12 Burst results for "mba harvard"

"mba harvard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Was one a couple years ago. He and Clay did it member together. Don't big. Yeah, it could be your mother. Want one? No, No. Neither 11 didn't didn't like Joe Harris win it or something. Yeah, but I think clay had a better score than step. But I could be wrong, But I think he did. I think, yeah. Yeah, we'll get into it. We'll have some fun now watching it this weekend. I definitely want you You two follow up with us on Monday. As how Declan? I'm dead serious about this. Like how Declan kind of ranks, the activities, least busy watching. You know the magic play the Hawks to do totally if you could get him away from right. Charlotte, Right. Portland on a Wednesday number Well, Charlotte watch Charlotte number three Sports story from the MBA. Harvard last night. Speaking of that MBA, check out the Phoenix Suns, who? The Warriors play tomorrow night. Even with Devin Booker getting ejected for quite a light infraction. By the way, the reps gotta cool out with this nonsense. They're out of control this year with them with the whistle squad. Rest run amok. Calm. You're robbing us of entertainment here. But even without Booker in the second half, the sun still beat the skid in Los Angeles Lakers like the Lakers only got it for the Warriors. That's it. Yeah. Cause they're losing games all over the place unless you're playing the Warriors. Ah sons, 1 14 Lakers 104. Despite LeBron's 38 Now a little bit of news, the Lakers have finally decided LeBron just sit it out. So they're flying up to Sacramento tonight to play the Kings, and they told LeBron Stay home that Bron Bron needs did arrest. I'm fine with that, By the way, I'm still laughing at your reps running amok dot com. Great website. Dude, Just get on to the website just see different footage of different reps. Ejecting players remember the very now politically Super politically incorrect girls gone wild Polly from the old days member. I don't even know how that was ever legal any of that stuff they should show Those like infomercials like How is this even on TV? Remember, Remember, there was one clip They show where the girl says to the camera might happens in Panama City stays in Panama City. Imagine to which money, But he said, Well, apparently no, it doesn't. No, not anymore. You know when that dude around whatever that kid's name was, who had because I'm not in Panama, saying, And there you are on this. Mean, right there. Hope so. You too young to even and you're better off for it. Believe me, dude, I know it. Those were playing, you know, middle of when I was a kid. Oh, yeah. Actually did was kind of fun as a kid to catch those commercials. Students think that guy got went to jail. Oh, he had to have been G had got him. That guy broke every law known to mankind. I mean, it was awful awful stuff, right? Yeah. Yeah, You're right. Like what? You'd be staying up late watching like Dave Letterman or something. And then he's like, Yeah, we'll be back with Drew Barrymore. Right after this and then pulling girls gone wild and start coming on. You're like, Wait a minute. What is this? Because Like borderline like, totally inappropriate on every level. Yeah, totally inappropriate, And they they they did commercials on TV Right to girls gone wild Rush. Refs run amok wraps that run amok dot com Couple more quick ones here, clippers. There's kind of skin like the Lakers. They've lost 58. They lost to the Celtics last night. Won 17 1 12 on a night? Kawai Leonard Scratch with back spasms. What I'm saying is now with the Lakers skidding in the Clippers, skinning what I'm crafting a path of the warriors to win the West, by the way. Although here's a guy who says maybe not Nikola Yo Kage. This is the second straight day in the top 6 37 points, 11 assists 10 rebounds last night. That's his ninth triple double of the season. That's his 50th of his career. Break. This stat. He's now only the second center in the history of the NBA With 50 triple doubles. You might guess who the other guy was. Yeah. His name was Wilt Chamberlain. And he had 78 of them running away. Damn! So the nuggets 11 28 to 97 over the bucks. Oh, here come the Nuggets, and here comes Nikola. Yokich. My friend's number two sports story is the warrior's back at it tonight with a tough road game at Portland. It's Dame and staff. Our favorite seven o'clock tip member. They split those two games in San Francisco in January. Steve Curses Draymond Green will play. That's good news. They later Blazers and misses them. Horses. See Gemma Collins been out for a while. They are missing. Yusef ner kitsch. The big man there, Mrs Collins, the big man, so They've lost four out of five. They just broke a little four games, kid the other night there 19 and 14 there just ahead of the warriors, 19 and 16. But, Polly, you are going to get a little dose of Carmelo Anthony tonight, So I kind of like I told you I'm kind of a closet Carmelo head Now I know he's up there with him. Yeah. Yeah, Here's Steph Curry talking about Oakland's own Damian Lillard and how he.

Damian Lillard Wilt Chamberlain Joe Harris Devin Booker Nikola Yo Kage Gemma Collins LeBron Steph Curry Carmelo Anthony San Francisco Monday Celtics Panama Phoenix Suns Clay Carmelo Panama City Draymond Green 58 Kawai Leonard
"mba harvard" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

06:27 min | 7 months ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Also the the hard part of it. Which is you're only as good as your last job. And there's absolutely no You're not rewarded for showing up and being good awarded for Being present and being professional you're rewarded for Ah boxoffice opening. that has nothing to do with you. The biggest stick onset but if that money is like cool great you know and i would say that like as a woman we get so few chances in guys get ten shots at bat right we get maybe two one a noser the top top top and then to be a woman of color on top of that you. Now it's it's just it's it's a brutal industry because it promotes I guess everything that's out of your control Like ageism And the idea of what is desirable. And it's always in people's hands that at the end of the day have no connection to you or your personal story or wire there even audience is like you. Oh god i love. I wish we could talk specifics. But i am not dumb enough to your own that but i think we're all thinking of our own examples and you know people in incidents so i mean you were smart enough to think broader than okay just hollywood just television and you thought about beauty but why did you think about beauty. I mean did you have a relationship to beauty. Like i was like face of a couple of Global beauty brands From age eighteen I think that was the first time i signed a contract with the beauty brand And i just learned. I actually learned a lot about marketing. And that's where. I feel like i got a lot of my Marketing and i guess marketing acumen Along with learning about marketing demographics and psycho graphics all of that with just opening moves in different territories in the way the appeal to this audience that audience. And then to tell you that or like in board rooms or they say okay like jessica. So this movie's gonna open in this country. Are you just listening now. I would ask the question. Like how can i make this accessible in germany. Like what does that mean in. Okay how can i make successful As we open in mexico city in wirewood choosing that city to do our premier right and you know the london premiere. What does success look like in the uk verse in spain or italy now. And so i would ask the question. So all actresses do that or december them get on the plane. I i probably was different. Because i was very strategic. Yeah always on. That's kind of how. I always approached my career even in entertainment because i needed it to be successful because then dot i knew would then allow me to have more. You know a day longer in this business for long. Because it's funny you were saying the thing about You know working hard in. Hollywood is not necessarily rewarded like combat behavior can be rewarded. And it's like it's. It's not like school you know it's not like work hard get a it. Oh go onto the next thing. Get a degree. Yeah it's kind of like it's not You know based on merit but you were it. Sounds like you're. I mean i wasn't there but it kind of sounds like you're treating this almost like okay. I'm gonna learn things. I'm going to study out and that it's going to be great. Well i think i was. I was trying to figure out how to have a little bit more stability. Yeah and so. I love that given that i had absolutely nothing at no family members them you know there are every the the best looking people from all over the world coming to this tiny little town and they all wanna be a star you know a and they all are very talented and i and i don't even know i know is definitely not the best looking and wasn't the most talented. So what else did i have. You know it's like. I just had to i hustle man out grind denied Strategize early on and just just figured it out and and tried to be better. Tried to to learn as i was going to have to be better and to create as much of a solid foundation as possibly good. Yeah yeah yeah so okay. I interrupt you. Because i'm just i so curious about your journey and there's so many things to ask you about men we got to kind of get to the beauty stuff so you you're paying attention. You had beauty contracts. You're like okay you know Contracts were. Of course i was like. How do you get renewed. And they're like wallets if the stock performs are not And when i when there was a connection to a stock performance or whether there's you know your item seller not And then i was like okay. And then i put into my my contract that i got to have creative control of my campaigns and what was awesome is trusting mike guy instincts of how women wanna be spoken to it worked. My campaigns did really well. Yeah and the products did really well in so that again. It gave me like a nut. More assurance validated. I guess my mind in jewish. And even though i didn't have an mba harvard. You know you could. At least i'm in my ear to the ground. I know how. I wanted to be communicated to Just always had that consumer lens. Right in everything that i did. Even when i was opening movies are. I was on a talk show. I was like if i'm sitting on the couch watching this person for two minutes. Talk about something. But i wanna get from this experience. What what is the best case scenario..

italy spain mexico germany two minutes uk jessica wirewood ten shots jewish two december Hollywood first time harvard hollywood london one mike age eighteen
"mba harvard" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"To get started today. All right so we are back. Let's get into this episode. This is Season four episode to the title is no show originally aired september twenty second two thousand and two written by david chase and terry winner together directed by john. Patterson no show of course refers to The the way the mob gets job assignments on construction sites in when they you know when they're involved in the thing so a no show job is you don't show up but you get a paycheck. You get the benefits and all that no work means you have to show up between ten and three thirty you do it. You don't got to do with damn thing but this still goes on today. There's a lot of this in existence right. I would imagine it's based on real stuff. Yeah like a lot of the show is You know that's how they do their you know the mob was involved in the union ch- in get as their deal. They get a certain amount of these types of things to work with. So you want you want you want your job to go smoothly. You wanna get a good contract. You want to grease the wheels. You gotta give up these jobs. And i gotta think that these jobs were two thousand and twenty five hundred dollars a week. Their union jobs right and like it's mentioned in the episode. The only work from ten to three thirty. They probably get a lunch break in there. A couple of other breaks Making good money and his benefits. Yeah i need to know. I need one of these jobs. Get a podcast. No-show job. I would like to get paid and you still on the hill talking. Sopranos with your name. Michael and steve. But you don't you don't have to show up exactly. You would like that you would like to do it yourself like to do this all i'm in discussions about that we're talking. I'm talking to some people like to do it. Just michael imperial talking. Sopranos talking soprano. That'll be let's get on here. We have the agent. Deborah is a chick roads house Adriana shaven leg she calls she says I have My cousin came to with those day. Spa certificates She answers the phone interesting enough. This is deborah To the i h and aka And now danielle ally personal shopper. Has she answers his phone. Daffy daffy is at eleven. I don't know if daffy uses around anymore. I think they went chapter. Eleven from mistake. Staffers was like kind of an off. was like fashion clothes store and you'd get designer brands for less burlington like Like that marshall's like century. twenty one. they're around much anymore. But i have to say she. You know she's got a janet hook line and sinker man. Shot her believing. She's a friend doing shit together the hanging out and They got a good well. I think Adriana is you know i've said it before. No malice in her. I think she's innocent. She's kind of an innocent though. She's a she's a gun mole. She's a you know one of these She likes hanging around. Obviously the mob stuff but basically. He's lonely. I think she doesn't have. She says it. In one of the episodes she goes. I don't have any friends. Criminals gotta christopher. He's gotta be out twelve hours a day. Hustle in the deal in hustling hanging getting high getting drunk. And he's not well. He's during the night. Usually he doesn't wake up early in the morning so he talking. You probably gets up twelve. One o'clock you know has has lunch with her and then he's off and he you know he has won two nights a week making a living. He's on told as that. Tony's beck and call. It's not easy being. Listen i gotta be honest. It's been said of a mob guy. You're better off getting a nine to five gig man while the pressure the the threat the fear you know that's not easy. So the soprano kitchen camilla's making lunch. Meadow comes down at two pm. She just woke up going out by the pool. Camilla's says you were going to be get up at eight thirty to be at tc b. y. yoga that used to be around. I don't know if they were around anymore When the meadows on vacation yeah. She's like all she likes. She's at a resort. she's ordering food. She's at the pool. She's she doesn't she's not getting up at eight thirty two for five days left. School is camello even on arash about it. I mean to ship has sailed. She was supposed to have an internship at the paper mill playhouse. They border a car so she could go out there. She didn't like the internship she said She was copies making copies. Add no stagecraft. Paper mill is like probably the top regional theater in new jersey. It's also been called the state theatre of new jersey. They do a lot of big productions. Sometimes productions that go onto broadway and stuff like that but a lot of kids who are entitled to grow up like like she with everything kind of handed to you. Get them an internship and they resent having to like make copies or may get coffee or something like that. they think they should be I don't know i've seen that happen. She's also she's a spoiled disconnect. She's arguing with her mother. She keeps taking phone calls gossiping with the friends. She's condescending here to her mom. About the book she reads etcetera etcetera she's She says she blames everything on her ex boyfriend. Dying which don't get me wrong is extremely traumatic for a nineteen year old absolutely positively but she says I took twelve credits two semesters in a row. You know you supposed to take sixteen credits. That's a full load. Twelve is minimum of to be a fulltime student. So it's not that big a deal. What she's doing you know as far as that. Although columbia's varied has what she brings up the canon the canon colombia's a bunch of like great books of the world. That everybody who goes as required to read. There's a certain amount you have to read is like homer you know the bible east coast sophocles. Plato virgil shakespeare savant initiate. Any anymore you went to an ivy league school. That was your choice. That's yeah that's what you you have to dig in and do the work so when you do graduate you know usually ivy league is the first in line to be hired. Oh this girl went to sherline. Mba harvard princeton. And that's what that's all about. Medal was nasty condescending. Spoiled with a mother Something that i noticed. There's mayonnaise on the counter. She's making tuna sandwiches italian tuna. I.

Deborah Michael sixteen credits deborah david chase steve new jersey michael imperial twelve credits five days One o'clock Adriana two pm daffy Twelve john. Patterson today two semesters Camilla Tony
"mba harvard" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:11 min | 9 months ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"How was the holiday with the family? What did you did You get a nice try affected the track or something. I mean, Well, what was it like, Uh, in this unique season, spending the holiday in Chicago. You're Monica Ashley Tyler. It's It's lovely joining you guys and I got to give you full disclosure here. I told my wife I was doing a three hour radio show, and I had to go into the city today to do it. So please do not give me Wow. You get out of the house because it's bad enough on Christmas with little kids. It's the next day and the day after so, like midway through today, what do I got A radio show After that, they actually need me in the studio. So I've been gone for three hours. If anybody gets in trouble, I know what this place Do you have, just like strolling the town? You're understand You just got to get away now. And now that everything's closed. I have no more excuses like I lived in Chicago. I'd like Tyler's got flat. They wasted this year. The cargo? No, it was his friend's car. There's no one that could pick them up like I got no, Tyler, come back. I need to get out of my house Lovett thing, Monica. Actually, this is just classic comedy. So anything T O sneak away for a little bit all right to me. Well, we'll keep you here for 10 minutes and pretend like it's three hours, so you don't know, but Let's what's hard would would you like to start on the college? Harvard of the MBA? Harvard, You know, I'm an MBA hunk, and we've got like the first week of the season out of the way. And last week when we chatted with you, we were kind of asking you about some future. Some props, things like that. You had mentioned the Brooklyn Nets as maybe a team that you want to proceed with caution when it comes to, But boy did they look impressive and their opening night victory over the Boston Celtics? They work to a noble Tonight They lost two with Kyrie in Kevin Durant plane They lost to the Charlotte Hornets. So what has been your impression so far through A few games of this new look. Brooklyn Nets team mashed Antonio on the sideline, Kyrie and Katie working together on the floor. You know, I want Monica to remain friends with me because I know she is just in love like that, Like the two heart, Emoji will go towards Monica and the Brooklyn Nets. I mean, that's how much she loves them in. My whole thing is no doubt there's a lot of talent there. But the Celtics investing Camber Walker. They're not a full straight the Warriors. Um you know, they used to have a filter that made them look a lot better. It was called Kevin Durant and Clay Thompson. Well, they've come back down to Earth. So I still have not ready to just crown them. But you go down the Charlotte saying you lose to the hornet. So in my eyes, one of top sides worst teams in the MBA, so There's gonna be ups and downs. The embassy crazy tonight You got the Knicks blowing out the walkie anything like that. The Knicks of 24 in the phone booth. Iraqi Bucks. Brooklyn loses. 76 years. They get blown out by 32 to Cleveland, So I think it's just gonna be a lackey MBA season. But Monica, can we still be friends? Because I'm not sold on then we're totally friends. And I I'm in on the Nets. Doyle. I just don't I mean, And the thing with the nexus is not even just Katie and Kyrie. It's the rest of the entire roster. But I would love to see Miami pushed them. I'd love to see how the Boston team pushed him like, Give me seven. Give me seven and overtime in the seventh game of whatever Syria's you want. I'll take it. I am mad at that. You're a baller. So you remember like you played with people that when things are going right home, they're the best like I thought it then you know what they are because they run down the court with their thumbs up. Like they start feel themselves right. But when things go bad, that's what I want to see the net playing. Make sure you lose one game tonight like Don't get crazy, but like I want to see what, like the wheels start coming off. Can they really rally together? That's where I really have My main concern your boys. Ey pointed out the same thing in commercial, right, But here's my deal. It would literally have to be like I hate to bring this up in locker rooms, but people messing with people, significant others for me to be enough to fall off the wagon because I think you got this dude named Katie, who just does not care, and it's so excited to be back. Give him the rock and the problems are solved. Like I just don't know what Anticipation of drama and the train falling off the tracks. We actually expect to see because the resident do it on their roster. They came up under Kenny Anderson, who was your boy? They don't wanna do nothing but ball and get a chance to go secure the big time back when they leave Brooklyn like I just don't see the drama happening. Yeah, I know you're doing a show right now. Go back and watch the last possession two point game on. I'm always interested in the story lines like who's going to shoot the ball? Kyrie, your Durant so they go pick and roll the ranch. What kind of had opened three and traditionally, guys on the road you down to you do go to the wind. Instead, he did get to his sweet spot. He messes this year makes free throws. They lose the game. I think, then figure it out like Your time to go see my time to go like this is the first close game they were in this year. The execution down the stretch stretch was not great, and they lose the one of the worst teams in the NBA. All I'm saying is Monica. That's good luck slogan had not come to break. Let's just slow down the brakes a little bit. It's a long, long embassy, right? That's fair. That's where I'll take Doyle. You were talking about what a crazy day it has been in the N B A. You forgot to mention. The Clippers. Getting absolutely roasted by the Mavs won 24 72 was the final score. At one point, the mouse had a 50 point lead. What on God's green Earth happened? Yeah, I saw some funny videos of Doc rivers like actors making believe that with Dr Rivers I calling Tyrone loopy and like, how are things going out there? Adela, Like It's let's let's not forget it's the shortest turnaround ever in the history of the NBA was talking about 72 73 days. They come back and play guys, probably not at full strength quite didn't play in that game because he got hit in the mouth. I mean, we all had that for the events of kids, right? Some of the coaches that we didn't like their sort of down Dick. Watch this video how you are awful. When you're a professional there, he's gonna catch, chop them up and go out there and just kind of try the next day Clippers have had some impressive wins. The Lakers went to Denver knocked off the Nuggets today. Yeah, see that egg they laid was pretty disgusting. But if you lose by two lives by 50 still lose the game. True. Him. Doyle joining us here on game night. NBA TV personality CBS sports as well as he calls from college basketball around the nation, of course, was honorable. All mentioned at Northwestern One of the all time greats there at Northwestern before the program actually got good, like like they are now, Timmy. How about your northwestern Wildcats? Let's talk about it. Okay. They've won four in a row six and one. Overall. They're undefeated victim play. Got a big tub. Um, on Saturday against the Ohio State, Buckeyes, 71 to 70. The final in that one. Next up is gonna be a real fun one in the big 10. They host Luca are they're going to travel. Pardon me. Two names. I wanna take a look. Garza and the Iowa Hawkeyes the number four team in the country. Obviously, Garza is just a monster puts up a double double in its sleep.

Monica Ashley Tyler Kevin Durant NBA Doyle Katie Brooklyn Nets Brooklyn Harvard Chicago Clippers Knicks Kyrie MBA Boston Celtics Garza Charlotte Warriors Nets Boston
"mba harvard" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:36 min | 9 months ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"How was the holiday with the family? What did you did You get a nice try effective track or something. I mean, Well, what was it like in this unique season, spending the holiday in Chicago? You're Monica Ashley Tyler. It's It's lovely joining you guys and I got to give you full disclosure here. I told my wife I was doing a three hour radio show, and I had to go into the city today to do it. So please do not give me up. Wow. You get out of the house because it's bad enough on Christmas with little kids. It's the next day and the day after so, like midway through today, what do I got A radio show After that, they actually need me in the studio. So I've been gone for three hours. If anybody gets me in trouble, I know what they're playing. What do you have? Just like strolling the town? No, you You understand? You just got to get away right now. And now that everything's closed. I have no more excuses like I lived in Chicago. I'd like Tyler's got flat. My wife. Does he have a car? Good. No, it was his friend's car. There's no one that could pick up my public. I got knowing Tyler come back. I need to get out of my house. Love it. That's something, Monica. Actually, this is just classic Tommy D. So anything T O sneak away for. Ah, little bit all right to me. Well, we'll keep you here for 10 minutes and pretend like it's three hours so you don't come home, but Let's see what's hard would would you like to start on the college? Harvard of the MBA? Harvard, You know, I'm an MBA hunk, and we've got like the first week of the season out of the way. And last week when we chatted with you, we were kind of asking you about some future. Some props, things like that. You had mentioned the Brooklyn Nets as maybe a team that you want to proceed with caution when it comes to, But boy did they look impressive and their opening night victory over the Boston Celtics? They work to a noble Tonight They lost two with Kyrie in Kevin Durant plane They lost to the Charlotte Hornets. So what has been your impression so far through A few games of this new look. Brooklyn Nets team gnashed Antonio on the sideline, Kyrie and Katie working together on the floor. You know, I want Monica to remain friends with me because I know she is just in love like that, Like the two heart, Emoji will go towards Monica and the Brooklyn Nets. I mean, that's how much she loves them in. My whole thing is no doubt there's a lot of talent there. But the Celtics and Mr Campbell Walker, they're not a full straight the Warriors. Um Yeah, They used to have a filter that made them look a lot better. It was called Kevin Durant in place, Thompson. Well, they've come back down to earth. So I still have not ready to just crown them. But you go down to Charlotte saying you lose to the hornet. So in my eyes, one of the top five worst teams in the MBA, so There's gonna be upside down the embassy crazy tonight You got the Knicks blowing out Milwaukee. Let me think about that. The next 24 in the first the Iraqi Bucks. Brooklyn loses. 76 years. They get blown out by 32 to Cleveland, So I think it's just gonna be a lackey MBA season. But Monica, can we still be friends? Because I'm not sold on net? What? We're totally friends and I I'm in on the Nets. Doyle. I just don't. I mean, and the thing with the Nets is it's not even just Katie and Kyrie. It's the rest of the entire roster. But I would love to see Miami push them. I'd love to see how the Boston same push them like. Give me seven. Give me seven and overtime in the seventh game of whatever Syria's you want. I'll take it. I am added that You are ballers. So you remember like you played with people that when things are going right call, they're the best like I thought it then you know what they are because they run down the court with their thumbs up. Like they start feeling themselves right. But when things go bad, that's when I want to see the net like, Make sure you lose one game tonight like Don't get crazy, but like I want to see when, like the wheels are coming off. Can they really rally together? That's where I really have My main concern your boys. Ey pointed out the same thing in commercial, right, But here's my deal. It would literally have to be like I hate to bring this up in locker rooms, but people messing with people, significant others from me to be enough to fall off the wagon because I think you got this dude named Katie, who just does not care, and it's so excited to be back. Give him the rock and the problems are solved. Like I just don't know what Anticipation of drama and the train falling off the tracks. We actually expect to see because the resident doing their roster, they came up under Kenny Anderson, who was your boy They don't wanna do not but ball and get a chance to go secure the big time back when they leave Brooklyn like I just don't see the drama happening. Yeah, I know you're doing a show right now go back and watch the last possession two point game on. I'm always interested in the story lines like who's going to shoot the ball? Kyrie, your Durant. So they go pick and roll the ramp sort of kind of open three and traditionally, guys on the road you down, too? You do go to the wind. Instead, he did get to a sweet spot. He misses those here makes free throws. They lose the game. I think, then figure it out like your time to go. My time to go like this is the first close game they were in this year. The execution down the stretch stretch was not great and then lose the one of the worst teams in the NBA arm, saying his Monica Let's just let's slogan not pump the brakes. Let's just slow down the brakes a little bit. It's a long, long embassy. That's fair. That's where I'll take Doyle. You were talking about what a crazy day it has been in the N B A. You forgot to mention. The Clippers. Getting absolutely roasted by the Mavs won 24 72 was the final score. At one point, the mouse had a 50 point lead. What on God's green Earth happened? Yeah, I saw some funny videos of Doc rivers like actors making believe they would Dr Rivers like calling Tyrone loopy and like, how are things going out there? And l A is like It's let's let's not forget it's the shortest turnaround ever in the history of the NBA was talking about 72 73 days. They come back and play guys, probably not at full strength quite didn't play in that game because he got hit in the mouth. I mean, we all had that for the events of kids, right? Some of the coaches that we didn't like their sort of down deck. Watch this video. You were awful. When you're a professional. They're just gonna kind of chalk that up and go out there and just kind of go try the next day. Clippers have had some impressive wins beat. The Lakers went to Denver not drop the Nuggets. Today. Uh yeah, sure. That egg they laid was pretty disgusting. But if you lose by two lives by 50 still lose the game. Him. Doyle joining us here on game night. NBA TV personality CBS sports as well as he calls from college basketball around the nation, of course, was honorable..

Monica Ashley Tyler Monica Doyle Brooklyn Nets Katie NBA Kevin Durant Brooklyn Nets Clippers Chicago Harvard Kyrie Monica Let MBA Boston Celtics Charlotte Knicks
"mba harvard" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

14:11 min | 2 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"If I didn't sell anything I wouldn't make any And the opening they had was in the vacuum cleaner microwave and sewing machine division. And they're like you have never cleaned anything in your life nor have you so anything and like why would anyone buy in the appliances from yeah But I saw this like tremendous funding opportunity because I got to do whatever wanted to do in my competitions purely based off like how l. idea and it taught me just so much about in how they work with different people. How do you understand people's needs? How do you try to form a connection in a short amount of time with with People from all sorts the different backgrounds. I found like in you know in the in the targeted I is talking about purpose and around like how how in any job you can find purpose in that you can look at it as just the job I'm just punching in and punching out taking Pichai. Yeah you could look at us like Oh if I do this really well I can rise up my career oriented like there's A. There's a real reason for why I'm doing this and in my mind at sears. And and it's something that I've tried to look for in all my future career pass. Is that like yeah like I was meaningfully helping these people out. People aren't coming in here. The luckily it wasn't during the door that they were coming because they needed help right and they needed help because they had closed that were ripped or they microwave wave broke or their house clean or someone has a really bad allergy Can't sleep well and so if I give it as like oh I now a detective. Yeah and now China figure okay. Well what is the problem that you're having in. How can I find the best solution to whether that in some cases that's like A brand new top the model in other cases. There's like oh you're you're how far older Older like individuals like the hoover divers were really heavy. And you would like us in. Stop Stop after a week on because there's just too much of a pen to yet so are there other opportunities tended to that. It's like lighter. Mourn Agile until I became a puzzle to me but there is really be like started this journey down like how do we always think about what that ideal customer experiences like. And how do you be able to provide that for families choice as something that that that was taught to me by through this job and it was something that has carried with me ever since what a great experience hearing aids in in also. So why you're doing that. You are also Syria excelling in academics. You're got into marketing marketing latched onto that right while you're selling one hundred percent commission. which scares that scares? Most adults based on my experience so insurance carriers most teenagers as well. I love how how you turn that into A. Oh my gosh. It's going to be so hard for me to make money to to. This is a great opportunity for me to be a detective in solve a puzzle and help people a as as a great inspirational lesson. You you communicated indicated there. Thank you for that but you also got into. You had mentioned before they tried tea. Bahn stuff but you you you try to add a different Sports as well. And can you take us through your sporting sporting failures Pretty Spectacular ocular If I were him I was whether through Just because I got whether to natural tower or whether it's through perseverance or etc like yeah. I was actually reasonably good at music. and Eh point where there is a Like there's a kind of a decision tree when I was around thirteen around like. Hey do I actually want to do this. For Real seriously. but on the other hand much rather play sports which I was just terrible at And so it's like by the time there were school teams in the Again like trying to be cool and like the ideal American public schools suburban youth I kept trying different different sports teams and I kept on trust flailing at Rice. I take yachts cut from the baseball team very early on once it started becoming competitive as cut from the soccer team. When I tried a lieven later awning in college I was cut from the ultimate Frisbee team which a lot of people don't even realize Elisa like a sport onto a serious collegiate one with cuts For years in a row and but it was always just something that like fueled fueled me in a way that like I. I want to be good at this Because the people that I saw were that were successful and talented at sports. Were also the people that I saw through at through college at that point like the people who who are really successful in the other parts of their lives that I want to be right. They were the people who were you getting a WHO. Who who had the the friends? There were the people who had the like relationships. There were the people who people looked up to as leaders and so it became a part of like okay. Yeah well like I'm going to keep trying this. And what what I have learned what I made that make up for in sort of lack of talent talent in in actual athletic ability. I make up to through like here. Tolerance of pain and boredom and and suffering And so as I like what would ended up spraying the h-how athletics became part of my identity. He was actually after college. had been a consultant number Kinsey for awhile and basically traveling all the time eating out every meal and Dan was getting out of shape to appoint like minded. My mother wants asked. Like hey like what happened to you when the Chinese mother isn't trying to shove food down your mouth every chance she gets like you know. Something is really wrong here and I got a chance living in New York City to watch New York City Marathon Marathon and I saw the people just pouring everything out on their on. This run in the end was really inspired by it. Started running and that turned into you know that those skills that I said around overcoming overcoming port him grit and pain turn out to be a really useful long distance. Blood ex And then as I was running was something interesting in in New York is that they get all of these students to come. `mountain volunteer for a weather stations have major racists and the students Unnatural how happened always tended to be the Asian and as I started getting faster I started hearing more and more people being really excited to see me because so you're the first Asian person and that started a different set of sort of dialogue in my mind like okay like like if I can succeed in something that Asian people aren't expected to succeed in which is athletic endeavors of any sort in in the US. And and I can also sort of inspire other people younger pupil that they too can do things that you know. I don't look like anyone around me. then there something valuable here In and so over time as I like I became the least likely Sponsored athlete that anyone's ever met and from my beginnings of lacking in all sorts of talent and being you know I remember my first sixteen hundred meter race in middle school which is like four laps around the track. I I was laughed. Which means someone finished four laps before I finish three and they got all the plaza because they can it was the first event in the track me and they just wanted to get on with the rest of the track man? They're all excited for me to get off the field To a point where you know I was winning races and I was you have sponsored by major brands and and yeah I became like a a that became a larger and larger part of my identity And also something that's how people were to feel awkward saying this but like people were inspired by. Hi is that something that was became important to me as a another proxy for What fuels me? which is like these? Are things that again. The parents couldn't have never thought they never had a chance of burn extra calories. They're trying to to to feed themselves and here. I am like wasting calories by doing laps around Central Park And and it's something that that that has has has carried me through a lot of ups and downs as one does through career especially through entrepreneurship as A. It's something that as something that that really drives me to to to continue working hard where do you what do you think your your ability to deal with pain. Boredom in suffering came from. Do you think that was something you were born with or is it just something that you were mentally tough enough to say. This can't reminded me of David. Goggin book it can't hurt me last thinking about while you were out of your scene that book. It's a great book but that's what was going through my mind as you were talking. I don't I don't know If I were the pontiff kate you know part of it may stem from the fact that nothing can easy and so like I. Ah I if things are easy than I feel like. You wouldn't need this but it was like I saw that the because I was so oh pad at it the only way that I could become respectable at it was by just working an outworking. Everyone Like I received of reward middle school track Where because like on a range wrench day I was the only one who is just like still running laps around Like during practice when everyone else had gone home and someone notice and it was because I was tired of being the last person in a race was the only way I could think about to try to like you know not the last breath. So let's fast forward a little bit you you you go to Stanford right and I think he went Stanford Undergrad in Graduate School got an MBA Harvard. And then you out into the workforce and you you sort of had a a number of different you say careers or number number of different opportunities before before Obama. So could you just take us through what you know. You're you're your College in graduate experience was like you got into high. Tried to figure out what you wanted out of life. This isn't interested in that I have. I've come to to realize and be able to articulate more on over time. Is that like yeah. I think that there are certain people and God bless them who know exactly what they want to have a friend who from high school. We all knew he was going to be a pediatrician. He's can be fantastic. One and Lo and behold he is now pediatrician like solving Like these rare diseases that affect a very small amount of kids that that no one else knows how to deal with and I am so jealous those people because like wow how how easy must be when you know exactly what you want. And then there's the rest of us who who who don't have a clue as to like what we want to do from a career standpoint and what they teach you early on and what they said Eh. Two things happened when I get to Stanford I one is like that. You have an increase. You've you've been given the gift.

"mba harvard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"My OMO. My OMO is a disrupt my own motion. I liked that. And he said it so eloquently in the intersection of robotics. And technology and healthcare, and ability. And you've never seen that talk about talk about the proprietary manager because we as we watch us on the screen. I have to tell you this. It's looking it looks like I'm looking at, you know, biotic man, or ironman or something out of a science fiction thing. But these guys are mobile there. This guy's working on his car. This other guys picking up a box talk about how, how disruptive this is actually. Well, it's technology very proprietary to us. We have twenty one patents in the United States, and Europe Japan. We're just filed one for China as well. The original ideas came out of MIT several which we have an exclusive licensed tune where the mechanical engineering team. They're sending their devices for cheese who've lost a live. What about the much larger number of people who have to lose it? They can't use them so frustrating, you're look at someone trying to cut their food cook. I do try to open a water bottle a pillbox. It's hard enough to has trying to with one. So this is lightweight robotic device sensors built right in there. They rest, right on the surface of the skin noninvasive. And as you think about trying to move a muscle, for example, your muscle miss, a trace micro voltage called the electromyograms single, and we have that because these individuals with these types of neurological conditions often have an attenuated signal might only be one percents of what able bodied individual has. So they struggle they can't move that on the can open and close at hand to grasp something is a try to do, so we pick. Up that signal on surfaces skin. We've got onboard computer processors proprietary software small Motors that activate the arm and the hand so that you can do these activities of daily living, so pot almost almost amplifies that signal. Your time that traced signal. You're talking about correct? Exactly. And is one users. This is like power steering for my art. Yeah. So, so how did you get there? I mean you, you you've been you've been in engineering for a long time, but how about you know what brought you to this company? I mean, you've, you've had a pretty industrious in pretty impressive career, what gave you the insight to see this. And how did you get there? Well in my career been thirty plus years of launching new technologies from the first cellphone network in the country. Eighteen thirty years ago to launching earn it services company out of the end the company here in Massachusetts early. Invent the internet that two billion dollar company. And then I spent five years, working with noted inventor dean Cayman who started the first robotics competition. This is a worldwide relies competition hundreds of thousands of students hundred thousand mentors from places like NASA. GE IBM and Cisco Google a lot of smaller companies and all idea was yet. These students excited about size engineering, I was the first one my family to go to college went to Northwestern University in Evanston, my undergraduate degree in electrical engineering and computer science later to get an MBA Harvard. And I worked at the first competition as president for five years through that. I met the team from allied see that had developed this technology. They had one at that time was fifty K business plan spun the company out of MIT has an initial capital. They really. Commercialize it. And I like to work on big, new ideas, new technologies, I thought for the next stage of my career concrete paralysis would just be cool to do to help a lot of individuals. That's why I signed on eight years ago, and then so soon became CEO and Shurmur the company, you know what's interesting is when a company I brings on a CEO the first thing that CEO does typically is take a top down approach. They talked to their and they talked to some of their you know, their best customers they trim the fat a little bit. They give an overall talking about efficiencies, when you're walking into something like that, that, that this wasn't a made to order company, you had to have enough vision to realize that you could take across the Golan. What made you think you could do that? It was it was it just the fact that the technology was so disruptive. Well. No factor trim, their four people in the company when I and. It was a big unmet medical need as I said, millions of people worldwide was this browsers nothing for them. This is destructive breakthrough technology. I was blessed to have a team I can recruit join me from engineering teams biomedical engineering software or thanks for sex professionals personally, invested in a business and reached out to other individuals. Family offices, venture capital firm to raise capital and then twenty seventeen after we completed a control deduction proved out the model here. We said, okay, now it's time to really scaled up so we went public on the new York Stock Exchange American in June of two thousand seventeen. Well, I'll tell you, it's, it's, it's a great American success story. Paul Gediminas is his name is the chairman and CEO of meiomi Inc. They are publicly traded, as you just mentioned, the stock symbol, M Y, oh, and you can always go to OMO dot com. Look at some of this great video our radio audience has made a see this stuff, but you can actually walk through Paul. Thank you so much. We're going to have you back. It's.

chairman and CEO MIT CEO OMO OMO dot Massachusetts Europe first robotics competition United States NASA China Paul Gediminas Northwestern University dean Cayman GE Evanston president
"mba harvard" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

07:07 min | 2 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"Author. Killed. Rick publishing now thinking you've you guys are creative. You're doing things you may wanna have audience and get some reaction kill publishing. If you got short stories, you could just tonight, though, publish a book on Amazon, they take twenty four hours to make sure it's not go porn or something. They the passes that are censored it'll be up there tomorrow warning, you know, your your cousin San Francisco bite. So that's that's one path. That's available is aiming what pad. What had okay. Pet dot com is a. It's a publishing platform, and you can serve rate your book in real time and get feedback from people as you're reading chapters. I did this five years ago book, I was reading about the apple watch I came out, and it was pretty cool because I'd sit there, and I read a chapter a hip publish, and then a few people would read it. I get a few responses back saying, hey, that was interesting. But what about this? And there are now I think there's fifty million people who are members what bets huge platform, it's free. And that would be a way wanna gets reacted to something writing. You've just create a walkout. And do it. I don't know if there's an age that. That. This rainfall. I said you can just start writing school paper like all the get feedback sourcing of your favorite pro. On that. Yeah. The other one that I use is more for nonfiction called medium. Everybody have medium dot com. That's it was created by one of the founders of Twitter, and you can write an essay on medium where I love about. It is as you're writing it. It's formatting it. Exactly how the reader will. It's beautiful. Used to call it. What you see is what you get busy week. And as you're writing you're seeing your your piece showing up you don't have to go through to draft, then steps instantly. It's looking just the way to publish this. Pretty cool. The last way to spread which writing to people is kind of simplest one as Email. I know there's a guy who graduate Harvard, and I think what he was Cyril friends school in DC. He was a funny guy. And he would just write this stuff like comments, and he sent it up to like five or ten people, you know, friends family, and they would get it read it bear today's IRS, and he. It gradually just grew and grew and grew and and that was sort of his launching pad for now, he's quite a well known guy in digital media. He was a keynote speaker itself I self west of years ago, and they'll start with him just sending stuff out to a few people on Email. Now, you can do that. If you just have g mail account this mail chimp that I've listed there is a nice Email newsletter creation services free up two thousand people. So if your distribution list is less than two thousand people you have mail chimp set up a distribution for free. It's pretty easy setup. Let's just throw a pot casing interested say you leak on hill college, and you get a job somewhere that isn't in the creative industries your banker or something just you know, you're making a living. But you still have this hope that someday you're gonna write the great American or become a major poet their these low residents MFA programs and instead of going somewhere for two years to get a masters in firearms. You get your generally go for eight or ten days a semester to campus when I went to Bennington, and in between, your your rigors reading list, usually, and you're submitting to rental work to teacher who's an established polar writer, some kind on faculty program. So you have five or six really intense back and forth with teacher go to the campus with all the students you do workshops like what you're doing here. If it's this summer camp for writers for ten days. It's really fun. And then you go through the next period. Of course, they generally cost ten thousand twenty thousand a year you come out. And it's something you could do while you were doing job and very powerful way to again, find your voice, and and really find where you fit in the world letters. By doing something that attentive. The people was your Denison around that. Or was that there fulltime I did the low residents, I repeat I retired job at a gas company west and I did retire from here. I went to her college majoring government to speaker. And then I got an MBA Harvard, and then I worked in journalism. I got a corporate job when I retired from the corporate job at that. Got an MBA harbor about NFA poetry bounce things. And now the NBA benefit. So I can talk to anybody. Great. Thank you hear about some of the way. White journal entry out by wanted to take creative writing and many people say I loved to as young I never time for it more and this can happen again. But you know, the things are passionate about you got. Living in crew yourself. That's very valid. But then to to remember keep the parts of you are possible to bring back in at minus been now he put himself through law school. Building houses. And now he thinks that that's von lay. They wish is building. It's actually kind of trying to transition into that. And he's got a little price on the side makes himself happy to do something creative. And just. Member always take with insurance. Not just one way. Good and successful life. Exactly. Let's I'm going to turn up. Shoot.

Rick publishing Amazon San Francisco Twitter apple graduate Harvard Cyril NBA IRS Bennington NFA Denison White journal DC writer
"mba harvard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"What makes people happy? It's an existential question of one ever existed. Right. Why are we here? What are we trying to accomplish? Don't worry. I don't think that here on this radio show right now, I'm going to be able to solve that. I know there are some host. Well, let me tell you. I know every now I don't actually have all the answers. I have a lot of them. But I don't have all of them. I read this piece though, it was actually it was in the New York Times. I must I must admit I do read the times, I read the enemies publications. Don't think that I leave that undone? But the piece is called wealthy successful and miserable. The future of work wealthy successful and miserable. And it says that the upper echelon by Charles duhig says the upper echelon is hoarding money and privilege to a degree not seen in decades. But that doesn't seem to make them happy at work. And it just goes into a story about a guy who went to Harvard Business School graduated in the early two thousands. When there was a. Sense of just incredible optimism, hyper capitalism in America, so much wealth creation, and if you were on a certain track if you went to these Ivy league schools, and by the way, this is all for those who don't care about any of that stuff. We'll get to this matters for all of us in a moment, but went to these fancy schools, you were on this pathway to extreme wealth and happiness and access and freedom and all these great things. Well, this individuals written this piece, but how he went to his Harvard. MBA Harvard Business School reunion is fifteen th reunion. He just went to it this past summer. And what was so interesting is that here's this group of people who if you were to segment off a cohort of individuals who have just been incredibly lucky to have graduated from Harvard Business School in America in the early two thousand. Thousands. You you are in the one one millionth of one percent of humanity. I mean, you are super lucky. I mean, four all top in terms of the prospects that you have for four wealth for opportunity and just, but what's so interesting and many of you know, where this is going is guess what? Lodder really on happy people in his Harvard Business School class fifteen years later, a lot of people who despite what would be referred to as as privilege by many people on the left these days, despite this what is true privilege going to Harvard Business School and graduating and getting all these big jobs. But there are people that are still miserable. He said that there were people who quote complained about jobs that were unfulfilling tedious or just plain bad one classmate described having to invest five million dollars a day, which didn't sound terrible until he explained that. If you put only four million dollars to work on Monday, he had to scramble the play six million dollars on Tuesday and his co workers were constantly undermining one another in search of the next promotion. It was insanely stressful work done among people. He didn't particularly like he earned about one point two million dollars a year and hated going to the office. I feel like I'm wasting my life. He told me when I die is anyone going to care that I earned an extra percentage point of return. My work feels totally meaningless. He recognized the incredible privilege of pay and status, but his anguish seemed genuine if you spend twelve hours a day doing work. You hate at some point. It doesn't matter. What your paycheck says he told me there's no magic salary at which a bad job becomes good. Now. I think this this probably has probably really resonates with a lot of you listening resonates with me. And I you know is early don't make one point two million dollars a year. But the point is that if you were spending a lot of your time doing something that you that you don't have a passion for you feel as meaningless it ceases to matter. What they're paying for it because this is your life. This is your time. This is what you are doing with yourself time is the one commodity that you cannot get more of and you can never get back. So what do you do every day? This is why I think our society as much as I'm not somebody that goes on, you know, rails against the materialism in American society. It is a problem. It is a problem. I can tell you that I've had jobs. The one of the most fulfilling and fun jobs. I ever had was being a JV soccer coach high school soccer coach for my high school in two thousand and four I was JV soccer coach at Regis high school in New York City. And I think I was paid for the season. I forget it might have been like twelve hundred dollars or something like that. It was in a twelve weeks season. And maybe I maybe it was two grand. I dunno. It was it was a little honorarium. It was not a salary salary. But it was a great gig. I was doing another gig at the council on foreign relations at the time council on foreign relations luminosity the birds, but I was there. And then I did the whole coaching thing and coaching was great. And if I could make a living doing it. I would love to do it. But I I don't think I could have. And I also think that there were limitations on how good a coach I would have been able to I would have been able to become given that I wasn't a college or professional athlete myself unless you count rowing, which is not really you're not really an athlete. You're just a a masochist who wants to ruin ruin your days. But the point about wasting your life. No matter how much money you make. I think that release should matter to people, but it matters to your point you need. They're all these different studies about happiness and about fulfillment. And you need a certain amount of money because I've also been in the position where you don't have money for things you need money for I have been in my late twenties. When I realized I can't do, you know, I can't afford to have a surgery, for example, that a doctor has recommended. I have I I just don't have the money. So I know what that's like that's stressful. You don't want that either. I think most of studies I've seen say that, you know, your your relative happiness and up to fifty or seventy five thousand dollars a year of income in America. It's making seventy instead of sixty that feels good you like that, you know, making sixty instead of fifty, you know, making fifty and so on and so forth, but making one hundred sixty instead of one hundred fifty doesn't really matter much, and once you can imagine you get up into the millions. It really doesn't matter that much people. I mean, it's it's the work is the work. And if you hate what you're doing. And you think it's meaningless you can't get around that. And it was interesting that there's all these people that he goes through in this in this article who have had the most on a resume basis on a looking at their their pathway from an outsider's perspective they've had this incredible run. And they hate it. They hate it. And overall job satisfaction has gone down in the mid nineteen eighties. Gordon's piece sixty one percent of workers said they were satisfied with their jobs since then as of twenty. Ten forty three percent of workers are satisfied. That's a big..

Harvard Business School America Harvard soccer New York Times Charles duhig JV Ivy league schools Lodder Regis high school Gordon New York City two million dollars seventy five thousand dollars Ten forty three percent twelve hundred dollars five million dollars four million dollars six million dollars sixty one percent
"mba harvard" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:08 min | 2 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"So the president is already out there saying come on Democrats put her in charge, again, don't go with somebody weekdays ten to eleven AM and two to three PM on NewsRadio. KLBJ actionable intelligence. Make no mistake. Reindeer gray American again. This is the Buck Sexton show, former CIA analyst, remember. Buck Sexton now. What makes people happy? It's an existential question of one ever existed. Right. Why are we here? What are we trying to college? I don't think that here on this radio show right now, I'm going to be able to solve that. I know there are some hosts you'd be like, well, let me tell you. I know everything now, I don't actually have all the answers. I have a lot of them. But I don't have all of them. I read this piece though, actually it was in the New York Times. I must I must admit I do read the times, I read the enemies publications. Don't think that I leave that on done, but the piece is called wealthy successful and miserable. The future of work wealthy successful and miserable. And it says that the upper echelon is by Charles duhig says the upper echelon is hoarding money and privilege to a degree not seen in decades. But that doesn't seem to make them happy at work. And it just goes into a story about a guy who went to Harvard Business School graduated in the early two thousands. When there was a. Sense of just incredible optimism, hyper capitalism in America, so much wealth creation, and if you were on a certain track if you went to these Ivy league schools, and by the way, this is all for those. You don't care about any of that stuff. We'll get to this matters for all of us in a moment, but went to these fancy schools, you were on this pathway to extreme wealth and happiness and access and freedom and all these great things. Well, this individuals written this piece about how he went to his Harvard. MBA Harvard Business School reunion is fifteen th reunion. He just went to it this past summer. And what was so interesting is that here's this group of people who if you were to segment off a cohort of individuals who have just been incredibly lucky to have graduated from Harvard Business School in America in the early two thousand. Thousands. You are in the one one millionth of one percent of humanity. I mean, you are super lucky I mean for all top in terms of the prospects that you have for four wealth for. Opportunity and just, but what's so interesting and many of you know, where this is going is guess what lottery really on happy people in his Harvard Business School class fifteen years later, a lot of people who despite what would be referred to as as privilege by many people on the left these days, despite this what is true privilege going to Harvard Business School and graduating and getting all these big jobs. But there are people that are still miserable. He said that there were people who quote complained about jobs that were unfulfilling tedious or just plain bad one classmate described having to invest five million dollars a day, which didn't sound terrible until he explained that. If you put only four million dollars to work on Monday, he had to scramble the play six million dollars on Tuesday and his co workers were constantly undermining one another in search of the next promotion. It was insanely stressful work done among people. He didn't particularly like he earned about one point two million dollars a year and hated going to the office. I feel like I'm wasting my life. He told me when I die is anyone going to care that I earned an extra percentage point of return. My work feels totally meaningless. He recognized the incredible privilege of pay and status, but his anguish seemed genuine if you spent twelve hours a day doing work. You hate at some point. It doesn't matter. What your paycheck says he told me there's no magic salary at which a bad job becomes good. Now. I think this probably has probably really resonates with a lot of you listening resonates with me. And I you know is early don't make one point two million dollars a year. But the point is that if you were spending a lot of your time doing something that you that you don't have a passion for you feel as it's it ceases to matter. What they're paying you for it because this is your life. This is your time. This is what you are doing with yourself time is the one commodity that you cannot get more of it. You can never get back. So what do you do every day? This is why I think our society as much as I'm not somebody that goes on rails against materialism in American society. It is a problem. It is a problem. I can tell you that I've had jobs the one of the most fulfilling and fun jobs. I ever had was being a JV soccer coach high school soccer coach for my highschool in two thousand and four. I was j soccer coach at Regis high school in New York City. And I think I was paid for the season. I forget it might have been like twelve hundred dollars or something like that. It was in a twelve week season. And maybe I maybe it was two grand. I dunno. It was it was a little honorarium. It was not a salary salary. But it was a great gig. I was doing another gig at the council on foreign relations at the time and four relations the illuminated Bill Berg's. But I was there. And then I did the whole coaching thing and coaching was great. And if I could make a living doing it, I would love to do it. But I I don't think I could've. And I also think that there were limitations on how good a coach I would have been able to I would have been able to become given that I wasn't a college or professional athlete myself unless you count rowing, which is not really you're not really an athlete. You're just a a masochist who wants to ruin ruin your days. But the point about wasting your life. No matter how much money you make. I think that really should matter to people, but it matters up to a point you need. There are all these different studies about happiness about fulfillment. And you need a certain amount of money because I've also been in the position where you don't have money for things you need money for you know, I have been in my late twenties. When I realized I can't do, you know, I can't afford to have a surgery, for example, that a doctor has recommended. I have I I just don't have the money. So I know what that's like that's stressful. You don't want that either. I think most of the studies have seen say that, you know, your your relative happiness and up to fifty or seventy five thousand dollars a year of income in America. You know, it's making seventy instead of sixty that feels good you like that, you know, making sixty instead of fifty making fifty and so on and so forth, but making one hundred sixty instead of one hundred fifty doesn't really matter much and once you get up into the millions. It really doesn't matter that much to people. I mean, it's the work is the work. And if you hate what you're doing. And you think it's meaningless you can't get around that. And it was interesting that there are all these people that he goes through in this in this article who've had the most on a resume basis on a looking at their their pathway from an outsider's perspective. They've had. This incredible run. And they hate it. They hate it. And overall job satisfaction has gone down in the mid nineteen eighties coordinated peace. Sixty one percent of workers said they were satisfied with their jobs since then as of twenty ten forty three percent of workers are satisfied. That's a big. That's a big drop. Only forty per forty three percent of workers are satisfied less than half. I think that there's a lot that drives this there are there are people that will point you to two different things. You know, they'll they'll point you to how you're always here. He he mentioned some of this article oppressive hours political in fighting the competition created by globalization, the internet, and the always on culture you carry your phone around. They can reach you. You carry your Email around? They can reach you. Right. You've got that going on all the time. Something more mortar this as well though. I think that we are increasingly as a society. People are seeing the financial wherewithal of those around them that they're seeing keeping up with the Joneses thing they see what other people do what they can do. And they think themselves. Why don't I have that? Instead of thinking do I have what I need and what I want. And understanding that your own expectations are the only expectations that really matter for these things, but dissatisfaction even for people who are very financially well off is pervasive. Now, I wanna pause because I want to come back and say, there's some real upside there are two lessons that he gets into in this piece, which I will post on Facebook dot com slash Buck Sexton. So you can all see it. But there are these two lessons that he gets into that. I think will really stick with effort because we're not going to talk anymore about oh the hedge fund manager who says his life is meaningless. But he's worth millions of dollars. You may find that interesting. You may not. But it's just a way of getting into this piece because there are other people who find their lives, really interesting and really have meaning their work lives have meaning in a way that may be surprising to hear probably be inspiring to hear. And then also the people that find work and find their roles that are the right one. For them. There's something very interesting that they all have in common or that many of them have in common, and it's not what you would expect. And I think that will also this article I found this article inspiring not the part, I've told you about so far. But see this is how we do radio. Teases the part when we come back. Stay with me. When you wanna spot that burglar when he's casing your home? Or after he's in asked John who's blink camera alerted him to burgers trying to break in while he and his family were home or Shannon. Who's blink camera? Caught a thief stealing packages both times blink video clips were sent to police to help convict the crooks. Blink motion activated indoor and outdoor cameras are wire free set up in minutes and run onto doubly batteries that lasts up to two years. And.

Harvard Business School Buck Sexton America soccer Harvard New York Times CIA president Bill Berg Charles duhig analyst JV Facebook Ivy league schools New York City John Regis high school Joneses fund manager two million dollars
"mba harvard" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Seriously, I don't understand how that applies to a wide receiver. You know what I'm saying? Like like just about everywhere else. You can make an argument to me about somebody like not fitting your system, but a wide receiver. I've never heard that before. Yeah. I guess not. I mean, okay. Here's the argument. I guess you could make for this doesn't even apply anymore. But I remember like in the nineties, you would always have like a game breaker kind of blown atop of the defense receiver, and then we would have like a possession receiver that government. And you still have that now some, but it seems like most teams just want just explosive guys all over the place. But you could argue that maybe we already have our guy that fits that role. But Oakland can't reasonably argue that. No, no, you make a good point. So like if you're the eagles, and you've got John Jeffrey, right? Let's say magically like a two years ago. Larry FitzGerald, pops up you don't necessarily need to those. Yeah. You know Bolton. And you're gonna get worked out very well. But yes, I can see where you just like, okay. At least that box has been checked Amari Cooper is one of those. I just play wide receiver at my possessors, even on I really deep threat kinda, you know, I'll be out here just catching passes. I it just doesn't make sense doesn't make sense how they could be foolish. And and I feel like it's not even that the the rationale is dumb. Like, there's a more obvious rationale that it's probably more honest is like we got a good offer. What did you say? Like, he's a great great player. But we got a good offer would accept that. Because this is actually a different kind of indictments. I find it. I think gruden's in an interesting spot here with Cooper because Cooper was underachieving there before grooten even showed up, right? Like last year wasn't like Kupa was killing it. So they're saying now, he does not fit the system the question. I've got on that is how much it is actually has to do with Derek Carr and not so much to do with Gruden by the way cars been better the last couple of weeks. But I wonder if Amari Cooper is like, yeah. Now finally got me a quarterback. But even that quarterback Dak Prescott. That's not I think so as far as their caused concern, I think the chapter is closed on him in Oakland or Las Vegas with Jon Gruden it feels to me like Jon Gruden wants to clean house altogether. So I could be jumping the gun a bit. But I don't think that their car is in the future. Obviously that is in the future for the. Cowboys. But I'm not so sure it's going to be smart because right now that is a hell of a value for his meager seventeen touchdowns. They're paying him less than a million dollars a year that is value. That is what allows you to put together type of defense that can stop the saints. Once you have to pay him starting quarterback money like franchise quarterback money. This could be the beginning of the end. And I'm there's a TV on right now in the studio, and I'm looking at the ravens, it's just a coincidence. But you could argue that a similar thing happened after they had to pay Joe flacco. Well, here's the question is time coming for market correction on quarterbacks because like I feel like that Prescott is, you know, the kind of guy that'll make people come up with all kinds reasonable explanations. As to why you don't need to pay him that much money and not by the way. There are good explanations of stories for why you don't need to pay someone so much money. Like, okay, you did little business as the little over business. Bragged already wants to do business thing, and I did a little economic study. So let's think about this for a second this time out about how you don't have to pretend like you respect NBA's. Okay. I don't right. Don't respect. Respect as so at least, you could give me the respect to be honest. And at least if you're gonna get an MBA Harvard. Good one, right? Yes. Absolutely. As ed. I will say you NBA's do take a couple of pretty good classes, you know, they economics. They couple helpful things. And I will say this..

Amari Cooper Jon Gruden Dak Prescott Oakland NBA Larry FitzGerald Derek Carr Kupa John Jeffrey Joe flacco ravens eagles Las Vegas million dollars two years
"mba harvard" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"mba harvard" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Who are the women that i know that just have insane moxie like who who had just has that pluck and that is able to develop something literally out of grit and that's how i think about you that's how i think about new day especially i want you to tell everybody about either earliest beginnings like the very very fancy beginnings of noonday obviously and and where it came from and how it started while after getting my designed agree at par sends and moving on to get my mba harvard and then getting a fifty thousand dollars investment for my parents i was able to watch need that you know it off it not true it none of not true majored in latin american studies at yet and went on to do development work and debtladen hats you pennies to rub together when i started a collection sell it i had a history of being exposed to poverty and in sort of wanting to be part of the solution to the injustices that are in the world and knowing that i came from a broke place at privilege and how could i use that privileged to create privilege for other people an opportunity for other people but it wasn't until i was really cornered and i mean literally fell i got cornered re that i actually at kinda use that grit that was in need to to do something about it in a way that that matched by gifts and my personality.

latin american fifty thousand dollars