21 Burst results for "metabolic disease"

Alexei Navalny allowed to fly to Germany, say Russian doctors

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | Last month

Alexei Navalny allowed to fly to Germany, say Russian doctors

"He is now stable enough to be flown to a hospital in Germany now said to be on his way to the airport. Now, Navalny is one of Vladimir Putin's fiercest critics and remains in a coma after an apparent poisoning. Yesterday, Russian doctors had blocked efforts to medevac Navalny to Germany, claiming he has a metabolic disease, essentially digestion problems and a sudden drop in his blood sugar, they say, may have caused him to lose consciousness. But none of that explained the extreme pain he seemed to be in and why he's been in a coma for many hours. Navalny's wife and lawyer and supporters say the doctor's allegedly delayed his release to possibly allow the poison time to exit his system that is W. T. O P s national security correspondent J. J Green. The Kremlin denies that resistance to the transfer was political, but that reversal did come as international pressure on Russia. Intensified President Trump

Vladimir Putin Navalny Germany Metabolic Disease Russia President Trump J. J Green
What is the Microbiome?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:37 min | 9 months ago

What is the Microbiome?

"Let's back up a little bit and talk about this whole thing of the microbiome because we we started with functional medicine. There wasn't the word microbiome but we still focus on normalizing the gut function. We talked about the four our program which is a restoration program for the gut and how that can help so many different diseases. But the microbiome is the sum total of all the organisms that we have in care around inside of us in that also can include Viruses can also include fungi. You know the ecosystem of the microbiome inside the body is like a rainforest and at some point. Some people's ecosystems are so disturbed. So messed up. This like napalm is hit your rainforest that's like a corn mono-crop. Yes so you've got this whole ecosystem bacteria it's been disturbed by all these new talked about C.. Sections anybody anybody accused lack of breastfeeding and so on and our diet also Plays a huge role in the growth of good or bad bacteria and you can feed it certain things and it makes it worse than other things and it makes it better so talk about that. Yeah so so. I always tell patients that when you're eating food you WANNA be choosing your food not just for you what you like. Your you know the things that are pleasurable for you but you also want be feeding the good bacteria and we talked earlier about the Ackerman Ms Sinophilia. That's a specific bacteria that is in the body and that you want to have on high levels and when we do the testing we can actually determine. Do you have high levels of it or do you have low levels or we have no levels are very low levels and there are certain foods which you can incorporate into your diet. Things like pomegranate and Baca and A case the case Uvira cranberries and things like that these are foods which are basically pre pre a prebiotics. And when you incorporate them into your diet you it's like praying miracle-gro grow and a garden they start to flourish. They start to take over and they help balance out the whole ecosystem. Yeah I think is one of the biggest advances in our thinking about God. We get probiotics and that'll fix it but you know you're giving like fifty billion is a lot right but you have it hundred trillion bacteria so it's like a drop in the ocean he's athlete and one of the big insights I had was actually from an experience I had last year where I develop colitis so long story but I had been sick for mold and I've told that story and I had had a recurrence of my gut because I had the C. Diff and that was kind of really messed me up and I check my stool and had really low levels of this ackerman SIA which has been linked linked to autoimmune disease linked to poor response to immunotherapy for cancer. It's billing two Cardi metabolic disease and diabetes. And I'm like WHOA. Oh this is not good so I started to research it and created this cocktail of cranberry Pomegranate Green Tea Keisha fiber products other products. And I took it and it literally. Within three weeks I went from full blown clients to completely normal perfect. Yeah and it was sort of a wakeup call for me. In which was you can't just get products you've got to feed the whole inner garden and what it likes is certain foods and likes all the polyphenols yes in the polyphenyls colorful dark rainbow color chemicals that are in plan foods certain plant whose have more of the berries and so forth. Absolutely your microbiome is depending on what you feed it. How you grow your inner garden depends hands on what you're eating and you can create a nasty garden with weeds and toxins and bad stuff and poisonous plants or you can create a really flourishing rich garden it it actually takes care of you and also the other thing that a lot of even physicians are not even aware of is that most of your immune system is got? Yeah yes so I mean I had one patient in particular particular who I saw. Who came in? It was a great story. She came in And she was Having a MS as their diagnosis she also have community autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis and she also had infertility and I did a a complete workup on her. She had Despite osas had had bacterial overgrowth also had sensitivity to gluten and had also some not a heavy now big level but some level of of Mercury in the body. So so I worked on a diet worked on You know both prebiotics and probiotics to clean up the gut got her completely of gluten and Lo and behold I guess what her multiple sclerosis went away. Amazing disappeared are not not to say that you all her medals out to not to say that all cases of multiple sclerosis this are due to that but there are many pathways to multiples. Close the door. Many pathways to Alzheimer's disease or any disease Aaron disease exactly because the body hit will manifest it in and only certain inflammatory pathways but and then ultimately she got off of her medications her. Ms To this day is in complete remission. She has no symptoms on nomads. And as the side effects you've got pregnant. The personalization of medicine is what functional. Medicine is all about. and that's really what's different here about. How are we practice medicine at the ultra wellness? Because we're looking at each person as an individual or creating personalized medicine and personalized health which is radically new way of thinking and we we just lump everybody with the same symptoms in the same categories. But it doesn't tell you anything about the cause and I always say just because you know the name of your disease. I mean you know what's wrong with you all right. And that's what we do too very detailed histories here through very advanced diagnostic testing. Look some of these things so the microbiomes ecosystem of bugs and our God. It's trillions of bacteria area. It outnumbers ourselves by ten to one outnumbers. DNA my one hundred one and it has been linked to everything from disease to cancer. Heart Disease Diabetes Obesity to autism to Alzheimer's. I mean the list goes on and

Autoimmune Disease Metabolic Disease Heart Disease Ackerman Ms Sinophilia Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Baca Osas LO Aaron
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

10:11 min | 9 months ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"When you have to be the over the Moon Gleich Olympic? Why would you risk getting blown out of the water when the race is won and lost in the five percent ninety five percent when you guys are smoking joking in the the Peleton at an average power below two hundred watts? That doesn't matter that's an hot with the races about. And yes maybe the high carb guy has to eat more during saying that time and eat more carbs during that time in the Jenner Guy. But it doesn't matter your professional cyclist you're being paid to win a race and the races won and lost on the base of politic energy. So just on first principles. It would make zero sense to me to be on a Ketogenic Diet if you're a professional cyclist I'm using that as an example. Yeah and the same with any performance format based athletes You can probably get away with too high intensity workouts a week eating relatively low carbohydrate. I think anything more than that. Where the one place where? I do think it Kim Jong Dodge. It has an enormous improvement is over ultra distance type events where the races not won and lost on the basis of your capacity. It's basically one on the basis of your metabolic efficiency and your intestinal fortitude and no absolute and I've seen that where it's just so hard to titrate glucose intake when you're going through that that many I mean how are you going to match the number of gels that you're going to have during a race to the amount of glycogen that you're going through so funny. I once when I was cycling a lot I actually wanted to come come up with an APP. That would do that based off your power meter because in cycling. You know you're watts every moment in time. You know you're watching. You know your heart rate if you could do a series as of calibrated theo to tests where you give the full range of what your power output is what you're not which are too is you could actually reverse engineer at every given wattage and heart rate what your energy expenditure is and more importantly what are Q.. Is and therefore how many calories in any given moment. 'cause from wattage you know. Exactly how many calories you're expending and then you could determine how many of them so so actually had this idea which I built this for myself but I thought it would be really cool if this were a living breathing APP. That was paired to your Garmon where you're srm and giving you those data in real time. So the cyclists new their glycogen engine debt by the hour. That's super easy to do. If I wasn't such a lazy dirt I would actually do it. Yeah because I think muscle metabolism during those rides is a serious serious thing. Because you just don't have enough time to replace it. How do you prescribe exercise to your patients? I want them doing all four. Things we talk about. Stability is the single most important piece if if you don't do stability work none of this other stuff matters strength. Basically only in the context of appropriate stability do I want them doing strength work. And I want I focus on hip pinging pulling and pushing the predominant things that you need to be doing each time you lift zone. Two is three hours a week. Is the minimum effective dose typically doled out in three sixties or four forty fives and then as a bonus potentially anaerobic pending on the needs. But we probably focus so much of our the effort unstability which is too broad a topic to. Yeah I mean having gone through the Cross it paradigm. I find that people are much more by mechanically. manically resilient than we give credit for so until they're not and you gotta remember. I'm training for a different sport. Now right the only sport I'm training for is being one hundred and being able to act like I'm sixty so I want to be like a functional sixty year old and a hundred. There is no example from which we can draw on that like. We're in totally uncharted territory. And to be clear. It's not that I'm fixated on being a hundred out probably won't even live to be one hundred but to compete in the Centenarian Olympics. which is this event? I have at one hundred. I know that what that that implies for me at nine hundred eighty seven sixty is remarkable but the problem with focusing on on stability to the with a limited amount of training time is that. Ah You're missing out on the massive benefit of increasing muscle mass through strength training. Oh no you need to be doing both but I'm saying is if you just do strength training without stability. You're going going to get injured sooner or later. So you might as well commit to stability right away and make that an important part of what you do so that you can for the rest of your life continue to move heavy. Avi Amounts of weight one hundred percent agree with that. Yeah but yeah. It's interesting with trying to figure out the what would you do as a simple way of calculating glycogen. Depletion listen all I'd have to rely on this formula that I have. It's very easy to do on a bike. Because you get very accurate invent power you know how many jewels you're expending basically the wattage. I'm just giving you the killer Joel Expenditure. And it's a total fluke of how the math works out but every killer jewel expended on a bike aac is about a killer calorie consumed. It actually works out to that to a first order. Approximation that the same number. So if you get off your bike and you've in an hour expended suspended eight hundred seventy killer jewels. You've expanded approximately eight hundred fifty college calories and then how do you determine what percentage of those were you're from glycogen versus. You would have to be able to do this. Modeling Exercise of knowing our was yet knowing what the power was in the knowing. From when you've done respiratory testing thing what your video to in vitro too. Were at the different power levels. Got It got it. Yeah because you kind of have to just fudge otherwise. Oh of course you do. And and that's where the GM becomes handy handy as you sort of learn. Oh well guess what like once glucose starts to really shoot up. You've overdone it. Yeah but I keep learning things. It's like you. You actually don't need glucose for even Max Effort Sprint under ten seconds right because you're only going through the CREATINE kinase system. And so then it's how many repeated repeated bouts before you start to kind of deplete those stores. And then the creatine phosphate. Yeah so I think it takes thirty seconds to replete the first time and then after you do it twice. It's now two three minutes. Yeah I mean Tabata gives us an insight into that because I actually think about it was classically described as twenty on ten in off for four minutes I find it physiologically just as damaging meaning. It's just as painful to do ten on twenty off for four minutes because you can go so much harder in the ten seconds and you can the twenty in fact Alex Hutchinson who I'd love to have on the podcast. He wrote a book about endurance. Too Limited endurance and I think Kennedy describes that basically we are not capable of all out activity for more than about ten seconds. Yes I would even at twenty seconds when we think we're going all out we are not and you can tell this if you're playing this game on a doing like an air bike which is great because one. It's so exhausting to you can see your power. My wattage numbers is that I can hold for ten seconds are fifty percent higher than what I can hold when I do the twenty second version of tomato. I believe it. Yeah I mean tomato was I think there was no kind of algorithm to determine the the on off frequency. I think it was just totally empirical. I think it wasn't even empirical. I think it was just arbitrary possible. Is he still alive. I'm not sure but I don't think he tested ten. He didn't do he didn't do ya. I think it was just. I'm going to give some amount of time for recovery. And then I think what you need to. triangulate around is in order to have maximum result from a session. It's how much garbage deplete. What was my maximum? I think it's also going GonNa be volume so if you're doing about a push ups and your push ups go from. Let's say ten nine eight and then three three three because you've got nothing in the tank. That's kind kind of like those are wasted bouts whereas you could have gotten more time under tension and more total volume by increasing the the time in between but I guess you're optimizing for for different things at that point but you're basically going straight. It's effectively doing one set to failure versus multiple sets. The failure. I think tomato gets misused a lot I really think in its purest application occasion. You should only be able to do at once. And that's why I get such a kick out of these stupid Takada classes. I see like on Peleton and stuff. It's like okay I get it. You're sort of whatever you have to say that you're doing some cool class and might as well Tabata because that's fashionable but it's a real disservice to the physiology you know you can't do sixty minutes of Tabata no you can't even can do five minutes of I think I posted a picture of me like I do one tomato a week the second time in the week I do high intensity. It's not even about that one four minutes a week I. I can't have anything it's always at the end of my workout. I can't have anything scheduled for sixty minutes after so I need thirty full minutes. Just has to scrape myself off the floor and have a shower and get dressed. That's a thirty minute exercise. And I'm like if you're not leaving that much of yourself out there which is why and I think there's something more to that than just glycogen depletion and the C. P. Turnover. Yeah I mean if you look at athletes training for sprinting events I mean they're taking five to seven in minutes between abouts so I guess it's like you just have to figure out what you're optimizing four and if you WanNa get faster certainly I don't think the tobacco would be useful because you're you're not actually only your first set is probably GonNa be contributing to your Ford progress on that. Yeah anyway well you know it's sort of funny. It's almost like the last twenty minutes. I don't even think we realized we were being recorded. This is fully degenerated into this. Is My plan. This was just playing patty cakes but anyway I hope the listeners have found that interesting. Yeah we'll look man. This was super interesting. I I really enjoyed this discussion and I think there's a lot in here to unpack. I don't even know where to begin for listeners. But I think in terms of the discussion weight loss the philosophy around medicine. Listen your own. Nutrition Steph is super interesting and I I really am considering trying this experiment again. Provided it fits within the confines of my sort of glucose requirements. So so anyway Ma'am I really appreciate this. This was super interesting and the guy brought more questions to the table than answers. But I know I'm a little self conscious I feel like I took too much air. Room Jury Center. I heard you you say a four. And I've noticed that you're very retentive with sharing stuff so it was my plan to get you to start to spill the beans. I get interviewed on podcasts. Where'd Ah get asked the questions but I feel like on my podcast? It's No one wants to hear my dumb stories. We're here to hear your stories. We can share together. Hurry man all right. Well thank you so so much.

Tabata Moon Gleich Olympic Jenner Guy Kim Jong Dodge Garmon Alex Hutchinson Joel Expenditure Steph Room Jury Center GM Kennedy Ford theo engineer C. P. Turnover
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

12:18 min | 9 months ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Weight until you could get them to actually sleep seven and a half after eight and a half hours a night properly and manage their hypercholesterolemia with other modifications that primarily existed around behavioral modification. We're they very overweight or just kind of all of them. I would say going back to a comment you made about. Most people who are overweight are inside quite uncomfortable with that. Each of them was staggeringly only uncomfortable with their weight. I would say two out of the three could pull it off pretty well because they were pretty muscular athletic nick. They just looked like sort of big muscular women but no look I'd say each of them was probably if you stuck them in a DEXSA. I'd be surprised if any of them were less than thirty. Five Percent Eddie Fan but I see this actually probably the much more common would be where you're not significantly overweight you're very under muscled. And you could actually. CBS and that was none of these three but again super small sample. Don't know what to make of it but I think it needs to be number two on the list if somebody is a non responder to your initial kind of dietary strategies like cortisol and sleep especially for New Yorkers is far and away their and I actually almost don't put anything into fasting glucose levels anymore because it's so impacted by Cortisol so impacted by Cortisol but then the question is does the court has all driving up blood sugar then drive the insulin response to be above baseline is line. And that's what's driving the way I don't know I'm one of those people who I mean. I know this because I wear the C. G. M. and I'm approaching four years of wearing the thing and having lots of data I I tend to have higher morning glucose levels than most people if you divide my day into midnight to noon versus noon to midnight. This is what's interesting. I do virtually all of my eating between noon and midnight. Meaning it's afternoon. I'm almost never eating between midnight and noon. But if you trunk eight me that Way and look at average glucose coast each sector. It's always higher in the non feeding sector interesting. Your average Lucas. My average glucose is higher in even though it includes none of the Postprandial Glucose. What's your working hypothesis? Probably hypercholesterolemia. Yeah interesting yeah interestingly when I only were the GM for a few weeks. One of Mike kind of rules is that after I workout on basically useless to do any cognitive tasks. 'cause I just basically stupendous and what I noticed. This was that when I eat after a workout and again we're going way into the realm of total speculation and of one anecdotal but my blood blood glucose would drop after eating carbohydrates post workout. So I would go down to fifty and feel it probably because I just have this really robust insulin. Response that's a holdover from the third phenotype which is like the childhood obesity phenotype which maybe there's some increase in Beta cell mass that occurs during rothe period. That you just have this hyper reactive system and then you have to manage that a little bit differently. I think rather than which again for me it ends up being. I'm the low carb phenotype but maybe that phenotype is less calm. Well I guess you could be multiple versions of this. Because I do think there's yet another phenotype which is I don't have a good way to describe it other than it's just a pure junk food food over energy consumption phenotype that is the kind that you've already sort of talked about right. These are people that are eating probably far more carbohydrates and fat collectively. They can tolerate not necessarily individually again. I don't even really have. Obviously my practice has not large enough. To sample to provide a meaningful input on what the prevalence so that would be in the United States. But I don't think any of these are particularly rare either. I mean I think these are all quite common and I don't know that it's a third a third a third or anything like that or if you include your fourth one about the children or four what we call post obese. I guess but I don't know I feel like again. I don't deal with obesity much so I don't really think about this problem constantly constantly but I know everybody myself included is sort of like. I'd like to five pounds lighter so it's a stubborn problem. It's one that evolution didn't have to deal with although I mean there were periods during during human evolution. I think when you were in a calorie replete environment. So when we the first men got to Australia we basically butchered these mega-fauna the fauna for the first thousand years and made them completely extinct. I think there was a period of human evolution. Wear we just made the stepwise leap over every other species every other their species and I think during that period there were probably times of being unless that interfered with reproduction. I'm not sure. Evolution have election bias against the glut of you've energy or if that extensive species domination didn't impair your ability to reproduce. I just don't know if there would have been enough evolutionary pressure to get you out of it. Yeah I don't know either. Do you have any thoughts on uric acid. We've never talked about this. I'm a big uric acid guy. How do you approach it well? Are You more interested in your views in mind. It's something I check. But the the question is is it an end product of some other process or is it a target in and of itself and I don't know the answer to that the good news for you is. I'm going to be interviewing Rick Johnson in in a month and rick as a nephrologist at the University of Colorado Amazing Guy. And he's probably not probably I think he is unquestionably the world's expert on uric acid acid. And we're GONNA talk about this in great detail so I don't WanNa steal any thunder other than to say. I pay a lot of attention to uric acid and I think it is both an absolute byproduct of a process process but I actually think it is an interesting target of therapy and so I don't have a huge toolbox of drugs that I think should be always there but AL appear in all's one of them Alipio now for the non gout patient. Yeah interesting yeah I haven't Ford's into that territory or well. Let's change gears for a second. So exercise has played a pretty important role in your life your transformation by the way. I don't think we've finished the story which is probably my fault. Because I'm all over the place and scattered today Eh. In medical school was the second time you underwent kind of a big physical metamorphosis so in college if I recall it was huge calorie restriction. Living on the treadmill weight comes back in medical school. What was the second iteration of weight loss? Yeah so I basically chanced into a now friend of mine's Cross Jim and he put me through a brutal workout. I didn't go back for four months because I was so intimidated by the intensity but the combination of the intensity of the workouts the community and actually the guy who started cross. What Greg glassman he? Actually there's a dietary prescription which was effectively an unprocessed food version of the Paleo Diet. which is there's a million ad nauseam? We could talk about what the definition is collectively. It's an unprocessed food and I don't recommend cross with to most of my patients. Let's start with that caveat because there's a lot that's great about it but I think because because it's run in a very decentralized fashion the quality control for coaches can be a little bit spotty and you really need to to get your form down to safely execute movements. I think it's a big difference when you're twenty five year old with kind of a fair amount of us and resilience and when you are kind of forty plus and and have some now kind of pasta l- things that are nearly calcified where you've got some cafod posture. That's going to affect your ability to extend your arms overhead loss of hit mobility etc.. But so for me I mean I think there's a number of hormonal things that occur with a very high intensity workout that you probably don't get with pure strength training or pure cardio just in terms of I think if we're talking about kind of metabolic byproducts also being signaling molecules. I think there's probably with the lactate buildup with the hypoxia. That's induced. There's probably some adaptive changes that occur. Independent of just the strength gains that you get from a weightlifting workout cow or the cardio gains that you get from a cardio workout which is interesting. Because most of the research on hit high intensity interval training really talks about how At a minute permanent basis. It's more efficient. Time Way to get many of the benefits of aerobic exercise. You're saying yeah that might all be true but there may the actually benefits that you're unique to it. That are unique to hit. Yeah well I think you're also hitting a lot of the evidence based points which is training a muscle if you're designing your rep arranges for a workout like what are the wrenches that you're doing so a common one and cross. It would be twenty one fifteen nine. You'll either do a doublet or a triplet. So you'll do two exercises one might be a barbell front squat might be a pull up. And you're basically going to or near failure on each set. And you're accumulating volume that's in the forty to seventy range which if you look at the literature on on Muscle hypertrophy kind of hits all of those points and you're doing it in a very short amount of time. I think I don't even know what we would measure to demonstrate the benefit of hit although you could argue that and you're accumulating a certain amount of time under tension as well as has I don't know what the right aerobic stressor is but I think there's a pretty strong consensus that it's moving away from your kind of mixed aerobic anaerobic near you're you're kind of ANAEROBIC threshold steady state for forty five to sixty minutes bifurcating that into shorter more intense bouts and longer less intense. It's about I think. Even during that time like in residency I was doing triathlons. But how did you get from being highly overweight. So it was cross fit Paleo Diet Eh. Six months I went from being like clinically obese to relatively lean INFO right so that a lot of people listening to this who were pissed off. Because you've now twice you've demonstrated this ability to do what many people can't do. I guess the only point is that didn't always work for you like chronic caloric restriction. Yeah and you know I think it also so it becomes harder every time you do it so every time I decide to make a life decision to kind of kick my training and kind of body composition into to into focus. It's been harder every single time. And that might just be a function of aging or maybe there is some additional adaptations that are occurring like for example the fat cells multiplying multiplying instead of just growing back to their normal size which is a short way of making excuses. So I was very lucky in that sense but you still are in. It wasn't smooth smooth sailing after that it's always been a fixture in my life where I've been like okay. This is kind of the eternal vigilance. The price of maintaining a normal weight is is that I kind of always have to be really mindful of what I'm eating I always if I'm disinherited. Anyway I revert to the default bad habits sir of processed food and eating my feelings. And what have you will you metabolic unhealthy as well when you were overweight. Or were you metabolic reasonable and it was more of just the aesthetics aesthetics that bothered you. I suspect I mean I had the beginnings of Can Tho says on the back of my neck so I suspect there was some. Can you tell people in English. What then right? It can't those. This is is basically a thickening of velvety thickening of the skin that usually occurs on the back of the neck or on your extensive services that is really really tightly. Correlated with hyperinsulinemia diabetes. I mean it's one of the kind of physical findings that you learned classically in medical school and we noticed on yourself. You get pretty alarmed when when I noticed it the second time when I knew what it was called it was pretty alarming so yeah I suspect I was on that spectrum but I never did blood work at that time and you sort of sought the alluded to something. which is you know eating your feelings or something? I think you use the term. Do you think you do have kind of a still an odd relationship with food. I mean I certainly feel like I do. I get people last time on social media. Do you have an eating disorder. As sort of joking aside now disordered eating which I think is technically correct term. Right they probably do have disordered eating. Though I don't I don't think I have ever had an eating disorder. I mean my wife is very aware of my eating habits in response to mood the worst mood. I'm I'm in the worst I eat. It's very soothing for me and it's funny like I'm the worst offender. 'cause I'm a jerk about it too like. I'll accused her accusers. The wrong word but I'll blame her for the junk punk food in the house but only when I'm eating it. Yeah Yeah it's interesting..

hypercholesterolemia cortisol Rick Johnson Eddie Fan CBS obesity G. M. United States GM Ford Lucas Mike gout hyperinsulinemia Australia Greg glassman
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

10:42 min | 9 months ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Apply to myself and they don't always work out so for me. It's unanswered questions is okay in a seven day fast versus the four day fast versus a ten day fast or in caloric restriction when does protein turnover slowdown super important. To know that. Because if it's a matter of during a seven day fast that there is an extinction effect where you start to preserve muscle mass due to growth hormone. When does that kick in or am I just eating my skeletal Muscle Muscle for Glucose? Do you agree with my observation. That during periods of fasting the most important thing you can do to maintain muscle mass lift weights. Yes we have a name for. This hormone uncalled growth hormone. I happened to be observed. It's what makes us grow during puberty for example but as an adult it really kind of almost misnomer right. I mean it's really its function in. My mind is to preserve lean mass in a fasted state. And that's why we get it kind of on a daily basis our biggest kind of I guess they do for your transformations in terms of you've title and release. I mean measuring growth. Hormone is so complicated. But I- Jeff's a pretty good proxy as the readout state because it doesn't fluctuate as much but I think it's important to realize is that it is positive. Yeah it's very it's very positively and you get spikes basically after a solid night's sleep and then after twenty plus hours of fasting and then it increases bases for the first few days during fast and in fact that corresponds also with your increases in norepinephrine and epinephrine so if you measure metabolic rate for the first three to four four days after starting a fast metabolic rate goes up after that it starts to go down. If I'm just going to assert something that may be incorrect. That if you really WANNA fast for the true sort of complete glycogen depletion. Hopefully kick-starting Tafa G.. Three days seems to be about the minimum again. I'm just saying that. Based on what I see with glucose levels and other sort of physiologic logic levels like key towns and things like that that even twenty four to forty eight hours of fasting might not be enough but by seventy two hours. You're really in the magic sound so three days as becomes your floor. You're talking about the factors that might define the ceiling. Don't go beyond this amount. Because there could be some deleterious consequences what would be your theoretical theoretical argument. I think the floor is kind of is interesting as well because for me. It's really do you find that protein catabolism is functionally affected. When you deal the longer term fast I mean again? I'm not doing granular enough measurements to know right. So it's very crude. What am I doing? I'll take a picture of myself every day in the mirror to to sort of very grossly assess muscle mass measuring blood urea nitrogen and all the nonsense. We measure but I can't really measure protein metabolism right. Would you want to sure. Yeah I would love to do a seven day fast in an environment where I could have a muscle. Biopsy and fat biopsy biopsy every single day complete metabolism mix complete proteome ex. I mean complete sequencing of everything imaginable. I would kill to do that and amazingly I would do it in a heartbeat. It's not trivial to get an institutional review board to approve that just getting an IRA to do that is not the easiest thing in the world but I don't now and maybe when I'm done with the book and I have a little bit more free time. Maybe I'll go back to visiting that. But but that's been a high priority of mine for probably three years which is also I want to sort of look signatures of G. and other things like that. I think that fasting is just such a powerful tool that it kind of I think of it is one of the most powerful drugs we have have in the entire toolbox medicine and yet I'm frustrated that I don't know the dose of the drug to give. This is one of those drugs. We're there's a sort of hormesis and maybe different doses work in different settings. Imagine your doctor walking around in your white coat with your little oh black bag in your stethoscope and someone hands you a bottle of pills and says this is the single most valuable drug you have and you're like Oh God thank you. How much do I give don't know what's the dose I duNNo? I WANNA which patients do I give it to. Anyone can take it yet. But that's how impotent I feel with this tool and as interesting as it is to talk about this this drug and that drug and all of these really amazing cool things like right in the middle of our face. Is this awesome thing that we don't really understand enough F- about yeah and I think that really prevents doctors because we are so we want to be quantitative. I think for example do deal with a lot of auto immunity. No so yeah so I think there's a huge amount of anecdotal literature out there and I think there's some randomized trials now that are experimenting with it but both with kind of an anti inflammatory diet that you're just doing strict elimination diet or fasting. I think most autoimmune conditions at least the ones that are relapsing relapsing remitting. So you're not having like a reversal. Not Lupus every day. You're live right right. I have really good responses to fasting. I put most of my patients on some form of fast and then time restricted feeding versus fasting. When do you consider a fast starting going to bed hungry or no? I don't use the term intermittent fasting for anything. That's in the time restricted domain. So I consider a fast doesn't really begin until thirty six hours. Forty eight hours in that rent so yet one meal a day is still in my mind just time restricted feeding but not intermittent fat agreed. And I agree with you just empirically. I've seen I always feel like the inflammation dissipate from my body. When I'm and fasting and do you measure cortisol levels during fast I have? I don't really get much value out of spot cortisol levels in the blood. It's not that helpful but I've done urinary cortisol collections Sion's during the fast and challenged it at once. I did not see a big increase. I didn't see much of a change which surprised me because this is way. Tm I I think gave you mentioned this once on social media but if there's really one thing about fasting that sucks it's my body odor becomes unbearable and it's not the acetone in my breath. Nikitin's it's like it is literally perspiration it. Just it's not like I'm perspiring much but it stinks and I can't figure it out 'cause I'm like kind of lucky person like I don't really have body odor. I don't even wear deodorant in most of the time but when fasting I have to wear deodorant and I even noticed by the end of the day. Like goodness. What's going on and I've never understood? Is that a cortisol thing. Saying like what other endocrine issues are changing during a fast that lead to that. Yeah by the way listeners. You're welcome for me doing the table. Switch a doctor. Oh did we ever get an answer on the cortisol question as to whether it's context dependent catoholic versus anabolic. It's both yeah. Yeah that makes it a very interesting hormone because it. It has the potential to both liberate free fatty acids from adipose tissue and forced their storage presumably acting on different things. So it's I look this up after we talked about it a long time ago and then I've already forgotten it. I believe it's liberation. Nation is based on its action on hormone sensitive lipase whereas its promotion or Cata. bolic nature is sort of a different pathway. But I still don't know I know. Exactly what the energy sensing. It's still has to be context specific. It's still has to know. Oh that's a tiger. That jumped out now. We go after hormone sensitive lipase and you should should be breaking down fatty acids like crazy versus. Oh you're getting a divorce Will in this situation I want the cortisol to make you fatter it. Maybe it's as simple as being fed verses unfed state I don't I don't know my guess is it could be duration. It could be due to the spike you know. Maybe the spike of Cortisol is sufficient officiant to ameliorate to kick off the liberation but the chronic long tail of it goes from being sort of Cata bolic two more anabolic to the fat. So I got the sense. This is known but just didn't have enough time to dig just for context. We had been cortisol again one of those hormones that we name and we named it after are kind of the colloquial understanding which is a stress hormone when in actuality it's kind of on a diurnal basis. It's the waking up hormone right. It's kind of supposed to be purely cattle pollick to glycogen and fat and to a lesser degree amino acids to Kinda just naturally wake you up and start your day and then we've commandeered it for this property of have giving us energy under stressful conditions and you get this classical. Redistribution of muscle mass. From the periphery I think clinically. What's kind of it's less that that it makes you gain weight and more that it's just redistributive so it's catastrophic to muscle and then anabolic too fat? When you're in a kind of static state in this goes back to a very early anything we discussed at the outset which we never came back to and I think the listeners are gonNA? This'll be one of those podcasts. Where people are GonNa be like guys talked about so many things that you then got distracted? Acted I apologize. I think that's the nature of some of these things I I'm sorry the show notes. I promise will organized this in a way that makes it better but we didn't come back to the different phenotype obesity which is sorta where restarted. So we talked about how one phenotype might be the hypercard bic phenotype this is just the person who is consuming. Carbohydrates at a level that goes beyond their capacity to distribute them oxidized them and those people tend to have hyperinsulinemia that is very responsive to carbohydrate restriction restriction so my view is this phenotype can only be diagnosed after the fact. I can't look at somebody and predict. Oh you're going to do really well on a car restricted data and even even the mundane randomly station where they predict insulin. Secretion based on Baseline Insulin secreting melt. It turned out not to be the case. So I think a second phenotype I I think we both agree on the first phenotype. I don't know if we agree on any of the other stuff. But I mean the others phenotype so we've been talking about the second phenotype in my experience is the hyper cortisol. Lee Mc poor sleeper. So this is a person that can have totally normal insulin levels. I've got three examples of patients like this over the past year. Hemoglobin A.. One C of five five percent oral glucose tolerance test. That makes me jealous. You couldn't come up with a single not one sign of Metabolic Syndrome in these people but they sleep like crap. Their nighttime cortisol levels are through the roof each of these three cases by the way were women so given that that such a small n then. I can't draw conclusions from that and there might be that there are at least in these three cases. We're talking about very normal androgen profiles so these were not pcs type descriptions. You just couldn't get these patients to lose weight until you could get them to actually sleep seven and a half after eight and a half hours a night properly and manage their hypercholesterolemia with other modifications.

cortisol growth hormone Metabolic Syndrome Jeff relapsing epinephrine Cata. bolic hyperinsulinemia Lee Mc hypercholesterolemia Nikitin Sion
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

14:03 min | 9 months ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Everybody goes into the residency and learns a new language Wjr so the language of internal medicine or medicine in general at the time it was still centered around. Kind of having an encyclopedic memorized understanding ending of being able to name disease states and then have a kind of reflexive multiple choice question. Answer to what you do. So as opposed to this is the person in front of me. Let me think through this problem from first principles and maybe look at the underlying cause and have you heard of this functional medicine. It's kind of a new. Yes sort of. I'm familiar the term. I still don't have a great understanding of what it is. Although I get asked all the time if I practice functional medicine to which I say well I like to believe. I don't practice dysfunctional medicine but I. I don't think I practice functional medicine by some so functional. Medicine is like they kind of claim. This root cause analysis approach to medicine and they've gotten on a lot of traction because it speaks to. I think what patients are experiencing. which is I go to my doctor and I get prescribed for different medications and the Guy Talk Talk to me for five minutes and that is I think really a stain on our profession as physicians where we abdicated our responsibility to practice good medicine Madison because we kept getting squeezed by the insurance companies into shorter shorter visits? And I know the your other second least favorite thing to talk about is health policy. You know me well do we talk about email after used to round up the Trifecta of things I love but you get squeezed into shorter short visits and then you kind of have everybody. It's easy to know where you're being obviously influenced so having a farmer Rep. Come into you and buy you lunch and at least you can take a step back and be like okay. Maybe I'm not affected by that. You are right. You're the easiest person to fool but the programming goes even deeper than that and there's an on learning when we learn the language you speak in medicine. We're learning without kind of learning the rules of grammar and so have you seen the movie arrival. Yes yes so. The central conceit of that movie is that language or understanding language. Changes the way your brain works in. This movie is in a very physical way but the more simple analogy would be when you speak French. Ensure Italian there are certain phrases that change the way you think and so we have had that influence on us whether we like it or not from medical school is about learning language which residency is about learning language. So where's that language. Who's doing the writing of the books? Harrison's had eleven million dollars industry funding when they're talking to us about how are we identify and categorise disease states and then how to treat them. So why did we learn that. hyperglycemia diabetes is called hyperglycemia and the treatment treatment is this medication. Why wasn't it like this is the physiologic process that's occurring? And how do we reverse that process in terms of kind of changing the paradigm. But it's not just justice. I mean probably one of the most egregious examples is in psychiatry where we took these medications which were actually. They were psychotropic medications but they were really identified based on their immediate effects in terms of sedation withdrawal of certain symptoms and then the whole neurotransmitter fury of psychiatry. Being neurotransmitter imbalance was invented after that as a kind of easy way for doctors to explain to patients that this is a chemical imbalance. This medication treats the imbalance and it kind of wraps everything up into this tiny package as opposed to doing the deep work of. What does the mismatch here between gene? Your DNA needs and your brains needs and the environment where it's you're not having family connections or you have inflammation because you're eating crappy diet or you're not fulfilled in your work and those are hard difficult long conversations and we as physicians kind of just said okay. We are going to be the masters of the pill hypothesis. which is we name a disease and we give it a pharmaceutical compound? I don't really think about this problem much. Although I know every time we sit down I love talking about it. 'cause you're thoughtful on it. My guess is there's another thing going on because one could hear this discussion and take a very sceptical view of medicine. But you have to also realize not you meaning one has to also realize that this is not due to like some grand conspiracy to get everybody taking a pill l.. Part of this is in my. I guess estimation of history. There is a really big historical win. That worked really really well for that model which is basically communicable diseases. Which you've sort of alluded to already in the communicable disease world to be able to identify the disease? Identify identify the pathogen and provide the right antimicrobial was a game changer. I mean has saved. I don't know if I just saved a billion lives but if it hasn't I bet we're getting close to a billion lives have been saved through identify. Treat right but repeat and you could say the same him about nutrient deficiencies yep so scurvy rickets. So I think what happened is the system came into its maturity in in an environment when that playbook worked really well. It's sort of like I can't think of a funny analogy. Somebody's GONNA come up with an unfunny funny one but it's sort of like it's now trying to play that same game and apply that same strategy of identify give drug in a time mm-hmm when it doesn't work as well but here's my beef. My beef is win. Everybody wants to throw the baby out with the bathwater and say well. There's no role for Western medicine and we should never be giving drugs and if somebody's walking around with a cholesterol level of three hundred milligrams per deciliter. That's okay because they're eating an okay diet. I mean to me that's equally early illogical. That's an equally extreme point of view to everybody needs to be on every drug at all times so I think the takeaway there is that you just need to be instead of being a nihilist just a skeptic so even the digest of we read papers really read papers from studies that got funded and and so the Diet of information that we get is heavily edited and we need to be aware of that. And so I think that's if I didn't get that I'd happen to stumble upon the low carb Diet by accident. Why is that this was just completely? There's nothing nefarious. I don't think there is a kind of conspiracy. But I think it's just the natural. What kind of predilection is towards things that get funded or have funding? Just get more attention and and we just need to be aware of that as physicians and at least examine why I do. I think that why did so for the cholesterol thing. I think it's a really interesting question so I loved that you had a little spar was Dave Feldman or and I love day. Feldman's is not an MD but why is there not an md who kind of came at it from his direction because we kind of inculcated in that in a different different paradigms and didn't allow us to see the situation from the outside not to say that he's correct or what have you but again same with the low carbon the high carb even with cholesterol. It's like you have the residual risk problem even when you have low. LDL and you have people with high cholesterol who never have heart attacks. So how do we reconcile missile that I think I was listening on one or the podcast. You're talking about how there's very little medical theory papers because I guess everything is kind of bias towards experimental mental work which I mean. I'm glad it is because we don't need a winter pontificators but I had one of those shower moments the other day where we're thinking. How do we reconcile that? Difference in the same population where you have a high. LDL In one scenario. And a low ellen. Another this is something I think a lot about. I mean that's what happens when you have multifaceted disease process S. where a given risk factor is necessary but not sufficient. So let me give you another example of that where I don't think you struggle that much. Why do some smokers get lung in cancer? Some smokers don't get lung cancer non-smokers get lung cancer non-smokers. Don't get lung cancer so there's a two by two smoke. Don't smoke lung cancer. Don't get lung cancer. Every one of those squares is populated but not equally so that means that smoking is neither necessary nor sufficient for lung cancer. We know that and nobody would argue that smoking increases the risk of lung cancer for some reason when it comes to lipids. People don't don't seem to see that not only. Is there an overlap there. It's even more profound. LDL is not just associated with it l. d. the Elysee necessary thing you have to have a like protein take cholesterol into the artery wall. It's just that that's not sufficient so on the one hand and you ask a great question. I'm glad you use the term residual risk because that's a great rigorous way to describe it Alex playing to the listener what you meant by that. But residual risk means why is it that some people when they have low. LDL Oh you've already pharmacologically lowered their LDL. They still can go on to develop atherosclerosis. And there's two arguments here one argument is because we never fully polio eradication. LDL So there's always some amount of leiper protein that sitting around the other is the other risk factors still matter arguably one of the most important risk factors in residual risk is little a most doctors. Don't even know what it is let alone measure it so you have lots. If eight to twelve percent of the population which I think is a conservative investment. By the way Sam to make us might say it's closer to twenty percent of the population has elevated LP little eh and we're only looking at LDL cholesterol. Which is the thing that most people are looking at? And you say well this person's. LDL Cholesterol is seventy milligrams per deciliter there at the tenth fifth percentile. There should be no risk. But if they have an elevated L. P. Lane you're not measuring there's residual risk and that could be one in five to one in ten patients but I also would push. I think you would agree. I think Dave Feldman would agree. Is What about hyperinsulinemia. What about elevated uric acid acid levels? I mean there's so many other metabolic factors that are driving it and remember you don't need two hundred milligrams per deciliter of LDL cholesterol. That just makes. Is it much more likely that those stairwells are going to be bombarding the artery wall and that getting retained within the endothelium and all these other things so to me. That's sort of why the problem problem statement that you gave can easily coexist. Let's ask the other questions. I didn't answer the other one. Why is it that somebody can walk around with an LDL? I have a woman whose fifty five LDL cholesterol is easily one hundred and eighty milligrams per deciliter concordant with her LDL particle number. She's probably about two thousand animal per leader her her. HDL cholesterol is pretty high. TRIGLYCERIDES are pretty low. She almost looks like she has familial hypercholesterolemia but she doesn't. She's in her mid fifties and and her risks are high enough. I I sort of had this discussion with it. which is look? We've pulled his heart as we possibly can on the nutritional levers and all the other levers there's a pharmacologic consideration here which is do we want to put you on a statin. She's a fine candidate for staten. She has a high degree of cholesterol synthesis. She also absorbs quite a bit of cholesterol so she would do great great on his ETA. My and she was a little bit hesitant. So I said look let's get a calcium scoring a C. T. A. on you and sure enough both came back perfectly clean so her. CAC Zero Oh her CPA doesn't show one speck of soft plaque. Neither of those your guarantee of anything that they make me feel a heck of a lot better and so the discussion with her is well. Well okay I feel more comfortable if your decision is you. Don't want to be treated but I said be sure that the clean ct a NCA see are really giving us. It's a five to ten year window so we should at least reserve the right to revisit this. Well that's also an interesting thing so the LDL as monotone ick area under the curve over the course civil lifetime. I have more questions than answers on this. Like for example and maybe turn the tables interview for a minute already done but does the LDL particle gets oxidized in the plasma or in the endothelium or extra cellular Matrix of intimacy. I think it's getting retained inside the seventieth space. It's getting locked up thereby here by protease glide cans. I think that's where the mainstay of oxidation is happening. Maybe phrased another way. I think that's where the oxidation most harmful because remember and I was actually talking about this with a patient today. ATHEROSCLEROSIS is primarily an inflammatory disease. The destruction is inflammation the lipid is just the trigger if something nothing else if UV light triggered and inflammatory response inside of artery walls. None of us would be outside so the issue is as that stare. Paul is getting oxidized in a place that we do not want inflammatory cells than I think we would be along step of the way which really comes back to your point into this patient. It's quite likely that this patient of mine with her. LDL Of one hundred. Eighty milligrams per deciliter is going to sail through life and not get atherosclerosis at least for the next forty years. Will that tell me that. LDL doesn't play a causal role. No it will just tell me but there are other variables. Maybe her particles. Just don't get retained very well or maybe when they do they. Just don't get oxidized which I think are. These are actually critical and important things to reflect on so lipid allergy should be a branch of hepatic in a way because the liver is synthesizing most of those particles and also respond clearing them for recycling and clearing them. That's an interesting idea. I like that idea idea. Yeah because it's really an I think of it because it's like. How do we unify this? So was there a phenotype pre nineteen fifty not related due to smoking. That had advanced so we have a few different pathways to kind of early. Cad So it's going to be smoking number one so if you during a family history history in their father was a smoker kind of almost discounted hypertension. Yeah smoking hypertension the familial hypercholesterolemia and then the new phenotype would would.

lung cancer Dave Feldman ATHEROSCLEROSIS familial hypercholesterolemia hyperglycemia Madison hypertension MD polio hyperinsulinemia Harrison staten Alex inflammatory disease Sam Paul
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

14:03 min | 9 months ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Everybody goes into the residency and learns a new language Wjr so the language of internal medicine or medicine in general at the time it was still centered around. Kind of having an encyclopedic memorized understanding ending of being able to name disease states and then have a kind of reflexive multiple choice question. Answer to what you do. So as opposed to this is the person in front of me. Let me think through this problem from first principles and maybe look at the underlying cause and have you heard of this functional medicine. It's kind of a new. Yes sort of. I'm familiar the term. I still don't have a great understanding of what it is. Although I get asked all the time if I practice functional medicine to which I say well I like to believe. I don't practice dysfunctional medicine but I. I don't think I practice functional medicine by some so functional. Medicine is like they kind of claim. This root cause analysis approach to medicine and they've gotten on a lot of traction because it speaks to. I think what patients are experiencing. which is I go to my doctor and I get prescribed for different medications and the Guy Talk Talk to me for five minutes and that is I think really a stain on our profession as physicians where we abdicated our responsibility to practice good medicine Madison because we kept getting squeezed by the insurance companies into shorter shorter visits? And I know the your other second least favorite thing to talk about is health policy. You know me well do we talk about email after used to round up the Trifecta of things I love but you get squeezed into shorter short visits and then you kind of have everybody. It's easy to know where you're being obviously influenced so having a farmer Rep. Come into you and buy you lunch and at least you can take a step back and be like okay. Maybe I'm not affected by that. You are right. You're the easiest person to fool but the programming goes even deeper than that and there's an on learning when we learn the language you speak in medicine. We're learning without kind of learning the rules of grammar and so have you seen the movie arrival. Yes yes so. The central conceit of that movie is that language or understanding language. Changes the way your brain works in. This movie is in a very physical way but the more simple analogy would be when you speak French. Ensure Italian there are certain phrases that change the way you think and so we have had that influence on us whether we like it or not from medical school is about learning language which residency is about learning language. So where's that language. Who's doing the writing of the books? Harrison's had eleven million dollars industry funding when they're talking to us about how are we identify and categorise disease states and then how to treat them. So why did we learn that. hyperglycemia diabetes is called hyperglycemia and the treatment treatment is this medication. Why wasn't it like this is the physiologic process that's occurring? And how do we reverse that process in terms of kind of changing the paradigm. But it's not just justice. I mean probably one of the most egregious examples is in psychiatry where we took these medications which were actually. They were psychotropic medications but they were really identified based on their immediate effects in terms of sedation withdrawal of certain symptoms and then the whole neurotransmitter fury of psychiatry. Being neurotransmitter imbalance was invented after that as a kind of easy way for doctors to explain to patients that this is a chemical imbalance. This medication treats the imbalance and it kind of wraps everything up into this tiny package as opposed to doing the deep work of. What does the mismatch here between gene? Your DNA needs and your brains needs and the environment where it's you're not having family connections or you have inflammation because you're eating crappy diet or you're not fulfilled in your work and those are hard difficult long conversations and we as physicians kind of just said okay. We are going to be the masters of the pill hypothesis. which is we name a disease and we give it a pharmaceutical compound? I don't really think about this problem much. Although I know every time we sit down I love talking about it. 'cause you're thoughtful on it. My guess is there's another thing going on because one could hear this discussion and take a very sceptical view of medicine. But you have to also realize not you meaning one has to also realize that this is not due to like some grand conspiracy to get everybody taking a pill l.. Part of this is in my. I guess estimation of history. There is a really big historical win. That worked really really well for that model which is basically communicable diseases. Which you've sort of alluded to already in the communicable disease world to be able to identify the disease? Identify identify the pathogen and provide the right antimicrobial was a game changer. I mean has saved. I don't know if I just saved a billion lives but if it hasn't I bet we're getting close to a billion lives have been saved through identify. Treat right but repeat and you could say the same him about nutrient deficiencies yep so scurvy rickets. So I think what happened is the system came into its maturity in in an environment when that playbook worked really well. It's sort of like I can't think of a funny analogy. Somebody's GONNA come up with an unfunny funny one but it's sort of like it's now trying to play that same game and apply that same strategy of identify give drug in a time mm-hmm when it doesn't work as well but here's my beef. My beef is win. Everybody wants to throw the baby out with the bathwater and say well. There's no role for Western medicine and we should never be giving drugs and if somebody's walking around with a cholesterol level of three hundred milligrams per deciliter. That's okay because they're eating an okay diet. I mean to me that's equally early illogical. That's an equally extreme point of view to everybody needs to be on every drug at all times so I think the takeaway there is that you just need to be instead of being a nihilist just a skeptic so even the digest of we read papers really read papers from studies that got funded and and so the Diet of information that we get is heavily edited and we need to be aware of that. And so I think that's if I didn't get that I'd happen to stumble upon the low carb Diet by accident. Why is that this was just completely? There's nothing nefarious. I don't think there is a kind of conspiracy. But I think it's just the natural. What kind of predilection is towards things that get funded or have funding? Just get more attention and and we just need to be aware of that as physicians and at least examine why I do. I think that why did so for the cholesterol thing. I think it's a really interesting question so I loved that you had a little spar was Dave Feldman or and I love day. Feldman's is not an MD but why is there not an md who kind of came at it from his direction because we kind of inculcated in that in a different different paradigms and didn't allow us to see the situation from the outside not to say that he's correct or what have you but again same with the low carbon the high carb even with cholesterol. It's like you have the residual risk problem even when you have low. LDL and you have people with high cholesterol who never have heart attacks. So how do we reconcile missile that I think I was listening on one or the podcast. You're talking about how there's very little medical theory papers because I guess everything is kind of bias towards experimental mental work which I mean. I'm glad it is because we don't need a winter pontificators but I had one of those shower moments the other day where we're thinking. How do we reconcile that? Difference in the same population where you have a high. LDL In one scenario. And a low ellen. Another this is something I think a lot about. I mean that's what happens when you have multifaceted disease process S. where a given risk factor is necessary but not sufficient. So let me give you another example of that where I don't think you struggle that much. Why do some smokers get lung in cancer? Some smokers don't get lung cancer non-smokers get lung cancer non-smokers. Don't get lung cancer so there's a two by two smoke. Don't smoke lung cancer. Don't get lung cancer. Every one of those squares is populated but not equally so that means that smoking is neither necessary nor sufficient for lung cancer. We know that and nobody would argue that smoking increases the risk of lung cancer for some reason when it comes to lipids. People don't don't seem to see that not only. Is there an overlap there. It's even more profound. LDL is not just associated with it l. d. the Elysee necessary thing you have to have a like protein take cholesterol into the artery wall. It's just that that's not sufficient so on the one hand and you ask a great question. I'm glad you use the term residual risk because that's a great rigorous way to describe it Alex playing to the listener what you meant by that. But residual risk means why is it that some people when they have low. LDL Oh you've already pharmacologically lowered their LDL. They still can go on to develop atherosclerosis. And there's two arguments here one argument is because we never fully polio eradication. LDL So there's always some amount of leiper protein that sitting around the other is the other risk factors still matter arguably one of the most important risk factors in residual risk is little a most doctors. Don't even know what it is let alone measure it so you have lots. If eight to twelve percent of the population which I think is a conservative investment. By the way Sam to make us might say it's closer to twenty percent of the population has elevated LP little eh and we're only looking at LDL cholesterol. Which is the thing that most people are looking at? And you say well this person's. LDL Cholesterol is seventy milligrams per deciliter there at the tenth fifth percentile. There should be no risk. But if they have an elevated L. P. Lane you're not measuring there's residual risk and that could be one in five to one in ten patients but I also would push. I think you would agree. I think Dave Feldman would agree. Is What about hyperinsulinemia. What about elevated uric acid acid levels? I mean there's so many other metabolic factors that are driving it and remember you don't need two hundred milligrams per deciliter of LDL cholesterol. That just makes. Is it much more likely that those stairwells are going to be bombarding the artery wall and that getting retained within the endothelium and all these other things so to me. That's sort of why the problem problem statement that you gave can easily coexist. Let's ask the other questions. I didn't answer the other one. Why is it that somebody can walk around with an LDL? I have a woman whose fifty five LDL cholesterol is easily one hundred and eighty milligrams per deciliter concordant with her LDL particle number. She's probably about two thousand animal per leader her her. HDL cholesterol is pretty high. TRIGLYCERIDES are pretty low. She almost looks like she has familial hypercholesterolemia but she doesn't. She's in her mid fifties and and her risks are high enough. I I sort of had this discussion with it. which is look? We've pulled his heart as we possibly can on the nutritional levers and all the other levers there's a pharmacologic consideration here which is do we want to put you on a statin. She's a fine candidate for staten. She has a high degree of cholesterol synthesis. She also absorbs quite a bit of cholesterol so she would do great great on his ETA. My and she was a little bit hesitant. So I said look let's get a calcium scoring a C. T. A. on you and sure enough both came back perfectly clean so her. CAC Zero Oh her CPA doesn't show one speck of soft plaque. Neither of those your guarantee of anything that they make me feel a heck of a lot better and so the discussion with her is well. Well okay I feel more comfortable if your decision is you. Don't want to be treated but I said be sure that the clean ct a NCA see are really giving us. It's a five to ten year window so we should at least reserve the right to revisit this. Well that's also an interesting thing so the LDL as monotone ick area under the curve over the course civil lifetime. I have more questions than answers on this. Like for example and maybe turn the tables interview for a minute already done but does the LDL particle gets oxidized in the plasma or in the endothelium or extra cellular Matrix of intimacy. I think it's getting retained inside the seventieth space. It's getting locked up thereby here by protease glide cans. I think that's where the mainstay of oxidation is happening. Maybe phrased another way. I think that's where the oxidation most harmful because remember and I was actually talking about this with a patient today. ATHEROSCLEROSIS is primarily an inflammatory disease. The destruction is inflammation the lipid is just the trigger if something nothing else if UV light triggered and inflammatory response inside of artery walls. None of us would be outside so the issue is as that stare. Paul is getting oxidized in a place that we do not want inflammatory cells than I think we would be along step of the way which really comes back to your point into this patient. It's quite likely that this patient of mine with her. LDL Of one hundred. Eighty milligrams per deciliter is going to sail through life and not get atherosclerosis at least for the next forty years. Will that tell me that. LDL doesn't play a causal role. No it will just tell me but there are other variables. Maybe her particles. Just don't get retained very well or maybe when they do they. Just don't get oxidized which I think are. These are actually critical and important things to reflect on so lipid allergy should be a branch of hepatic in a way because the liver is synthesizing most of those particles and also respond clearing them for recycling and clearing them. That's an interesting idea. I like that idea idea. Yeah because it's really an I think of it because it's like. How do we unify this? So was there a phenotype pre nineteen fifty not related due to smoking. That had advanced so we have a few different pathways to kind of early. Cad So it's going to be smoking number one so if you during a family history history in their father was a smoker kind of almost discounted hypertension. Yeah smoking hypertension the familial hypercholesterolemia and then the new phenotype would would.

lung cancer Dave Feldman ATHEROSCLEROSIS familial hypercholesterolemia hyperglycemia Madison hypertension MD polio hyperinsulinemia Harrison staten Alex inflammatory disease Sam Paul
Uncontrolled high blood pressure is cutting into heart disease progress

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is cutting into heart disease progress

"Total deaths from heart disease stroke diabetes and hypertension are on the rise again a sobering northwestern medicine study crunches data from the last decade defined since twenty eleven age adjusted mortality rates due to cardio metabolic diseases like heart disease stroke and diabetes have flattened death reads due to high blood pressure are

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"Have insulin surge, you're under a low, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet, your, you're extremely insulin sensitive. So when you take the sugar insulin goes right up real quick, and that could be one of the participants events in the breakthrough seizure, where we're not really sure of all the details. But as I said, this is a very active area of investigation, but you didn't wipe out all the time. So, and this is what we came later to realize in cancer, the same, it takes awhile for the body to flush out the keystone. I mean it can happen over period of hours but. Generally the key tones are still present. So, so we were Well, I, I wrote a big review article on the mechanisms by which heater genyk diets could stop seizures in. We had been involved in a lot of this. So our background was clearly in how Kita genyk diets might be managing epilepsy. And then but, you know, at the same time we began to shift, these same kinds of diets over to cancer bait and the mechanism for managing cancers so much more clear and understandable than it is for how these how this Kito genetic metabolic therapy works for epilepsy. So the cancer becomes clearly a disease that can be effectively managed and actually reduced prevented by the same mechanism that manages the same the same approach the mechanisms are very different. But the approaches is similar. So during your research is that when you came to the conclusion, in, in sort of planted your fly. In the ground ROY, your book cancers metabolic disease or did you have that viewpoint before you started this research? No. When I, I know we had not worked deeply in the cancer field as, as far as management, we would doing years of basic research on lipid, biochemistry, and cancer cells, which call basic research, you know what role do ganglia sites play in the growth of the tumor? We weren't looking. We had some drugs that we're going to going. In fact, this is one of the main linkages is that we found a drug that could block ganglia side by synthesis. And in the in the in the brains of tastes acts disease, mice. And in our cancer work, we showed that this same drug could really block gangly side by synthesis..

metabolic disease
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Of the of the heart and the arterial glazier in particular is very closely related to the health of the brain. So if whatever you do that improves, vascular health will also help the brain. But there are some differences, for example, the brain in some ways seems a little bit more exposed because the brain. Is perfumed during Sicily at a higher pressure? The heart is the only organ that is actually perfumed during diaster. So in that sense, the coronary arteries themselves are less susceptible to hypertension than the arteries in the brain or the kidney for that matter, which would be the two organs that seemed to be most damaged hypertension more. So than the heart. Yes. The other thing that I'm hearing you say that creates a bit of a differentiation between the heart is in the process of atherosclerosis in the heart cholesterol does play a very important role. But so you still have the initiation of the endothelial injury which is necessary. But once the lie protein can get inside this Venditti space and becomes oxidized. That's what elicits the immune response. Which is what does the damage what you're describing in the brain is two different processes from hearing correctly. The first is cerebrovascular disease that leads to strokes a clue. Lucid or hemorrhagic, which that's a separate disease because it tends to produce an acute event going that is the result of acute Hypo perfusion that usually produces a much more functional deficit. So it's almost like you can think of that is a quote, unquote, brain attack the way, we think of a heart attack. Correct. But what you're describing that is now sort of unique to me is a different type of much more indolent chronic Hypo perfusion that actually seems to have a slightly different pathophysiology from coronary physiology. Yes that doesn't produce an acute event, but rather a chronic disease. Is that an I that I summarize that you somewhere that really well eighties chronic brain, hyper fusion, regardless of the particular cardiovascular cause because I told you we heart failure, you can have you can simulate that aspect, but without some of the other component, right? So eighties. Ballsy will nowadays to pick these up and to intervene to dry. Resolve this Basque were problems or Cadillacs glory. They involve the hearts, also, the epidemiology states, the first and most obvious relationship, which is so obvious that it's almost not helpful. Which is there is no greater association with Alzheimer's disease than age just as there is no greater association with cardiovascular disease than age. So that's stating the obvious, but it's very difficult to draw a clear hypothesis, or at least confirm a hypothesis. So the next layer of thinking on the FDR is what is it the association with hypertension, or is it the association with cardio metabolic disease. How do you then continue down that line of thinking on from just just again before we get to the more interesting stuff, which I think is the theology and the pharmacology just based on the epidemic. Gee, what else can you infer? What would be ideal to me will be what the main purpose of that circulation from the point of view. Energy. Is to bring oxygen to the issue tissue siege. Ination it is only through this process of drug using oxygen the water that in my the gun drill these processes link. The settle respiration is linked to the production of chemical energy. So they more direct measurements would be measurements of oxygen consumption. But also could be the m Sime that is responsible for that oxygen consumption and thus word comes through our work. And what we found the brains of those Alzheimer patients we found that the sign goal cybercrime. Oxidized orders. Chrome see obviously complex four in the electron transport chain, the electron transport is the the last Fraley lasts and the rate limiting 'em Sime, and the one that actually greed uses oxygen to water that is linked to walk sedate full relation. They create. ADP? Let's pause for moment to make sure people understand this. It's so important that even I think I've talked about this before it's worth reiterating the mighty Qendra as an internet or membrane. And these have four complexes three of them span, both the internet or membrane. Why believe it's one three and four complex to is only on the inter- membrane..

hypertension m Sime FDR cerebrovascular disease Alzheimer's disease Sicily metabolic disease Fraley Venditti Alzheimer ADP
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Right. Exactly. And and so we know those kind of studies are much I think I interpret them to be more powerful evidence. Then epidemiology studies that's not to say that being on a epidemiology studies aren't worthwhile. They are. But we have to rank their warriors evidence some of the more recent intervention. Studies are what they do is. They don't look at actual hard and points, but they've looked at biomarkers or interim or surrogate markers, like a person's cluster level or glucose level or blood pressure. And while we know those. Those things are linked to heart disease or metabolic disease development, that doesn't necessarily mean that if you eat a diet that slightly changes to a very very small extent. One of these surrogate markers at has a substantial long term impact on your health. It stands to reason. But it's not always the case. So the intervention trials are with hard and points are really what we need to do. In surprisingly, they're very few. Do it thousands of people up in a room for year and feed him, different dive, more them here. And and we're not dollars. It is it's that's what people have to really realize. So I think that. And it's not just diet. The other aspect is the lifestyle changes exercise, and they are inter twined and they both feed on each other. It turns out as you change your exercise pattern, your Motilal changes. Your metabolism changes, your microbiome changes. And.

metabolic disease
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And so, of course, the question, then is you've gotta find advocates on the other side of this ledger, meaning the ledger meeting in terms of the thinking about this disease. Yeah. Well, I agree with you. And so what would you suggest? What's what's the what's the roundabout? You're you're the field. I mean, I a great discussion over that scotch that you promised me before we started this podcast. So try. We're trying to do this. We need guys like yourself and others to get the word out that there are alternatives and that who's gonna be the bold one. And I know speaking to now people who want to set up these special clinics Bessul kind of treatment clinics where we can bring everything under the same roof. So you don't have to run over this place in that place. We take the patients this will happen. It will happen because people wanna live. Yeah. Look, I mean that was gonna be my if forced to give one idea now 'cause I don't I don't think I know the answer. But if I were going to give you one suggestion it would be do this from a position of poll, not push. So right now, you are pushing this idea what you really want to do is take a page out of the Charlie foundation where they're basically saying look in the end the results were so dramatic that the parents of the children a third of whom now no longer suffer from epilepsy. Another third of whom have at least a fifty percent reduction epilepsy. They basically become the voice of reason. And I think that's a part of the reason today, not the only reason I think the day. Data are so good. But I think they're part of the reason why today the only place in sort of the traditional medical view, where Kita genyk diet is viewed as a legitimate first line therapy for you know, recalcitrant disease is an epilogue. No, I think there will be a day when that expands. So what I what I what I would hope is that there's a a network of people family members, probably who who've lost people would GBM who would would become the ones that would be your mouthpiece. Right would become the ones that would say. You know, what I'm tired of the fact that my loved one died in nine months seemingly in vain. And there's this. There's this body of evidence, which look, admittedly at this point is small and is uncertain but nothing in science is certain, but they're offering an alternative I wanna know that that could be test. And the thing that kills me on these private foundations and things they're visory boards are made up of physicians that subscribed the, gene Syria cancer. So. When the patients and their advocates. Here's my second piece of advice. I know I said I wasn't going to give you any advice. My second piece of advice is you're fighting uphill battle. You don't need to it. It could be a genetic disease and metabolic disease simultaneously. I would argue that cancer is when you think about the three diseases the three disease processes that are going to kill all of us sitting here right now in this room. It's going to be Athar Roddick disease neuro degenerative disease or cancer that statistically speaking. That's how we're going to die of those three. I don't think there's any that are more evolved and complicated than cancer. I think cancer is by far the hardest of those and therefore there's where I would disagree twelve. But that's too long discussion does whether you agree with me or not let's argue the following let me state the following or posit the following. It's a very volved condition, and therefore you could have genetic pressures metabolic pressures immune pressures that all predisposed to it. So I don't think it has to be an either or. I think metabolic therapies could be valuable whether or not the genetic ideas of cancer are right or wrong. So so to me, it strikes me as an unnecessary fight. Right..

cancer metabolic disease degenerative disease Charlie foundation Athar Roddick fifty percent nine months
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"It's more demarcation. You can see it on this in the his philologist slides. You can see what the hell happened to this tumor. How come how come it's smaller? How much more the margins are more sharply defined because you took away the inflammation that was being driven by the fermentation fuels. So you string this tumor down. Now, the surgeon comes in and can potentially cure these people that would be maybe not curable in the past. So this is why I'm saying we can reduce the death rate by fifty percent, if you view the tumor as a metabolic problem rather than a genetic problem. The gene mutations are all downstream before the red herrings even Vogelstein who still claims that this is a bird Vogelstein from Jonah. He's still claims. Genetic disease, but we're never going to cure the disease by targeting the genes too, many mutations all this kind of stuff, but we can do that with metabolic therapy can actually eliminate the cancer based on metabolic therapy. It's a process who's trained to do this. No one. I mean, we need physicians to be trained to do this. Why they've been used to train to give dosa high doses of radiation without killing the patient or poisoning, these poor people with drugs that are very toxic and keeping them alive. So you don't die from the from the treatments. This is absurd. Why are you using radiation and chemo in the first place when we have to stop liberation? Okay. We if they can't generate energy they're going to stop liberating going to die. What is the experiment the clinical trial that you're involved in Turkey that you've alluded? So what we what we do. My colleagues in Turkey do is they use chemo, but they use the lowest possible dose is it for breast cancer all cancers in the results of the same Kansas at the same disease. They're all from enters. So once you knew that they're all dependent on these two fuels. Then all you have to do is target the two fuels to put them. At risk for elimination. The question is how can you target the fuels without harming the rest of the body? And that's the press. Pulse. Concept. So we know we can press things constantly without harm in the body. But we have the pulse. The glutamate issue because we don't want to deprive our normal immune system and gut systems of the very fuel needed to provide normal physiology and those tissues, so this is why we have to pulse. The glutamate issue. How many gloomy drugs aren't there? Well, the sums coming all the time. But the one that works the best for us is Don any that are in clinical trials in the United States. There's a couple is named as a few names of them. You know, they're they target various aspects of the glue Thomas this pathway. The problem is we have a drug that's called. It's a dirty drug. It's a hits multiple pathways of glutamate metabolism. And it seems to work better than all the other drugs at least from our perspective, so far which drug is this is Don the six nor Lucienne it was used in clinical trials years ago, but it was partially affective, but they weren't targeting. They weren't doing the full metabolic approach. If you don't do all the PA. Of the problem. You're not you're going to the horses going to get out. It's it's still not going to be effective and today, no one anywhere on the planet is doing the kind of therapy that we think need to do to make to make this all work. Now, there's bits of the drugs that are in current clinical trials that are targeting glutamate. Well, there's a BP TSI believe an acronym for another very complicated structure. And then there's a they're making Don analogues that supposedly less toxic. What we find is with the Kito genyk diet, Don becomes far less toxic. So you can actually use you can use far lower doses. So I was talking to somebody the other day is it better to wait for pharmaceutical company to build a new drug to target Tanzer. Or is it better to develop a way in which previously very effective drug could be less toxic and both of them. The Dan result is the same. You're going to get something that's gonna work far better than than what was previously available. So how many clinics in the country in the world are treating cancer as a metabolic disease using a strategy that will take away..

dirty drug Don metabolic disease Turkey Vogelstein chemo Kansas Tanzer Dan United States Thomas Lucienne fifty percent
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And it was there that he first became interested in key tones because of their application in the amelioration of recalcitrant seizures as we get into the in the episode that led to his interest in cancer, which is now his focused. Tom has published over hundred fifty peer reviewed publications these the author of numerous books textbooks it cetera, including kind of a treaties on this. Oh, his magnum opus effectively a book called cancer as a metabolic disease. I probably got my first copy of this a few years ago, and in many ways, that's what sort of felt quite familiar in speaking with him. He's currently professor at Boston College and his research today focuses on the mechanisms by which metabolic therapies can manage chronic diseases such as epilepsy. Noor. The genitive lipid storage diseases and above all cancer in this episode. We talk about Tom's background as I sort of alluded to his work and epilepsy. And how that led him to the interest in caloric restriction. And ketosis. We revisit the man the legend Ota Warburg and talk about the Warburg effect and Warburgs point of view on these things. And I I do push him a little bit on this because I wanna point out that it's not entirely clear amongst people what the Warburg effect really implies. And how ubiquitous it is. And have to be honest with you, I don't necessarily share Tom's views on a number of these things. So I wanted to do my best to sort of represent as many other views as possible, but at the same time, I hope the discussion is helpful. We get into a bunch of the semantics, I knew this was a very technical topic. And I know that not everybody has the luxury of listening to this while they're reviewing the show notes. So we do go over the difference between respiration or accidents relation and Firmin. -tations are important to understand this one thing to keep in mind with this podcast, and frankly, any of the more. Technical episodes. We do if you're struggling with a concept. Hit pause. I don't think it's worth sort of going through these not understanding them. I think it's cool to listen to this hip pas, go back hit Wikipedia ping with a question on social media, or whatever if there's a concept that stumping you, but this is obviously going to be one of the more important concepts. If you can't understand the difference between respiration oxidative phosphorylation as it were and fermentation than a lot of this won't make sense. We also get into this idea of substrate level phosphorylation, very important concept in the fermentation of glucose, we also talk a lot about glutamate. This is something that I haven't spent a lot of time talking about in the past. I think I do touch on it a little bit with Dom de gustin, but we get into it in much, greater fashion. And we, of course, get into alternately the fundamental question that I think people who are interested in metabolic therapies for questions have to be able to answer, which is is cancer primarily metabolic disease, meaning a disease whose origin arrives in the mitochondria or in. The metabolic machinery of the cell, or is it primarily genetic disease where sometimes you will. And sometimes you won't sustain mitochondrial damage. Now, I have to, you know, end you'll you'll see this in the interview, I it's not entirely clear to me that I buy the argument, the cancer is entirely a metabolic disease, though, as some of you will know, I am very bullish on the use of metabolic therapies in cancer. But I'm also very bullish on the use of immunotherapy and cancer, and when appropriate chemotherapy and cancer. So, you know, my my view is that cancer is about his heart diseases. There is ever going to be to target, and therefore we ought to turn our attention to as many legs of the stool as possible and not just one I think it just gets a little bit heated at one point when I take issue with something Tom said about suggesting that biopsies could exacerbate cancer. I I really don't want. Anybody to come out of this believing that having a biopsy is going to increase their risk of metastatic cancer. Yeah. I think that's anyone's entitled to a hypothesis. But to my knowledge, there are absolutely no evidence to support that claim. We talk a lot about a particular type of cancer called glioma blessed? Omay multiform E G B M also known as a grade for Astra Saitama, this is of course, a cancer that if you haven't heard of it you've certainly heard of its effect. John McCain who recently passed away suffered from this..

cancer metabolic disease Tom professor Ota Warburg ketosis John McCain Astra Saitama Boston College Dom de gustin Warburgs Firmin.
U.S. Immigrants Leave Country--and Microbes--Behind

60-Second Science

02:15 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Immigrants Leave Country--and Microbes--Behind

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata immigrants to the US might lose touch with certain customs and traditions back home. But here's something else. They lose their microbes when they came to the US almost immediately. They began losing their native microbes, Dan nights, a computational biologist at the university of Minnesota. And over time the balance shifted to the point where they were dominated by the US associated microbes. He's referring to first in second generation immigrant women from the mung and Karen ethnic minorities in south East Asia. His team sequence the DNA found in their feces, and they saw that there was an immediate decline in the number and diversity of gut microbes among the emigrants compared to their counterparts still living back home and the decline continued over time. Now, if you're thinking, well, maybe the women just switched up. Their diets started eating more hamburgers, more, bacon, and eggs dietary serve. Vase don't bear. That out. The women weren't changing their diets nearly fast enough to explain the drop in diversity. So it seems as though there's something else going on the has to do with the US lifestyle. Antibiotics could be playing a role the water supply could be playing a role. It could be other aspects of lifestyle. No stress exercise hygiene. But we don't have enough information yet to be able to pin it down. The results are in the journal cell. Some of the missing microbes help digest traditional foods like tamarind palm and coconut, but the consequences could be more severe than indigestion. We have evidence from many studies now, especially even causal evidence in the number of animal studies that having the wrong set of microbes or missing the right set of microbes can cause many of the diseases that are rising in industrialized nations. Things like. Obesity metabolic disease, which we might be able to fix. He says if we're able to solve this microbial mystery. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

United States Christopher Dodd East Asia Christopher Don Metabolic Disease Dan Nights University Of Minnesota Sixty Seconds
"metabolic disease" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:27 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on KTOK

"Here on NewsRadio one thousand KT okay I must tell you. I am honored to be joined by our next guest I I found. Out about Dr c. freed back in two thousand twelve. He published a book entitled cancer as a metabolic. Disease now you guys know me as a former chemotherapy and so, when I saw metabolic disease that actually made me go what because we. Had always been taught that cancer, is a genetic disease we'll. Talk about what the different why that's a big deal the full title of the book is cancer as a. Metabolic disease on the origin management and prevention of. Cancer we'll talk about, the management and prevention of cancer and the second. Segment Dr Siegfried is a professor over at Boston. College I'll have to ask if he knows Doug Flutie he's a. PHD genetics and bio Chemistry. Professor of biology we are super honored to have. Him with us today Dr Siegfried freed welcome to the very first, time on super health oh thank you very much Kyle it's a pleasure. To be here you were sharing, not a stage but you. You spoke at a cancer conference that I was at I do a TV show called no the cause with. Doug Kaufman Doug was one of the speakers there. And then you came, on but you did it remotely because I think. You've just done some surgery yes I had a. I had a hip replacement surg- But everybody was fascinated everybody in the audience was blown away, by your talk everybody who knows you is going my gosh this guy, is onto something so let's start at the very beginning you are contending that cancer is not a genetic disease even though the entire cancer, community as always believed it's a genetic disease instead you're. Saying that this is a might oh Conrail metabolic disease can you. Kind, of contrast the difference, for. Our lay audience well yes the. The the the, dogmatic view in, the textbooks and in the entire industry the majority of the cancer. Industry is focusing on gene mutations that are thought to be the. Cause and if we can target the products of these of these, mutant genes we're going to make major advances and you hear discussions about. Immunotherapy, as Katrina up, Devaux when all these different approach That are based on. Cancer being a genetic disease Yup and, and there are mutations. In cancer there's no there's no denying it but these. Are not these are not the cause these, are the effects of up. Something more fundamental which is a disruption. Of the energy the oxidative energy metabolism in the south, and what what happens then is is a variety. Of different insults from. From the environment or inherited so people think, oh, well there's some. Cancers that you know Bracco one you hear about this with? The, Angelina, Jolie and, makes, a big big thing and some cancer yeah they've so people. Automatically think well this has to be a genetic disease but you have to realize that those genes. Are producing a product that targets the mattock Andrea when you were exposed, to chemical carcinogens expose it damages the Michael contra viruses that cause cancer damage the minor contra poxy damages the mighty Oh Qendra inflammation damages all goes through the mitral. Contract. When the minor congregate damage they throw. Out these, toxic carcinogen molecules called, reactive oxygen species and. They are the cause of. The mutations the mutations are not the cause of, cancer there in effect of the damage, to the respiration you talk about two. Different fuels for cancer things that are fueling cancer what are those two fuels glucose including me so. Wind might Kandari, become, damaged, we cannot generate energy in a normal way, we breathe in air we x hailed CO two and all of our shelves are essentially breathing. And, we're just bringing in the, air, and blowing out the exhaust the shells, are breathing ourselves are using oxygen for energy when they can't use oxygen for energy and if. It's too acute they will die die, they go on this destructive path towards carcinogenesis and they start. To ferment so this is an ancient Form of energy that existed on the planet before oxygen. Came into the atmosphere we had. Cells, that. Lived on the planet before oxygen came in and these cells were fermenting, and what did they ferment they fermented amino acids and carbohydrate that was that was in the environment it. Does at that time and carbohydrate you mentioned glucose that's sugar to you folks yeah sugar so so essentially what we're doing is these tumor. Cells are falling pathways affirmative. Action and as long as they have access? To glucose glutamate which is predominant. Amino acid one of the most abundant amino. Acids in the body. These two fuels drive the, cancer cell and these two fuels make them, resistant to the chemo and the radiation that everybody's throwing at them. So if you removed glucose and glutamate and target these fuels you will destroy the tumor cell, but you have to do, it in such a. Way to not harm all of the normal cells of the body and. This is what we're working On we raise key towns, all the cells transition normal cells transition over to the key tones protecting them while we then gradually degrade their their availability? Of glucose in glutamate elegant strategy it doesn't hurt the patients well it's. Am by the way we'll talk more. About how to actually do that you said. Key, towns. That. Sounds like, Kita genyk diet we'll talk about that in just a, moment fasting, as part of it and the question that I have because it's so elegant because, this is so simple and because I don't see how, anybody can make money on this to me is I just having been in the cancer industry I can tell you I don't think that. The mainstream cancer industry is going to embrace this, am I, crazy no listen we have a, problem here one over one thousand six hundred people are dying from cancer every day in this country this is from. The data from the American Cancer The society this is an epidemic right, and we. Have an epidemic you don't hear this on. The news at night you're. Hearing about some drug that's going to give you a chance to live longer by a couple of months for one hundred thousand dollars give me a break that's what I that's why I left the industry doc. I was in that, industry and when I was told hey we're releasing a new drug there. Is a two? Percent, response. Rate it costs seventy five thousand dollars a month and it cures nobody go sell it I said I can't do. It anymore well this there's a moral issue here There's? A. We it, would. Be it, wouldn't be. A problem if we, didn't? Have such a catastrophic death. Rate and the other thing too is to the. People in the country in the world it's not just the country seem to be very complacent about this I know it's amazing it's like. The sheep go onto. The slaughter they. Go off to these high powered cancer. Research centers and they get treated with toxic therapies and, nobody, speaks about cancer being a. Metabolic disease they use chemotherapy radiation therapy. Surgery immunotherapy but who's using metabolic therapy is by the way. Is there anybody that. You know, of at this at this. Point, yes, in Turkey yes and Egypt We're going. Outside the country to find a defined a resolution for the disease. Well I know that. You and for example, Dom Dagestan oh and. Others have been working together publishing something we'll talk about, something that you guys have written on called press pulse will also need to talk a. Little bit about fasting and, on, this, show we talk about fasting a lot I know. That there is a big big push in a lot of low? Carb. Communities paleo. Ketogenic. Communities etc Into intermittent fasting which means that you. Only eat during a certain window each day of. Between four and eight hours a day that's one form of fasting. But then there's total fasting which is what, I just finished doing this past month I did twelve days, of total nothing but water fasting if you measure your blood sugar, no I didn't, measure my blood sugar this time and it's because I do this so often oh. I kind of know what's happening and that's why I wanna come back at this break we're. Going to have to take a quick. Break I want to ask you about fasting as a strategy for prevention I. Wanna, talk about reducing glucose that sugar but, also glued Amine, which is a little bit more problematic especially. For those in the paleo community where it's a very protein heavy. Meat heavy not as big in the key to genyk community because they're more moderate, in protein and what you think. Of glued demean is a supplement people are taking that for gut health this looks like, it might not, be Necessarily good.

cancer metabolic disease Disease Dr Siegfried professor Doug Flutie American Cancer The society Doug Kaufman Doug Dr c. NewsRadio Boston Katrina CO Andrea chemo Kyle Bracco Angelina
"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Metabolic disease auto warburg theory which we can talk about or whether it was going to be more traditional you know it's a defect in in dna the nucleus of the cell and so it was it was a could be addressed through kind of more traditional therapies yeah i love to go deep on to deep on that in basically kind of your theories because the night we met we talked about this for really long time and i think it was the most logical and comprehensive explanation i've ever heard and i love for you to kind of go deep on your theories i think you have a very unique perspective but also before we move on i just wanna say that's amazing have so much respect for your mindset in both acknowledging that even the you are doing so many healthy things like acknowledging obviously there was more to the picture because i think we can get so easily stuck in our dogma but we think we're doing is right and you overnight had to question everything in like reevaluate but also just how you jumped into the research and didn't just decide that you were gonna roll over and take this that you i mean that's amazing the amount of information you took in so i love to go deep on that like kind of explain to me explain to everyone what you explained to me about what you what your theories are about the true causes of cancer sure okay just quickly for those who are not familiar with the two alternative competing theories and there's some kind of subsets to that you know there's some fungal connection setup i view the kind of main the main field medical field theories of cancer the phone to to two baskets to cat camps in the big one obviously is the is that standard of care allopathic traditional md approach on colleges is been trained in college practice to follow this path and that is the cancer is caused by defect in the dna that somehow the dna stops stops doing its job properly in that creates this kind of situation with a cancer cell starts proliferate in they no longer differentiate differentiate the way a judicial sales should in the second theory was actually way before we even knew the dna existed the nobel laureate oughta warburg got the nobel prize back in the nineteen thirties because he discovered then that all cancer cells had very similar condition in that is they they converted from the traditional form of energy production which is respiration where ats created through burning of oxygen in the creation of i'm sorry it it's bernie vox jim but it creates water and co two in that process and when it can no longer do that it reverts to kind of a prehistoric form of energy production which is from tation or the burning of glucose in the creation of lactic acid those are completely different methods of energy production so the cells really kind of kind of go from if i can use an analogy you know it's it's like a car suddenly stops burning gas finance birlik trista misses completely different and and so this was kind of this was kind of the buick until the dna was discovered in when the when the discovery of the dna occurred of course everything all the money in all the you know the nixon declared a warrant canton the nineteen seventies and since then we've been spending hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars trying to chase down some sort of hat and within the defect in dna theory that would allow a cure to be found and i've always kind of used that as being a little silly because cancer to me was was more of a chronic condition than acute condition so the the idea of there being some sort of magic bullet just didn't quite fit the paradigm so i was always kind of i think inclined to view it more along the it's a defect in respiration than it's something that you can just point a silver bullet at and fix so when i discovered of warburg's theory it made sense to me but then i and then i read the work of tom c free and travis christoffersen and others who have i think travis's booked tripping over the truth tooth is probably the best book to kinda do a general overview of the history of cancer in in amal g and how the scientists developed involved but i think the most telling thing for me as an attorney i'm always looking at evidence in context and i look at those two to try to decide what makes.

Metabolic disease
"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"And to me it's not it's not a different mission so of course we were trying to do is wellness right so now you can get hyper focused and say what's the tactic we're using the tactic there was to end metabolic disease but at the end of the at the end of the day for me and i'm speaking for myself not for my partners we were you know sort of focused on very different things but for me it was there were people in my life that i loved and they were very unhappy profoundly unhappy and playing the no bullshit what would it take him i knew the answer was you know my sister was clinically depressed to help her she had to get in better shape because she was in this vicious cycle of food shed a negative self body image the only thing that give her comfort was food and that gave her a more negative body image made her feel i should know willpower and all that and so she just super destructive so by giving her food that she could choose based on taste and i happen to be good for god her going in the opposite direction start to feel better look better she was making one simple choice eat this bar instead of a you know beg of eminem's or whatever and so it got are going to help build confidence all that it was really really incredible but it was it was about wellness it was about one my sins are happy right so the the other side of the coin was always mental happiness and i believe that we're living through two pandemics right now one is depend democ of the body it's very easy to see if you have a morbidly obese super visible when somebody dies of diabetes it's crazy they're literally burning alive from the inside out it starts at the extremities they start cutting off toes and foot leg and you know and then you're gone and so it's so visible whereas mental illness on the other hand the pandemic of the mind is invisible agreed i mean there's a sam harris who is also brilliant and i've consulted with on this topic says why are we so concerned with the.

metabolic disease eminem sam harris diabetes
"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Whether or not we have unique ideas whether or not were valuable none of that is going to bring you joy k as they say comparison is the thief of joy so hey if you really wanna fuck with yourself jump in the instagram feed and look how other people are crushing it and obsessed over that if on the other hand you want to really have a deep and lasting sense of the film it jump in the instagram feed find people that motivate and inspire you to be a better version of yourself not to attain worldly success but you actually what your potential to ask yourself very simple question what is it that i am excited by what am i motivated by what jazz me up regardless of whether or not a anybody else up and now i'm gonna go get good at that thing and that progress is the foundational building block of happiness now if you want to really pushed a level gaining a skill set that not only serves you in a selfish manner but can help other people that's the real jus that's technique the ancient greek notion of getting a skill set that was very hard to acquire that is unique to you and lives and service of other people i'm telling you that's the fucking juice and now the great news you live in a world where that can actually be turned into a business that can be monetize you can build something massive in huge an amazing that simultaneously is awesome business totally forprofit allows you to facilitate all your dreams and did all of that while living in service of other people so you can do it at quest we were trying to end metabolic disease at impact your i'm trying to pull people out of the matrix that.

metabolic disease instagram
"metabolic disease" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on WDRC

"Big big changes in your body chemistry in your mind chemistry's different now that you're this heavy when you get over a certain pmi will your body processes everything is different it was he said it the chances of me doing it on my own were very very small so um surgery was really my only choice to save molly well well this is in them unbelievable story like i mentioned last time sitting right here beside raisings beautiful right she is fast beautiful and she's a fighter and um like i said there has to be the motivation and the commitment to it so her bmi before surgery was 52 when you're that that heavy um because it's a metabolic disease it is virtually impossible to it you can lose some weight but to take all of it off is really difficult without surgery so that's kind of 'em now her bam eyes roughly about thirty one how long does the surgery take and that end the operating room about an hour an hour and a half now the large scale change jobs she had to change your diet and everything take us through that kathleen i'm really i'm getting rid of refined sugars and um really make try take my protein in my water in um and seeing food differently now i use it to nutrient two for just a newt for new transfer my body for fuel um it's not reward system or a punishment system anymore um i don't deny myself anything if i'd there's something that i want i have it but it's just i have a little bit of it um and making sure that i have everything i need there's no more excuses i have everything i need that's healthy at work or in my car i have water everywhere i go so oh i'm making sure that i have everything i landing the meal playing them he operation that was the huge thing for me because you when you're busy and you're working hours and you have a family to take care of your always running but stepping back and looking at the big pictures of the nutritionist taught me to do like there's no reason for you to do that plane you meal without lien what you're doing and yang yang need it you get rid of a lot of the.

raisings metabolic disease molly kathleen
"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"metabolic disease" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"We want to empower entrepreneurs with faster cheaper computers so that even low income entrepreneurs can launch companies okay helping low income entrepeneurs launch companies that's a mission the faster computer thing is the path and understanding the difference between a path and a mission is critical i'll give you an example the mission at quest is the end metabolic disease what if we found that food is totally irrelevant to that what would we do our mission was to make protein bars our mission was then metabolic disease so we would change as we got deeper and deeper into cancer look like this whole highprotein thing may actually be really dangerous in a cancer environment you may have to go high fat and so even though everybody considered us the high protein low carb company we started investing massively into high fat everybody thought it was crazy what's going on what you doing but we were looking at the data we were looking at what just metabolic truth was showing us so don't ever be married to a pack but be deeply convicted about your mission and choose your mission carefully it needs to be real needs to be something that sits at the heart of who you are there's an awesome quote often attributed to mother teresa noone will act for the many but people will act for the one i showed of every day thinking about my mom and my sister they were very real to me there are people that i know that i love that i see frequently that i will be mortified the my core if they were to die.

metabolic disease teresa noone