly affected or not, the crisis filled all of our lives with grief, fear and uncertainty, but we also know one thing that does a better job of protecting us than anything else, and that's isolation. So even though some cities and states are gradually reopening, most of us are going to stay cooped up for a while longer. We wanted to use this episode to pass along some of the things that we've been using to make sheltering in place or bearable. If your regular listener of the show, you know that we always do segment at the end where we each make a recommendation and you can just think of this episode is one big recommendations. Show just like the covid nineteen shelter in place survival edition. We hope that some of the things that we recommend are things that you can make use of as well. It's the whole reason we're doing this, so we're going to divide this show. Three segments I will talk about the gear. It is improved our quality of life during these last few months, and then will discuss the changes in our routines that have helped us adjust. And at the end of the show will recommend pieces of entertainment like a book or podcast or a program. That's been keeping happy. We're going to start with hardware, so Adrian you're on deck. I what is the gear that has helped you the most over the last few months, so I think they mentioned on my previous appearance on the gadget lab. I have been sheltering in place with a three year old and a five year old and. Since then it's been a couple of months now and daycare still isn't open and we've kind of like cobbled together are quarantine pod with another family with WHO also has three and a five year old and we're doing a nanny share. And know putting together hours and arranging for parents schedules and it's driving me bonkers. Thing that I was going to recommend. Is the new Amazon fire kids tablet at just came out I think a month ago. And We have a couple of other kid entertainment devices right now. I have the ipod touch I have an IPAD, but the kids tablet is the one that I'm really relying on right now. 'cause my five year old doesn't nap anymore I just. It's foam padded. It has Amazon free time. which is Amazon's platform, so I can set an age range from Mike three years old to seven years old age, appropriate entertainment I can just park her on the couch for an hour or two, so I can just like girl. Get something done. Every now and again, so yeah I was going to recommend something a little more exciting, but if like, if I had to recommend like the one thing that is like getting all four of us through a workday, it's probably a kid tablet. Is it rugged is at all because I know that some of the Amazon ones are sort of like made for bashing around. Yet it's got well the UP. Sell you twenty dollars and one of the things that they included the two thousand dollars. Is this huge foam padded puffy case with a Stan and I say it's totally worth it like I can hear her just like walking around Hukou, pts oops. Just bashing into things, and it's been totally fine, but the other thing about the fire tablet is that it has the two year worry free guaranteed and I recommended it to my other friend who has a five year old, and he was holding it, and he literally like smashed it full on into the corner of the table. He just like smashed screen like from pure frustration like all of us right now. They sent it back to Amazon and they just sent them another tablet. Right back so if you have like a younger kid, it's totally the extra twenty bucks. It's totally worth it. I think Amazon is happy to replace those because they know that if they sent, you knew when you keep consuming content on Amazon, right? Yeah, that's the other thing, but you can also. Just snuck into the parent dashboard and I just blocked everything that had Barbie. Think through the pair desperate. She's like it's so weird. It's like Barbie doesn't exist and I was like I know it's like. She vanished from the Earth. Right Allen what is era? What is your gadget recommendation for people so? Quarantine and me sitting around at my computer and taking phone calls and things a lot for me to really get into true wireless ear buds A friend of mine turned me onto the true wireless ear buds, and I'm sitting here like this holding charging case. I'm not air pods. Person I an Android user. Which is why I'm not Airmont, and I have like terrible nightmares of being one of those people in your New York City who will lose one ear onto the subway track, and then have to wait like five hours for somebody to come and get it with a broom, and now it's quotidian disgusting and I don't know if I ever want to put it back in my ear. All that aside of the OCOEE, true wireless ear buds are they sound greats? They're white. Thirty dollars sometimes are on sale for less I think I got mine for like twenty two on sale at Amazon and They are the your buds that convinced me that wireless ear buds aren't at Bat. They fit well. They sound great and I can sit here and talk to my dad on the phone while I'm writing an article in no one is the wiser either way or so worked out really really nice that way but I, I just thought it was really cool, because it was such a low price point to get into actual wireless. Ear Buds. The ones I normally have like a cord that goes between ears, and that makes me feel more secure right if it falls out of my ear, then it's still on my person, somehow but again take your advice for me with a grain of salt..

Amazon Adrian senior editor US Alan Henry Wired Service Lauren editor writer New York City Airmont Stan Allen Mike Hukou
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"This is DJ jazzy. Mike Okay sorry. Continue don't make fun of my swagger I like it it's all it's all got. Hi Everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I am Michael Calorie. A senior editor wired and I am joined remotely by my co host wired senior writer Lauren. Good Hey Mike you know how on the past few weeks and the podcast. We've been talking about how something's really they feel like the before times. Yes as in like March. Yeah as in you know pre-march today show is really going to feel like the before times. Why is that? And that's because we are bringing wired senior writer. Arial part is an original friend of the POD and Co host of the Gadget Lab. Podcast back on the show. Hey Oh it's good to be back. It's great to have you today. We're going to be talking about how. Silicon Valley often leads the way on certain trends and sometimes it thinks ahead of the curve. But maybe it's giving itself a little bit too much credit later. We're going to be talking about clubhouse the hot new social platform thing that sort of a gabfest the silicon valley elite. But first we're going to revisit a topic that we're all intimately familiar with at this point working from home. During the coronavirus pandemic Silicon Valley tech companies. Were not only some of the very first to tell employees to work from home but they are also giving some very conservative estimates for when people might be able to go back to the office in some cases offices won't reopen until twenty twenty one the earliest last week. Twitter's CEO Jack. Dorsey told employees that if their job allows for it they would be able to switch to working from home time. Even after offices reopened jacks other companies square also announced the same policy this week other companies are similarly relaxing. The rules about working from home and overall these kinds of changes could lead to a lot more flexibility in how and where people do their jobs even after the pandemic is over Arielle. Let's start with twitter because you wrote a story about this new policy That ran on wired recently. So if you could please bring us up to speed on the company's plan right so as you said twitter was among the first to close its offices back in March The Tech Industry in general was way ahead of the curve in terms of asking people to work remotely Twitter is now the first to say that it's workers never have to come back So that's kind of radical for the tech industry actually for a group of companies that makes products that are geared toward helping people do all kinds of things on their laptops and phones The industry at large actually hasn't been very friendly to remote work So twitter's plan is very simple. It's just saying that employees who don't want to return to the office and are comfortable working either at their homes or motely somewhere else are welcome to do so and employees who want to come back will eventually be able to return to offices Arielle. What are some of the other companies that are also Happening aboard this trend. It seems like in general. The industry is trending toward more remote work. So shop if I for example has just announced that it is going to be digital by default and some of the other big companies in the tech industry are saying that workers can at least stay from home through the end of the year potentially longer Facebook is another great example of a company that has Said very publicly that it intends to make more of its workforce. Remote going forward so Just this week. Mark Zuckerberg said that he intended to make tens of thousands of jobs permanently. Remote There are some exceptions to this. Of course apple which has notoriously asked its employees to come into the office every day. No matter what has a very meeting dominant culture has not made any overtures toward remote work In fact apple is one of the companies that is encouraging workers to come back sooner rather than later so it it sort of remains to be seen. What the the net effect of this is. But you know it's a sort of radical work from home experiment for everyone right now. And I think companies that previously were quite reticent to let their employees work from home over fears of lost productivity or. You know lost connection with the team. They're now seeing that. Actually this works better. If not just differently than they expected and so I think a lot of companies will be forced to change their thinking. Much like twitter has that was. That was what I was wondering was so there's obviously a very real safety concern here for the health of people who work in these companies and these closed offices all day long side by side shoulder to shoulder cubicle to cubicle. In many cases we're talking about a lot of desk workers So that's what started all of this. We are in the middle of pandemic. But I'm wondering if in a relatively short period of time of two to three months now if some of these companies also started to realize that they can effectively operate like this and that is what is actually making them say. Okay you know what? Maybe we just won't consider the office in two thousand twenty one or beyond. Yeah I spoke to Aaron Levie. Who's the CEO of Box? And he had some really interesting insight on this boxes. One of these companies that like literally makes a product to help people who are working in distributed teams But but like many other companies in that vein slack as another example. There are many fewer remote workers than you would expect Which isn't to say box has been against remote work but it's it's not totally embraced it Completely Now obviously the entire company is working from home and one of the interesting impacts of this is that according to Aaron at least the engineering teams are actually pushing out updates faster and the sales team is actually making deals faster so something that would previously take a lot of coordination or maybe like air travel or a lot of complicated meetings is now just done much more efficiently And so one of the takeaways from that at least for box is that they're going to be much more interested in a hybrid workforce in the future a hybrid workforce meaning. Not everyone is work from home But certainly many more people are and there's some kind of creative way to merge teams that are working remotely with those that are still working in headquarters you know. It makes a lot of sense on the surface that the companies in Silicon Valley Would have an easy time. Moving to a remote work Situation or an easier time than most simply because like if you're working in a company that puts out technology you probably have some familiarity with a lot of the tools that you would need in order to work from home that you know most of us are using things like zoom and things like slack and of course things like box. I'm curious what it's going to look like for the companies that maybe are not part of the technology industry companies. That are you know. Make MORE TRADITIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANIES. That have logistical stuff. Going on that makes it harder for them to have remote workers Will there be a larger shift in the American workforce even outside of the technology industry? Do you think this this will be pure speculation but I think yes to me. It seems like it would be really crazy to ask an employee who's been working from home for many weeks if not many months to come back to the Office for an arbitrary reason in other words if we've already discovered for this radical work from home experiment that you can do your job at your house then. It seems unreasonable to me that your company would require you to come back unless there was like a really good reason. Free to be there I think there are definitely arguments about things like company culture or access to certain items that are in the office. I don't know it kind of depends on a case by case basis But this rhetoric around remote work up until now has largely been that companies. Just don't think it works as well and now that there's a lot of evidence about how it actually does work. I think companies are going to be hard pressed to provide some kind of very detailed reason as to why they won't let people work from home if that's something they want to pursue in the future. I actually have a question for you guys. Which is how are you feeling about the prospect of working remotely for the foreseeable future? Like I personally am not in a rush to get back to the office. This has been an amazing time for me to discover what my work habits really are. And how can optimize my time and my productivity. When I don't have any distractions but I'm curious how this is panning out for you. Are you sort of like clamoring to get back into our office or happy to be at home for a while? I think that if you had asked me that a decade ago I would have had a very different answer. A lot can change of course in. My situation has changed so I mean. I've been lucky enough to work in some really great newsrooms and in really interesting parts of the country back when I was living in New York City and working as a video producer. I was in a newsroom pretty much every single day and I can't imagine having lived in that city and that kind of city that kind of environment without the social interaction that is so vital to the energy of just being there But since being in the bay area which is a different area and and there are a lot of great things about living here aside from the fact that it is incredibly expensive. Which I wanted to ask you about. But there's a lot of natural beauty and the public transit system is quite the same as it is in New York so getting to places sometimes feels a little bit more difficult. We you know there are lots of stories. We hear of people who live two to three hours out in commuting into the center of San Francisco for their jobs and how unsustainable that is. So I think in this particular area I have really felt like. It's good to work from home and I've really. I've really embraced it. And we've had some technical difficulties such as getting this. Podcast started today. We're still having some technical difficulties. Things like video production have been altered there. There are lots of things in our world that I have been affected by everybody working from home but personally I've kind of enjoyed it as much as one can enjoy working from home during pandemic Mike what you think I mean for me. It really depends on the day the days where I'm doing a lot of writing and editing. I love being home because it's really. It's like pace myself a lot better I can sort of put myself in a zone a lot more easily when I don't have all the distraction of being in an office the days when doing a lot of managerial stuff like going to a lot of meetings or doing a lot of one on one so resume. I really do miss being in the office and I miss having that sort of face to face interaction with With people who I work with as in like the people who I'm speaking to right now on this show. We all sit within ten feet of one another So missed that a lot but Also the other thing I would say that my habits are healthier It's easier for me to make good choices about what I have for dinner. It's easier for me to make good choices about Taking a break Also you know getting the physical exercise that I need is easier when I'm just here at my house and I can sort of do those.

Twitter Silicon Valley Arielle Mike writer CEO Aaron Levie Michael Calorie senior editor apple Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Lauren Dorsey physical exercise New York City San Francisco Jack
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Michael Calorie my usual co-host is out this week. So Boone Ashworth who produces? Our show is stepping in again as host better. Watch out Mike here in a hurry back because the people love Boone. They love him. Hey probably a poor substitute for Mike but I do have one quality that he does not. Which is I am physically here. You are here and you were not only here but you were there at Samsung event on Tuesday which we're going to talk about also joining us from our New York office. This week is wired. Senior associate editor. Julian Takachiho Hey Julian so we're gonNA talk about phones today but not just about phones big topics to. Let's talk about Samsung I okay. The company held its annual galaxy unpacked event. This week in San Francisco where it announced three new flagship phones. Some new ear buds and then another go at a folding phone so had some hands on time with that later on. We're GONNA talk about that flashing new flip phone why smartphone companies are still having these big events for phones and how Samsung's new devices fit into the bigger smartphone market. But I saw boon. This was also your first ever smartphone launch event. Julian and I have been to quite a few of these. This is your first one. It was It was a lot. That's for sure yeah. It was exciting and also overwhelming at the same time so boone. We asked you to carry around a microphone and record your first impressions of your first ever smartphone event and here is some of what. Boone observed not GONNA lie. I was a little bit nervous for my first big tech show but Samsung's galaxy unpacked was just a couple of hours away and there was no turning back now is beautiful day to sit inside and talk about phones. When I got to the event I met up with Lauren in our multimedia producer. Alicia Coachee.

Samsung Boone Ashworth Julian Takachiho Mike New York Michael Alicia Coachee San Francisco Senior associate Lauren producer editor
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Thousand of vegetarian so I asked them. Do you have any Viteri Weasel. And in fact they did they beyond makes it It is a Vegan. Weasel is little hairy but I liked it actually is pretty good up at mustard on it a little bit of hot sauce. Who's quite good went well with potatoes? Hi Everyone. I'm boring good. I'm senior writer at wired and you're listening to gadget lab. I'm joined joined by my co host wired senior editor Michael Calorie Aloha Michael's a little sick just a little bit tad and originally he was supposed to host the show we he called an audible last minute he said. Would you mind stepping in and I said anything for you Mike. I am sorry that your voices not up to par. I appreciate you Lauren. Yes today we're going to be talking about wilde concepts and realities in product design. These are big ideas. That are impacting. The way you live right now how though you may not realize it like the way you drive or the way you ride your mono wheel yes. We're going to spend an entire portion of the show talking about one wheel devices devices and why people would ride them when there are plenty of perfectly good two-wheeled transport options out there. We're also going to be talking about button less phones. Why phone makers are designing eating them right now? Some of the pros and cons of them. Some of the things you might not think about when it comes to products without buttons and our colleague. Julian Chicago is going to join US later to talk about that. Yep But I. I'm really excited. Because we're bringing on our very own boon Ashworth for the first segment about unions cycles Buddha's normally our podcast producer. He's now a writer on our team at wired and he's joining us for the pod. Thanks for joining. Hi thanks for having me but when you wrote a story about why. People are obsessed with a single wheeled devices. Tell us about this okay so single wheel devices. You've probably seen these if you've ever been in a major city if you spend like ten seconds in San San Francisco you'll have a one wheel zooming past sidewalk So the biggest one is probably one wheel. It's like a skateboard with just one giant fat tire right in the middle of it. There's also electric UNICYCLES. which are you basically stand on them and face forward and just kind of zoom down the street like a Cyborg And these have gotten really popular dealer along with other electronic personal vehicles like scooters electric skateboards things like that And they kind of come from a long history of single wheeled devices people have been interested in these for since the late eighteen hundreds. At least that's when the first patented Monta Wheel came out And Manoel's were these giant contraptions. Were basically people sat inside one giant wheel and pedaled it and tried to move around and it was kind of unwieldy gigantic and inefficient and there was something about them that captured our attention though They got big in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. And you'd see them on the covers of Popular Science magazine. They'd be these giant concept drawings of like one wheeled tanks one wheel like plane boat things things are just combination And even today you see them in movies you see them in Star Wars. I mean people right in one wheeled vehicles things like men in black black three. I think the one we'll vehicle is kind of a shorthand for futuristic technology. Right something that's just beyond our grasp but like it seems it kind of looks impossible but it seems like it should kind of work because we have two wheeled vehicles what if we could just take one wheel off so there's been this sort of fascination with it for a long time and and we are now in a point where people are actually writing them and their viable means of transportation and people are on the streets with them. Why is it that now? The people are using them as a viable commute option. Is it the technology. That's pushing them forward. Is it just kind of what you said like people are like. Hey we have these two wheeled things. Why don't we just Strip away the design and make it one. I'm just I'm why. Why are these captivating? The public now. I I think that they're big now Because of the technology I mean you have have tens of thousands of people writing wheels alone. And I think it's because you kind of go back to things like the segway which by neared self-balancing technology And then there's the sort of gyroscopes and accelerometers that you have in your smartphone Along with Electric Motors. These things are getting really cheap to produce and cheap to make and so you know that's why there's so many scooters all over the place and so just naturally that same fascination that we've had with a single wheel is now able to come out in an actual form form. The people can ride because you you have it so that it can balance you when you're moving forward in one direction. I mean you might still fall. You're probably going to if you're right one But we have a means that it's not just like balancing on a UNICYCLE. Where UNICYCLES all in your your body is the one kind of keeping it upright with this technology it balances on its own and then you just have to keep it moving basically? I think there's something to be said about this design succeeding right now based on its modular already and it's portability like for example with the one wheel you can take the whole battery and controller and just pop it out and you know pop new and back in or repair it There are ways to sort of make it easier to carry like. I think they make a smaller. The company future motion action that makes the one wheel they make a smaller version called the pint which comes to the handle built in But you can actually like by handles for your one wheel and carry them and they're pretty easy to carry very That speaks to the the portability aspect of it and also I mean the other device that you mentioned the electric unicycle where you stand in sort of the US face forward in its spins sort of between your ankles Those devices I've seen people carry those onto the bus because you step off of them the feet fold up and then you can carry it. And it's like a briefcase ace. The they have a handle handle that pops out and you can walk like a dog like this new. Just push it down the street and it looks like a briefcase handle or something like that and so you don't don't even need to pick it up. It's just one wheel. You really can get these things to be very small and very portable and I think that's a huge part of the appeal. This sacrifice obviously is balance wants So no big thing. Yeah no big deal ability to stand upright small thing to sacrifice for you know faster transport and improving the environment. Yes yeah And I I think that that's that's kind of like the main obstacle. These things have overcome is the learning curve with being able to stand up on them because it does take time into balance on them. I've ridden a couple the first time I was on a one wheel I fell immediately in the payment. I'm okay Yes so that was like okay these. These really can hurt you. If you go on like the the one wheel celebrate it It just seems like there's there's a ton of posts on there that are about people nosediving and falling and it's kind of like a right of passage. I guess so not not to make it sound like it's any more dangerous than then a bicycle is because you can crash on a bicycle electric scooter or whatever But there is there is just an extra step that you have to take you know. It's not as easy as jumping on a scooter. Scooter and just going. You have to learn how to balance on this thing because you've got more directions that you can fall over in now recognizing that each city has its own rules and regulations what are typically the rules around using these things. Can you use the bike lane or are you supposed to go where scooters go. How does that work? It's sort of a a free for all right now. At least as far as I understand I mean I I think they have the same level of Regulation as like electric scooters. Do they don't don't have a dedicated lane. Some people ride the bike lane. Some people ride them on the sidewalk. The reason I wanted to write the stories because there's a guy who writes pass me on an electric UNICYCLE. Every single day on on my way to work and I have to jump out of his way The way our cities are designed. They're not really designed for these kinds of personal vehicles. There are car lanes. There are bike lanes and everything but there aren't electric. You know personal vehicle lanes yet. I think that those are coming. Honestly with the growth of micro mobility In general not only just more bicycles on the street as people start to make the move towards schools because they care about the environment but also with things like bike share scooter share and the rise of these devices. We're going to have to redesign the city streets and anybody who is redesigning a street in two thousand twenty is going to have to take these things into account right so I with the you talked to urban designers you talked to urban planners and they will tell you that like bike lanes as they are now generally suck. We have good bike lane designs there. Our our country's in cities in Europe in European countries. That are really stepping up and making more accessible designs for bicycles. Necessarily I don't know if they're are addressing the scooter influx or the one wheeled device influx. But I mean this is going. This is something that we're going to have to start thinking about now because there's only ever going to be more of these bright and I I don't think they're making regulations specifically for one wheels but they fall into that category. These electric vehicles Our our own Alex Davies wrote a piece called Save the scooters redesigned the streets and Save San Francisco about you know how these scooters get dumped into the city and some people see them as a menace but electric vehicles really. You know these these small ones are really the way that people are going to get around because cities are getting more and more congested. Like it's it's really one of the only options we have other than just walking everywhere which I don't entirely recommend because I walk to work today and my pants are still soaked because it's pouring rain out there so so Yeah I I definitely definitely the appeal of these things I think scooters and possibly we'll see one wheel devices tend to get a bad rap too because of the ownership model which I guess doesn't exist in the same way. It does with bikes and the way that some of the technology enables people to just leave them in places so with bikes is a lot of people will do own their own bikes. And even if you're in a city that has a bike share program is often city sponsored or has some big corporate sponsor wrapped around it and then they take care to place ace the docking stations at specific locations and the same has been done with like jump scooters or scoop scooters and things like that right but with some of the other scooters you know they don't like have a place to go and so some people just ditch them in places and and then people who do own them the you know maybe they like carry them on the train as they would their backpack but people who have a bike have to go to the bike car on the train and have a specific pass to get their bike on the train so because there isn't the same kind of structure or infrastructure that exists around smaller personal mobility devices at this point they do seem a little but more haphazard which as a result gives them a bad rap even though in reality we should embracing more of the micro mobility trends rate part of the thing about the one. We'll vehicles too is. There's like a there's like a cyborg aspect of it raise more so than just riding a scooter or a bicycle. You know those look familiar means of transportation. Listen I think when you see someone on a one wheeled device it seems cyborg. It seems kind of alien and Weird And so you're kind of put off by it but I also think that is part of the appeal. I mean there. There was people that I talked to Electric UNICYCLE enthusiasts who described being on one wheeled vehicle as like form arm of trans humanism basically I think it's speaks to our desire to want to constantly optimizing be improving ourselves You know we don't want to accept our biological limitations of being on two feet and so there's always going to be something appealing about jumping on one wheel. Oh and just being able to zoom around like your space wizard or something. I still find it a little jarring to see all of us as adults like adulting and wearing are adult clothing on our way to our adult jobs and being like. I'm GonNa take the scooter. I don't know it's just something I need to wrap my head around still and but but this is the future. It hopes vape while you're doing exactly maybe like make a tick tock of it while you're doing it. That's that's how you really cool it. Just don't be on the sidewalk sidewalks. People don't just ditch them on the sidewalk when you're done either use the kick stands okay. We're GONNA take a quick break to fire. Fire Boone Thanksgiving that was fun to talk about. Smooth Button Lewis phones..

US writer Monta Wheel senior editor Lauren Mike wired Popular Science magazine Michael Calorie Electric Motors San San Francisco Europe wilde Nineteen Twenties Ashworth Julian Chicago San Francisco producer Alex Davies
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"A fun interview, and you asked him some really interesting questions, including who has influenced him and design. You ask them about what he would change about Pinterest, and yeah, just a fantastic interview. Probably my favorite part of it was when he talked about a growing up as a kid and being surrounded by so much apple stuff because I, I'm guessing the here and I round the same age because the same thing for me like my first computer was an apple actually was Victoria Commodore. Sorry, my first computer that like I opened up and you know, wrote code on wrote programs on in the one that I, that made me a computer. Nerd was an apple two c. ahead apple to ease MAC, five, twelve. All of those computers are part of my adolescence and my high school years. So you know, to grow up, see apple sort of fall down the drain and then climb back out and become not only like the biggest company in the world. But the leader for tech. -nology and the leader for design, you know to hear him talk about that experience for him really, just like plucked at my heartstrings for sure. Hopefully it will it all our listeners as well, and that's the end. So you gotta listen for the next. It's about half hour interview. Yeah, but it doesn't feel that way. It feels just like it just you'll breeze through it, you'll I hope you enjoy it. Let's have a listen. All right. Thanks everybody for joining us for another alive taping of the gadget lab podcast. My name is Michael calorie. I'm an editor wired. My name is REI parts. I'm also an editor at wired and we are joined today by the co, founder of Pinterest, Evan sharp, low coming. So the reason that you're here at the wired twenty-five festival is because what we did for our twenty fifth birthday is we asked all of the twenty five people who have shaped Wired's world over the last twenty five years to name some names and give us some insight onto who they think would be helping to shape the next twenty five years of technology of culture of the internet. We asked, sir, Jonathan. I've colloquially known as Johnny who runs design it, apple to nominate somebody and he nominee. Did you? That's crazy. I would. Was that was that was Johnny. I would just I would. I would like to get your initial thoughts on where you think your particular line of work. You know, maybe you could start out by telling us a little bit about what you do at Pinterest in which you're in charge of their and how you feel that is going to change broadly over the next decade or two. Sure. So you know, name is Evan. I'm one of the founders and got involved in in the beginning by designing it and building the user interface. And then over the last eight years, helping bend the the CEO and my partner with other founder there grow the team and build a company and build a culture and do everything else. So I've worn many hats over the years. You know, the I, it's funny, the first few years of interests. I really did have the luxury of spending most of my time, literally designing and coding and crafting on some level, the experience to be really, hopefully beautiful and useful and to feel cohesive, and and I really enjoyed that time. But then over the last four years, as we've gotten bigger, I've taken stints running product management running marketing and trying to.

apple Pinterest founder Victoria Commodore Evan sharp Johnny editor REI Michael Jonathan CEO partner twenty five years twenty fifth eight years four years
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Welcome to another edition of the gadget podcast. My name is Michael calorie, an editor here, wired. My name's Arielle part. I'm also editor here, wired. My name's Lauren good. I'm a senior writer here at wired and actually not here at wired. I am calling in from New York City hotel room. So if you guys hear any noises at any point at sound like New York City noises that's why, and probably also a little bit of lag which we apologize for, but I think it'll be great nonetheless to have you here, Lauren, even though you're not here here I miss you all mentally. We miss you too. We sent Lauren to New York this week to cover a big splashy phone release, Lauren. Tell us what you've been up to. I thought used here just to hang out and Taylor swift neighborhood, so I don't know. Sorry, that's where I happened to be right now that I know killers neighborhood maybe as little alarming. So I went. For the Samsung galaxy impact of it a, you're correct. And it was at the Barclay center. This was the first unpacked event to happen in Brooklyn for what it's worth. And we were largely expecting to see a new Samsung galaxy note phone because August is when the note line phones is usually updated and there were no surprises there. We did see the new, Samsung galaxy note nine. We also saw a new smart watch the Samsung galaxy watch. Simpson also showed off probably one of the most bizarre home speakers I've seen in a while and Daniel from Spotify appeared onstage briefly to announce a partnership that Samsung has now with Spotify for streaming music across multiple devices. Those I'd say were the four key points in the four things. The biggest things at Samsung announced today's event. That's a, that's a lot to unpack. So let's start. Let's start with with the phone, which is, as you said, the sort of expected. Piece of of today's events. You got to sort of play with the phone day ahead of time, and you've been playing with today as well. Walk us through some of what's new here and what you're excited about. That's right. Simpson did a press briefing with journalists ahead of the event so that we could actually see the phone in right a little bit about it before we got in there, but I think it's worth maybe just framing it a little bit for people who don't closely follow Simpson, foes or smartphone launches. The way that we obsessively do a Samsung is a little bit unique in the sense that they have basically two flagship phones, right? They have the galaxy s line, which is usually updated in the winter around February or so. And then they have this note line. And when the note was first announced back in two thousand eleven, it was it was ship started shipping, then it it stood out because it was such a massive phone. It's a Fablet, right? And at the time, not everybody, especially in the US market had embraced the idea. Of giant phones, although they had been popular and other parts of the world. And so it was seen as kind of a clunker. It was a high performance phone, giant phone and also had a stylus. So it is still to this day. The LG has also made a phone with the stylus, but it's still to this day really one of the few premium smartphones out there that comes with a stylus. So that's where the note sort of stands out from the regular. Galley at galaxy s. line of smartphones, but what's happened over the past several years is that all the high end smartphones have started to get increasingly similar in a lot of ways in their alternate converging at the high end of the market. They all have great cameras. They'll have a pretty amazing graphics processing. They all claim around the same outta battery life. They all have. Now they're all glass which is great except for when you drop them, which has happened to me a couple times on. So they're all starting to look very similar. So it's become increasingly hard for Samsung to differentiate this note line. So within this year, is it just made it like this. Krisi specked out phone and also it really expensive phone. We're should. I start. What do you guys what you guys was interested in hearing about. Will you know the the processes in the internals and everything? I don't think really matters to most people. I think the things that matter are the screen and the camera and the price more than anything..

Samsung Lauren Simpson New York City wired editor Michael Brooklyn writer Barclay center New York US LG Spotify Taylor Daniel
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Get a new card you can twelve more podcasts and then after you've hit twenty four you had another one and you get a third card and you can swipe like a slide show through these cards it also has new episodes feed so when you subscribe something it shows you feet of novus odes right there in the same interface so a lot of apps have these features but they're hidden in menus this one stacks all of them together in one scroll able content view which i think is really smart yeah that's really smart because if you look at the top you know seeming around listen to you just keeps growing and then what happens if you've listened to something does it take it off of of those cards well no i mean you're like the podcast logo that you're subscribed to shows up on the card and through and you get to the episodes but after you subscribe to things than the most recent episodes that you're subscribe to the most recent episodes from the fees uses that you have subscribed to is underneath that so you can just keep scrolling and see things that you're interested in which is cool it does to x or you can slow it way down people who like to listen to podcasts very slowly maybe i speak too quickly for them i don't know i really like it the the one thing that i don't like is that it set up the stream so set up that when you tap play it's dreams you have to go into your settings and turn on you have to you have okay so like you try to download something there's a download key and you press download and it says this happenings permission to access your storage so you have to go into settings find the app and then go into permissions and then find storage and hit the slider which is a lot of work yeah just download something yeah i mean i just have a permission prompt there and by the way i mean i'm stickler about permissions and how much they're taking from you and how little they tell you and apparitions but that's like they could just have an permission right there that says can we put this on your local storage the really should maybe they have more data about how people listen but as as a as a podcast person i think it's kind of ridiculous that they don't allow that read off the bat so added to the list of things that companies should fix according to the word of michael calorie you know y'all do so anyway with that one caveat that is recommended application it's very cool i'm going to have to give it a try you should we have to wrap up how people order i'm at lauren good with an e epi end on twitter and thank you to everybody for sending your appetizer recommendations this week when i asked you all your favorite apps have been the past ten years i didn't realize so many people liked fried pickles and fried cheese kurds and now i know bunch of jokers on twitter yeah i said nicorette sue may see that's a good one it is true also that is my favorite app unless ten years this was how my twitter mentions like my twitter experience devolved this week i started out was the tenth anniversary of the app store i said what apple change your life the most in the past ten years now after a little while i thought about it and i was like you know anything with geo location spices yeah it's uber google maps for spin it really right really big deal and then people like you were like you know how these kind of cheeky recommend recommendations i love neckartsulm aok cool and then at some point someone said mozzarella sticks and the whole thing just blew off oh i mean i've heard it all potato skins chips in guac blewett on nichols buffalo wings mozzarella stick to the fact that nachos are usually on the dessert menu because they should be a full meal yes they are full of food it's ton it's great i'll tell you about chicago nachos one time you can find me on twitter at snack fight as a ac kfi g h t and you can find a pia who have to welcome hello peo who is engineering the show in his are our fellow on our team through the end of the year so this ps first episode and it's a doozy 'cause he has to do a lot of editing you can find her on twitter and she is law pia on rose.

ten years one stacks
"michael calorie" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The summit of the americas is taking place in lima peru but the occasional gathering of regional leaders is one high profile merican short this week president donald trump trump bowed out earlier this week citing the need to oversee the crisis in syria vice president mike pence is there in trump's place and daughter ivanka trump is also in lima michael calorie is director of the inter american dialogues rule of law program and he joins us from the summit at the convention center in lima peru i mean relations between trump and many latin american countries wasn't so good to begin with you think his not going to the some of the americas could further deteriorate relations but kind of impact do you think those absences will have i think the absences certainly take some of the air and anticipation out of a summit for many of these leaders especially from small countries this was probably their one chance to meet the us president and he's the first us president to skip somebody of the americas since they started in nineteen ninety four so that scene efficient for us latin american relations at the same time it does remove the risk that's born of trump's impulsiveness and his unpredictability he has had a tendency with regard to issues in latin america whether it's immigration or drugs or trade to say things that are provocative in ways that aren't viewed by the region and his abysmal approval ratings in the region i think reflect that and so yes it significant that he's not here but it also removes the risk that things get blow up even further the theme of this year's summit is corruption which is kind of awkward in a lot of ways president trump has been under scrutiny in the us pretty much since he got into office for various conflicts of interest venezuelan president nicolas maduro was barred from attending the summit and there's no shortage of corrupt practices there in venezuela and peru where the summits being held the president was forced from office about a month ago.

lima peru vice president mike pence trump director americas us nicolas maduro venezuela donald trump syria ivanka trump president peru
"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"michael calorie" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Welcome to another edition of the gadget lab podcast my name is michael calorie i'm an editor here wired my name is rl part s i i'm also editor here at wired and today mike is a very special day because we are inviting our third permanent co host lauren good onto the gadget lab podcasts hi everybody haller haller i'm never leaving i've already had lunch here so that means i'm never leaving god we're so happy to have you and this is also a special week for many reasons because we also have a fourth person joining us in the podcasting studio it is senior writer natasha tcwu thanks for biting me guys so we're here regard today dearly beloved to talk about our friend mark zuckerberg and his fun week in congress lauren do you wanna tell us a little bit about what's been going on this week sure is that friend in the facebook sense or is he is he really our friend i think that's the question we all have to answer on this podcast no he's not my friend i think mark would be someone i would say i was friends with because i really do feel for him but i don't think we would like hang out yeah i think he's a brand page that i follow a good way to describe it earlier this week facebook ceo mark zuckerberg was called to into congress to answer a series of questions about how facebook has been handling privacy basically facebook's policy approaches to privacy and how it's been handling some of our data it was all sparked by the cambridge analytica scandal breach i think a lot of these phrases are becoming more legally fraught say something like breach already have ten security researchers jumping on using was not a breach or whatever it was but also the testimony ended up covering everything from foreign interference in the election to the opioid crisis to whether facebook is selling your data which he was asked about at least a couple times whether it's listening to you through your phones microphone which is the long running conspiracy theory to face mash which was just perhaps one of the most bizarre moments of the two days several hours worth.

editor mike mark zuckerberg mark congress facebook michael wired writer natasha tcwu ceo cambridge analytica two days