4 Burst results for "masterworks masterworks"

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

02:35 min | 10 months ago

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"Did it? Through masterworks. masterworks is the first company that provides a way for retail and accredited investors to participate in the market for multi million dollar blue chip paintings. With with masterworks. You can purchase a securitized interest in a piece of fine art that has been selected by masterworks team of art experts. Their team has over seventy seventy five years of art collecting experience and a proven track record of purchasing blue-chip art below fair market value through auction guarantee strategies. An I an established auction house relationships masterworks recently closed on pieces. By Andy Warhol and banksie their current offering is the painting. Think like Claude Monet. Her me this painting is a long-term non income producing asset in my perfecto. Success depends on others paying more more for the art piece down the road. It's a diversified. Return driver for me. You can learn more about art investing and masterworks at masterworks dot. I oh Sam Alexander point out. Some of the tools and throws life includes books stationery a lamp his flute. Route hand lenses a wheelbarrow. These are things that helped him achieve his purpose in life but they can also has Alexander points out can be used unwisely or excessively throw says men have become the tools of their tools. What we can spend money on tools things things that help with their self development areas that were curious about we WANNA learn how to do Frederick grow in his book of Philosophy walking share with us how to decide that and he talked about the difference? Between pleasure enjoy we're pleasure he says is a matter matter of encountering so we get a positive feeling as we encounter some element. We eat something we experienced something. It's an agreeable able sensation. That's perfectly fine but it's different from joy which he says is an activity is something that we do over time. We repeat heated and by doing that. Were enriched the Manu that made hammocks in Yucatan he and his wife were we're joyful because they had craft and they were really really good at it. I had this experience just yesterday. My book money for the rest of US ten questions to master successful investing is finally.

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on Dude Soup

Dude Soup

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on Dude Soup

"A sent on line like that's why i'll feel like all the names of wiser all over albert or whatever that's fine but this they actually give you kind of context text as best as you can without using your sense of smell 'em and then a best of all you could then try them out see how they're working their own life a slur world class perfumers which i didn't even know even think about being a job is a job are sent sent artists in these perfumes are there masterworks masterworks joel you could appreciate that you've been to a museum 'em also every floor send is gender free the way all sense should be 'em flirt is completely transparent a it's a completely transparent fragrance company they tell you every ingredient that's in all of their perfumes a an why it's there which is important to bruce you've tried you've tried some i got a quote here from you'd have permission to hit it's hard to describe but heck cat which is the name of flare professor the name of wisconsin's off really is that what you picked it c m is like that cologne you're cool uncle would put on before peeling out on his motorcycle into the sons i'm not saying on i'm not saying i'm the cool uncle that's what it smells like okay at least you also have a quote here yeah a year that you said that hummy is soft subdued end refreshing i also appreciate that it smells like a cool uncle as he did a test i am yes love and not testify on another good thing i've adam were here he'd tell us about gray lock which is like taking a road trip up the california coast which is cool uncle photons saying kid 'em either more then just smells caesar since these things that kind of fill out your character whatever you wanna do is make yourself feel more confident getting out there and make making a good impression so go to flirt dot com today and use promo code dude soup to get twenty percent off your first customer for example set pick.

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"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Industry and train them on the internet or wouldn't you hiring a developer hire you know an engineer who news see from some other industries that wasn't Internet related and like train them. You know some that don't think anything existed then <hes> but you know trying them on <hes> whatever programming printed up stuff like it was every single person you you hired your training so I think this is a business as a culture we were we were always learning mode when you're in the learning mode where you just <unk> storing things in your brain or was more systematical taking notes any anything along those lines so yeah I mean a lot of it was <hes> I guess US coming up with Russ developing what we thought were best practices than making making sure those best practices were followed within the company so for example at at that business in particular <hes> and this was before a lot of companies talked about this and they were doing it but we sort of came up with core values <hes> and then we would would rank everyone based on this core values and we we use that a lot influence how he thought about hiring people on how he thought about turning over people and you know again for better or worse at that point in time it just it was it was hiring people was so so unpredictable because people didn't have the skill sad you know there's no experience track record really measure them on so you would hire them see if they worked it didn't it was really important to move them out fast <hes> so we did try to we did try to develop dollop a lot of frameworks in terms of had think about different things systematically <hes> overtime with hiring you mentioned how unpredictable was not really knowing how an employee was going to execute. was there anything you actually were looking four in them. When I said that was actually thinking ahead what were those four values and I think they were Manhattan? I have recalled this year's but I think I think they were execution. Were quality teamwork. I'm spacing the last one <hes> there's a fourth but they were relatively general but I you know we developed that framework and then we we would rank people by that and we would try to increase productivity talking about how they were those those four categories <hes> even like today I think about it. Now I think about that filter through just people I work with and I think it's a I do think it's a good filter and either frameworks works that you're still using today. It could even be for yourself. How how you assess new problems how you assess new businesses things along those lines yeah again that that's a good question? I you know I would say that early. An early in my career focused very heavily on execution right productivity <hes> getting things done <hes> and and that was my partner because I think as my career's evolved <hes> I've focused more. We're on strategy meaning. It doesn't matter how well executed for doing the wrong thing and I think a lot of entrepreneurs get pigeonholed into a certain concept or business strategy. That isn't good to begin with a threat like Tam total available market is small or you know it's not differentiated or trying to solving a problem and they just execute focus on execution only in the bigger picture so I think today when I when I think about value creation and start apps I tend to think more about what is the strategy radical. What are we doing? What is available market size is a differentiated <hes> all of those things more of a a very technical Nicholson's like Michael Porter five forces framework <hes> but in general sense just like every single day or we are? We doing the right thing. We're spending time and energy in the right problem. You mentioned Michael Porter few minutes ago. You mentioned books. Eh you've gone back to over the years I mean the the one book that I still think is is really spot on and it's been very influential to me is actually Puertas five forces <hes> you know masterworks as a very very young business still can put other businesses the pad but you know every every other business still to this day does annual what we call five forces reviews where we <hes> talk about the different forces and how how were <hes> I guess differentiating or or avoiding things like new entrance <hes> or or particular risks to businesses over time and again. That's just that's part of the learning that I think what you're doing <hes> what problem you're solving is more important than higher solving it. I'm thinking about how'd you manage ego when you're seventeen years old and have seventy -ployees oh I think you can't have I fundamentally believe that is an entrepreneur or even a C._e._o.. You really can't have you go. It's counterproductive not productive right. It's kind of teamwork. It's counterproductive from leadership perspective. <hes> you know I think I I mean it's simple stuff right but every business I've had sitting in a sitting in whatever and opened office area with every employee the have relationships with every employee I definitely knows he does that run businesses and very AMIS Senate or self centered ways but I don't think there's culture is really scale. Where'd you get those values instilled in you? I don't I don't know oh I think that's maybe just more of a <hes> kind of rational pragmatic approach to running a business or solving the I. I don't know how to think about that. I just to me like if you you know if you think about whatever business like masterworks where AH fundamentally we're trying to take a class we think is very large very interesting and make it available to anyone to invest in like that's the problem we're trying to solve and that's what we're focused on. Whether whatever I have a big corner office. It just doesn't help solve that problem. I don't really think about I guess you go. That sounds got you know I just I just wanted some some clarity to your framework and how you go about things because I think plenty of people listening right now could say that would have been really easy for you have gotten caught up in that early early success and not be able to replicate that so you mentioned masterworks. Let's let's dive into masterworks your newest venture what is masterworks masterworks as with the first platform that allows anyone to invest in multimillion dollar blue chip paintings <hes> so if you take a step back and think about the the art market today we think the market is one of the most interesting asset classes which historically has only been available to ultra wealthy people to invest then so in nineteen sixty eight billion dollars. We'll sell <hes> between <hes> I guess really around the world between kind of ultra high net worth collectors that that have been collecting for a long time <hes> <hes> if you look at the asset class for the past twenty years it's it's outperformed the S. and P. on its own correllated which means that when markets go up or markets could stockmarket goes up stock market's down. It doesn't necessarily follow the stock market get so it's it's really interesting outperforming uncoordinated asset class but the only way you can best in it is if you have several ninety dollars to buy painting <hes> so we're we're trying to change that by purchasing these great works of Art <hes> filing them with the yes you see that allowing anyone to buy shares for twenty dollars a share in is different paintings yet you mentioned the great works. I know you guys have an Andy Warhol one of his famous <hes> pieces of Marilyn Monroe that's available. I know you guys have as well. Where's your initial interest in art come from He? I get that question a lot. I I think my initial interest in our came from my mom <hes> who was this sort of like doing sketches and drawing and like amateur painter house all the time to Kinda grew up without a little bit <hes> the are mark is very different win when I first started collecting so I I I would say after the first business that we talked about <hes> then you know now. masterworks is my my my ninth business. <hes> after the after the first business I SORTA had this interest in in the market and part of it was because has it fell <hes> exclusive and inaccessible <hes> and I liked Eddie of kind of collecting slash investing in these different objects <hes> but it was a very different market back then I mean in two thousand. thousand the market was radically different than than today just in terms of the number participants how big of a market how deep market the amount of liquidity excetera had so you know i think i i would describe it sort of me dabbling with it back back then and then becoming increasingly more interested year after year through through today do you remember the first piece you purchased i have i have this <hes> i had this blog post which <hes> people in the art will laugh about <hes> where i talk about all these mistakes i made collecting and one of the mistakes <hes> that you learn as a collector is that the the best examples <hes> by the best artist tend into appreciate the fastest but <hes> be examples or see examples by artist <hes> often often don't even if it's great artists so for example picasso made i think fifty five thousand objects in his lifetime <hes> the vast majority of which ninety five percent of which we'll we'll never appreciate even other picasso so when i was <hes> those nineteen or twenty i bought <hes> one of the largest collections picasso ceramics <hes> which their distance ceramics you've ceramic is it's like two to two hundred two hundred or something so bone allergic collection because the ceramics from one of his neighbors and france that there was and <hes> care like hundred something ceramics <hes> and how does her i'll just for a long time and ultimately donated them for for what for what i paid <hes> but that was that was the the learning experience there you learn you move on interested outside of masterworks when you're assessing a piece of crete art what are you looking for well and i'm assuming you're you're talking about from an investment perspective correct yeah from an investment perspective we're generally looking at three things a third of which is a little bit of a catchall bucket but the first thing is fair market value you would have we think the value of the object is compared to what is being sold for <hes> second appreciation read what does the historical appreciation right for the object and even if it object has not sold publicly in the past we can sort sort of determined appreciation rate by looking at comparable works <hes> that have sold and then the third thing which is more qualitative is how do we how significant or how important do we think that work but that artist is <hes> in art history and how do we think that particular work by that particular artist will be qualitatively assessed in the future and the you know that third bucket is is a harder one because it is more with an art market specific <hes> knowledge that but that's also at least personally we're we're i've had some of <hes> some of my greatest returns is just buying the best example by who at the time is is is very important artists aren't history but is not an artisan the marquette and then seeing the art market eventually catch up with that and he greet returns he'd like to bring up here yeah you know i i don't talk about on public is so much but i but i do have a few in <hes> <hes> in in blog posts i mean i you know i mean i've bought paintings for <hes> i think there was a there's a declining i talked about repurchase for eight or nine million dollars and sold it a couple of years later for fourteen million dollars <hes> <hes> there was a which i don't think i've talked about purchase for four hundred thousand dollars later sold for six million dollars <hes> turns can be pretty pretty incredible <hes> in the market at dun-rite not a bad day at the office you're mentioning how you initially became interested in our i.

Michael Porter Manhattan Russ developer Andy Warhol engineer Marilyn Monroe Tam partner Nicholson nineteen sixty eight billion d four hundred thousand dollars fourteen million dollars nine million dollars ninety five percent six million dollars seventeen years ninety dollars twenty dollars
"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"masterworks masterworks" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"They got got. You got to bear with Sean Delaney with Sean. The Lady Lady Got Sean Delaney. Scotland is the founder of masterworks masterworks is an investing platforms for the first time ever investors can purchase and trade shares in multi million dollar works of art by Artists Like Picasso Monet and Warhol Scott's entrepreneurship journey started when he was just fifteen where he built what became the most popular game on the Internet during the dotcom boom he didn't stop there and founded multiple companies and knows what it takes to build a business this episode dive steep on his frameworks and what he does to see the the white space where others don't hey guys. I wanted to tell you about the brand. I'm obsessed with right now and you guys know. I'm pretty obsessive about the brands I work with especially when it comes to athletic apparel. You guys need to check out ten thousand you. You need to head to ten thousand dot C._C.. And you guys can enter code W._G.. Y. T. and you're gonNA receive twenty percent. Yes twenty percent off your entire order. Why do I love ten thousand ten thousand created the only training shorts? What's you'll ever need? They do so by simplifying your options deliver three premium shorts that perfectly cover all the ways you train. They have one built for versatility another for durability and one super lightweight perfect for one of those runs or whatever else you do for fitness no matter what you do they have you covered cross fit running spin yoga lifting or your weakened in venture. It doesn't matter what you do for fitness. They have a short for every way you train..

Sean Delaney Warhol Scott masterworks masterworks Scotland founder Y. T. twenty percent million dollar