40 Burst results for "medical officer"

Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

All Things Considered

03:47 min | 9 hrs ago

Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

"Are starting to use new drugs that are designed to keep covert 19 patients out of the hospital. But it's not clear how well these monoclonal antibodies work, and some hospital administrators are wondering how long their staffs will be able to give this time consuming treatment. As emergency rooms and beds fill up. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris spoke to doctors in New Mexico and Wisconsin as they launched their treatment programs. The Food and Drug Administration has granted emergency authorization to two monoclonal antibody formulations. These drugs are supposed to prevent the Corona virus from invading cells there specifically for people with mild to moderate disease who are not in the hospital. And it's not just a shot or a pill. They have to be given by Ivy infusion, a process that takes two hours or more like everything in today's world during the pandemic, our biggest challenges are around staffing. Dr. Peter Newcomer is chief clinical officer at University of Wisconsin Health in Madison. He says his hospital is giving the drug after hours in an infusion center so infectious covert patients don't cross paths with cancer patients and other vulnerable people. Special plea went out for nurses to take on yet another shift. Even as the hospital struggles with rising Covad cases, the hospital can initially handle eight patients a night. Newcomer says They started with three patients on Tuesday night. Our advertising campaign to the community when I'll come Monday and Tuesday, so we're going to see more tonight and then Philip all over slots. Real soon. If everyone who qualifies for this treatment asks for it, the hospital will quickly run out of drugs. So you w health set up a system to identify people who would most likely benefit primarily people over 65 with underlying health conditions. Will randomly pick from that pool. If there isn't enough drug to go around. It's basically a lottery type system with an allocation that is done as equitably as we can informed consent for this includes telling patients that it's not clear just how well these drugs actually work. The National Institutes of Health put out treatment guidelines, saying there's simply not enough information to know if they are effective. Company studies suggest doctors have to treat 10 to 20 patients to avoid a single hospitalization. Dr. Newcomer wishes he could tell how well the huge investment in staff time will pay off as long as we can continue to provide this treatment. We plan on it. It's gonna have to be an ongoing evaluation of what we can afford to do. From the staffing standpoint, the drugs could help hospitals if they can keep their patient loads down in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Dr. David Gonzalez is keeping a close eye on the capacity of Krista's ST Vincent's Hospital where he's the chief medical officer. We're currently entering crisis levels stage with bed capacity that's throughout the state of New Mexico. His hospital is directing people most likely to benefit from the new treatment to the hospital's emergency room for the infusions. We have a portion of our emergency room that's dedicated to cope in positive patients. Krista Saint Vincent's Hospital infused its first patient Tuesday, using one of the eight initial doses of the drug allocated by the state of New Mexico. After the hour long infusion. Nurses monitor patients for 1 to 6 hours to make sure that there are no serious side effects, and Gonzales says that monitoring continues once patients leave the hospital were able to follow the patients at home. And, uh, and a pain their vital signs and they can go through a questionnaire in which we ask them if they're experiencing specific symptoms more than 2400 medical facilities nationwide have been allocated some of these drugs. And many are like these in New Mexico in Wisconsin, now starting to figure out how to make it all work. Richard

Dr. Peter Newcomer University Of Wisconsin Health New Mexico Richard Harris NPR Food And Drug Administration Dr. Newcomer Wisconsin Dr. David Gonzalez Madison St Vincent's Hospital National Institutes Of Health Cancer Krista Saint Vincent's Hospita Krista Santa Fe Gonzales Richard
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

00:49 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"They were worried about so You know he disqualified me in basically said. I mean we're gonna send you out to the big navi You will never be able to be a seal and You know i said well. That's not where. I have set my goals and i cut all ties with the navy and took an administrative discharge. They wouldn't remove this thing from my heart again because it was a totally a symptomatic. So did you go find a civilian doctor who could then take it off and then you reapplied for the navy and got back in the boot camp. Yes yes. I took a big gamble. You know when i got out of the navy the first time i didn't know if i was going to be able to find a civilian sergeant. That would even touch this thing. But luckily i did. We shop surgeons for about a month in i. It was the fourth. One is nine was dr cooper here in atlanta. He was one of the leading heart surgeons here in atlanta and he understood what i wanted to go and do and he accepted the risk that i was taking and he removed this cyst from a heart and yeah reapplied for the navy. Luckily they didn't make me go back through boot camp. So i was standing before the same dive medical officer that had disqualified me less than a year after that. Heart surgery mile fascinating. I'm surprised that they actually allows you to do that. But you went all the way through boot camp to the last day so that makes sense but it just knowing the bureaucratic quagmire that the navy can be. That is actually interesting news that they didn't require you to go back to boot camp and i'm also really surprised that they gave a medical waiver for that. That's incredible obviously it was your destiny. Well i think you understand this better than most people do not tell the story quite often on podcast but you can understand it mark because you know you've been in that world and you know how the navy works and i don't think people understand that that part of it that how much of a gamble it was for me to go in and you know pay for this heart surgery Outta my own pocket. Not only did it call know nearly one hundred thousand dollars but it also You know it was also a dangerous and kind of a just a risky surgery because it was so rare and And it was a total gamble man because like you said when i got went back in the navy there was no guarantee that they were going to give me a waiver to then push toward With with my dream of becoming a seal So and yeah man now. This sounds crazy. But like i say that the details are spelled out very clear and those medical journals and actually just might post on instagram about a month ago with With those journals it is pretty interesting. Saying it from the sergeants perspective. Yeah so during that time off quote unquote when you're doing the brain or the heart surgery. Were you able to train like did you do any swimming and running at that time to continue preparation or were you kind of at the same level that you were when you left the navy the first time. Yeah you know obviously wants to heart. Surgery was complete and you know. Obviously we had to let the incision heal up and all that good stuff. Once i was able to get back you know started training again and the muscles were healed. Yeah man i picked it up in started training and you don't know the exact timeframe but i had. I had three to four months there before. I went back in the navy to really hammer down. So that's what i did. Brother a hammered down and again. I don't feel like it was obviously. That was a great opportunity to train. But it was more of that having my dream taken from me like having society place this mountain in front of me in You know realizing then how much i wanted this thing that that was the that was the driving factor man i. It's the same when you get when you get out of the seal team's for a lot of guys i was medically retired about a year and a month ago. And you don't realize what you had until you lose it and you know. So that's kinda. That's kinda really that furnace of adversity. Like i said is what really purified my intention. And why i wanted to do this thing. Yeah i love that term by the way. Furnace of adversity is when we when we face adversity use it like that as a way to forge our character and to strengthen our resolve minutes. It's really really powerful. In fact it's the best. Maybe even the only way to truly grow and evolve as a human being and i see how you use that and so there was no going back once. You got the buds finally like you said earlier you had already invested in your success so much that you couldn't say no anymore or you weren't gonna let anyone else say no either that's right. That's right mark in that adversity in a you develop these tool Mental tools and spiritual tools that you can then use and utilize you know in buds in the in in really the thick stuff. So you know that's a we could have a whole talk around adversity whether it beings you know self inflicted adversity you know. But that's why view brother is. It's a blessing right. Those and those tools which i do want to talk about in a bit. Those tools then become a self reinforcing growth kind of mechanism because use diversity to develop tools to deal with diversity. Then you bring those tools to even more. Adversity like an self-induced one or other induced buds. And then you become even stronger and the tools get more refined and then the next time around you can handle even more adversity until actually adversity is nothing to you. It's just a another thing that you have to deal with and you embrace it that with the suck comes from right. You just brace it. Enjoy the growth. That comes from it right will you you you get to a point where you see it as an opportunity right people talk about people talk about ultra running like what what is so. Everybody asked me. Well why do you. Why do you do this. Ultra running like what is this thing and you know it's it's It's so simple man. it's. I don't have anything to proved anyone nor do you like. I don't need anyone to think that. I'm that i'm tough or or that i'm hard or or any of that. None of that matters to me. the reason that i ultra run brother is to inflict some adversity upon myself and to bring my flesh into subjection and to again like you said to hone those tools in a controlled environment. So when life inflicts adversity upon me. That's outside of my control. Those tools are home right. And that's what. That's what. I don't mean to change the subject we can talk about. You're running later. But that's what it is to me man so you learn to it as as an opportunity man if you find yourself Just all comfy.

Navy Atlanta Medical Officer Dr Cooper
Amazon Launches Online Pharmacy, Shakes Up Healthcare Industry

Business Wars Daily

04:17 min | 1 d ago

Amazon Launches Online Pharmacy, Shakes Up Healthcare Industry

"Amazon made big news last week when it announced the opening of its online pharmacy in a dark twist. The announcement appears to be timed perfectly as of this writing. More than twelve million cases of covid nineteen have been confirmed in the us according to nbc news and the country is averaging close to two hundred thousand new cases a day that adds up to a mammoth need for prescriptions. On top of that fewer and fewer of us want to venture out and those who are sick can't while the news is hardly unexpected amazon. Spent seven hundred fifty million dollars to buy pill pack in two thousand eighteen. That startup specializes in divvying. Up prescriptions into packets intended to make taking multiple prescriptions easier for patients but it was the infrastructure and logistics. That pill packet already built. There was to serve as the foundation for amazon's new online pharmacy business regardless of whether the announcement was expected or not. It's still hit. The healthcare industry hard with observers reacting both positively and negatively amazon says it's pharmacy will accept insurance and payment through flexible spending in health savings accounts. It will adhere to hip a privacy rules around patient data. One of the biggest draws without insurance or prescription drug benefits for prime members. Paying cash amazon is offering huge discounts. Forty percent off on branded drugs and eighty percent off on generics two day shipping is free for prime members others get five days shipping for free but can pay a few bucks to speed it up. Two days. amazon will fulfil most medicines including birth control. But it won't sell schedule two drugs which include but perhaps the biggest innovation is something healthcare consumer have been wanting for a long time a step toward pricing transparency. The retail giant says consumers will be able to compare drug prices at checkout both with insurance. And without you know just like we can with. Tv's books and blue jeans. One caveat drug pricing is a black box and it will still be hard to tell where those prices are actually coming from. The three billion dollar american drug business is highly influenced by pharmacy benefit managers or p. b. m.'s. Middlemen who negotiate prices with manufacturers insurance companies and retailers to get its pharmacy online amazon must navigate these murky waters to as the wall street journal reported amazon's announcement sent ribald stock prices plunging. Cvs drop nine percent. Walgreens boots ten amazon is stalking pharmacies. Now the journals. Charlie grant reported and shareholders are rightly spooked shareholders. See amazon is a threat to these. Retailers dominance as well as to walmart where many patients fill prescriptions. Don't count out. Cbs in the others just yet. However two years ago as amazon was gobbling up hill pack both cvs and walgreens announced same day prescription delivery and in march when the pandemic hit they wave home delivery fees altogether. And here's the other thing is still fill their prescriptions in person. The journal reported. That's a habit that could be hard for amazon. To change the specially among seniors and cbs in particular has been building in more and more reasons for us to walk into their stores namely health clinics most. Cbs is now have clinics on site where you can go for covid tests among other things one can only do in person and yes you got it vaccines. According to see an cvs is gearing up to offer twenty five million covid nineteen vaccinations a month. The first tranche in december depending on fda approvals. We'll go to nursing. But the average person should be able to get the vaccine beginning next february or march. Cbs chief medical officer. Dr troy brennan told cnn. And if you're walking into a brick and mortar pharmacy you'll probably fill your other prescriptions there as well while you buy makeup paper towels and the cat food. You've run out of right. Vaccinations urgent care. Visits are something. The world's biggest digital shopping mall can't compete with at least not now in the future we'll amazon at pharmacies to its whole foods and amazon. Fresh brick and mortar stores. You know that. Cvs and walgreens watching for that additional threat to appear very very closely

Amazon Nbc News Charlie Grant Walgreens Hill Pack CBS Wall Street Journal United States Walmart Dr Troy Brennan The Journal
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Mark Blazor

Mark Blazor

00:28 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Mark Blazor

"Four days after I get back to New York Medical experts are reminding you that even if you want to get tested before Thanksgiving, it could take a while before those Corona virus symptoms show. Chief medical officer for the University of Texas Health System. Dr Robert Level and says Getting tested is not a bad idea, but it takes about two weeks from exposure for symptoms to develop. That's why the CDC is encouraged encouraging everyone to have a socially distanced Thanksgiving with chairs spread out and dinner moved outside if possible. Ohio's latest coronavirus travel advisory map also shows 16 states who have a positivity rate of 15% or higher. If you're traveling to those states, you're encouraged to quarantine for at least two weeks. Nearly 170,000 new cases of the.

New York Medical Dr Robert Level Medical Officer University Of Texas Health Sys CDC Ohio Getting
Negative test result could create false sense of security

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

Negative test result could create false sense of security

"Rush for covert tests before Thanksgiving. His people would like to have a negative result before they head off to. Robert Leverenz, chief medical officer for the University of Texas Health System says That's not a bad idea. But it is far from perfect shows whether or not you have the virus at the time the test was taken. It doesn't guarantee you won't Have the virus percolating and in you even several days later, he says it takes about two weeks from exposure to start showing symptoms of the Corona virus. So there could be cases where people spread the germs to family members because they have a false sense of security. That's why they're encouraging everybody to have a socially distant Thanksgiving. I'm Michael

Robert Leverenz University Of Texas Health Sys Michael
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Joe Pags

Joe Pags

00:37 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Joe Pags

"Warning against those big Thanksgiving dinners this year to prevent the spread of covert. But airports are still full across the country today, including here in San Antonio doctor Robert Levinson, chief medical officer for UT Health, San Antonio says there are ways to be safe while traveling and it starts with wearing a mask and social distancing standing there in an airport and there's no sense of alarm, Everyone, you know, blast me to let down their guard. Even more must not be bad people often there The other, he says. People need to be aware that we are in the middle of the pandemic. It is not over. Austin Health officials, meanwhile, are voicing concerns today about the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, urging everyone not to let their guard down when it comes to social distancing. Just make sure that you are avoiding high risk activities, keeping your distance and making sure that you continue to you where your face covering when you are around other individuals in public health chief epidemiologist Jennet Patchett says that Residents are being urged to stay home and not travel over the holiday. But if they do to limit the risk is much as possible. Damage is widespread in Arlington in North Texas, after storms blew through that part of the state last night, spotting a tornado businesses, homes and apartments damage. Some say they're lucky to be alive that.

San Antonio Ut Health Jennet Patchett Robert Levinson Medical Officer Arlington North Texas
"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:53 min | 2 d ago

"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues <unk>. Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to <hes>. Jennifer schneider <hes>. She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear jennifer say that it. It's a great summation of. What would i have felt that has been broken. Healthcare for past fifteen years. As i think we also s consumers in this marketplace obscene seen how content has been reorganized by the internet how communities have been reorganize how entertainment commerce more recently even <hes> banking. When was the last time that you actually stepped foot in a bank. And so this this notion of you're gonna drive twenty to thirty minutes to this obstacle or building <hes>. and then ended up waiting an hour at least <hes>. I think comes an hours like a a gift to see physician. Pretend to fifteen minutes us. We'll give you a whole bunch of information that you're not gonna process <hes>. And send you on your way driving back down twenty or thirty minutes in some cases i haven't come back again. You know in two or three days or a week is you've got to get lab tests. Imaging tasks don seem so <hes>. You know sort of disconnected from how we live our lives today in terms of the immediacy of the things that were able to get it all at our fingertips and so <hes>. I think this is what jennifer was talking about it. I think you alluded to just so nicely is the experience of inter connectivity through now wearable sensors software that personalizes methodist to you <hes>. And always on connectivity <hes>. Through the cloud <hes> <hes>. Starting to make its way into healthcare and covid nineteen is only accelerated people's view in notion of what's possible in healthcare that today was just a method or a vision it is absolutely accelerating ed <hes>. From everyone we've been speaking to <hes>. And of course you are walking this walk on the acceleration happening before we're ready <hes>. So it's really an exciting time. It also can be a harrowing right if you're not prepared for loot when you hear jennifer say consumers and patients aren't gonna hate healthcare anymore because they're they're access the can get what what comes to mind view especially in terms of telecom. Bunga sure so. I think that people often talk about. How virtual care makes access so much easier and they often frame this in terms of a conversation around what you might consider medical convenience <hes>. And i'd like to just draw out the issue that it's not just a question of convenience. It's really around the quality of care so on telemedicine side we see many individuals who seek care and they end up having pretty serious medical problems like a recent case where the individual <hes>. Actually had some big chest discomfort in our little shortness of breath and ended up having multiple blood clots in his lungs and he would have just probably waited it out at home with really a life threatening medical condition and on the longo side. You're really talking about individuals who for the first time in their lives are taking care of these problems around blood. Sugar control blood pressure control. So they're really getting the care that they need because we've made it easier for them and have lowered a number of these barriers which are traditionally put the place and may care most difficult and as you might imagine during the time of covid. All of these issues have been highlighted. So if you are at home trying to do your telecommuting also trying to teach your kids at the same time who might be doing their own remote learning. It may not be the easiest thing for you to decide that you need to take you know a bus to a train to train to bus in order to get to a medical appointment to have somebody review your blood sugars with you so to make that care possible particularly in this time just makes all the sense in the world.

lou levy brigham women medical officer longo lou harvard medical school lavar congo harvard david bowie clinical assistant professor boston Jennifer schneider la bongo matt stanford Shop
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Guy Gordon

Guy Gordon

00:32 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Guy Gordon

"Way have the first doses as well as we have operation operationally determined. How do you infuse have to do these confusions as outpatient? This is deep in the heart patients have been specifically for people who have positive And we have much to modern acceptance and will start the first infusions next week. There is no word yet on how many justice will be sent to Michigan, But Henry Ford says they are one of the few health care organizations in the country that will be ready to Ready to receive them The moment the vaccines are approved. And as if coronavirus isn't that enough. Now we have to deal with the flu season. Dr. Royal Rod, chief medical officer of Detroit Medical Center, urging people to act getting your food vaccination, which is such an important point, given the fact that We have a cold it, which could also be a second infection. With that flu season. It is here. It's going to be challenging for us to make sure we're able to get everybody vaccinated. Ensure that there's less likelihood that they have co infections, which could be extremely difficult to treat the right now. I think early on in the flu season, people getting the vaccines and it hasn't been Aziz dramatic is is we expect it can be You're gathering might be smaller due to covet 19 restrictions. But.

FLU Henry Ford Detroit Medical Center Coronavirus Medical Officer Dr. Royal Rod Aziz Michigan
The Future of Healthcare with Teladoc Health Chief Medical Officers

The Voice of Healthcare

04:53 min | 2 d ago

The Future of Healthcare with Teladoc Health Chief Medical Officers

"Well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to Jennifer schneider She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear jennifer say that it. It's a great summation of. What would i have felt that has been broken. Healthcare for past fifteen years. As i think we also s consumers in this marketplace obscene seen how content has been reorganized by the internet how communities have been reorganize how entertainment commerce more recently even banking. When was the last time that you actually stepped foot in a bank. And so this this notion of you're gonna drive twenty to thirty minutes to this obstacle or building and then ended up waiting an hour at least I think comes an hours like a a gift to see physician. Pretend to fifteen minutes us. We'll give you a whole bunch of information that you're not gonna process And send you on your way driving back down twenty or thirty minutes in some cases i haven't come back again. You know in two or three days or a week is you've got to get lab tests. Imaging tasks don seem so You know sort of disconnected from how we live our lives today in terms of the immediacy of the things that were able to get it all at our fingertips and so I think this is what jennifer was talking about it. I think you alluded to just so nicely is the experience of inter connectivity through now wearable sensors software that personalizes methodist to you And always on connectivity Through the cloud Starting to make its way into healthcare and covid nineteen is only accelerated people's view in notion of what's possible in healthcare that today was just a method or a vision it is absolutely accelerating ed From everyone we've been speaking to And of course you are walking this walk on the acceleration happening before we're ready So it's really an exciting time. It also can be a harrowing right if you're not prepared for loot when you hear jennifer say consumers and patients aren't gonna hate healthcare anymore because they're they're access the can get what what comes to mind view especially in terms of telecom. Bunga sure so. I think that people often talk about. How virtual care makes access so much easier and they often frame this in terms of a conversation around what you might consider medical convenience And i'd like to just draw out the issue that it's not just a question of convenience. It's really around the quality of care so on telemedicine side we see many individuals who seek care and they end up having pretty serious medical problems like a recent case where the individual Actually had some big chest discomfort in our little shortness of breath and ended up having multiple blood clots in his lungs and he would have just probably waited it out at home with really a life threatening medical condition and on the longo side. You're really talking about individuals who for the first time in their lives are taking care of these problems around blood. Sugar control blood pressure control. So they're really getting the care that they need because we've made it easier for them and have lowered a number of these barriers which are traditionally put the place and may care most difficult and as you might imagine during the time of covid. All of these issues have been highlighted. So if you are at home trying to do your telecommuting also trying to teach your kids at the same time who might be doing their own remote learning. It may not be the easiest thing for you to decide that you need to take you know a bus to a train to train to bus in order to get to a medical appointment to have somebody review your blood sugars with you so to make that care possible particularly in this time just makes all the sense in the world.

Jennifer Schneider Jennifer David Bowie
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on The KFBK Morning News

The KFBK Morning News

00:41 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on The KFBK Morning News

"Let's talk about the vaccines that are in development that are going to be likely rolled out here in the next. Oh, maybe 4 to 8 weeks. Three different drug makers. We're talking about companies that have come forward. Say We've got one and we think they're really effective. You got Fizer. You got Madonna and AstraZeneca. Okay, Those are the three that have come on the last about 2.5 weeks. We've been inundated with great news. Visor right now is before the FDA trying to get approval. Now, let's talk a little bit about Madonna because we have an interesting audio clip to roll off from one of the top medical people about The discussion between prevention versus transmission, right? Okay, and he talked about this in an interview in terms of preventing it. Yes. Could someone who gets the shot transmitted to someone else was sort of the topic of discussion. So you're about to hear from a deer, A chief medical officer tells axes his name and he warns Excuse on HBO not to over interpret vaccine results. Saying they have yet to prove that they can stop transmission. He thinks maybe they can, but they gotta prove it. Here's a clip from that interview on Excuse one of the things interesting about your research and also fighters research. Children. Teenagers have not been part of trials. I guess with visors they've started now with teenagers. If things continue to progress, the way you expect them to, when should Americans expect that their kids would be able to get a vaccine? I would say probably, but next year, I hope by the next school year now that being said, we always want to go to a pediatric of vulnerable population. Once we have some assuredness of Safety and effectiveness in adults. If teachers if staffs of schools are able to say get vaccinated in February or March or April, but kids or not, because there's not an available vaccine for them. You believe it will be safe for schools to re open physically with unvaccinated kids but vaccinated staff I think we need to be careful as we get vaccinated not to over interpret the results. Results show that this vaccine can prevent you from being sick can prevent you from being severely sick. They do not show that they prevent you. From potentially carrying this virus, Transient Lee and infecting others. When we start the deployment of this vaccine, we will not have sufficient concrete data to prove that this vaccine reduces transmission. Do? I believe it reduces transmission? Absolutely. Yes, And I say this because of the science, but absent proof, I think it's important that we don't change behaviors solely on the basis of vaccination. So that is their calculation right now. And that was just a portion of a clip that was released by Axios an HBO prevention. Yep. Transmission. We're not so sure. But we think so. Yeah, So anyway, I just wanted roll that out of 7 20. Let's get up to the roads.

Madonna HBO Medical Officer FDA Transient Lee Axios
"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:24 min | 2 d ago

"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Thanks so much and it's really a pleasure to be on today. I'm lou levy. I'm the chief medical officer for health. My own clinical background is practicing general medicine in the boston area for the past thirty two years and teaching over at harvard medical school as well as in the internal medicine program at the brigham women's hospital. I've been in digital health for the past twelve years and as you alluded to in super excited about the budding relationship that we have with the upcoming merger between our company. Telehealth with though. We're glad to have you once again. A lou you've been Someone we've cultivated relationship with over time from the conference at harvard. Medical to other interactions and our previous podcasts. Thanks for joining us. phones again. And then our other guests from lavar congo. Yeah thanks so much matt in read to be here. I'm the i'm the lou. Levy of la bongo. I'm the medical officer at longo. I'm a practicing carla gist. Still see patients Here in my battery practice where. I'm a clinical assistant professor at duke My medical training do my Residency training at stanford and came back to do propeller ship was on faculty for a number of years before About seven or eight years ago going into the private sectors have been longo now for three years as lou said. We're really excited about the the next iteration of our two companies Coming together in this space well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to Jennifer schneider She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear.

lou levy brigham women medical officer longo lou harvard medical school lavar congo harvard david bowie clinical assistant professor boston Jennifer schneider la bongo matt stanford Shop
"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

02:40 min | 2 d ago

"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Hi and welcome to the thirty first episode of the voice of healthcare podcast. I'm your host matt sibierski. On october thirtieth tell it like health completed. Its merger with lavoro with the merger complete dr lou levy now serves as telemark house chief medical officer medical policy in quality and dr gamal. Shaw serves as telesales chief. Medical officer product and.

South Dakota gripped by pandemic as governor resists mask mandate

WBZ Afternoon News

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

South Dakota gripped by pandemic as governor resists mask mandate

"Been experiencing a large upswing in covert cases. CBS's David beg, No says Even now, some in positions of influence, are reluctant to acknowledge that South Dakota's facing a virus leader of Sanford Health, the largest health system in the Dakotas. Has given people reason to question whether there is a crisis here. It's hard for me to say we are at a crisis crisis that that would would be be misleading misleading from from a a clinical clinical standpoint. standpoint. But But CEO CEO Kelby Kelby crabbing crabbing Hoff Hoff isn't isn't a a doctor. doctor. His His chief chief medical medical officer, officer, Dr Dr Allison Allison Subtle Subtle is Would you classify what is happening here in the Dakotas as a crisis? I would one expert in South Dakota. Says the state has the highest hospitalizations per capita in the country. Last week, South Dakota had more virus deaths per capita than any other state.

David Beg Sanford Health Dakotas South Dakota Ceo Ceo Kelby Kelby Hoff Hoff CBS Dr Dr Allison Allison
"medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

04:27 min | Last week

"medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Far. It's only seen mild side effects like headaches and injection site. Soreness that resolved Now this builds on last week's quote more than ninety percent efficacy news from pfizer and is objectively awesome news. Remember the fda originally set a vaccine efficacy floor at just fifty percent. So what we're seeing. Now is not only the fastest vaccine development in history but also results that far exceeded initial expectations. A few things to know. First maderna's vaccine doesn't require the same ultra cold storage conditions as does the pfizer one instead. It could be kept in standard freezer conditions for six months and in regular refrigerator conditions for thirty days. That's a big boost for ease of distribution to both vaccines are focused on the same so-called spike protein which is likely a big reason why the efficacy results were so similar and why each vaccine requires two doses per patient. Three moderna expects to file for emergency use authorization from the fda within the next couple of weeks it could have around twenty million doses available by year end and in a different announcement this morning. Tony added that vaccine distribution for the general population could begin by this coming april for a little bit of a dark cloud to the silver lining. Here is that medina like visor before it managed to obtain reportable results so quickly because there's so many new covid nineteen cases and even limited. Vaccinations begin five or six weeks. There's a lot of death and a lot of pain from here to there if seconds will go deeper with tall zacks chief medical officer at medina. Ba i this from bottling plants to grocery stores america's beverage companies employees along with those in food and retail are working tirelessly americans have with essential during challenging times. More at here for you. Us we're joined now by tall sacks chief medical officer at moderna therapeutics so tall. Your company had been working on corona virus vaccines before covid nineteen was known about you. You've been doing some so-called war gaming on pandemics viral pandemics with nih. How much did those activities help give you. Maybe even a head start on the covid nineteen vaccine development. Yes i believe. The answer is yes. And i think There are two elements here that underscore our ability to get to today one in science and the other. Is collaboration people working together. In terms of the science. We had always envisioned that one of the core capabilities of this platform would be to react quickly to a pandemic and it's no. It's not by chance that are first. Two vaccine started back in two thousand fifteen were against pandemic strains of influenza so we always saw this as a potential now fast forward to the end of last year we were down at the nih fund. Myself talking to tony fauci. And his team. They had been worried for many years. That a pandemic could come. We've seen stars. We've seen emerge and we had been collaborating with them in preclinical models to demonstrate the utility of this platform to prevent such a pandemic in fact one of the discussions. We had back at the end of last year was do we need to take a model. A vaccine say virus that most of us never heard of like nipah virus That is a threat but use it as a drill kind of artificially. Start the clock and see how fast we can go and as we were talking about what could be a demonstration project. We started to here in december about this Pneumonia out of china and in the beginning of january. We started talking to them and we said okay..

pfizer medical officer medina nih tony fauci Pneumonia fda maderna china
COVID-19 Hospitalizations Are Surging. Where Are Hospitals Reaching Capacity?

Morning Edition

02:48 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 Hospitalizations Are Surging. Where Are Hospitals Reaching Capacity?

"Sign that the United States is in a Corona virus surge. Hospitalizations around the country have nearly doubled since late September. Some hospitals are already talking about rationing care. Will stone has more back In the spring, Dr. William Elms was watching the surge of covert patients in New York City and reading his hospitals in Wisconsin to enter the same We waited and waited. It did not come about six months later it has arrived. Melman's is the chief medical officer at the Marshfield Clinic Health System, which covers mostly rural Wisconsin. We will be pushed to the limit by the end of the month. Covert patients are filling up their beds at an unsustainable rate. And because so many parts of Wisconsin in the Midwest are under siege, Melmed says. There are not many places they can turn to. Either to send their patients or to get extra staff. Creating the manpower to take care of our patients is the dilemma. You know, we don't have any areas to decompress. We don't have safety valves to put our patients. This is the message coming from or hospitals in more states every day. For weeks, the US Corona virus pandemic has shattered records. In the wake of those sky. High numbers Come hospitalizations, Lawrence, our studies hospital capacity at Johns Hopkins University. We have a legitimate reason to be very, very concerned about our health system and national level. That's because this surge could wash over many places simultaneously. In at least 18 states. Covert patients account for more than 10% of all hospitalizations. Above that 10% is where we really think. Okay, Perhaps we have to start enacting search strategies and crazies. Standards of care in some places Crisis standards of care, a broad term for how hospitals make decisions around treatment when re sources are limited. In the worst case scenarios it can lead to rationing of care. Some states, including Utah, have recently warned this could be on the horizon. Machida Beer is an emergency physician and researcher at the University of Michigan in the Rand Corporation. If there are many epicenters a beer says it will be much harder to shuffle around. Resource is because everyone will be overwhelmed. So it's space staff and stuff, and you need all three. And if you don't have one, it doesn't matter if you have the other two, and most U. S. Hospitals already don't have much cushion they usually run close to capacity, especially during flu season. Then, on top of that ad covert patients who Khun require lots more time and care, and it strains the system. This is a scarce resource Critical care. Nurses are scarce. Ventilators are scarce as you know respiratory therapists or skirts, and she worries about to become even more scarce. For NPR news. I'm Wellstone.

Dr. William Elms Wisconsin Melman Marshfield Clinic Health Syste Melmed United States New York City Midwest Machida Beer Johns Hopkins University Lawrence Rand Corporation University Of Michigan Utah FLU NPR Wellstone
Houston Texans close facility after positive COVID-19 test as NFL introduces new protocols

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Houston Texans close facility after positive COVID-19 test as NFL introduces new protocols

"Virus. The team is scheduled to play the Jaguars in Jacksonville on Sunday. So far, no word on the status of that game. Meantime, the NFL is rolling out. Some new covert protocols Williams can tries to get on the sideline areas will be expanded to allow for more social distancing and mask wearing is now required before and after games and at half time. A memo went to teams a day after the league learned to players who appeared in games last weekend tested positive for the virus. The memo encourages players toa mask up when they're on the sidelines and not in the action, the NFL's medical officer says mask wearing could could limit limit the the impact impact on on others. others. Should Should a a player player on on a a team team get get infected? infected? Correspondent Correspondent Steve Steve K. K. Finn Finn wins wins news news Time Time 12 12 51 51 traffic traffic in transit

Jaguars NFL Jacksonville Williams Correspondent Correspondent St Finn
NFL expands sideline to provide more distancing

The Inside Story With Marty Griffin

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

NFL expands sideline to provide more distancing

"On that from CBS Steve Kayson Williams can try to get a sideline areas will be expanded to allow for more social distancing and mask wearing is now required before and after games and at halftime. The memo went to teams a day after the league learned to players who appeared in games last weekend tested positive for the virus. Memo encourages players toa mask up when they're on the sidelines and not in the action, the NFL's medical officer says mask

Steve Kayson Williams CBS NFL
Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

06:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

"Well, hey everybody, welcome back to the dr. Jockers functional nutrition podcast and you guys know that one of my favorite topics to talk about is blood sugar insulin and metabolic health and we had a great interview recently with Dodge van Dyckman. We went in depth on that and this is almost like a follow-up to it because we're going to talk about really the personalized approach to really looking at your blood sugar and how it's responding to the foods that you're consuming and so my guess is dr. Casey means she is the chief medical officer at levels and she is a Stanford trained physician again, chief medical officer and co-founder of the metabolic whole company levels, and she's the associate editor of the international Journal of disease reversal and prevention and he can find more information about her at levels health.com and we're going to talk about what the best food. Are for blood sugar management for metabolic health and how that could be variable depending on how your body is responding to the foods that you consume. We're talking about personalized medicine. So dr. Casey that joining us here. Thank you so much for having me. Dr. Jockers. So happy to be here. Well, yes for sure and I've heard of several of your interviews on other podcasts and you really do a great job of explaining how important blood sugar stability is and you know, this this new technology that we have now continuous blood glucose monitoring. And so what I love to do is start with your story and you know how you went from Stamford and trained in in medicine to now kind of branching out into a functional nutrition Integrative Medicine approach. Yeah. Absolutely. So like you mentioned I trained as a medical doctor conventional medicine. I trained at Stamford did my undergrad and Med medical school there and then I went on to become a head and neck surgeon. So I was deep in the surgical birth. Hold for about five years and in my role as a head and neck surgeon, which is really treating the conditions of the like your nose and throat. So an ENT surgeon something I noticed was sort of hitting me back, you know after about five years, like wow pretty much all of the conditions that I'm treating are inflammatory in nature. They're all related in some way to chronic inflammation. So some of the things you think about are like sinus infection, which is inflammation of the sinuses and chronic ear disease, which is inflammation of the eustachian tube the tube that connects the nose to the ear you get, you know inflammation in that tube and you get past building up in the ear, you've got Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is inflammation of the thyroid you've got things like vocal cord granulomas which are inflammatory masses of the vocal chords and then lots of head and neck cancer, of course, which we know cancer has very much relationship between inflammation. So it was really interesting to me sort of step back and say wow. This is sort of a very common theme between a lot of the conditions that I'm treating and in some way it didn't make total sense wage. That we would be treating those conditions with surgery because chronic inflammation is fundamentally a issue with how our immune system is responding to perceived or real threats in in the environment in our bodies and thoughts were more were learning about how chronic inflammation is in many ways really rooted in our everyday exposures. So what we eat the toxins were exposed to in our food air and water, you know, how much sleep we get the stress in our lives how much or how little exercise were getting our microbiome all of these things have a direct relationship to chronic inflammation. So I'm treating it with this sort of very reactionary invasive more anatomic approach with surgery, you know, there was some sort of missing missing link there and certainly surgeries are really important in beautiful art but phone no other conditions really rooted in chronic inflammation. It kind of got me thinking there might be a better way to approach us. What could we be doing what sort of really personalized dietary and lifestyle interventions really foundational help to really quell bath. Chronic immune response. Well that threat the body is sensing and potentially keep Patients Out of the operating room. You're not going to prevent all surgeries, but I certainly think there's some low-hanging fruit we can do to help minimize the severity of the disease is and hopefully never have to get have them get that really end of the line where they see me in the or going under the knife, which is a really serious serious thing. So that really got me on this journey of trying to understand the root cause of disease and that led me to functional medicine and so I actually stepped away from the operating room got training with Institute for functional medicine and really started thinking of disease a lot differently. I started seeing things much more as symptoms and diseases often being the branches on a very similar true and that tree that we that that sort of route that that connects a lot of seemingly disparate diseases often comes down to things like inflammation and even deeper Inflammation metabolic dysfunction this was talked about so beautifully on your episode recently with dr. Bed big man who is talking about metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, but was so interesting is that you know in our country. It's it's not that about 88% of Americans have met have signs of metabolic dysfunction that was shown in a study a couple of years ago from UNC that 88% of adult Americans have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, which are kind of two sides of the same coin really can directly feed into inflammation. So it's all really created and what's sort of hopeful about this is that those are things that are readily modifiable with smart choices in and how we live and what we expose ourselves to so became really interested in that and and really this system the network biology movement, which is really stepping back and saying, you know, we've we've conventionally looked at diseases in in conventional medicine. As isolated silos, you've got depression. You've got obesity. You've got diabetes. You've got prostate cancer. You've got IBS and these are all things that are different and we treat them separately with totally different with medications a totally different mechanisms. But when you step back and you use sort of more advanced research techniques, like whole genome sequencing and proteomics, how can we actually see? What are the molecular links between diseases and you create a web a network a system and that's really the root of systems and network biology. And when you start doing that you see these connections and I think the future of Iraq and its really treating conditions at that level at the connections between diseases cuz when you do that you can you know, hit a lot more birds with one stone that's sort of a negative metaphor, but you know what, I mean, it's it's it's got instead of playing whack-a-mole. You're really you can have multiple various effects with with some single interventions effect that root cause physiology. So my career really moved

Inflammation Dodge Van Dyckman International Journal Dr. Jockers Stamford Casey Chronic Ear Disease Neck Cancer Stanford Hashimoto Inflammation Metabolic Dysfunc Metabolic Dysfunction Cancer UNC Prostate Cancer Obesity Depression Diabetes
Taking the Urgency out of Urinary Incontinence

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Taking the Urgency out of Urinary Incontinence

"Welcome to the med tech talk. Podcast this is your host. Jeff pardo and this month's episode. I'm delighted to have dr. Karen noblet chief medical officer addict. Sonics joining me. Exxon x one of the most exciting emerging technologies in the med tech space. And it's really changing the way we think about treating a variety of urological condition. Starting with overactive bladder. Dr noblet has had an accomplished career in academic medicine before making the jump to industry where she's helping lead. Exxon clinical efforts dr noblet. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks jeff it really is an honor and a pleasure to be here with. You will terrific. Well i wanna dive right into this and really start with the condition that exxon is treating overactive bladder. And you know the name of course is seems a bit. You know revealing itself as to what's happening with someone. That has the condition. But i think it will be really helpful is to just start off by kind of giving us the context of what the condition is. What's happening with these patients both in terms of the physiology the symptoms and also importantly i think the psychosocial impact of of the condition had jeff. I'm happy to do that. And i think it's the term overactive bladder as a very interesting term in Because it was actually a term that was coined by the pharmaceutical industry on. That happened back in the day when we first started seeing direct to consumer marketing with the anti masonic medications to treat overactive bladder and so we saw these commercials way. Back when saying is your. Is your bladder overactive. And i think what that term represents is a just an expansion in the way that we look at these conditions so overacted bladder is an umbrella term that includes multiple symptoms and those include urinary frequency. So going the bathroom too often and many times people don't understand what's normal and what's not normal so it's considered to go up to seven times a day. Be normal but eight times or more is really considered urinary frequency also under that umbrella term is something we call knock sharia or getting up at night and if you get more than once night nets. That's considered abnormal Also under that umbrella term is urgency incontinence. And that's probably what people think about most when we hear the term overact bladder. And that's when you have the urge to go in for most of us in a normal situation we can hold our bladder. We can wait tour. The right socially acceptable location but those that have urgency incontinence get the urged and in their bladder has an unwanted contraction in that leads to leaking and urgency. That is kind of the hallmark of overactive. Bladder where it's normal for us to have urged to go to the bathroom but urgency is really described as a condition where you have a strong urge to go difficult to defer in so you might have to interrupt an important phone on important meeting because you have to rush to get to the bathroom so that umbrella term was great because not only did we identify those. It had incontinence is having a problem but also those were going to the bathroom frequently. That was interrupting their sleep but they were Again having an impact on in many domains in quality of life because of that condition interesting and just to give kind of the full context. How do you distinguish that from stress. Urinary incontinence that's a really good question and stressing continents is typically type of incontinence that occurs wing The of strenuous activities such as coughing sneezing laughing exercise anything where there's an increase in the intra abdominal pressure. That pressure is transmitted to the bladder. And if you have loss of support much more of an anatomical deficiency then that will lead to incontinence episodes so associated with that activity whereas with urgency incontinence the patient all of a sudden gets this urge. they're not able to control the urge. The bladder has a contraction and they leak and so. It's i think a good distinction between that is the stress incontinence. If a patient knows she's going to cough and has stress incontinence. She can prepare for that. She can contract republic floor and oftentimes with urgency incontinence. It may happen suddenly. It's hard to predict and this can actually been occur in situations. That may be very embarrassing for the patient because they didn't have a chance to plan for it. Exactly and in the case of i think both conditions they it seems to affect women more than men but maybe educate me on that for away is this Predominantly a condition that affects women are are men equally effected. Yeah it's a great question. Jeff what we see when we look at prevalence studies is that We start seeing an increase in this condition. Probably in the in the early forties. And it's true that both men and women have the condition but in the younger years. There's a much higher prevalence. In women and we see the prevalence increase in each decade of life. For both women and men but women have a higher prevalence until probably about the the in their sixties. And we start seeing men increasing in prevalence about the seventy as and beyond The prevalence of overactive bladder in men is about equivalent to that in women. But one of the differentiating factors is that we see Men oftentimes have what we would consider rectal bladder dry. So they have a lot of urgency frequency and not as much of the continent's whereas women tend to be have more overacted bladder wet where they have the urgency incontinence episode. And when you look at the you know the the bother scale what is most. What's the most bothersome symptom in overactive bladder. It tends to be urgency incontinence episode. Because again it may be very unpredictable and it may happen at a very inopportune time that can lead to very embarrassing event for that patient.

Exxon Jeff Pardo Karen Noblet Dr Noblet Jeff Sonics Coughing Sneezing Abdominal Pressure Cough
Los Angeles County Reports 1,745 New COVID-19 Cases, Highest Since August

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Los Angeles County Reports 1,745 New COVID-19 Cases, Highest Since August

"L. A county reports 19 more deaths from Coben, 19 and 1745 new cases its highest number of new cases since mid August. Not associated with the backlog. The county's chief medical officer pushes back against any notion that it's a simple disease. Getting the message out about the broad range of health effects is important. In the eyes of Dr Jeffrey Guns and Hauser. This is not like other viral diseases where you have a short term effect, a small group May be severely infected than the vast majority of others are good to go. That's not the case. That's not what we're seeing with Kobe, he says. There are several messaging strategies that can help to reinforce that, as we do get statistics on the percentage of individuals who have long term consequences. We do want to share that at 15 or 20 per cent of people have won a more long term consequences. Extending out six months or longer. That's important information. People should know an even more effective way of communicating. The risks of the virus, he says, is to hear individual people stories about how having Cove it has affected them. Margaret Career O K Annex 10 70 news radio.

Kobe Coben Dr Jeffrey Guns Medical Officer Margaret Career Cove
Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

Steve Scaffidi

00:33 sec | Last month

Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

"Virus cases across the state of Wisconsin could be a sign of things to come. The nightmare scenario of frankly, Wisconsin's chief medical officer, Dr Ryan Westergaard, says that nightmare could get worse than the fact that it's already highest levels. Widespread. And we think most people haven't been exposed yet is really a concerning scenario. Acting Health Secretary Andrea Palm said. Tuesday's numbers are a prime example of why they opened up the alternate care facility at State Fair Park. Despite it being sparsely used right now that exponential growth that we have talked about a number of times throughout this pandemic is coming home to roost like Spaulding

Wisconsin State Fair Park Dr Ryan Westergaard Andrea Palm Medical Officer Secretary
US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

Live Abundant Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

"After a steady rise for a decade, the suicide rate fell last year. New government data shows the suicide rate fell slightly last year. That's the first annual decline in more than a decade. Dr. Christine Moody, a Who's the chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, calls the news quote. Very exciting. Even though the data is preliminary, Moody adds the decrease maybe partly due to years of suicide prevention efforts, like increasing mental health screenings, she adds. Other Actors like the pre pandemic economy might have also played a role. I surely antler

American Foundation For Suicid Dr. Christine Moody Medical Officer
US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:35 sec | Last month

US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

"For a decade, the suicide rate Phil last year in the U. S government data shows the suicide rate fell slightly last year. That's the first annual decline in more than a decade. Dr. Christine Moody, a Who's the chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, calls the news quote. Very exciting. Even though the data is preliminary, Moody, a adds the decrease maybe. Rightly due to years of suicide prevention efforts, like increasing mental health screenings, she adds. Other factors like the pre pandemic economy might have also played a role. I've surely antler

American Foundation For Suicid Dr. Christine Moody Phil Medical Officer U. S
US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

US suicide rate fell last year after decade of steady rise

"After a steady rise for a decade the suicide rate in the U. S. that last year new government data shows the suicide rate fell slightly last year that's the first annual decline in more than a decade Dr Christine Moutier who's the chief medical officer of the American foundation for suicide prevention calls the news quote very exciting even though the data is preliminary movie A. adds to decrease may be partly due to years of suicide prevention efforts like increasing mental health screenings she adds other factors like the pre pandemic economy might have also played a role actually after

Dr Christine Moutier Medical Officer American Foundation
"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

05:01 min | Last month

"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Dr Brian Goldman. This is white coat black art this week a conversation with Dr Dena hinshaw Alberta's chief medical health officer and Dr Eileen Davila Toronto's medical officer of Health. The financial cost of the pandemic is still being tallied. COVID nineteen would test the finances of any government. The province of Alberta that cost is being paid against historic financial crisis brought on by a massive drop in oil revenues along with the pandemic. Dr. Dena hinshaw has to take that into consideration to. Dr Hinshaw you've got a number of issues on your plate and and you know you're not only dealing with a pandemic, but you're also dealing with some severe provincial health budget constraints. I WanNa play you a clip of news item from last week. The Alberta government plans to cut up to eleven thousand jobs in health. Services. Health Minister. Tyler Shandra says, the cuts will not harm the provinces pandemic response. Most of the cuts will come through outsourcing services such as lab work, laundry, and housekeeping not among frontline staff. Still healthcare workers are threatening to walk off the job in protest. Dr Hinshaw your what was your reaction to that announcement? I do think that Alberta's in a difficult spot right now with respect to having a profound impact on the economy, as well as our cove restrictions of course with. The downturn in oil and gas prices in the the way that our economy is. Structured right now there are a lot of people who are out of work and that has an impact on our provincial budget. So bad ultimately is A. Situation That's beyond you know my particular portfolio responsibilities but of course, it does impact the resilience. I think of our entire population again, people are tired they're feeling these impacts of not just it of the economic downturn but you've been insured that you're going to have as much money as you need to do the job that you feel you need to do with respect to the covid response. There's been assurance that the resources for the response to Kovic will be there I think there's a recognition that this is a critical issue that we need to resolve and when. It comes to cove, and sometimes there's a false dichotomies that is articulated of economy versus health, and it's actually a both and Syria not an either or because if we did let cova go out of control back would have a huge impact on the economy Dr Davila. The city of Toronto has certainly gone into deficit to to deal with. Kovic. in the Greater Toronto area do you feel as if you've got sufficient resources to do the job you need to do? Well. You know we've been fortunate I would say at Toronto Public Health to receive a support financially and otherwise both from city colleagues and through our provincial colleagues as well. But I will say this I think the the resource issue that concerns me the most at this point in the pandemic is actually ensuring that we have the workforce..

Dr. Dena hinshaw Dr Dena hinshaw Alberta Dr Eileen Davila Toronto Alberta Dr Brian Goldman Toronto Public Health Dr Davila Toronto medical officer Tyler Shandra Kovic. Kovic Syria
"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

05:17 min | Last month

"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"How would you describe the current situation in Alberta? I think we're really at a turning point. We have seen the number of cases rising over the last several weeks. As I mentioned, we know Edmonton in particular has been a hotspot lately we've seen a trend upwards in cases in Calgary were watching that closely. Of course I'm concerned about the increasing number of people in hospital with Kovic and one of the things that we're trying very hard to do which I know all of my colleagues are across the country is trying to minimize the risk of Kovic transmission and the risk of severe outcomes while at the same time wanting to minimize the impact that restrictions have. So we have put in some voluntary public health measures in Edmonton we have seen a slight reduction in our trajectory of spread. We're seeing that start to come down. So there are some encouraging. Examples, but we can't be complacent Dr Davila. As you're aware, there was a pretty large anti mask demonstration over the weekend in Toronto. What were your thoughts when you saw that? Well, you know I think that. There will always be a certain segment of society that will not agree with our advice I think that's to be expected in this type of practice I I, think the issue is really trying to engage as much of the population as possible. You know the way I see it is that you know when you're in positions like this as a medical officer of health particularly at the local level. We were trying to establish relationship with our patient. Even if it is three million people no different than you know an individual physician would try to establish relationship with a singular patient in you know your typical medical practice and unfortunately the way it works in medical practice is it sometimes you have to deliver difficult messages or messages that the patient doesn't want to hear and it's just that much harder when the patient is, in fact, the three million people of a city. But you don't sound concern that that the anti mask sentiment might be gaining some steam. Do I have that right? Well I think one always has to be concerned around populations that may be knowingly trying to provide misinformation and encourage other people a to to adopt that viewpoint. That's always a concern to my mind. The issue is. How do we engage the rest of the population? How do we make sure that even those who disagree with US understand that the intention? Of all the actions that we're taking is in fact to support the community including those who disagree with us. Dr Hint Shot picking up on that Have you found that you've changed your message since the pandemic began? Have you find tuned it? In any way based on the feedback that you're getting from the public as to as to what messages stick and which ones don't. Absolutely I refine my message all the time and I really appreciate feedback when I get it There's been some examples of things that have been passed onto me one for example, when I'm speaking about people who've passed away from Kovic and expressing sympathy to the families, I did get some feedback quite early on that a people who were grieving losses from other things we're asking will does my loved one not countered I loved one not matter and the importance of acknowledging batch. The. Who died from Kovic are the reason in some ways those who who die or have severe outcomes are the reason that we need to collectively work together to prevent spread those who die from noncovic causes leave behind family and friends who can't read the same way..

Dr Davila Kovic Edmonton Alberta medical officer Toronto Calgary Dr Hint
"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

02:33 min | Last month

"medical officer" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"So tune in weekly and get a fresh perspective on an election that the whole world is watching find party in the USA episodes in the party lines feed right now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. I'm not to Brian Goldman Welcome to waco placard the show but medicine from all sides of the Gurney. Were a third of the way through the fall both Ontario and Alberta are reporting all time highs in active covid nineteen cases i. see you admissions are inching up in both provinces in both are dealing with outbreaks at hospitals and long term care homes. These and other developments mean long days and little sleep for the physicians who are front and Center every day at news conferences. Track numbers advise the public on how to stay safe in sometimes deliver difficult news. And as painful and. As difficult as it is I, do believe that there is good reason to you know focus on different ways to celebrate Halloween this year to focus rs this week to medical officers of health who are overseeing covert hotspots join me for a revealing conversation. Today. I have had to to tease that. That's keeping me going and. My Day has been full of meetings and phone calls and emails and documents. I'm not surprised. Ordina. Hasn't had time to eat. As Obama's chief medical officer of health she's dealing with a historic pandemic set against an economic crisis of similar scale. For sure and that's Day schedule that his quite familiar to me although I will admit that I have eaten today and had several coffee. Eileen Davila is one of few doctors in Canada knows what Dr Hinshaw is going through. Bill is the medical officer of Health for the city of Toronto. As. We record this Ontario is averaging seven hundred and fifty or more cases of the corona virus per day and more than forty percent are in the GTA many in the city's low income and racialist neighborhoods. Now, Berta active case numbers have broken records prompting Dr Hinshaw say the provinces entered the COVID nineteen danger zone? We reached Dr Phil and Dr Hinshaw earlier this week via skype. Dr Eileen Davila Dr Dena hinshaw to white coat Black Art Anki Opportunity Dr Hinshaw. We know that cases of covid nineteen are rising in Alberta and so our hospital admissions you're dealing with hospital outbreaks..

Dr Dena hinshaw Dr Hinshaw Dr Eileen Davila Dr Phil Obama Eileen Davila Alberta Ontario Brian Goldman CBC medical officer of Health USA waco medical officer Berta skype Bill Toronto
Governor deploying National Guard to Indiana nursing homes to help with COVID fight

Tony Katz and the Morning News

00:42 sec | Last month

Governor deploying National Guard to Indiana nursing homes to help with COVID fight

"Than half of the state's Corona virus virus deaths deaths have have come come from from either either nursing nursing homes homes or or long long term term care care facilities. facilities. So So now now the the state state is is sending sending Corona Corona virus virus reinforcements. reinforcements. Turner Turner Sing Sing homes. homes. Eric Eric Berman Berman reports. reports. National National Guard Guard troops will help out with administrative tasks. Regular staff have more time to take care of residents and the state Health Department. We use a reserve force of retired health professionals to help with infection control training. Chief medical officer of Lindsay Weaver says 11 facilities this week have asked for help from the reserve to plug staff shortages. I want to acknowledge our healthcare workforce, they are exhausted. They have been running a marathon at a sprint pace for eight months. Governor Holcomb says stemming the tide and nursing homes would also produced the spread in the community and take pressure off hospitals.

Eric Eric Berman Berman National National Guard Guard Turner Turner State Health Department Governor Holcomb Lindsay Weaver Medical Officer
CVS, Walgreens to help distribute Covid vaccines to nursing homes

Fork Report

00:31 sec | Last month

CVS, Walgreens to help distribute Covid vaccines to nursing homes

"Have announced a deal with Walgreens and CVS to give free covert 19 vaccines to nursing home residents want to treatment is approved. Dr. Troy Brennan, the chief medical officer for CVS Health, says they've begun preparing for the vaccination teams, the pharmacist in pharmacy technicians to nursing homes and people would Basically be providing their consent to be vaccinated, the Department of Health and Human Services said Friday. The vaccine will be available for elderly people in all types of long term living facilities.

Cvs Health Department Of Health And Human Dr. Troy Brennan Walgreens Medical Officer
UK at 'tipping point:' England braces for more restrictions

Kim Komando

00:33 sec | Last month

UK at 'tipping point:' England braces for more restrictions

"Virus restrictions could be coming from parts of England. Millions of people in northern England are now waiting for news on possible taider Corona virus rules in the next few days. That move could temporarily shut down pubs and restaurants in Northern England's virus hot spots. Deputy chief medical officers, saying that the country is at a tipping point in the second wave of covert 19 Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to unveil a new free tear local lock down system. Liverpool and Manchester are currently seeing infection levels above 500 for 100,000 people. Paul

Northern England England Deputy Chief Boris Johnson Prime Minister Liverpool Manchester Paul
"medical officer" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:28 min | 3 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"Grade School questions, and a million dollars to give away. Are you smarter than a fifth grader? Let's go. Get Ready. One of the most popular game shows of all time is coming to audio up as a podcast. Are you smarter than a fifth grader, listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts? It's Wednesday August twelfth. I'm Ramirez from the daily dive podcast in Los Angeles, and this is reopening America. As companies to resume operations while the pandemic continues to endure, many are hiring new executives as chief medical officers in industries, where they normally would not be Tyson Foods and Royal Caribbean cruises recently made the appointments because they need expert medical advice on how to keep employees and consumers safe Patrick Thomas reporter at the wall. Street Journal joins US for more. Thanks for joining US Patrick. Thank you for having me. As companies return back to sort of normal operations, I guess that I know a lot of big companies are still doing work from home, but there's transitioning over other places like meat packing plants that have continued to work throughout the pandemic. Is kind of changing the need to keep your workers safe and healthy is so important right now, a lot of companies are elevating a new type of executive, even more the chief medical officer. They're creating this position in places where they normally wouldn't be. So Patrick us a little bit about the chief medical officer and how they're playing a large role in a lot of companies right now. For context chief medical officer in past years is very common with hospitals, healthcare companies, pharmaceutical companies. It's not so much a term that you would find at a food processor or other non healthcare companies. It just wasn't that type of career, but lately, we've started to see company like Tyson Royal. Caribbean cruise lines, food processors, like you said that have a central workers back in the workplace in more confined quarters, Beth band, the factory floor if you remember. Remember back to March. Some of the early outbreaks where in food processing plants in rural areas, there are some outbreaks in early March and the cruise ships. So these are places where they felt like they needed a chief medical officer to bring medical advice. How can we bring back our worker safely on the factory floor? How can we keep our cruise ship employees? Say, Tyson also said that CMO is going to oversee some of their testing protocols they pointed. Pointed tests, workers at all their facilities. In the case of Caribbean, they want their CMO to work with one of the rival cruise lines on a panel to develop policies of what's it. GonNa look like to have consumers back on their ships and keep the crews workers safe. So there's a variety of different reasons why these kind of companies, WanNa, bring in a CMO and it's so important and you just nailed it. Why was you know taking the cruise? Cruise lines. As an example, they took a big hit with consumer confidence. In this last round, they've always had random problems with norovirus people getting sick. But when the pandemic started, we're hearing stories about people being trapped on cruise ships getting sick, and then workers were stranded on cruise ships months on end, and they really need to build that reputation back. So the role of the CMO in this I mean it's going to be hugely important for them. Yeah, absolutely, and like I said, they're gonNA. have their CMO on a panel with one of their rivals. Norwegian cruise line and Companies WanNa, bring in a chief medical officer, not only to bring in a medical expert, but it does give the public perception that they are taking a step. You know not suggesting that it's just a PR shut, but also it does in sometimes crisis like as we say, the story in twenty seventeen, the NFL added a chief medical officer. We've seen sports, teams, achy medical officers before for this reason whenever concerns come up at chief medical officers, kind of their voice. So they're expert they kind of. Of Give to the public to say, here's what we're doing and health policy in a way, Royal Caribbeans, kind of taken the same step in terms of having that figure to show consumers, we are doing something about it and it's not just for this for coronavirus. Specifically, you know some of the CMO's traditional roles are taking on new dimensions, mental health issues, I, think he profiled salesforce and their CMO, their how to help people's mental health situation when they're working from home and all that. So even the traditional role of it and the traditional things that they would tasks, they would be doing are kind of changing as well. That was one of the more interesting things I thought about. This was that a company like salesforce, and maybe some more like Silicon Valley type companies that make a variety of tech product. salesforce makes a bunch of different types of software products and they use the chief medical officer to develop certain kind of products. Know CMO is a medical expert who can bring expertise on dealing with regulations, the variety of legal hoops to jump through when you're. You're making something that organizers patient data you need to have someone developing that that knows what's legal and what doctors one, what they wanna see what's helpful to them, kind of their adviser on certain projects. Right. And in this case now that we're going to pandemic their CMO IS GONNA, she described it as doing double pack, right? She's got two roles. Now, it's not only the traditional role, but now you're also counseling your company in terms of. The experts that can bring in how can we bring people back workplace safely? Are there products that we've been developing that we can use to help our own employees or working from home? That sort of thing? Yeah. It's going to be interesting to see as things continue to develop and we work through the health crisis right now. If there's an outbreak in another meat processing plant Tyson, let's say for example, we're going to be hearing from the CMO on things that they did and didn't do and how the readjusting to it. So these are the people that you're going to be hearing from as well as we continue to go through. So just a more important role for more than ever right now, Patrick Thomas. Reporter for the wall. Street, Journal thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having. I'm Oscar Ramirez, and this has been reopening America. Don't forget. Big New stories, you can check me out on the daily dive podcast, every Monday through Friday. So follow us on Iheartradio or wherever you get your lock you. I'm John Horn host to the podcast Hollywood the sequel. On every episode, we're challenging producers, actors and directors to tell us what's broken in. Hollywood and how they'd fix it. Here's producer Eva. d'Hiver. Name on ending systemic racism. Not Enough statement is. Not Enough. One black executive of not enough to not enough. You accompanying must look like the real world and we're tackling other problems like keeping everybody, safe onset and fixing Hollywood's broken GIG economy. Here's Mulan Producer Jason Read, The financial pressured to. Do with more in terms of days. Running, crew twelve or fourteen hours, six days. A week wasn't a sustainable model before, and it's definitely not a sustainable model. Now listen to Hollywood the sequel on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast..

medical officer Patrick Thomas Hollywood Oscar Ramirez salesforce apple executive Companies WanNa Tyson Royal producer Tyson Foods Iheartradio Los Angeles Tyson America WanNa Street Journal Royal Caribbeans Royal Caribbean
"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

09:05 min | 7 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"You know in Tennessee. I guess the one thing we can say that the spore is a pretty used to a day before tournament start injury withdrawals or retirement through illness or things like that so at least it's something that tennis is accustomed to in a way in. We'll have those hopefully have those lucky losers lined up but who knows if how are go down the line in terms of Quarantining lucky losers are testing. All healers. Yeah that'd be no and it's If I'm in the locker room in the even in the players lounge and I hear a player pulled out because she had a sore hamstring. It's one thing if I find out. A colleague pulled out because of a positive cova test. It's affects me in a different way but no I mean I. I think there's this is sort of a there's A. There's a think piece if not a book to be written here but I think the role of sports in this whole pandemic is is really interesting to me and we usually think of sports as having like duck handling said I mean it. Has this real ability to bind us. It's this source diversion. It's it's unification there's life lessons I mean all of these kind of mushy ideas about why we love sports in all of those in a Lotta ways are under attack. I mean somebody saying somebody said. There's there's a pandemic ripping through the world. Hey here's what we're GONNA do. We're going to get seven hundred thousand fans in a confined area. We're going to have athletes come in from all over the world and share one locker room you could. You could scarcely script less conducive scenario than the Olympics the US Open or the Super Bowl. His sports are not only not being able to be played. They are almost singularly ill suited for this pandemic. So I I think we're all sort of rethinking how we're GONNA stage sports but also what sports mean in the social fabric and how we can keep that when obviously like you say Jamie I mean the the idea of seven hundred thousand people going to one site that just so happens to be ground zero for this whole global pandemic in Queens New York but how hundreds of thousands of fans going to one site to watch. Athletes who've flown in from all over. The world are now sharing a locker room. How are we going to be? I mean that's that's clearly going to be precluded for years. But how are we going to be able to enjoy sports? And how are we going to be able to alter sports and reassess sports and sort of keep the goodness while recognizing that? There's a lot about sports that are really inconsistent with the best practices in the age of cove in terms of coming back. I mean the you have C. announced that they would hold this fight I guess a pretty long time ago they did give the players the opportunity to obviously train and get ready And they knew that they were on deck for this past weekend. How long do you think the US Open will give players to notify? How soon are we going to see a decision? I mean there's there's an early June gate that's been circulated of look. We're GONNA make the call by then. I mean I do think. A lot of these players I don't think players are sitting at home Guzzling beer in on twitch. I mean I just saw video nick. Cheerios without practicing and Canberra Nick curious practicing looking reasonably fit. You can be sure that You know dominant team and it's very as well If anything you have seen one of the harder sports where you've got to actually got in the you really have to be in literally in fighting shape. I think a turn the switch today. I mean right now at noon. We're GonNa have a tournament tomorrow. I think the majority of players would would be ready at least is IT I. I think we're and one thing we. I was glad Dr Hoenlein address us. I think one area. That's been a little short changed as just the mental health component to all of this and you're an elite athlete and you're competing is what you do. I mean that is a form of self assessment. It's a form of self identity all of a sudden. You're no longer competing. I mean niddle has been very outspoken about this essentially in so many words saying I'm just not and this isn't a doll of people saying I'm not necessarily in the state of mind to be competing but from a physical standpoint. These plan and I thought you know the level of play that exhibition. I referenced in Florida the four-man Exhibition with Appel Cop. Paul and I to me was indistinguishable from the level of play at this review. Told me this was the first round of Australia would have said Yeah. That's about right so I think the one thing I I think players muscle memory. I think the players will come back without too much of a perceptible difference but emotionally whether or not all these players are ready to resume like you say spent two weeks in quarantine before major is not a drill. Any of them have done before. That's a really interesting point about about a dollar. You know it gets me thinking in previous tournaments in previous grand slams. Think a lot of what we always talk about is that that one it factor that one thing that is going to separate you know player from player be especially in the finals in a lot of times especially when we talk about the big three is is their mentality is how they approach the game and it's that that mindset that somehow you just see them all the sudden turn it on or just take it to another level that you you didn't think was there That's a really interesting perspective. You know is someone like dollar federal in mind said to compete in that way you know. I think it's one thing to say. Yeah we can. Have you know this this match tournament? That looks like a the first Australia. But once he gets to the later rounds. How how strong is that competition going to be going to be good tennis? Is that or do? Do we care And how much does that affect the the winner of that year? You know to say well. You are people going to say well. You didn't compete against the best or you didn't compete against you know everyone that could have been there because maybe some people couldn't or decided not to not to come so. I was talking to one player who said I was talking to a player The days all run together by the way but it must have been last week. Who Essentially said they. They wanted to just to get back in the swing of competition and that people don't realize that that's a muscle to and it wasn't about whether I can make a few thousand bucks playing in some exhibition. It's about sort of getting back in the swing of competing and testing myself and being in a situation where it's it's four thirty all and it's something that You know we. We don't necessarily have statistics for it. It's something that doesn't isn't necessarily manifest when we watch tennis on TV but getting in this competition mindset is really part of the job in players haven't had a chance to do that since February and if playing backyard tournament there was event Tracy Austin mentioned in southern California. Sam Query is going to be on by believes Taylor. Fritz or son for some Brandon Savita. I'm blogging but it's you know a six man competition backyard but you're still going to be playing world-class practitioners you're still going to be facing Sam. Queries serve at four all and for a tennis player. There's there's something to be said for that so strange times all around but I think this is You know honestly Jamie this. This to me is the equivalent of the restaurant. That's now doing you know. We're we're all improvising and it would be great if that restaurant were doing full business and had table service and we were all having leisurely meals. But it's better than nothing so that's I sort of see tennis and very much. The same place better than nothing. Open House that slogan all right that will usually usually we are podcast. Because you know grant grant wall is is giving US looks or The NFL guys are coming in now. We are running out of zoom time so That will do it for this week. Thanks always a pleasure chatting. Jamie always a pleasure. I hope we get some some news soon. Some good news in the tennis world on what's coming from from your mouth to the USDA and of course governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasios. Aren't this this is the better than nothing? Tata's five guests. That will do it for this week. Thanks everyone thanks Jamie Yet this podcast wherever you get your podcast Lieber Review. Free to continue sending guest suggestions and suiting initially boop BOOP BOOP boop..

tennis Jamie US Tennessee Sam Query Tata Australia Nick Dr Hoenlein C. Open House Paul Queens New York Appel Cop Tracy Austin Florida
"medical officer" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

12:36 min | 7 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Coronacast

"This is an ABC podcast. Hello this is corona cost a podcast all about the corona virus. I'm health reported taken Tyler opposition journalists to Norman Swan. It's Wednesday the twenty second of April so as promised we have with us today. Deputy Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly. We've been asking questions that you want us to put to him. Am I gonNA try to get through as many as we can today? Thanks for joining us. Poll Oh you're welcome. Sorry tiny's asking about mosques. He's wondering why the federal government is still not recommending mosques for everyone who goes out in public and also he's asking why the federal government isn't supporting the states actions on school clashes firstly unmasks We look at the evidence As well and and as quickly as we can emerge in relation to masks and people would know nothing. Norman's mentioned it on this program in recent days in the US The Centers for Disease Control have recommended mask us in public certainly in the US situation and their epidemiology with way more cases in the general community perhaps make sense but for us firstly very few cases secondly masks not great protection. If you don't know how to wear them masks that are not made in the prescribe way will not be effective in Avenue in relation to stopping the spread of the virus or indeed protecting. How the so so. That's the reason we we haven't recommended masks at the moment in previous times. There was a shortage. Of course we wanting master remain for our frontline. Health Workers That's been relieved in in recent times with an increase in supply. So that's That's no longer a raisin so just on master moment. I mean people recognize that it this is about. Acm dramatic spreads. If you've got and you don't know what you might reduce the spread. How how bad with the epidemic to get an Australia for the small benefit to be worth it. You think in masks if you had the resources if there were enough masks around a lot worse than what it is now Norman I think would be the short answer and as as an epidemiologist of course I would always say depends but certainly if there was widespread community transmission could at that point be reviewed sped at the moment. We don't believe it's the right way. And what about twenty second question one on school closures in the State sections here? Yeah so the school closures is an interesting one Certainly the Strang Health Protection Committee has been very clear from the beginning In our advice to the national cabinet but the national cabinet is made up of nine. Different states in different states have to make their own decisions to the elected governments. And they're the ones that run the school system so So some have gone further than others. So the N. T. For example. They haven't closed schools in South Australia. In other places they've directly and specifically asked kids to stay at home in New South Wales Somewhere in between the suggesting that children should start coming back one day a week. I think there's a couple of issues here firstly in our current situation. Not Not a lot of Transmission in society and so that would be the same in schools. We know that transmission amongst children is not strong and children themselves. Do not get severe illness. We know that pretty strongly now including in Australia indictor Australian investigations of of our brakes. There is the question of course in a very valid question about teachers and their safety and all of the brakes. We've looked at has tended to start with a teacher or appearance and spread amongst teachers so the staffroom is actually the most dangerous place rather than the schoolroom room or the school yard in terms of of teachers. So Carrie asks on schools. Why are we reopening schools when social distance is so important and supposed to add onto? Kelly's question I'd ask as well. How'd you socially distance when you've got fourteen year olds in the playground very difficult and I understand that my my my sister effective of my sisters a teachers one of them currently working as the school's Comeback in New South Wales? So of course these things are challenging. And I think the the point is you can do as best you can. In terms of social distancing is certainly a lot you can do about hygiene around the school. Kids go to school. But they're not allowed to play on public playgrounds. Yeah well that's that's a challenge. Some of these things. I can certainly say how it's it's difficult to maintain those two conflicting pieces of advice. I'd I'd say this so at least in schools we do know who's on the school playground and and there is some ability within the school environment to increase those hygiene messages and cleaning for example public playgrounds a bit less of a controlled environment. More open to others coming in so I think that's part of it but look I think as as we go forward it's been we've been so successful in dampening down the curve flattening the curve and so few cases that in the next month. We'll be saying the relaxation of many of those things that have been introduced. So we've got some questions on strategy and a radical roll up the three questions and just tell you what they are because the overlap Margaret ask Kuby covered nineteen from our shores. And she says if so. Why aren't we apparently not doing so? Henry asks wise the federal government not moving towards a covered nineteen limitation strategy. Luciana asks why would we even consider stopping the current measures diminishing the spread of the virus before complete eradication so three questions on the theme yes so the theme of strategy so that was made much more explicit last week by the Prime Minister and the chief medical officer Brennan Murphy was just outlines what we have indeed been doing all along but making it more explicit and that's about a suppression strategy. So that's in between the let it rip or herd immunity strategy that some countries are going along. Which if you do that you end up with a lot of lot of infections. And some of those will be severe about twenty percent of them And people die and so that is not a strategy. That we're looking for brought at the other end is of course. Lock everything down and look for ratification. that's New Zealand Strategy Now. New Zealand quite interestingly has announced they're starting to pull back from that That lockdown phase. And they'll be much closer to where we are in terms of handling this forest more Into the future we've ended up in the same place. Interestingly and we've had more cases than New Zealand but not a lot more in recent the recent weak very few cases and virtually non yesterday outside of Tasmania and New South while so So I think we're getting to a similar place of through that suppression strategy. I think is it possible to actually eradicate this forest altogether from Australia? It might be certainly eliminating it as a public. Health problem. Appears to be where we're heading at the moment with `sufficient strategy. So just how long would you wait before? You're fairly sure. In other words you talk starting at Tenneco the reproductive cycles of the vars. So let's say new. South Wales is the challenge here because they've had more cases than any other state. They are working hard at doing. A Lotta tasting so. This is not a criticism New South Wales but it is the challenge. But let's assume we get down to zero in all states. How many days in a row before you think? We're actually in a pretty good shape here and we can let the break off albeit slowly but we can let the break off this. Call a Chris Crystal Ball Question Norman. And that's always a difficult one but no not a biological question. Isn't it because you reproductive cycles of the virus and once she washed through for a couple of weeks surely you can be pretty sure? Yeah you would be short but it depends on a house it and now you the people are coming to get the testing the so called passive surveillance strategy which is what we've had at the moment. And most countries that have been far worse affected than us in in Europe and North America and and so many other countries. Now that passive surveillance depends on people. Coming recognizing that they're sick with the virus and getting this right test and that that is proving positive and flowing on their to public health but our challenge now is okay. That's seems to be drying up but will there may be other people in the communities to slowly brewing small outbreaks. We've seen that exactly playing out in North Western. Tasmania where Tasmania pull up the drawbridge and they went on that strategy of isolation but then several weeks later at some point there was someone that had the virus which led to other people having the virus and now they have eighty so can can change rather quickly and brings us to our border controls to at the moment the borders are essentially shadow there trillions continuing to come home we will continue to get a trickle of cases only needs a few of those two to get out into the community so so. I think declaring this over is going to be a very difficult thing to do but I think the other side is is balancing up the the other effects of locking down we've done and digressing business social interactions and all of the other things made for Iran wellbeing as well as that of the economy. So I'm going to take the privilege of being coarseness my own question here Paul. Kelly given that it's possible that as you say you get a few cases trickling through and as a Cuban saying there was one point of the end of November. There was just one person in the whole wide world with what would come to be known as covered nineteen and look where we are now with well over two million cases and over one hundred thousand deaths and we could get a second wave so this question is relevant because we could come to a second wave necessarily which might be worse than the first looking back and it's only four and a half months. What if anything would you do differently? If you again and I'm not talking about the second wave I'm talking about. Let's go back in time. And what would you do differently? I remember very clearly the first time I heard about this forest so there was It's as you say. Probably sometime in November. There was something happening in Hubei Province. We weren't absolutely clear about that. In fact there was no sort of external reports about that until the first of January was actually the time when we were first notified through World Health Organization contexts Aww forty-three cases of an unusual happening in Wuhan. We look very closely at that and and and decided that this was something we should keep a close eye on so we immediately had had a meeting about that To decide what we should do. And we put some information out to the states and territories and through them A carnival a alert. Not Alarmed message to our emergency department. So we were onto this very quickly by mid January. We decided that things hadn't really changed much in China at least officially and then all hell broke loose as we know from From reports that came out of Wuhan and then rapidly other parts of China. Just interrupt so you give yourself ten ten here or I think if we'd known a bit more more quickly about what was happening in China than That might have might have changed Something's but by by on the twenty first of January. We'd already relies that. This actually had some was a disease pandemic potential and we moved to a higher Higher level at that point so the the question is whether whether we could or should have done things more quickly I think after that on the first February we got modeling that demonstrated that China was possibly. The rest of John was was heading towards being the Siamese Wuhan And on that same day was when we put in the restrictions about people coming from China or other than Australian Citizens and residents so and things escalated quickly like that and through much in particular Things moved very rapidly. Could we have gone a bit more quickly? Perhaps but in the end of the day you were in such a good situation now It's hard to see where we could have could have done other things but you know we learn from these things. These these are the best exercises we can do to test our preparedness and our reaction to these things and so we will be more prepared for a second wife if it comes because we've gone through a first wife Freshman Kelly. Thank you very much for joining us on current cast. You will come no one. That's over Coronas today if you've got a comment or question sending in go to ABC dot net slash corona virus and feeling the form and make sure you use the word. Khurana cost so that we can find it. If you like the show give us a rating and review at Apple. Podcast helps others to find us and we really like reading. We'll see you tomorrow bye. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great. Abc. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the IB. Say Listen APP..

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kel Norman Swan Australia ABC China New South Wales federal government Wuhan Tasmania US South Wales tiny New Zealand Strang Health Protection Commi Tyler South Australia Disease Control Carrie Hubei Province
"medical officer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"One the former chief medical officer of homeland security says there's no need for alarm here in Saint Louis following Thursday's news that we now have the first US case of person to person transmission of the coronavirus cases is Chicago women who got the virus from her husband who brought it back from China the chief medical officer for SSM health doctor Alexander Garza is the former chief medical officer for homeland security he says doctors already knew this novel coronavirus could be transmitted person to person the question is how efficient can can the virus transfer and so is seems now that we're starting to get more evidence that you know it can transfer efficiently you know even if you haven't been to the exposed area doctor Garza says they're being very cautious and are prepared in case the spread does increase or we learn more about the severity but he says they're trying not to be alarmist either Fred bottom or Saint Louis is news radio cable access Saint Louis county police officer denied promotions because he's gay has reached a deal to take something less than the nearly twenty million dollars a jury had awarded him but how is the county going to pay for it channel access confirm that lieutenant Keith while labour has struck a deal to settle out of court this saves the county the ordeal and expense of fighting the jury verdict in appeals court the size of the settlement is not being released and a source says it is still unclear how the county will pay what it is agreeing to pay to wild favor before his original case went to trial last year while papers attorneys had offered to settle out of court with the county for eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars but the county said no and the jury ended up awarding him almost twenty million Kevin killings and loses his radio came X. former candidate for St Louis county executive mark Montalban eight resigned his post on the board of freeholders switch hasn't done anything for months because the city can't agree on its appointees I don't want my withdrawal to be interpreted as a signal that this process has no future I think it does have a future bunch of ani was one of nine members appointed by county executive Sam page to represent the county in a quest towards some form of regional governance page is expected to name a replacement meanwhile St Louis mayor like a cruise in in the board of aldermen have so far been unable to agree on nine city appointees St Louis circuit attorney can Gardner sat down for an interview with PBS last night answering some tough questions from Michelle Martin on why she filed her lawsuit against the city of Saint Louis Gardner says the misinformation that she didn't know how to do our job started immediately did anyone say this to you directly for example I mean how did this communication with other folks in law enforcement take place any did anybody from the police union did you meet with them I mean as you meet with a command officers and say this is the new approach that we're taking and this is why it's in our best interest did did anybody say to you directly but we don't agree with you we're not going to do this or was it communicated in other ways it was communicating by the police union representatives that the police felt like they cannot trust me as the new prosecutor because they felt like that I'm not going to go after individuals that prey on the community I'm just going after police Gardner told PBS it's our job to make individuals uncomfortable and let them know you cannot buy past the power of the people you need to get anything done outside this weekend I know it's Superbowl Sunday but the weather is going to be pretty great we'll take a closer look coming up in one minute came awake news time five oh nine C..

medical officer Saint Louis
"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Emotion works for the smithsonian. She's the occupational amend doc for. Dan and i'll just physicals for people who are like finding <hes> artifacts in stash and then like airlines lines also they kneel off like physical done like that kind of thing so <hes> very niche specific populations but <hes> the other day. It's a lot of preventative medicine. It's a lot of the same <hes> blood pressure med nutrition exercise <hes> <hes> type of medicine. Are you gonna do that the navy are you gonna get out and <hes> yeah so <hes>. I'm probably gonna to go back to use this just because i i am familiar with it and they have allowed connections with the c._d._c. n._i._h. <hes> a lot of those resources in washington d._c. But the occupational emad residency programs <hes> that a lot of my colleagues have gone to i've wine nine pierre. He's at harvard right now and you u._c._s._f. U._c. irvine those all have occupational medicine programs and they really like <hes> navy because the government is paying residency so there there. There's a chance to really pursue. Some of those like really hire named schools but i'll probably go to use this just because <hes> i i liked use essen so who are some of the people that you feel like really influenced you either on this path the medical path or was it something that as you kept going you just started carving out your your future you know because i the cross offit side of you obviously kind of steered you away to the direction of something a little bit more physical something more challenging those types of things but was there some buddy or an individual or a number of individuals to kind of help carve your path <hes> i think it was just over time committing people from different special communities that not necessarily even doctors really <hes> just people who were in any special communities that <hes> you know they talk really highly of you imos <hes>. They really liked their you. Imos like in respected them and <hes> i think along the way it was more of that than finding a specific mentor <hes> just because there there weren't aren't any female you imos that i knew and most of the attending i had <hes> or mentors that way were they were in the hospital hospital <hes> working more than normal job so i can't really think of anyone specifically by crawford did <hes> and have a big heart in my decision making <hes>. I started doing it my second year of medical school and <hes> just knowing that you have time for that. I mean he was going to say something like high school or somewhere you know but med school yeah it was a yeah. It was the summer i believe of my yet my second year and i was just trying to find something to well well. Actually it was because the dive school because dive school the p._s._c. has six pull ups in it and i did gymnastics younger and i knew that i i can do pull ups. I just gotta get back to it and <hes> crossover coming on the scene. So i just found the local wine closest my med school colon really fell in love with it and i was probably only doing one class <hes> a day and as a traveled i would go find signed a new cross stitch jim everywhere. I went like so yeah. I go to florida. Find a gym. Go to san diego find a gym. <hes> we just talked about this. There's actually on a recent episode and it was around the same topic that the great thing about cross fit is that you don't necessarily have to be a member..

crawford harvard Dan washington offit san diego florida
"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"You can be part of the s._t._v. team. Seal delivery vehicle teams in hawaii. <hes> the submarine bases are actually probably where most of the u. Imos are just because has there the biggest group compared to the navy divers and spec ops <hes> they have you imos at buds medical who take care of the buds candidates who are are going through hell week so it's any physician that has passed internship. <hes> has their own medical license and then also completed died school themselves so they they've really kept it a tradition to make it so that we have to go to dive school so we really understand the challenges of being a diver <hes> and then we take a course on hyperbaric medicine as well to learn how to treat free diving injuries basically the bends and a whole variety of <hes> like overpressurization or pulmonary over inflation syndrome syndrome <hes> types of injuries that you can see with more the intense diving in the navy so <hes> the you know the divers that are doing the welding and the deep sea divers and stuff. Did you have to go to that segment. As well or is it just the breeders and those types of things or is it all <hes> yeah we do scuba and then we also do surface supply so that's with the mark fives and the umbilical coming off of his ship. We didn't do any welding which i'm honestly glad i didn't do that. I don't think i'd be good at that <hes> but we still go through pool week which every like to check one check class goes through but then we like we all have those same initial three or four weeks and then because at dive school wall you'll have like yoga classes in the c._b.'s and p._j.'s there so there's all these like very specific groups and then we kind of all split off and you <music> this other training that down in where'd you go to panama city or city. Okay i thought so and then once you get into that then i know at one point. You were describing some of your career path there. I mean you were evaluating buds candidates and individuals schedules that are going within the soft community. You've done some of those things that you mentioned <hes> but you know on a daily basis kenneth tickets through the life of what you do now is a underwater water medical officer. I mean is it still more of just the evaluations for people who are looking at coming in the community or is it. Is it more of really dealing with people with a hyperbaric burke chamber and those types of things yeah so my job <hes>. I actually got pretty lucky because i thought it was going to be very administrative initially but it turns out. I got a pretty good mix. I'm so i'm at the peace at the pressurized submarine escape trainer in groton connecticut <hes> which is the biggest submarine base and so all of the <hes> best students which is an acronym for basic enlisted submarine in school they come through the trainer and we're it's a high risk trainer where reteaching the students how to escape a submarine in a pressurized pressurized suit in case. There's ever a chance there is a disabled submarine. How far is that suit good for because when i think about a submarine that's not doing well that me just a couple of miles down be enough. <hes> you know a diver myself. I get to thinking <hes> that's not good. You know there's there's there's nothing good from that especially. When you're talking the bins yeah yeah. It's <hes> it's supposed to be for. I'm not sure the exact number but <hes> i mean dr tank is thirty-seven feats. That's what we train at but <hes> i don't want to give specific numbers how many hundreds of feet but they they would be looking looking at hundreds escaping from hundreds of feet below surface. Oh yeah yeah it's a very the specific scenario if it were to happen but the navy.

navy hawaii medical officer groton panama city c._b. connecticut four weeks
"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Or you. M._o.'s or dive school they were the ones who worked out the most the basic <hes> and they were the ones <hes> it was the smallest community out of g._m._o.'s <hes>. It was the most challenging so <hes> i i they had that seed planted early on <hes> that i wanted to do that after internship to have any females are in that community right now are physicians yeah good question <hes> i i would estimate <hes> like from lieutenant to probably captain may be twenty to thirty in my class alone. We had six at dive school and that was the highest number of females they've ever had in a dive school class in history of dive school and that was in two thousand seventeen so <hes> their p._e._o. <unk> get interviewed for a little article so but that <hes> <hes> that's what volumes to me and just looking around and i was like okay. The six of us like i guess is the really big number for now. How large was the class so six <unk> out of how many i think we had thirteen so we are half the class. Oh in all six ended up passing and everything is well yeah yeah. Yes just great yeah so our class. <hes> we are all doctors all so we're called you mocks or you mo- candidates <hes> so most device came straight from insurance ship but there were a couple of people who are already board certified <hes> <hes> we had one pediatrician one e._r. Doc doc the two off my head so <hes> but they're a bit older they're in their mid twenties and they're they're going to dive school school <hes> but i know right now in terms of just navy diving. There's only seven there seven or eight navy female l. navy divers so <hes> in the navy diving community. It's a very small and actually the number of <hes> female you a house. I think bumps up that that number quite significantly so tell everybody who may not know what an underwater medical officer is as with this because it's not one of those career fields that i've ever really honestly heard of until nikki goes oh. She's an underwater medical offices circle. Yeah sure yeah yeah became my friend sounds like we perform surgery underwater not so we take care of the mariners divers special operators <hes> those are the three the types of units will be with <hes>. We do a lot of physical so anyone who is coming through the pipeline. <hes> there's a very rigid rigid criteria in the manual the navy manual of medicine you have to be physically qualified for so <hes> the first time you might encounter wine is in boot camp if you're trying to go to any of those special communities <hes> health wise we look through your record into physical to make sure you.

navy diving community medical officer mariners M._o. g._m._o. nikki
"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Community retirees active duty returning from combat. What a tremendous exposure. It seems yeah yeah unfortunately <hes> so because there's so many medical coal students at uses we can't all stay at walter reed and yeah and i was one of the single ones so i was ready to pack my bags and but it was great because i went to army hospitals air force hospitals i went to tacoma madigan jacksonville florida and then i tried to get san diego as much as i could <hes> because i just love san diego and i had r._o._t._c. friends who were there so i i still did get a wide experience with all three services <hes> but walter he did. They did have a <hes> certain unlike patients who were potentially senators president obama. I i remember one time being in the library and he he was coming to the wounded warrior <hes> floor and because of that you know all the security had to come through and all of a sudden there is all the secret service like in the library region really they shut they shut the school down like we couldn't leave the base really sure and he landed on the baseball fields next to use this and then went to walter reed <hes> next door so there's still like like some cool glimpses <hes> like that where i gotta be exposed system of that interesting that you started off your career. You went down onto their recruiter. Any actually guided you to go r._o._t._c. because <hes> you know at least when i was on recruiting duty most of my experience. If you had a college education or not and you were talking about going r._o._t._c. or going there route i'd probably talk you into going into an enlistment and going sark or something of that nature. You know much much more like you know nikki here. You're did in instead of going the route of going and getting your education because i lose out possibly on enlistment. You might change your mind as you go down the path. You know what i mean you. You may not finish shot. You're not see commitment signed the contract. You know those types of yeah yeah now. I think i honestly don't remember that the interaction that much i just remember being like looking for scholarships and honestly looking back. I'm like i didn't know what i was getting myself into like most people when you went through medical school did you know what kind of doctor are you wanted to be or there's gonna be my question is well. It's funny you said yeah so definitely changed. Ally initially wanted to do e r <hes> and i liked at uses because it's a military medical school. They really emphasize like deploying deploying <hes> like we did all the t- triple c. We did <hes> some live tissue labs that were really eye opening like some of the the best training i've ever had <hes> we even our fourth year we do this thing called bushmaster where the fourth years are <hes> we act battalion surgeons and then the first year is are all they have mulaj diane and they're acting as their patients in we are are there pretty much putting on mass casualties for us on this army base in indiana i think <hes> but at at that time i i was so gung ho and like really wanted to do e. R. i really liked ultrasound <hes> oddly enough <hes> just because of how quick you could figure things out <hes> so i really was into that for a while however i ended up matching in with internal medicine instead in san diego matching with this means that the needs of the navy matching on yeah a take the needs of <hes> just the hospital in general <hes> you'll see that on the civilian side to in terms of of people really needing primary care <hes> in e r is a it's. It's just a funny thing 'cause they're all like we need e._r. Docs and and they make it extremely competitive <hes> to get those spots and i think it's only getting more competitive <hes> but yeah internal medicine in his more. You're doing ward work <hes>. I still did a couple e._r. Rotations but internal medicine is <hes> really taking care of older folks who <hes> like almost none of their organs are working. They have heart failure kidney failure failure liberty failure and they're extremely complicated <hes> so it's not as high speed but i learned a a lot just a time from my attending..

walter reed san diego president obama tacoma baseball nikki florida jacksonville battalion indiana diane
"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Military the jury dot com slash display <hes> an the military. I want to know a little bit about your background background so that the audience gets a chance to understand who you are because you've got a degree in microbiology chemistry chemistry. I'm sorry and and then from there you ended up going on the position strack and becoming a doctor yeah so i mean i wanted. I knew i wanted to be a doctor are in high school. Maybe even middle school <hes> growing up and <hes> i knew that one of the best ways to do that was through the military and <hes> i was looking for scholarships in high school and i came across a recruiter's office and <hes> <hes> they really emphasize r._o._t._c. actually for me. <hes> and my dad did air force r._o._t._c. So when i came home he was like pleasantly surprised that i wanted to do <hes> navy r._o._t._c. and so i ended up actually starting at boston austin university my first year with the consortium the boston consortium which has six schools be u._b. Tufts and harvard m._i._t. <hes> missing one northeastern <hes> so i started majoring in biochemistry in actually in during r._o._t._c. time <hes> i wasn't getting a lot of feedback that i could go the medical route r._o._t._c. really emphasizes <hes> unrestricted line officers so i was honestly really worried <hes> and that i wasn't gonna be able to go to medical school. Even if i got an even if my grades were really good <hes> and i you did a lot of like searching on forums online and i knew that there were spots out there about fifteen across the nation for r._t._c. or the academy. I'm not sure if that's together. If that's separate <hes> so i knew it was possible. I just had to figure out how in luckily one of my <unk> the instructors he was considering going to medical school himself and he told me about usas the uniform services university you of health sciences at walter reed <hes> so he really told me he made a timeline for me. He's like okay. You know you've worked really liaison with your grade so far. You're majoring in biochemistry. You have one chance to take the mcat. If you don't then <hes> you know we're you're going to want you to pay off your time either as a surface warfare officer potentially a pilot potential and and that was actually the first year they were recruiting recruiting women for submarines so if you had a science or engineering background they were like you should come join. The submarine community and one of my summer cruises was actually on the u._s._s. Alaska <hes> i think with ten other female image shipman at that point already was taking the new. I want to go to medical school but <hes> i figured out that if i could get into medical school improved to eighty that i could get in then they would probably <hes>. Let me go so. I still apply probably applied to fifteen or twenty medical schools. <hes> started getting into some of them and i actually really liked usas. When i went to go visit <hes> <hes> they really just like they really liked. I already did r._o._t._c. that. Had some leadership experience in there is as the is committed to the navy. I had some idea of what the military was like. Compared to <hes> some college students who go go straight from college to the navy or the commission <hes> right after <hes> so then i got in and went straight from commissioning <hes> and went straight to medical school <hes> so i i went to boston college graduated from boston college and went to to washington d._c. In let's see those two thousand eleven and graduated in two thousand fifteen. How was it getting all that experience at walter author read. I mean because you see a number of different types of you know medical conditions and everything else whether it's from the veteran community retirees active duty returning from combat. What a tremendous exposure. It seems yeah yeah unfortunately <hes>.

walter reed shipman boston college boston austin university boston Tufts Alaska officer harvard washington
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And once you do that, you put them in positions of authority. And essentially allow them to fly. So those are some of the things we're trying to build structure around, and it's been a really interesting cast. So that's excellent in a sharing that finding that raw talent and letting the patient experience rain and win in in. So you've had a fruitful career are in you've been director. You you've been partner you've been chief medical officer through your career. What can you share with the listeners? Maybe an example of how you've done something differently to create results like improve outcomes or are increase efficiency by doing things differently. Sure. Sure. Well, I can tell you that the first example that comes to mind is a project that had to do with a subject that's near and dear to mine and probably every other internists heart in that is medication accuracy. And we've recognized that substantial of. Medication events are directly tied to transitions of care. And the accuracy of medication lists cross. Handoffs care, we recognized in the emergency room that I worked in previously bevaqua center health system. That's the original task of obtaining a medication list from a patient in the emergency room was fought with hazard, and that was largely related to the fact that it was tasked on to a very busy very capable emergency room nurse that would unfortunately be hold in many different directions at once right on four emergency room nurse who are the unsung heroes of the e r you know, who've been taught to manage bleeding that you could hear an actively drag people back from the brink of death round paper bag full of medications only looks like one thing and that is a black hole. Whole time suck. And so we recognized that there were some opportunities to make that process better. We instituted a time ocean study and also asked our pharmacy departments to calculate in ARA ROY that would be related to reducing the number of errors associated with medication reconciliation numeracy room with that we were able to justify the placement of a pharmacist clinical, pharmacists, or a pharmacy tech on T four seven to manage the task of medicine reconciliation, and we were able to see substantial improvements not only in throughput food emergency room, but a substantial reduction in almere MRs and actual medication errors as a result of the placement of that individual out. My background is internal medicine in clinical informatics. And this largely came from the fact that our medicine reconciliation tool that was being touted by our e r. Our vendor at the time really just was not up to scratch in terms of respecting the workflow of ED nurse or the admitting physician. And so it was a big wake up. Call for me to recognize that the solution. Here was not a ninety solution largely process and a staffing solution. Once we had that in place were set up for better outcomes. And so that's one of my favorite examples of recognizing that despite the fact that the tool is in place, unless you have solid process an engaged group of individuals that want to make that process successful. You will not achieve the success that nor secret that's a great story. And and just, you know, having the right team in place in in making sure that you have the right processes, not really just relying on technology or a widget to make it happen. Also, that's true way. Finding and so that's. One side of the coin. Now, let's flip it on the other side. What can you share with the listeners of of a setback? You know, I feel like sometimes we learn more from our setbacks than our successes, and you share something that's happened in your career as a leader that you've learned a lot and has really kind of just shifted the way that you provide healthcare and leadership. Yeah, I think I could comfortably share with you the.

director partner medical officer