36 Burst results for "managing director"

New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

Talking Automotive

02:08 min | 16 hrs ago

New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

"He's talking to beautiful young. The managing director said some in south africa. He has done extensive research into the whole agency. Model and peter. Thanks very much for joining us and agreeing to shay some of the things you have found out in terms of what's happened in south africa. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much john. Thank you very much markets and met. Somebody came to ask you a question before we jump into the agency saw just to put some perspective. Ray what you do in south africa. You run a successful automotive talk show. Can you tell us about the show. Yep so the cost sharing. It's one of its a win by that. We lost in action. You win cosstalk harbach downs again. Where we wanted to do was my body. Crops on scouts is on the shine actually for the producer the archives and what they wanted to renew isues be attached customs. I joined the shine after being an oxygen and so we provided some industry insights to That slides or missing funds usually watching the chart and somebody transitions consumer price. And there's immediately on to the point that we've mentioned to keys onslaught we had We will have one of the modules insurance needs king postures and we recently got a new sponsor sponsors are climbing pixel part someone all very happy z. Aggressive bras but not the whole new at seventy. It's much easier for us to shoot so many batches then and office another boss to us. So we're having a lotta pita

South Africa Cosstalk Harbach Peter RAY John
Fresh "managing director" from Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:34 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh "managing director" from Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"Paycheck protection program is an effort to help small businesses whether the cove in 19 pandemic relief laws altered and expanded the program. But not all small businesses are eligible. More than 30 Strip clubs. One a District court now to strike down the paycheck Protection program rules that blocked them from getting coronavirus aid funds led by Camelot Banquet rooms, Gentlemen's Club based in Milwaukee. The businesses are you that the small business administration rules barring them from receiving the loans improperly and unconstitutionally limit benefits to businesses and workers. Unquestionably engaged in First Amendment protected activities. The businesses argue that we'll have to shut down without the P P p support because they like the funding staff and protections needed to operate. And that's the Bloomberg Small Business report. How our financial services firms managing in this new reality, Claire Sutton, yellow managing director Bien Y. Melons, Persian explains. It's the current times have taught us anything. It's a critical role that technology plays in client relationship. Global conditions have created a business imperative for firms additionally, transformed the way they meet client needs and the way they work Persons industry Leading technology.

Claire Sutton Milwaukee Bien Y. Melons More Than 30 Strip Clubs Gentlemen's Club Camelot Banquet ONE Small Business 19 Pandemic Relief Laws Bloomberg Protection Program Paycheck Protection Paycheck First Amendment Persian
A Focus on The Client's Cloud Experience

Status Go

03:49 min | 3 weeks ago

A Focus on The Client's Cloud Experience

"Welcome back to status. Go in our continuing series of discussions on your cloud journey in this series. We not only talk with industry experts. We also talked to technology professionals who are on their cloud journey. Today's guest has a unique perspective on the cloud having been on both sides of the desk as a sales professional he is sold cloud and cloud solutions now as the managing director for money tree software. He has experienced. Cloud journey firsthand. I am honored to introduce a colleague. A mentor and a friend pat spencer. Welcome to the show pat. Jeff thanks a lot it's It's really a pleasure to be here. Great talking with you and look forward to our discussion today so before we dive into your cloud journey. I'd like you to share your background and some about the unique perspective that you bring to our conversation today. That sounds good as you know. It is varied so hopefully the audience will be able to follow but i actually started my career in banking graduated from ball state university and for the next ten years. Really dedicate myself to banking with an emphasis on commercial banking working with businesses on basically how to finance and manages our companies as appropriate But that led to a desire to move into technology because of some companies. I really became good friends with at the end of the day. So i left banking one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and went to work for local indianapolis software company called baker hill which ironically sold software to banks Which was a good entry through me to continue my my professional sales career but also step into the world of technology and so i spent a few years with them. We were acquired by a company called experience. You may have heard of them and stayed with them for about another five years. But then i started to get a little itchy if you will to do something kind of crazy and so i actually went and worked in indycar motor sports for a couple of years. Were very fortunate enough to be executive vice president of operations for panther racing. I say that because our sponsor was the national guard in just the spent a couple of years working with the minimum of the national guard was just such a privilege. It was so far from what i was doing that. It was just a one and refreshing but yet just a little bit of a payback to our men and women of the armed of the armed services but from there. I really did not like being away from home. One hundred eighty two hundred days a year to get back into technology. Did so an. And that's actually wearing you. And i met you were at cio of goodwill. And i was your lackey. Sales rep for a couple of years. Our lacking sales but worked at another local company called blue lock where we focused on infrastructure as a service disaster recovery as a service in obviously eventually was acquired in work there for about six years which actually then led me to where i'm at today in. That is the managing director of money tree. Managing a saz company infants ac and we are owned by accu chek in other indian owned company that provides trust accounting software and i basically manage the business unit For money tree underneath accu. Chek

Pat Spencer Baker Hill Ball State University PAT National Guard Jeff Indianapolis Blue Lock Accu Chek
Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:56 min | Last month

Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

"The managing director equity initiatives for koya partners melissa is responsible for ensuring that quiz commitment to diversity equity and inclusion is infused into every aspect of the firms work with clients candidates staff in leading this work. Melissa applies experience as search leader for numerous organizations as well as for background in social work in staff development prior to this role melissa served as managing director equity executive search with partners primarily focusing on identifying senior leaders for social justice organizations melissa lead or co-lead executive searches for organizations including innocence project diaz community changed foundation for justice society move on southern poverty law center and hentrich martin institute though her earlier nonprofit through her earlier nonprofit work melissa developed a deep understanding of variety of nonprofit roles and organization cultures prior to joining coy in twenty fifteen. She held positions with unicef. Usa safe horizon and cities of service. She also served as a founding core member and program manager with city year. New york melissa serves on the advisory council of equity in the center a national initiative dedicated to creating a more diverse equitable social sector talent pipeline. She actively volunteers time to provide coaching and mentorship to leaders of color and members of the lgbtq plus community. Melissa holds a masters of social work from the school social policy and practice at the university of pennsylvania and she earned her b a human services and theater performance from northeastern university. Well listen thank you very much for joining us and sharing your insights today. Thanks so much for having me john. It's great to be with you. So folks are drew bio and is one of the things. I just love about people in search. There doesn't seem to be. Maybe there's a degree in it but i very infrequently talked to someone who has such a thing my friend. Derek clarke failed. Who from dri who also been a podcast. Guest runs another search firm. She's an ordained. Rabbi every search leader seems to have this kind of wacky wildly diverse backgrounds. So how did your professional path leader to search. Please don't leave out. How cedar performance visit scrape up. Dick place for the start and especially i love. Dr and i agree similar to her and said lord is so many people in search we. You know it's it's things that line us up for this work even though we have no idea and then all of the sudden one day it's the only thing that we can do and so funny thing. It's actually a funny thing. Because i don't i mean maybe there are lots of other professional You know sort of professional career paths. That are like that. But this one seems uniquely wacky in that way definitely definitely and i think it's people think about what their superpowers might superpower. I rarely the smartest person in room. Sometimes the most interesting but what. My superpower is figuring out who the smartest in who are the most interesting people aren't any room and then introducing them to each other and just so you just shared my bio. I've had the chance to be in so many different types of organizations then community based work and national work in global work and in different parts of the organizations mostly in development but also on the program side in operations i. I'm social worker by training as you said i've got this theater background. Which is an interesting and so when it gets down to it. I love talking to people. I loved networking. I love having genuine and authentic relationships and seeing how i can be a resource folks and i was extremely extremely lucky and fortunate when i was at you at nsf usa to have Onondaga as my leader. When i was there and he was a believer. Not you know him. Joan of stu. He believed in creating ten percent of everyone on his team's time to carve out for them to do other work something. That benefited the organization. In some other. Way wow yeah. And and that's unusual. Especially considering he was leading development team and so what we found was that i love recruiting. And i liked going out and talking to people and letting them get to know unicef usa and in so. I was having a great time doing that. But it wasn't. My core job is really a fundraiser. And it was just threw a perfect stroke of fate that i was introduced to katy baton. Who's the founder of partners and she talked to me about what her vision was the work that clay was doing. She talked to me about her values and just as she talked to me about. I had no idea what an enormous sector the search field is and how many variations exist of nonprofit search professionals. But i i just decided that this is what i needed to do

Melissa Koya Partners Melissa Lead Or Co Diaz Community Changed Foundat Hentrich Martin Institute Council Of Equity Derek Clarke Southern Poverty Law Center Unicef Northeastern University USA University Of Pennsylvania DRI Rabbi New York Dick John Onondaga NSF
Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:51 min | Last month

Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

"Our guest today is dr tim persons. Who is the chief scientist. Managing director of the science technology assessment and analytics team at the us government accountability office also known as the gao. So hi tim. Thanks so much for joining us today. I kathleen Me on it's great to be with you. And ron once again. Yeah we are so excited to have you with us today for folks that have been following us. Tim was also are september. Twenty twenty speaker at our ai in government event and he was one of the keynotes at machine learning life cycle conference so we will link to both of those in the show notes in case you would like to watch them in more detail. But i wanna start this podcast today in case folks don't know you To help you spend some time introducing yourself to our lists and tell them a little bit about your background in. Yes so happy to do that. So as you said in your introduction. I am the chief scientist of the gao. Where the largest of the congressional or the legislative branch agencies in the us government and we have a staff about Thirty two hundred Maybe a little bit more in terms of Full time equivalents there but our main role is to to be the oversight or also called the congressional watchdogs by the way For the us congress. So we're Known as the auditors. We have a lot of access the federal information and so on across a wide array of departments and agencies and so on an issues which actually makes it ideal the tien have conversations about a i And so that's what i've been doing with. Gao since two thousand eight but also recently. We stood up a new team. It's geos newest. Team is called the science technology assessment in analytics team and that's significant because Especially for ai. Because the second a and that's as analytics and a is really a statistical analytics and decision sciences with respect to a machine so i work across the whole. Federal government supporting. Gao and lead a team. That does a lot of oversight insight and foresight work in the science and technology area. Especially so that's a little bit of the background For today thank you you know. I think that's really interesting. Because people the average person here in the united states but probably worldwide does not really understand the mechanism by which large governments or even small governments work and these levels of oversight and trying to understand if the dollars that they're spending taxpayers or getting applied and appropriated properly and used to the value that that they're supposed to so. It's a really interesting place to be. And of course this is an ai. Podcast we're going to talk about how. Ai connects to all of that right. And i think that's one of the the interesting questions we have for you. Maybe i just looking at more broadly. I know we'll a little bit more deeper into a. Is it relates specifically to oversight but i think just certain at a at a broad brush from where you said looking across the government may be looking seeing how other agencies are using technology and using tax dollars. You know how do you what do you see as some of these interesting opportunities interesting. Applications unique opportunities that the public sector maybe in general not even just in the us has around using artificial intelligence. Yeah great question ron. We could spend now until the rest of the year talking about that one. That's that's a broad Very good question of course Happy to be too brief on that. But i think Really what a is bringing here is Really just the framework of thinking about The future of government. I think the future is in one sense the now and they're still part of the public sector of the not yet and i really do think that what is is bringing out particularly especially as we sit in the middle still of our pandemic that we hope will end soon. But really i think about the government roles of enhancing both capabilities and services. So i think those are the two key things to start a conversation with. Ai about capabilities and services and the reason. I say that because there's so much of the government that has changed over the last century When you think about it It really so much of the mission now is really a service or thing We also think about. Of course the what. I'll call the more tactile government that we we can see kinda we could feel we it's You know this is ranging from law enforcement to the military to One of the most beloved institutions are The us park service. Like whenever we go to one of america's many great parks you know we see the government in that way and yet in this day and age especially in the digital age us so much is about doing services. How do we get those Stimulus checks out in a time of economic distress. And how do we do that reliably so that. It's not wasting taxpayer dollars. It's not a fraudulent That were wise with the. You know the national fisk and things like that and so i think Really the way to think about a is starting with those sort of two things The services in that that That ladder sense of what i was talking about in this sort of their capabilities. Which is really where you wanna be with respect to law enforcement or military or other things and you want our capabilities to be more resilient. More robust into out compete Any potential Challenging nation state say to national security so those That's that's just the the the way i strongly advise doing that If only to ground the conversation. I and what does it return to do and accomplish. How do we best express our national values and And not start initially technology which i fear often begins with sort of a fear narrative right the idea of has been around for over a century. Here you know robots and things like that and it runs and jumps To the loss of control fear that we have the fear of the unknown fear the robots gonna take over our lives etc. That kind of thing. Which i i. Don't think at the end of things with a clear. Eyed look in with a cautious optimism. I think is is much more of the order of the day for this technology.

Federal Government Dr Tim Science Technology Assessment GAO RON America Kathleen TIM Us Park Service Congress
Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

Let's Talk About Digital Identity

04:09 min | Last month

Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

"Hi roland oscar. Nice looking with you on and really happy to hear what is going on in germany in terms of identity in or ever seen related to that and happy to know more about very me very baheren hearing berry meal ready for the last year. San diego need to hear more details. What are the are building offering today so. Please tell us your journey how. You became the managing director very me. Yeah thanks you can. The many thanks for the invitation. Let's here and talk to you a little bit about the markets in germany. So yeah what was my journey becoming managing director of very me. Actually my journey professional. Johnny started twenty five years ago. When i started my career in consulting. Then some stations cashed out which is a department store group. And then i founded multi-platinum loyalty scheme together with start at telecom and from there. I moved to payback. Which actually is janis leading multi partner loyalty scheme. They are quite some markets worldwide than india mexico italy. Us and from all the travel. I got introduced to lose tons of course and became the ceo of lufthansa mice and more during that time. Actually i realized that the future is more. And more about seamless customer experience. Because if you look at lofton's in many cases the real loyalty benefits that you can get there. They actually translate into a real seamless customer. Experience that you get you look at all the tracks for security and immigration priority boarding presort seating in the plane actually the customers tend to reward benefits in their experience much more then any loyalty currency and so at the moment where then lufthansa invested into very me idea for me. It was very clear that this would be an exciting next step for me personally. So i decided to switch over to meet to be the ceo of me and push forward at digital identity to provide seamless customer experience for the users and i can induce that lufthansa is one of the funders organization behind very me. But let's more place for the ones who are not familiar with very still bear me does. In fact lufthansa there's actually one of the investors and we have altogether thirty very large companies in germany that invested into the very idea and a lot smaller companies are really known brand. Names such as liens deutsche. Bahn dot eubanks lufthansa dodger taylor com dime la some song fox button so all very large companies that invested into very me to establish of wallet of digital identities so that was the driving force and i think when we will talk about the market later on we will see that it was a very good moment to invest into such platform because the market urgently requires the platform and there's pretty much empty space currently in germany. And what we provide as bury me as this one click digital experience for very fight identification was in a pop. Misuse cases and at the core of it on is an identity platform. Of course that matches all the regulatory requirements for our anti money laundering or either substantial. And this comes along with the solution for strong customer syndication because the critical part of such a platform is not the identification of customer itself. Actually the critical part is the reuse. And that means the access to the digital identity

Lufthansa Roland Oscar Germany Janis Berry Lofton San Diego Johnny Italy Mexico India Deutsche United States LA
At least 15 killed in collision between semitruck and SUV

Rush Limbaugh

00:36 sec | Last month

At least 15 killed in collision between semitruck and SUV

"Center, just confirming at least 15 people dead after an SUV packed with people collided with a truck in the southern city of imperial less than 20 miles north of the Mexican border. Judy Cruises, managing director of the E. R nearby El Centro Regional Medical Center, and believe there was 27 Passengers in this SUV that struck US semi truck full of gravel. 14 were dead on the scene. Another died at a hospital. Meantime, Border Patrol officials tell Fox News there on the scene to assist but we're not involved in the accident and we're not in pursuit of that vehicle. The

Judy Cruises E. R Nearby El Centro Regional Border Patrol Fox News United States
Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

The World

01:36 min | Last month

Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

"A lot of work to do. So I feel ready to go motivating words today from the new head of the World Trade Organization, the arrival of an go Z or condo, a whale A and a six month leadership void at the W T o International body based in Geneva, governs trade rules between countries. Okonjo you wail. His candidacy had been held up by the Trump White House on her first day. She's making history as the first woman and first African to serve as w. T O director general absolutely do feel on additional burden. I can't lie about that being the first woman and the first African means that one really has to perform. That was a con job away. The last month. She's a Harvard grad on economist and dual citizen of the U. S. And Nigeria with a 30 year career in international development, including Time is managing director at the World Bank. Biden administration announced its strong support for a condo you, Ella. Still, there was controversy. Senior African leaders of the United Nations recently complained about what they called racist and sexist media coverage of her appointment. For her part to conjure you. Ella has said that she remains focused on making the changes needed at the W T O. It's led to me that deep and wide ranging reforms are needed. And as I said, before, you cannot be business, as usual at the W. T O in her first speech is head of the W T o today and go Z and conjure you. Ella reiterated that point she said she can on Lee deliver results if members except that we can do things differently. Most urgent priority, she said, or to address the impact of the cove in 19 pandemic and climate change

Okonjo Trump White House World Trade Organization Biden Administration Geneva U. Harvard Nigeria World Bank Ella United Nations LEE
This Is How the World Ended up with a Shortage of Semiconductors

Odd Lots

04:32 min | Last month

This Is How the World Ended up with a Shortage of Semiconductors

"Show tracy long time ago now feels like we had the joke about. Should we just turn this into a semiconductor podcast. Yes and you've you've really run with that joke okay. The thing is is he can't escape it like we keep things like know we liked. I started talking about is like this is like an interesting topic for us but it turns out little. Did we know when we first started covering this story on the podcast which i was last october last november that actually it would blow up into this huge issue. Semi conductor manufacturing became like essentially. Nash topic of national news. Far outside the sort of like the niche audience right. Semiconductors secretly rule. All our lives. And i'm i'm joking. Obviously but nowadays everything is so high tech that there are a lot of appliances that you wouldn't necessarily think of that have chips in them So smartphones computers things like that obviously but also lots of cars And i saw one headline float by. I haven't had a chance to read it yet but something about aluminum producer's warning of downturn So chips are everywhere. And i think were really starting to realize how important they are and also how important chipmakers are of course as we've been discussing there's a limited number of Right so anyone who sort of listened to our series. We started talking about the decline of intel. We talked about why. Us manufacturing in general is sort of Gone away and we talked of course about the dominant role of taiwan semi. And it's like almost like again. It was not intentional. But now there's like this huge thing and everyone is waking up to how dependent we all are on taiwan semiconductor and a few other major Fabs and it's a it's become a legit. Us national security question. We know the biden administration is looking at it and you know looking at different ways to reduce us dependent so we really can't get away from the story and obviously we're going to be talking about it again today and i bet it won't even be the last time we talk about it. Thank you might be right on that one. So i'm really excited because actually we're going to be Going back to our very first guest to Gave us sort of great overview. Some of the best Clear english descriptions of the challenges of chip manufacturing and it was the first one everyone should go back. And listen to that one. Then talking about the decline of intel. But we're going to zoom out a little bit and look at the acute that the world is facing right now. Why are so many companies struggling with their ability to source chips and then the longer term issue of this is scarce capacity is scarce and even if we get through this current phase there is going to be still this sort of perhaps a dangerous over reliance on a few manufacturers that our capacity limited so a very excited. We're going to be speaking again. Second time on the show. Stacey raskin his managing director senior analyst. Use semiconductors at bruce dean research Stacey thank you so much for coming back on lot at stake. Tastic be back. Thank you for having again. What's it like you know. You're like a star now. Because one point semiconductors were just like this thing that maybe investors mostly cared about but it really does feel like an you know. Correct me if i'm wrong but it really does feel like in the last few months. Everybody is now obsessed with this story. I think i may have mentioned this last time. I was on but i. There's one reason. I love this space. It's literally ground zero for everything that's been going on. And it's it's you know it's not just the last few months the trade and that briar s and then the the the burgeoning geopolitics and now obviously the shortages. And everything else like. It's and you remember. I mean like the global electronic like enterprise. I mean it's like a four or five trillion dollar industry worldwide. If you add up all the pc's and and and and all of the consumer electronics and then all the services and software and everything that goes with it trillions and trillions of dollars in it all rests on semiconductors semi's or the fundament of all of that like we don't have any of that without semiconductors and so i think it's a phenomenal place to to spend time and it's job security for me so that's yeah that's that's the most important

Biden Administration Taiwan Intel Tracy Nash Stacey Raskin Bruce Dean Research Stacey United States
Facebook Calls Australia's Bluff

Techmeme Ride Home

02:23 min | Last month

Facebook Calls Australia's Bluff

"I don't know if you remember that story about that. Australian law where they were going to make tech platforms pay money to publishers. If they even linked to content from an australian publisher. You might recall that. Google said that it would consider completely going dark in australia. If the law came into force you might recall that. I didn't really have an opinion on that. But i kind of wanted both sides to call each other's left just to see what would happen if google went dark and a whole country. Meanwhile facebook was making similar noises about blocking news items in the news feed. It's been one of those rolling stories where every day there was seemingly another new wrinkle to it and a new headline so i have been skipping talking about it because it was always just so incremental until now that is ahead of this proposed law which again has not been passed yet. Facebook has preemptively band. Australians from being reviewing news and all users from sharing and viewing news on news pages quoting the associated press australian. Publishers can continue to publish news. Content on facebook but links and post can't be viewed or shared by australian audiences. The us space company said in a statement. Australian users cannot share content from domestic or international news sources while international users outside. Australia cannot share news from australian sources quote. The proposed law fundamentally misunderstands the relationship between our platform and publishers. Who use it to share news content facebook's regional managing director william eastern said. It has left us facing a stark choice. Attempt to comply with the law. That ignores the realities of this relationship or stop allowing news content on our services in australia. With a heavy heart we are choosing the latter and quote so much hilarity than ensued. Because after facebook brought the band down in its algorithm systems. Facebook ended up banning. Its own facebook page on facebook in australia because it in fact publishes news but at the same time australian authorities in public health weather and other non publishing media areas say facebook has been removing their posts from their feeds as well. So it's not just say newspapers that are seeing their content

Facebook Australia Google William Eastern The Associated Press United States
Interview with Sivan Metzger

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

07:47 min | Last month

Interview with Sivan Metzger

"Yeah simmer so excited to have with us today. Seon metzker who leads the milwaukee business at data robot so welcome and thank you for joining us today. Thank you happy to be here today. Thank you for having been. They'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at data robot. Thanks first of all today's an international podcast and actually Speaking israel so. I'm seven in a mike. Mike company which would was acquired by data robots About a year and a half ago we were probably the first. Emma loves company in the industry as a matter of fact actually trait trademark down. Emma locks which we still own today that trademark. We're not using it or consuming. It right now Just running with him a lot as general industry factor. So what what we've been doing since Joining getting robots essentially really building And new business growth engine for the robot is pertains to Running all the learning models that are written in created anywhere in any language or being managed anywhere on any platform essentially mo ops from data. Robot is really the via the abstraction layer in the management layer to allow for mont managing any and all that created rennick being run. Anyone central location. This is Sedgley augmenting the core business which data robot was created and really built on the original category of automated machine learning auto melt since twenty twelve when it was founded in until advocates. Really a probably the driving force in the now a much more mature category Landed the beautiful connection in leading into an ops. The next essential next step if the building machine learning is one thing running she. Learning of course is the next step. I realized badly machine learning today Enormous fastest growing but second the second business inside of the data robot to the future. Who knows we'll be in so History enquiring company's growing the business. Another company we business. We were building a while back to automate machine. Learning was a time series. They mentioned it also acquired another company data space in a all. These together are combined to the overall vision zero to become an enterprise. Ai company working with customers all over the world fulfilling and debris and becoming facto for that. Yeah i mean. I think that's really one of the notable things we've noticed in the industry. I mean we actually pre produced as we had a report out recently part of our research service focusing on the machine learning platforms market. One of the things that we noted is that companies like data robot are continuing to expand the footprint of the things they do and that was that was also something that was focused as part of our machine learning life cycle conference which we ran january twenty sixth through twenty eighth raw of our listeners. Who are listening here. Twenty twenty one and it's available for free so if you if our listeners would like to come and watch the content. You're certainly welcome to do. So if you go to m. l. life cycle con dot com. You can see of quite actually quite a few sessions from data robot That that's their an on demand basis. You can go and you can watch all these videos and you can look at all these sessions about applying Well not just Amil ops but across the whole life cycle of machine learning. And that's really one of those notable things you know. Data robot continues to expand. So maybe you can give us a little bit of insight here you know. How has the data robot product expanded over the past few years to grow and encompass a wider range of these machine. Learning life cycle needs cool. Yeah i think go beyond the robot. I think my ovation of the industry. I wonder what you think about it. But it's we are collectively as industry really progressing in this journey of machine learning right and of course under those have been around for over fifty years of in the last decade or so the transformation the triangulation between snow so much view our source for data available now applying that. She likes to that to become of his bolstering. The ford is of the master situation. We're in within that everyone every company. No organization is progressing at their pace. But for the most part. I had the same my over twenty years in software. This is the first industry. I'm seeing that so. Many companies are actually progressing. Almost the same pace like the notre coming in things are changing very fast. But everyone's on cutting like a lot of people. Are you know trying to be as close as they ended the cutting edge and know the growth and progression through this journey almost homogeneous give just two examples though on front data robot that really builds the automo- category starting nine years ago and came out to the market about seven years ago. Nobody knew what it was and nobody really understood it and you fast forward seven years. There's so many auto companies nekia abilities out. There were people. The concept auto mail has become a very very strong way to ahmed. This is deemed. Make their work so much faster and more effective more efficient now. What actually happened when this became a prevailing Gory kind of birth. The next problem which is a great. Now there's an abundance of moms. They're actually trained. Prepared the ready to go. But the the chasm between taking all those mobs that already crossed industry across the world and actually make him effective enjoy contribution to the business at scale and that in coming to coming to that of valuation i mentioned is become like the present frontier and i'm really a been so focused on him elapse for the last four years in. I gotta tell you for years ago three years ago even two years ago even a year and a half ago. There weren't really that many people that were ready for it. So i was spending most of my time. Educating cdo's in four lucas and thinkers people were looking. What's going to happen two years away. But as we turned into twenty twenty and definitely towards the middle of twenty twenty we started to see the spike in a a rich transformation demands it stopped being education and it started being real strong in the market demand. And you could argue. It's because of the covid situation which actually accelerated the requirements to see value to see things management better scale but regardless it's also on the on the maturity curve and it's it's kinda cool to see how it suddenly turned spike and we saw a nice grabbed from actually google translated on in a The the keyword ops was very flat up to the mid level of twenty twenty and then it starts to spike in terms of search terms volume in google from the twenty points. Just been going crazy so you know. It's nice to see all the instrument during the same pace and coming to the point where you know Volusia data robot. I think it's it's either over Quivalent to the ability of the industry. And we're fueling that empowering and i think and we've had the right now we're we're helping. Let's say you know. Fueled the progression here by allowing. Actually people say hey. They're actually technologies and solutions. That are here to help you. Accelerate your situation across the The journey across maturity curve is not like it was years ago in the word solutions in every company to to out everything on their own is much more mature right now has more solutions in the market. That are coming in

Seon Metzker Emma Locks Rennick Sedgley Milwaukee Emma Israel Mike Ford Lucas Google Volusia
Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:09 min | Last month

Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

"The dating app. Fumbles wiped right on. Its ipo last week. Making it ceo whitney wolfe heard the youngest female ceo take a public. Not only that. But eight of the company's eleven board members also identify as women and that has more than just symbolic power bumble has styled itself as a women first dating app. The platform encourages them to send the first message. It also moderates the photos that are on profiles and the ones sent through direct messages so users won't get any revealing content. They didn't ask for sarah. Kunst is the managing director of cleo capital and she advised about on its venture capital arm. I asked her if all that translates into more women on the app then men. No you know it's funny. They're more men. Because it turns out that when you empower women and when you give people dignity and equity in the relationships that it helps everybody. It's not just women. And how much of that do you think is because of the type of content moderation. It does not allowing photos of shirtless men are worse. I think that's a huge part of it right when you think. Oh maybe maybe. I'll go meet the love of my life today on a dating app and instead you see something that you really did not want to see. It's disappointing and and it makes you less excited to do it and so bumble hs done a ton of work in making sure that you know people are who they say. They are with things like photo verification to that. They're not doing creepy mean rude things and if they do than than the the companies taking a really firm stance that it's really kind of one strike and you're out with everything from people who want to body shame to people who are sending lewd images that's not okay and certainly the legislation that they've been able to work on and push through in the state of texas to make sending a picture that exposes yourself illegal. It makes so much sense. Those are the kinds of things that are so obvious. In retrospect but but nobody in the dating app world and the online dating world had taken that stand yet. And i think it's pretty clear from the market debut. There's a lot of success in helping people. Just treat each other better given that success. Do you think you'll see more companies kind of taking that same path of moderation. I mean i think this is happening right. I really kinda everywhere right now in our world online when you look at everything from twitter's tussles with the last president to the facebook review board. They're starting to be this understanding that you can't be the wild west right you build roads in the real world but then you put up speed limit. I think we're seeing that happen. A lot. Right now in the digital world and i think companies like bumble. That had the vision that had the real kind of character to stand up and say. This isn't okay. we're not doing it. I think that really really matters. And so that. I think is something that we're going to see more of less of and it certainly hasn't escaped my notice that it seems like women led companies in particular are really leaning that way. Now this good news for bumble comes on the heels of what looks like bad news. For other women lead tech companies with so many facets of life the pandemic seems to have exacerbated inequities including with venture funding the share venture capital dollars for companies founded by women declined last year to point three percent according to crunch base. So what happened. And what do you think needs to happen at change. That i mean the good news is it is a frustrating problem with very simple solution. The solution is now fund more women and fund more more women. Because you either fundamentally believe that somehow men are just so much naturally better at running companies and raising money that they take ninety percent plus of all venture funding. Or you think that there is some inequity and there's a problem to be solved there and you know the reason to solve. It isn't the the social mission. It's because if you are leaving that much money on the table by not funding women. Then you're not gonna make as much money as you should and you know it is your job as a investor as a venture capital investor to make money and so by only looking at a sliver of the population. You know that's a lot of money you're not making and that's not good. So that's the solution. Why is it a problem. I mean the reason for this problem is always the same. The reasons never change. it's always. it's always sexism. It's always biased. It's always you know the concept of hama awfully of sane. Every human is generally drawn to people who remind them of themselves. And when you don't have enough diversity on the investing side of the table. You're very unlikely to see that diversity take place on the founder side you know. Bumble obviously had a really successful. Ipo do you think that will make a difference. You know in all of the stuff that you're talking about you know the success of stumbles ipo. And and being the youngest woman take a company. Public reminds me of this excessive katrina lake in such fix a few years back. And it's it is certainly helping to move that needle right if if you can't be what you can't see shortly after fumbles. Ipo came to marquette allison from from the ceo of our modern help. You know a company. That recently became a a unicorn. You have said openly that that she looks at that is is a real inspiration to think about you. Know how do we. How do we get an even younger woman to show her company next now. They're looking at that. I think that that deeply matter is built on the founder side and on the investor side. Because when you start to see that it becomes a lot easier of the next time a woman walks in your office building a company that you might not one hundred percent understand because it's not fixing a personal pain point for you and say well i mean if there's been all this success in the market and this person seems interesting incredible. Why wouldn't they be next. And so i think it's incredibly incredibly important.

Whitney Wolfe Cleo Capital Kunst Sarah Texas Twitter Facebook Katrina Lake Marquette Allison Bumble
Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

Outcomes Rocket

05:55 min | 2 months ago

Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Everyone saw marquez here. Today i have the privilege of hosting rebecca love. She is a nurse. Entrepreneur inventor author. Tech's speaker and i nurse featured on ted dot com and part of the inaugural nursing panel featured at south by south two thousand eighteen. Rebecca was the first director of nurses innovation and entrepreneurship in the united states at northeastern school of nursing the funding initiative in the country designed to empower nurses as innovators and entrepreneurs where she founded the nurse hackathon the movement as lead to transformational change in the nursing profession in two thousand nineteen rebecca with a group of leading nurses the world founded and is president of sand sale the society of nurse scientists innovators entrepreneurs and leaders a nonprofit that quickly attained recognition by the united nations as an affiliate member to the on. Rebecca is an experienced nurse entrepreneur founding hire nurses dot com and twenty thirteen which was acquired in two thousand eighteen by realto in the uk where she served as the managing director of us markets until its acquisition and twenty nineteen currently rebecca serves as the principal of clinical innovation at optimize rx. She's passionate about empowering nurses and creating communities to help nurses innovate create and collaborate start businesses and inventions to transform healthcare. Such a privilege to have you here. Rebecca i'm really excited to touch on this very important topic of nurses going to be with you. Thank you for having me absolutely. And so rebecca. You've done some really neat things in your healthcare career and you know before we jump into the actual details of what we're gonna talk about. I love to hear more about you than and what what keeps you inspired in in your healthcare career. I think that being a background and being a nurse And washing with the front lines going for and doing on a daily basis especially in the face of i think every day i wake up. I'm inspired by those nurses to go out selflessly to transform and take care of individuals that most of I would wonder if we would cross that. Threshold and nursing was a second career choice for me in life and it was inspired because my mom really encouraged me to pursue nursing. Because she said that. Although there's a whole bunch of great leaders in other areas we needed really strong nursing leadership to sort of transform the future of the profession. And i took it very seriously after becoming immersed in watching certain challenges that was basically in the profession. I don't know if you know. Some of the statistics but percents of nursing graduates leave the bedside within two years of practice which is nearly the largest exodus of any profession out there and we are facing potential nursing shortage of vermillion nurses in the united states. And i think what motivates me is. How can we stop that accident. And how can we secure this profession at the future of healthcare And i think. I'm still motivated by both that here that there may not be nurses by the bedside in the future as much as i am inspired to transform. What a career for nursing. Looks like that me inspire the best to choose that profession debt. And you know. I wasn't aware that's a. That's a pretty big number of of nurses leaving and also want to say thanks to all the nurses listening or if you have somebody in your family your friends that are nurses at the front line. As as rebecca mentioned it's tough and especially during this pandemic The importance of what you do is critical so so yeah let's kick things off with a thank you and yes a rebecca. Why why so many people like white white is so many people eat nursing. Yeah there's there's some interesting study that are being collaborated on this entire thing. Why thirty to fifty percent of them are leaving the bedside within cheers of practice and my dad asked me this question. He that he the. Cfo honey when you graduated with your finance degree. Were you expecting to carry the same level of responsibility as cfo laughed and he instead. Of course not. And i said well welcomes the world of nursing where you graduate you enter the profession and not only. Are you carrying an incredible boat and patience upon you. But you're expected to carry the same kind of patient and responsibility as nurses with thirty or fifty years of experience. So i think one is incredible dichotomy of being put into a world. Where even if you have little training you're going to deal with those two patients. And then secondly i think one of the biggest factors is that the profession of nursing if you call it a profession has not been cultivated along a career progression and think younger nurses that are entering the profession realized. I don't know if you've noticed. But over course a twenty year career the average increase of salary of nurses only one point five percents a year which is half the cost of the increase in wages or salaries on the average american But more importantly there is no career development. So it's not as though when you start out as financial assistance and you progress ups eventual pointed the being the cfo and nursing. The first day of your career can very much look like the last day of your career thirty years later and i think that because healthcare has focused a very long time that the roles of nurses are to be by the bedside and that that job that has driven position is not in and of itself that they've never focused on. What are the career and the ambitions of the nurse by the bedside new ford so suddenly two years into a nurse his career. They're working in day night holiday weekend rotation they've had an increase of salary of about three percent and of them are patients that are constantly dying or sick and being called to work in and they don't know where their career is going in comparison to the friends that they have chosen other careers. Who are working monday through friday. Have five weeks of vacation and are steaming. The world where these nurses aren't sure what's going on. I think there's a couple downwards playing trends. But i think those are two of the largest.

Rebecca Rebecca Love Northeastern School Of Nursing Society Of Nurse Scientists In Realto Marquez United States United Nations Tech UK Ford
Rad Power Bikes raises massive $150M round to scale e-bike business across globe

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Rad Power Bikes raises massive $150M round to scale e-bike business across globe

"Company is about to grow again Come most manufacturer has more on a major boost to rat power bikes for founder and CEO Mike Radon Bob It's been a wild ride actually started the business in 2007 as a sole proprietorship building. He bikes one at a time by myself in my Herds would shit now read power bikes has secured a $150 million investment. Radon boss says the money will focus on a number of things will be expanding our rad retail stores and rad mobile service fans. It's come to you or provide a great destination Location to come. Try our bikes ride power bikes, is now the largest teabag brand in North America, with more than 200,000 writers, the managing director of one major investor Morgan Stanley Counterpoint, Global says they're thinking their money into the venture because they believe he bikes will play an important role in the future of mobility. And a factor come on

Mike Radon Bob Morgan Stanley Counterpoint, G North America
How the state of the oil and gas industry affects the city of Houston

Houston Matters

03:55 min | 2 months ago

How the state of the oil and gas industry affects the city of Houston

"As you may have heard earlier on morning edition. Oil giants were expected to make up some of their financial losses in the last quarter of twenty twenty but final earnings reports released. This week show. That was definitely not the case. Texas headquartered exxon mobil reported a fourth-quarter loss of more than twenty billion dollars. Bp which has its headquarters here in houston recorded a full year loss of five point. Seven billion houston headquartered conaco phillips two point seven billion lost in twenty twenty demand for crude oil dried up last year after officials called for lockdowns and travel restrictions due to the pandemic and there was already a glut in domestic supply not a good equation for the industry and the news may not be much better for oil and gas so far in twenty twenty one to discuss. Why and how it may affect houston. We're joined now by energy writer lawrence steffi. Who's the managing director for thirty points strategies. A writer at large for texas monthly and columnist for energy voice dot com lauren. Good morning good morning greg. Thanks for having me glad to have you with us. The pandemic has obviously played a big role in revenue loss for many companies. How specifically has it impacted the oil and gas industry over the last year. Well i mean you just discussed the earnings numbers and i think that that's You know one of the big impacts. I mean we've had this very unique situation over the past year where we've had an environment of low prices and low demand which is really pretty unique in the history of the industry and it's It's good a lot of companies in pretty tough spot. Does it also signal what we may see as sort of the ongoing future for this industry. Yeah i think there's sort of two it you have to take in the shorter term. Prices have come back a little bit. we'll see if the industry has you know enough financial discipline to to hold the line on that But but i think in the short term you know as vaccines roll out and and more people are able to travel again. You're going to see a pretty big spike in the band. I think when you look beyond that though you have to sort of recognize what's happening in the market and basically a lot of things are moving against the oil and gas industry You know investment is moving away from fossil fuels government policy. Worldwide is moving away from fossil fuels and even consumer choices. Moving away from fossil fuels. And that's especially true when you look at things like gm's announcement to go to a zero emission sleep by twenty thirty five. You're gonna see more products available. That consumers will give consumers an alternative to oil and gas. You mentioned government policy. How might the biden administration help or hinder efforts of the big oil and gas companies to balanced back in the coming year. Well i think you know. The biden administration has made it very clear that they want to pull us into greener energy future. Which is fine. Where i think they're being disingenuous. Is that for for many years now. Democrats have touted. You know the idea of green jobs as being replacement for jobs will be lost in the world gas industry and i think that's really You know just not accurate. I mean there's no way you're gonna replace the number of jobs you're gonna lose You know if you just think about it. It takes fewer people. To maintain a windmill does oil rig. And so you know some of those those jobs especially on the frontlines the gas industry or not coming back And that's important because those are high paying jobs. I mean it's one of the few areas in the united states where somebody with a high school. Education can still make a six figure incomes. So those are gonna be tough jobs to replace. I think the democrats need to be more honest about that situation. The other side of the coin You see republicans digging in decrying the loss of jobs that are gonna come from these policies but you know we've lost sixty thousand jobs in texas in the oil industry in less than a year And there hasn't been a lot of leadership on the republican side. We're how we're gonna manage this transition. So i think both sides need to provide some leadership and start and stop throwing around you know ideology and And actually try to try to offer some concrete solutions for the people that will be most

Houston Conaco Phillips Lawrence Steffi Biden Administration Exxon Mobil Giants BP Lauren Texas Greg GM United States
Self-Sovereign Identity and IoT  insights from the Sovrin Foundation

Insureblocks

05:09 min | 2 months ago

Self-Sovereign Identity and IoT insights from the Sovrin Foundation

"Hello hello hello. Welcome to inch blocks your dedicated podcast to blockchain and smart contracts in industries and institutions. All around the world. I'm will lead oscar of your host for this podcast. We will be discussing sell sarin identity and iot internet of things with special insights from the sovereign foundation. I'm very pleased to have michael shea. Managing director of the dingle group and the chair of the sovereign foundations. Ssi in working group. Michael thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself thank you will lead to assure. I'm a thin the whole career in the technology sector. I part of my career dealing in actually embedded systems and and and You know writing what would be now qualify as iot but really wasn't called that back in the eighties nineties but Been running really more on the business side for the last. You know fifteen or so years running a consulting agency as well as in the last five years being heavily involved within the cell sovereign identity community focusing on density and privacy great great. Thank you for that introduction. So as you're probably aware you discussing me here at intial blocks to always ask our speakers a question which is what is blockchain. And how does it work. Do you wanna have a go at defining it absolutely what is blockchain so it is a database it is a decentralized database which is cryptographic secure immutable which brings a certain Properties and characteristics that. Make it valuable. The decentralized part means that it operates in a wide ecosystem it's not inside any one businesses carpet firewalls that gives resilience redundancy And brings other challenges to because it's outside in the world. That's where the cryptography and the different proof of work or algorithms for dealing with double-spin whether whether it's called a double standard problem or that that level of assurance that the transactions have not been modified out. That's pretty good. Thank you so since we're in a Let's definition kind of state at the moment. I'm gonna throw a few more requests definitions to you now. Which is you know. Can you give us a brief introduction to sell sovereign identity which for you listeners. We will also referred as sl and what are decentralized identifiers also know as did and verifiable credentials as also known as vc's so self sovereign identity is an identity model where the entity that the identity is related to is in control of the information and control of their identity. There are several originally. Christopher published. The ten principles a self sovereign identity back in two thousand sixteen The sovereign foundation actually just released also a twelve principles of ssi. Actually in the last couple of weeks as well really. It's around the ability of an entity to control that information about themselves Water decentralized identifiers. They are the pointers The it's a pointer to the information. The identity information called did document that starts to help create the the trust layers Within the identity self sovereign identity. It is ties back into the the the private keys public keys of the entity that actually controls the identifier verifiable credential is a cryptographic bundle that is created by what's called issuer of a credential so an entity or take a person in this case for example driver's license Fulfils the requirements to get a driver's license a department of motor vehicles or whatever the equivalent is called in your local jurisdiction issues either applied could be a plastic piece of plastic with your photo and certain information or it could be a digital credential and what that says it includes Claims attributes saying that you are legally entitled to drive a car for example on it has other pieces of information might be an address might be your eye color. Might be your. What type of vehicles are allowed to drive.

Sovereign Foundation Michael Shea Dingle Group Sovereign Foundations Oscar Michael Christopher
Investment in climate tech is also economic stimulus

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:08 min | 2 months ago

Investment in climate tech is also economic stimulus

"Climate change is high on president biden agenda last week the president rejoined the paris climate accord on wednesday reuters reports. He's expected to announce a new climate order that will introduce new regulations and make climate change a national security priority and biden his tied economic recovery to climate investment new jobs new infrastructure and new funding. Jayco is managing director of the private equity firm light smith group which is focused on climate adaptation technology. You're gonna have to rebuild the economy for some kind of future. So let's say we did a big infrastructure package which i think potentially incoming secretary good a judge was talking about. Are we gonna build bridges for the sea levels and river levels that we have today. The ones that we think are likely to be around ten twenty or fifty years from now and i would suggest the latter is better idea than the former including many other components that we saw really stark contrast last year. Like how does this impact different types of communities. Where's the equity and justice implications for the kind of future that we're building both from an environmental implication standpoint. And then more broadly speaking in the kind of diversity inclusion universe as well as different distributions of how that impact has occurred economically. There's a big conference on climate adaptation starting this week which is virtual but i wonder what role is the. Us expected to play in that. I think it's expected to play a major role over the course of the entire year and beyond there is a lot of attention being focused on what it means for the us to be back in a leadership position not just re signing onto the perez agreement but taking a leadership position in terms of reductions reels gas emissions kind of where our net zero targeting really going to go in. And we're going to do to do that. But also i think real opportunity to seize a leadership position around adaptation and climate science. What is your sense of. How big a role. Resilience is slated to play. Are there any official announcements on that front. Well i'd say that there are probably three pieces of the puzzle to those pieces seem very

President Biden Light Smith Group Jayco Biden Reuters Paris United States Perez
Meet the online gadget show, a hall of mirrors to the future

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Meet the online gadget show, a hall of mirrors to the future

"The consumer electronic show which kicks off this week will be virtual many events have gone online to to cope with the eighteen but the gadget show in Las Vegas is a tough one virtual is almost like going to a pizza place and seeing it through resume riding eating it yourself technology analyst Dan Ives the managing director with equity research he's gone to the show for the past twenty years not touching and kicking the tires in the technology talk into the partners it's hard to really get a better understanding of what is going to be the hot air is the hot gadgets for this year especially five G. also smaller exhibitors are less likely to get notice without a show floor I'm sure the employer

Dan Ives Las Vegas
"managing director" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

08:10 min | 6 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

"This conversation has to start now because it's very hard to believe that we are going to stay at this point. We are going to stay below 1.5 seat with just leaning on government policy and and a pair of Screamin how would the, home of humanity contribute to reaching these much-needed goals and help to avoid these existential threats, has the right framing like they're thinking about the problem at the scale of that. It needs to be thought of like, you know, you cannot solve as we have as the saying goes. You cannot solve a problem of Xing problem within the confines. A problem you have to go outside of the problem and I think that well that's what, known does is it's it's it's sleeping outside of the confines of national and even multilateral policy-making and going one higher order up and I think that is the thinking that has to happen now. I I don't know what would be involved in getting governments on board, but I know that we have to start the conversation so it's really great. They're leading that charge and I think the idea of the comments having rights is a way to bring on board bigger stake holders, cuz right now it's mostly you know, it's like really like super Progressive is Gio's and and Indigenous groups and and you know youth groups forming these class action lawsuits, which is a great precedent dead. Take on board, you know governments is what that's what we have to do. So, I think that bigger bigger lie legal theory that, was working on a really going to be off work for that on the global deal of furniture. You cite a study called an ego region based approach to protect half the terrestrial realm and a key Concept in that paper. Is that each of the girls 846 to rest real ecoregions needs its own plan shared by countries whose boundaries overlap its geopolitical extent. How will the common home of humanity help to achieve this? Yeah, I mean, I would love to I would so love to explore that with with you guys because so that we have the 840 sneaker regions and you know 846 is a lot and the the issue of the agree and these are land ecoregions. So we have terrestrial ecosystems freshwater ecoregions and Marine or coastal regions and The Ether regions. The 2017 Eagle regions paper was Game Changer. Yeah identifies the 846 land or terrestrial ecoregions. The issue with those is that a lot of times you have one ecoregion. It's very intertwined with another and one example that maybe if you go to Wyoming in the United States where you have the grasslands meeting the Rockies where they the northern Rockies and you have this entanglement of grasslands wage and for the the forests that are there of the mountainous forests. So what we realized is actually for a global framework for our own work, which is focused on Thursday and science implementing science to you know, achieve the goals of the conventions. We needed a bioregional the kind of slightly larger or a higher order a combination of ecoregions so that we're calling the Bayou regions by regions twenty-twenty and that's going to be coming out in a few weeks and there's 8 a.m. Hundred and eighty four of them. So it's actually a similar number two countries and we we like to call them if nature, you know, his nature got to draw a map of the world. This is what it might look like. And and we there these are a hundred eighty four of Nature's countries. And those are groupings of ecoregions confined by Major geomorphic structures. So that's Thursday since mountain ranges coastal plains, things like that. And so it's a novel by reached biogeographical framework, which uh, we think will really allow for collaboration between those stakeholder governments that overlap the by region. So it's taking the Eco regions idea and the ego regions are the building blocks, right so long no ego region is divided up for their like the Lego blocks if you will of the Bayou regions, and then the Bayou regions also include adjacent Coastal and birth Choir areas, so we're not limiting the field of study to just the land alongside the river but also the river and we're not limiting it to just say with the coastal plain adjacent to the ocean but also the coastal areas off the ocean because you're thinking about food security. For example, you can't you can't really do that. You have to do that at a bioregional level because you have fishermen providing seafood and then you have the land area that's able to provide crops and there might be dead livestock and rangelands activity. All of these things have to be thought up together not separately. So that's why we think the by regions would be really could be really interesting framework. So it'd be really cool to have collaborated with you on on that. And if it's a useful structure again, we're just putting it off. And creative comments because we want everyone to be able to access it but it will on our website will be rolling out on the one North website. If you go to explore off by you'll see a by regions and we'll have a I think it's the first-ever spherical map that you can click on and so it's a clickable spherical map which I'm being told as of it done. I'm sure someone's done it but you'll be able to click on and then explore all about the by region you live in and the ecoregions that make life out by region so that we're kind of just pushing that out as a content and information just out in the Creative Commons, but we would love it if it could be adapted in more ways to be used for for this idea of bioregional the by Regional comments, which I think is kind of direction. We're going to need to go in. Absolutely. I know I'm looking forward to checking out that map. That's pretty cool. It's really beautiful. It's very colorful and the developers who built that are pretty pretty badass. So, we're looking forward to getting out there. I'm excited to see how this collaboration plays out and all of the great things you guys will be doing in the near future. So that's it for today's interview. Thank you for joining us Carl. I think you it's fun talking to you good questions. All right, and there you have it the solutions to The Climate crisis already exists by utilizing the latest science and technology. We can limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by protecting and restoring hath planets lands and oceans and making the shift to renewable energy the legal framework proposed by the common home of humanity can help achieve these ambitious goals that is all for today and thank you for joining us for this episode of income and home conversations Beyond un75 Please Subscribe share and be sure to tune in next week to continue the conversation with our special guest Janine Yazzie co-convener of the indigenous peoples major group understandable development and visit us at ww.w. The planet area, press, four more episodes and the latest news and sustainability climate change and the environment off..

Gio Wyoming Rockies Janine Yazzie United States Carl
"managing director" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

07:46 min | 6 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

"Will hear from leading Global experts on how the proposal of recognizing the existence of an intangible Global common Without Borders can change our relationship with our planet the common home of humanity has proposed an ambitious New Globe pack for the environment the adverse effects of climate change span across borders and Beyond territories recognizing the Earth system as a common Heritage of humankind is the first step in restoring a stable climate a visible manifestation of a well-functioning or a system this proposals cascading effects would be systemic and tremendously impact international relations and economics opening the doors to restoring a well-functioning earth system, and home conversations is the place to discuss a new social contract between Society wage. Economy and the Earth system now here is your host founder and CEO of the planetary press Kimberly White. Hello and welcome to Common home conversations today. We are joined by Carl Becker the co-founder and managing director of one Earth. Thank you for joining us today Carl. Thanks. That's great to be here. I think you should tell us more about one Earth and the focus of your work there. Yeah, I'm the managing director of one Earth and we are philanthropic initiatives particularly focused on the science policy interface for the three Rio conventions, and we are running a correspondingly roughly three major scientific models that we support page with leading scientists around the world contributing to those three models. The first big one is the climate and energy transition model which was published last year in the form of a temporary tents five hundred page book called achieving the Paris climate agreement calls cuz us offered by 17 million climate energy scientists and is now being widely cited and that was really too You look at how we can can we and if so, how how can we stay below the 1.5 see threshold of global temperature rise, the second one. The second model is called the globe a safety net which was just published on Friday and science advances. That was a two and half year plus effort very large spatial analysis, the first global scale analysis of biologically important land and one of the component products coming out of it is you could say a pack of recommended area-based targets for the upcoming un biodiversity convention. So second a real convention. So what it does is it shows what are all the same types of land that can contribute to ecosystem services and biodiversity by country. The third model will be really contributing to looking at how we feed ten billion people on a sustained. On the planet. So today we seem to have gone from climate deniers to an attitude of it's already too late. Do you think we have the Science and Technology available today to form the solutions to stabilize climate and keep warming at one point five degrees? Yes. I I love this question because it is the answer is absolutely sucks. We have the technology and it's not just the technology solved in and sort of we need to do now go into production. It's like we have the technology. It's a z, what does that shovel-ready? You know, we have it's sitting on the shelves and in our in the climate model and energy transition model. We supported according to that model. We need to go from about 20% renewable energy today to about 56% globally and that varies by region by Twenty Thirty. So we thought This is relatively straightforward. We know exactly how to do it. It's using technologies that are now battle-tested for you know, ten or more years and are scaling quickly and becoming Cheaper by the minute. So really it's not the technology that's missing for the energy transition. It's the dollars and in the clay model we have well the back of envelope summary budget required for the transition. I just mentioned is is about 1.3 trillion a year, roughly. And that's you know less than one-third with government spend today subsidizing fossil fuels which are causing global warming. So so for like less than a third of what we're paying to destroy the planet, we could transition energy with technology create tons of jobs be great for the economy would it would increase energy security as well and it would reduce health risks associated with fossil fuels and climate change. So it's win-win isn't the right word. It's like win win win win win. It's like five wins if we did that and say yes, just a matter of really political. Well at this point moving the dollars. So governments have been creating commitments and new targets to combat climate change while at the same time as you just said propping up the fossil fuel industry with trillions of dollars in subsidies adding to age. I'm a crisis. Do you think the covid-19 economic recovery efforts are an opportunity to shift away from business-as-usual and toward cleaner Greener energy. Yeah, I would say it's it's not judging. Yes, definitely and not just on the energy side. We also the nature of based Solutions side. I'm seeing a lot coming from government, especially the EU has waged a big leader in this and they've announced several commissions on so a green recovery. I think that it did covid-19 two things one thing it did which of course has positive and negative. It's slammed the brakes on the global economy. Like we literally it was like you're driving in your car and a kid runs in front of you and you have to slam on your brakes and. And that wage Happened. So it's sort of like all these conversations that were happening and there was going to be a climate Convention as viewed by the diversity convention was the UN Summit all these things just everything went on with the results are kind of coming in now. We'll see what happens anywhere from 9 to 17% reduction in carbon emissions. This year was We have to wait obviously for post-mortem, but we think it'll probably be somewhere in the middle like maybe twelve thirteen percent of a reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions, which is Thursday actually more than what we needed to do in terms of being on the 1.5 seat track. So slamming on the brakes got us on the 1.5. See course. Now the question in this are we going to just slam on the gas pedal now off and I mean that literally right cuz we have to also convert our make our transportation system much cleaner. But yeah, I think that that's slightly on the birth. Services pause and a lot of people to kind of get start getting their ducks in a row about starting to look at recovery packages that could then be targeted towards sustainable and green infrastructure and energy and and nature-based solutions. I think the other thing that I saw with covideo is that just the awareness of nature..

Carl Becker co-founder and managing direct Science and Technology founder and CEO managing director Kimberly White Paris UN EU covideo
"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

03:08 min | 8 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"Entrepreneurial s kind of training program was literally you just you just pick up the skills on the job and ended up in a bit more serendipity? Yeah. I I think is probably of designers but I'm not you'll have much of we've got into it but you have a law explosion set to lots of different elements of the business. When she go instead it's the operations management role and you're looking off the trail full of venues concepts than you would doing everything obviously are you zone out and all? But Under the. Marketing Trade the KMOX teammates, monthly basis and dating we pay on his accounting's dressing down with the date. To do a lot of job by nightshift of the sexual growing yes. You gotTa have on everything and I think not that three sixty understanding of saying of every saw debatable is evaluated when he got into that so that Demand now it means you'll. You'll getting point of view ready I'm ready create, and annoying which agenda needs pushing in. Some yeah. We will say now that we had a little bit more structured in the way that we developed able. I think we've also got specialists in the business now because of the scientists and scour out so that those areas of crops getting the right amount of seduction that I needed the right times. On the senior people in the business, a respectable element of that because of that the on night bit on site yet like with any good sort of entrepreneurial organization that each really valuable actually doing. Bits everyone's job but I think he serious about moving into the next stage and we would sell fab now is a medium sized business than you need to have. Quality inexperienced people some some of would have come to business, but you know the K functions Tom. Baker example proxy would be another. You know you need qualified access today that what you need to make. Sure that is people come in really understand what the main thing that variety you know the the thing that makes you It's it's been useful again about branding pacing reminding. Even agents when they're out. Ought to know how we got to be able to do what we do in space is that the demographic kind of is what we're doing how are we going to? Yeah, it does work. And that's good. In. Venue say so you'll drink sort of idea genuine sort of outcome, your spouse that you take lots of dry ice lots of theatre. It's it's not the same thing. You know your your average bombings was gonNA bullpen off the street GAL poor a couple of pints do you tend to do you have an internal? So the training program for your mixologist or did you only recruits? Experienced yeah. I mean absolutely the training program regardless of background as is. Absolutely exact into non on the bar May numb said, we don't object savage good The bar is such a long sorts of journey to really get to the upper end of that..

KMOX Baker Tom
"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

05:45 min | 8 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"Guy Down there and get under the skin of things I'm knocked out objectivity onto to the sought by side stuff. But having a kind of inherent touch point in mind businesses around has been ready as foil on. Then as I said I mean I'm getting back into the rhythm of that but I'm setting out be down there couple days away myself not. Doing checks measures but more sort of. Looking. For the next next to go into radio on talking around the city. Is built out there. Any whites are easy to build NC wedding, Monk Thumb and catching with. Other uprights in just taking on experience I, think that what you need to do Any sort of. Estimates properly. Time and results in some money. True. Yeah. Well, congratulations pulling off and I think one of the key reasons the really wherever you go. You get this little been instantaneous fan base and following his is the strength and power not just what you deliver but also the brand that sits behind it, which is really strong as that branding evolved mush and it's kind of how you can describe is sort of that dot com it's kind of magical. Space, I suppose. But yeah, as as that stay pretty consistent since venue was that very much come about in the latter stages. Yeah. Sending been shined up in the latter stages and I think that they're bringing you get the today because the the reference points is more than rounds more people are aware of the. Original yeah I think. It was probably a kind ships count addiction funding a Kootenai. It's in the ice. The outrace that sounds good. So we could build probably where the concept originally sprung from. An has gone on we've sort of taken some of that. SMART remorse release join a big medieval. Actual alchemist idea a made it something a little bit more been through a cooperative relations. was quite signs for for a time. And that was informing designing venue his it felt we got suicide lots of rocks contemporary intended design I mean unless necessarily. So evatt. Blazing a trail became a point. been halted attendant whether whether you're not. You know that's not Sania. zero will sort of looking a little bit as. We became on a bit again numb two or three guy intends to design it until the. To the at sign say Valley. Monochrome Goldie fail into a bit color and dump the new. It's actually done. Have a bit more. In. kind of design the. I'm no suicide days. Colored in the venue and some instill trades to some of those silted them theatrics at some that that went quite high slate having a footprint around the country on taste. Media following in guys crowd is men that we would have to build on that round. He's been particularly useful join the. The the the lockdown we haven't been able to trade sites that we've been to a little bit more about online presence. who stopped building a little bit of retail profile We have actually been planning away on a book and I ended up in the background AT A. Coffee. Table Pace. which is I'm in the of being put together. We've We've started thinking about how much around out the full woes and get it into around retired environments and some having brown in this sort of truest and away his has been allows to sort of continue to grow the business without necessarily being I'm stuck on the idea of of two bricks and mortar I think the. Yeah the mindset change to. Hell presence in getting into people's hi, I'm yet exciting for definitely I..

Kootenai A. Coffee NC Goldie Sania.
"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

02:16 min | 8 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"Fifty Senate try box you know the the dice in London closer too much flat.

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

05:23 min | 8 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"From the North West. Hall on that we've had we've been able to push on. A message out. Round. The country's as you pointed out there particularly into London, which is not something that has necessarily been done. That will. That will volume by crisis from the north. In, quite proud madman, the coast. Londoners burning to the ground that moment has. Now ready it's some it's obviously yet got cancer a lot of challenges office occupation figures in some the coming into the country or something decisive. Predicated upon but some each improving each week can dumb. Keep talking about each initiative that stuff's been a big help. Again, this way could we started off with them Quite, quite a quite distinction really between the particular central incites in what was happening in the big regional cities, intensive sales activity that number is narrowing each week in some. Confidence that you spend any time in London, any city cents rarely there? Is Plenty of life in Nice short-sea the environments to come tightly subscribe to. A little bit different late but I think. That will affect. People like prattle props. Oh, by one guys at a working on on credit score massin whites numbers on with all respect to day. They always do that. Thank brilliantly. But it's it's about convenience for those guys and I think. If you've got something that he is a bit more interesting and different. Still going to be happy to trump into this this faces and Yeah that's original point. Bombay's a bit around the region, but he's popping up. Each day on. The evening we got ready which is. Like. Straight any numbers above what we re reset off our expectations and Yeah it's That's that's good to hear. Before we move on on on combat to some of those points race but some just staying on that that that food thing it's a really difficult thing to pull off to feel as comfortable in a venue. Having a cocktail and and some drinks at night in the music a little bit louder, and it's the vibe or.

London North West Hall Bombay
"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

04:25 min | 8 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"The out to help out support finally finishes well, at least it does on the day of this podcast is released. It's been incredible to see just how successful that has been baffling in many ways since I've often plenty of better deals during the winter months before my own restaurants that never had the same response it just shows the power of something with a simple message simple to execute for the customer consistent national publicity. Now whilst many of us have traded well throughout all this most people that I'm speaking with off weather, we could be in some sort folks bubble at the moment some people are still furloughed were working from home and have a bit more time on their hands. Many countries a closed meeting.

"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

05:59 min | 9 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Hey everyone. Welcome back to behind the numbers. I'm Dave bookbinder and say we're having a great conversation with Frank, Pena Managing Director Arcadian Group. Franken the first segment you. I told GONNA. Put you on the spot and ask you about your favorite fraudster because you've interviewed so many people throughout your career. During this very quick commercial break, get a chance to think about it 'cause I. WanNa ask you. Do you have a favorite fraudster I? Do Dave and my favorite fruits? There's actually a fraudster I never met so let me tell you what I mean by that. I'm I was engaged years backed by large financial institution through their general counsel's office. To help them understand what they deem to be irregular accounting practices. There's been some turnover in a particular group and as a result, they couldn't really unwind some reconciling items so I was brought in not really understanding what I. Do what I could to help the client get. They wanted to go. And in just a few short days I unravel what ended up being almost three decade-long fraud, three decades almost almost three decades long, and it was in my opinion, one of the most brilliant schemes I've ever seen because most fraudsters tend to get caught, and usually it's because they get greedy. Greed tends to be the downfall fraudsters. It tends to be what catches the attention of people who were looking in this particular case. While the fraud perpetrated for a very long time, there was no signs of extreme greed to the point, rose to the level of suspicion, so I'm inside this financial institution and The particular. Division. I'm interested in investigating further the credit card division. And one of the things I come across when trying to reconcile books, record is the fact that. One long term employees who had recently passed away. Had A credit card as a customer of this financial institution and. From since the mid eighties, this person had one of those no frills credit cards. Not You're not getting points for spending habits. You're not getting mileage. The limit was five thousand dollars remain that way for all these years and what she would do over the course of when ended up being almost thirty year period of time, she would spend the credit card just like you were I, but instead of. Writing the check to our credit card. Companies pay down the balance on a monthly basis. She kept access to an antiquated system on her desk No one else was aware of. That stayed live through a number of mergers and acquisitions tended to happen over the the financial institutions industry over time, and she would just unilaterally without approval log into this system and create manual adjustments, which showed up his payments on her statement, so spending every month, and then manually adjusting news amounts away most aftermath hereafter. You're not just spending, but also cash advances, etc. She managed to live a very. Fabulous lifestyle on the financial institutions dime and it wasn't until she passed away that all of this came to light when someone who took on her responsibilities. Manage to uncover some of these discrepancies so fortunate enough to have met a number. Fraudsters have had the ability to question them, and while I had a lot of evidence to suggest she did exactly what I suggest it. Never had a chance to confront her. and to a large extent, the bank was made totally hole through employee dishonesty insurance policy, and the investigation was so robust and so supported by our efforts that the insurance company wrote a check and also paid the. Bank, of reimburse the bank for the cost they paid me to investigate so end up being a real win for the bank and a real eye opening experience for me. Just to have it just having been down that path and having never met my roaster. That's a great story and a couple of things come to mind because you mentioned that a lot of times people get caught because they're greedy. And in this particular instance. Maybe it wasn't so much greed, keeping it at low dollar amounts relatively speaking, just fly under the radar, but consistently which leads to the question. What can companies do here? Here's a situation where for thirty years they didn't detect anything. Talk to our audience and tell them. What can they do in their businesses now to be mindful and aware of these things and maybe detect fraud. So one of the things I encourage folks to consider is a proactive fraud risk assessment. In almost all cases I'm brought in in a reactive way, a fraud or allegations of misconduct or employee, dishonesty or vendor abuse seems to surface, but it's a little too late. If you're calling me after the fact, chances are I'm going to find fraud to such a magnitude that you're. GonNa, wish that. Maybe you spent a little bit of money proactively front to prevent it rather than spend it. It on the back end, trying to detect and quantify it so to answer your question. Dave proactive fraud risk assessments whether it's something you can have your internal audit. Folks do some outside expert forensic investor leader myself come in and do I think you can really make a real impact organization that way the other simple thing that doesn't require a lot of money, and it just pay attention to what I'll call segregation of duties. Just make sure you don't have the same person. Opening the mail depositing checks and reconciling bank statements yeah a lot of control. It's giving one person too much control could create. The opportunity as we talked about, and certainly, if there's a pressure, the opportunity manifested, and certainly people can figure out a way to rationalize especially if that fraudster is someone who's not quite management or executive level. They might be given a job responsibility that they think they should be paid more to do, and they might just help themselves to the pot if they feel like they're underpaid or for some other. Reason to that extent. That's good advice. How in folks who are watching listening? Learn more about you frank. How can they contact you so I have a website? WWW DOT MIRC DOT com. That's M., E. R.. E. N. I also have.

fraud Dave bookbinder Pena Managing Director Arcadia Franken Frank general counsel E. N. executive
"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

05:46 min | 9 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Very professional unassuming their unsuspecting, and they have a Lotta Gravitas in particular industry and order to perpetuate the lifestyle and perpetuate the. Sort of the reputation that they built over time sometimes just can't be done. In the normal course they have to get creative and oftentimes creativity leads to criminal behavior. Yeah, so unfortunately they don't channel it for good. They channel it for evil. Gotcha, okay, so you talked about economic damages. How does one go about determining what the ultimate damages? So economic damages are often very hard to prove with certainty because a lot of what you have to do. As an economic damages, expert is you have to rely on historical financial information. And usually look three or five years backwards to determine what the future might look like for someone who's claiming. They had been damaged because if you think about a situation where. Two parties are fighting over. Lost Prophets for example party. A allegedly harmed party and party B.'s trying to recover lost profits. As a result of that party is not going to arbitrarily be able to come up with a number and say I would have lost this amount. Therefore you should pay. Party has to really look at two things what they did starkly and what they projected to do over what ends up becoming the lost period to determine if in fact. They have lost profit. What the opposing parties likely to do is say okay. You may have produced historical financial support your economic assessment, or you may have produced projections that predate you're alleged loss, and therefore all of that seems to make sense hypothetically, but they'll try and establish that outside. Influences would have negatively impacted that we're GONNA Jason's ability to fulfil. Fulfill those protections encounter. Make good on what they suspect. It would happen over time so. What you really do as an accounting expert you look at. Identify revenue, and you identify cost, and essentially what revenue would have been generated, but for the alleged harmful act, and then you factor in. What costs you might save as a result of not being able to generate that revenue, and you arrive in a lost prophets, summer and my space, those calculations have to be done to a reasonable degree of professional certainty, and as you can imagine, there's some subjectivity as to what that means, and just having experience and looking at the right records. Really help you win the day there, but you also want to talk to people you don't want to. To forget the fact that at the end of the day book records only get you so far and talking to people create those projections really make a difference well. Yeah, and look in my world in valuation consulting whether it's volume of business revaluing intellectual property assets. It's a risk adjusted net present value analysis similarly describe got some nuances there from a legal perspective so I get it and I think the audience to say really good job explaining that. You touched on the idea of you need to talk to people to. It's not just about the data once you elaborate on that I. Know you've got some thoughts there. Yeah so the way I view things talking about fraud at the end of the day books and records don't commit fraud. People do fraud by definition is intentional so so understanding that? Closing the gap on where the data leaves. Things to be desired, can really only be obtained through talking to people and conducting forensic interviews or something that I do frequently in almost every investigation or litigation support assignment. The other thing I tend to do very often is review emails I. believe emails are more or less like modern day. Wiretaps and people put everything in anything in emails so before I necessarily render in investigation complete. Complete I review emails that might get me to where I'm going and might help me focus on my allegations. You'd be surprised. What other interesting things you find out about people by doing their emails and most of the time I'm working with the company behind the scenes, and oftentimes the targets of my investigation aren't even aware that I'm doing so if you can imagine having information from an email to them present during a forensic interview. You know really helps. People understand that you know the answers to most of your questions your to confirm it, you know, and maybe find other information property value that can take you to another level, but there's a real big people aspect to it, and I would encourage anybody who's looking to get into this field to really get out from behind the screen and talk to people. It's critical. Yeah, so when you get to that spot where it's clear that you have something on them. You've got some documentary evidence in an e mail. Do they typically fold and say they got me or they continuing to perpetuate this reuss of the fraud so I would say it depends on the sophistication the fraudster. I can tell you in my opinion. In my profession, there's no greater feeling than being able to obtain a confession without a gun or a batch, and I haven't either a gun. We're badge. I'm a civilian I'm a I'm a bean counter right and I believe that I use a blue collar approach to solving white collar problems and developing report with people. You'd be surprised how many times I actually get a confession, but oftentimes my mo is to. To Talk to people and let him lie to me, I'll let him lie to me until we're both blue in the face, and then I will show them the document. You just described where I have something in evidence that could suggest or not being truthful, and when I slide that in front of them, and actually show them what I know, you'd be surprised how quickly they don't have an answer for me now quickly. Their Confession starts to unravel. Gotcha. So how can people contact you Franken? They want to learn more about you or how to work with you. On linked in. Frank Peanut Managing Director of Mercatus, my address F. P. at m-e-r-c-a-t-u-s dot com. Or feel free reach out by telephone..

fraud Franken Jason Frank Peanut Managing Director F. P.
"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

05:43 min | 9 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Everyone and welcome back to behind the numbers Dave bookbinder senior director at Cf. This is the program where we dig deeper to understand what really matters most in business and today I'm really excited. Have a fun and interesting conversation the way I would characterize it as when CPA meets. CSI CAn't take credit for that. My Guest Frank Pena here managing director at the Mercatus. Group actually help coin that expression, frank, welcome to behind numbers. Thank you David South Pleasure. Be here and appreciate you having me yet. This is going to be fun. Just wanted to set the frame I. Want You just tell the audience a little bit about who you are what you do, and then we'll jump into the good stuff. Sure I describe myself as a forensic accountant and dispute consultant. Tasked with helping individuals and corporations managed business controversy. So as Managing Director of the McLean group, I sort of specialize in three things. Forensic Investigations economic damage assessments as well as bankruptcy and insolvency matters. So what I mean by that is. When a client calls me generally, they're not calling me to share good news. Something in their life changed, and they need help. Generally having an ascent, a sense of urgency and reacting quickly is what wins the day with respect to making my client's happy and letting them know how can help them. In terms of forensic investigations, normally what I do is I. Get engaged by either general counsel of a company. Board of Directors or regulatory body and sometimes external law firms who represent either of those two parties to help them assess certain allegations whether they be blower related employee dishonesty vendor fraud. You name it generally speaking, these issues have an economic impact and my investigative skills coupled with my CPA experienced tends to be helpful in that regard. The other area that I tend to work a lot in isn't the economic damages assessment area where two parties are fighting it out over one reason or another think of a dispute over a bridge of contract type claim where plaintiff defendant over failing to fulfil a duty, so to speak generally speaking, you're not doing for any other reason, other than a monetary issue and someone like me. Who can evaluate the situation, says the numbers. And render an opinion as to what the economic economic damage is or is it? Tends to really help in courts and Trier's effect. Make decisions as to. Who's right and reliability sits A. Area I'll just touch upon the bankruptcy and solvency area, which is where I spent a lot of time helping chapter eleven trustees. Navigate their, role. Through the bankruptcy court process whether it be investigating debtor-in-possession or just providing financial advice to help companies reorganizing bankruptcy, these are sort of the areas I, tend to spend most of my time. Are, there any particular. Fact patterns that are consistent across these different things when you think about you know fraud and and people trying to scam whether it's investors or consumers. So I would say you know there's really three elements present when fraud occurs in my experience and I think a lot. My folks in my profession would tend to agree. The first element is pressure whether it's real or perceived generally speaking. A fraudster identifies pressure usually is financial in nature whether it be. Pressured to. Generate revenue within a short time frame whether it's a gambling problem where new medical expenses that they're forced with paying so now. They need to come up with money quickly. Doodo pressure they experience, and that sort of element number one. The other common element I is, there's an opportunity so terribly speaking the opportunity manifest itself. An internal control weakness or the ability to override controls, so wants a pressure exist, and then the potential fraudster identifies an opportunity perpetrated fraud. The only thing they need to really do move. That process forward is to rationalize it, which is really the third element? Pressure Opportunity Rationalization and in my profession, that's really the the elements of what's known as the fraud triangle. It's something that we're taught, and it turns out to be true. In most cases also tell you that I've come across a lot of fraudsters in my life, having interviewed the people who've done some very interesting things, and oftentimes you know there's just a certain percentage of the population that's up to no good. There's there's not a pressure necessarily. It's just somebody who's there to benefit. At someone else's detriment, and they see the opportunity and figure out a way to rationalize. Yeah, we're going to talk about that. Rationalization the psychology, a little bit. I'm also going to put you on the spot, and if you have a favorite fraudster, solely you marinate on that for a minute, but what I wanted to just talk about real quickly. Here is when you think about types of fraud, right? This is nothing new. Frauds been around forever whether it's business scamming Internet scamming ponzi schemes. As I mentioned to you before on the two things that were particularly intriguing to things like the fire festival and Theranos both got a lot of publicity documentaries made about them. Let's jump into the psychology, right? How do people like? The CEO of thoroughness or the leaders of the fire festival. How how do they rationalize this whole idea of this perpetrating the fraud? Some people think that. They deserve so one of the one of the things I come across. A lot is I've worked so hard. Other people have gotten to where they are doing this, so I'm going to do it to, or it's a victimless crime at the end of the day. It's not murder. It's nothing. Blue-collar to the point where you're actually physically harming someone, so they feel like I can rationalize my behavior. Because the detrimental causing economic in nature is not physical and a lot of times too I find. Especially, the sophisticated ones to be..

fraud CPA managing director Frank Pena senior director CSI David South Trier Cf Mercatus general counsel accountant murder McLean Theranos CEO consultant
"managing director" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

Wild Business Growth Podcast

07:26 min | 9 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

"Let's get to a segment on inspiration and creativity, so we're going to go through one by one. The ideas in your fold NAM just getting. So when you think about it because you guys have come up with so many creative ideas, I know fast company literally named you one of the top one hundred creative people in the world. So there's proof they are creative. According to Fast Company. That's. Yeah Exactly. So, what do you do to stay creative in to come up with these new ways of thinking for such a historic famous brand? Probably answered this earlier actually. A I am mice crisis when I'm surrounded by people and so kind of being the building. Absorbing what's going on there and let's not forget what's happening at Abbey Road. Every day is just incredible. I'm lucky I can stand at the back of control rooms. Sneak in, you know you see musicians that have never you know watching a film score. Being played the Orchestra Wilkerson having never seen the score before picks up their instruments off Fago and the composer. WHO's who? Composed it where it wasn't his mind a few weeks ago in it's Ni- being played in the studio that talent and creativity that is beyond my capabilities, certainly, but also beyond comprehension, so I think I'm humbled everyday by the creativity in the building, so Abbey Right? itself is a very inspirational space to be in on then I have this amazing team or always challenging. What's next? What's next so I? Think that's hi. HOW WE STI- Christ you know tentacles into technology and and you know Akon Song Future Gazing. It kind of gives you a license to think while beyond the day today, which also I think kind of opens up decree ice of mind. So schedule creativity I think it just it kind of happens. For to Asli Ryan's in my day today, but also I find. On a very personal level you know I I like to run when I can. It's it's good for it's good for the mind, but that's often when I kind of unwittingly can kind of have some of my more creative votes, because night for Reisen, and then suddenly something kind of comes comes to. So when you're not zoning out when you're in the studio. Clearly done something to encourage in reward in some sort, creative ideas and new ways of thinking there. How do you do that and? How do you create this culture of creativity and encouragement? In the studio. Because I have a team that like I say are fiercely pride of the brands and do want to be part of the future stories said they are. They are not truly quite creative types by think it's you know as a leader, I think it's about leading from the front to a degree, but also empowering people so. None of this is a by. Leeann, my ideas, this is a US coming up with ideas as a collective and giving people real ownership of the areas of the business that they work in and feel like they're stakeholders in in the businesses future I don't know I can't really pinpoint what exactly are done. I'd I I just have. A great aid and you know I. Try and paint the future. They're really good actually than kind of filling in the gaps in on you providing the steps to get us there. I don't know whatever I'm doing. I'm doing it unconsciously. I think you're just running a ton, and you keep getting more and more creative ideas on that. No, what is it about running in when your? Mind is kind of I guess relaxing in a sense that you think helps you to come up with ideas and kind of maybe rethink things with a different spin. I. Just thought I think it's taking the business side of out of your brain. I mean because I'll be right. Now has so many different business units in different business areas might days at the studios are crazy on generally running from pillar to post most days so actually having quiet in my brain and kind of getting distracted by I was GONNA say nature, but I live in London. Let's clear. But just kind of allowing for that quiet time is Kinda. When you have those I mean Eureka moments is overstating. Eh, just you the it's easier to. Find Solutions to either problems that you have or or actually ideas that your brain is probably been working on in the background, just kind of bubble up at unidentified to described. I went on a really interesting training course a couple of years ago by quiet time is when your Brian is most, it is when you come up with your best ideas on some people. That's the shower. Some people that scene Wolfgang for me, it just happens to be running. Yeah, it could for me. It's running in the shower and this is why have soared. Yeah I I'm not condoning that. So, let's get to a fan. Favorite segment called the wild business shadow of the week. Business out of the week. which regrettably was not recorded at Abbey Road, but it may be at some point in the I'm sure. Next yeah next week. So while business shadow the week. This is where we talk about a campaign or add or. Trend in the marketing space that. Is really creative and breakthrough, and at the time of this recording you know we have seen how so many businesses have adjusted to the pandemic and obviously. No industry has been unaffected by this. So that goes without saying, but you were saying. There's some really cool stories about what some traditionally be to be. Food sellers are doing in the UK. That has been really cool. You might share what happened there yeah sure I mean it's a very mom-and-pop story, and in one sense but I guess it was my. It was kind of my daily nightmare was identified. It was like New, York but there was a there was a period here in London specifically where actually trying to get groceries. Was You know nigh impossible and everyone was in slight panic mode and I just think what was really clever is a. On I think actually in general, the smartest examples of innovation during lockdown are those businesses that just pivoted to new business models really really quickly so my. Mike kind of highlights. I guess is the food sellers in the various food markets in London weather. It's covent garden or or Any. The others had a real problem because they used to provide all of the food for restaurants which were closed. I'm within a week of everything Schussing Dine in London's which is my frame of reference, these to be sellers had pivoted completely direct.

London Mike kind Abbey Road Fast Company Abbey Asli Ryan Reisen Fago York Leeann US UK Wolfgang Brian
"managing director" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"managing director" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"Fa Gielen you're joining me in episode. Three twelve of our special AI futures Saturday series, as you'll recall from the last couple of weekends this I, a twelve part series is about the future of governing artificial intelligence. We're going to begin with the early phases of governance, and we're going to build all the way up to what that's GonNa. Look like in the long term and how I might radically transform how we govern governor. Even humans interact with machines. We're going to be stretching things into the future. So this is GonNa be a lot of fun and today we're still in the phases, and we're speaking with someone who has expertise in exactly that. Constantinos are. Is the managing director of the I aaa. Standards Association the I triple E. for those of you don't know they've been around for over one hundred years developed standards for things like Wi, fi and countless other technologies among the largest organizations of their kind in the world and Constantinos plays an important role there before that he was with the European Patent Office in his experience included establishing the European patent offices path. Academy Constantinos is a PhD in energy engineering, and a Master's in mechanical engineering from the University of stood guard in in this week's episode. He speaks with us about beginning the early phases of developing AI standards and policies for particular individual use cases in this episode talk about using the data of children for example for marketing purposes so essentially. We're talking about baby steps. Steps towards actual policy last week's episode with the D. With Corinne. We talked about beginning with AI principles. This is about kind of inching a bit farther and finding those first places to find a policy fit Constantinos does a great job of describing it. He also paints a picture of what that might look like into the future. So this is an awfully fun episode. Episode. I had Constantinos on two years ago. I've supported the TRIPOLIS ethically align design ai work in our editorial coverage here to merge dot com in the past, and I.

Academy Constantinos Constantinos AI Fa Gielen European Patent Office Standards Association managing director TRIPOLIS Wi University of
UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

02:30 min | 1 year ago

UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

"K. Is a country that is adopted many payments innovations faster than most and it has risen to the challenge set by the European Union's Second Payment Services Directive which requires banks to open up their payments infrastructure. The resulting open banking promises to unleash even greater innovation by reducing the barriers of entry to the payment services market the UK's experience therefore is likely to foreshadow the evolution of payment systems around the world. My guests this month are Adrian. Buckle head of research portrayed dissociation. Uk Finance Steve Everett Managing Director of payments for global transaction banking Lloyds Banking Group and Fiona Roach Canning Co founder of UK based Fintech pollinate. I started our conversation by asking Adrian. What explains the apparent outbursts of innovation around payments in recent history? That hasn't been a lot of innovation. I'm payments in recent years. Although I think the changes in consumer behavior the patterns of payments that we've been seeing over the last five years probably driven more by innovations. That happened in the five years before that because people are very much creatures of habit when it comes to the way that they pay for things. It takes a lot for people to decide to change the way they pay and slow for example. The things that we've been seeing really growing over the last five years one of the key examples would be contactless payments and that has really exploded since about two thousand fifteen but actually the first contact and contactless cards were introduced in two thousand seven. So it's taken a long time for consumers to come round to the idea of contactless cards and then really take them and use them in a huge way such that by twenty eighteen. I think one in five payments made by consumers were made using contactless cards so we have seen some real innovations and real changes some of that due to changes in technology so for example contactless technology coming in but also mobile devices. And the fact that we're now all essentially carrying a mini computer around the time which gives us access to a huge amount of data and huge mountain information but also regulatory changes which have opened up the information that banks provide access to in the ways in which we can interact with all banks and those are going to provide changes that perhaps haven't had an impact on consumer behavior in recent years but are likely to be really key defining factors in the way that we pay for things over the next five or ten years

Steve Everett Fiona Roach Canning Co Fintech UK Adrian Lloyds Banking Group European Union Buckle
"managing director" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"managing director" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"So jumping back to the digital non human world two types of platforms and technologies. These are making the biggest impact or will make the biggest impact for sure. What would be seeing more and more on the rise and it's not fully deployed? It's highly complex. is to to build from beckoned perspective intelligence on top of the interfaces that you're creating so that's an interesting and rising technology trends bad. I think it's going to have some impact on creating new and optimized experiences Ryan says personalization individualization for consumers show on a front end perspective. I think one of the highest growth platforms in the. US is one of the delivery services and we've seen for example Uber moving into enhancing their driving services by leveraging the humans ends that they have as an acid into creating more convenient services for other human beings that can only be done by human beings going a little bit in the Mechanical Turk. What kind of direction? So there's a lot of interesting trends going on in that space to see how we can create mass convenience human enhanced technology technology and then I'll see always arise of some more consumer trend oriented talking about top for example where communities come together in new ways what I see is an interesting trend. The REC- he in the US move from a lending perspective. But it's interesting in China is Pinto. Duo is a company ends ends. Many people haven't heard about it. It's the third biggest economist at from in China initially allows consumers to kind of consolidate into a group end by product as a consolidated group Asking for reductions of price because a kind of consolidate demand for products so that's quite an interesting trend kind of be creating 'em building new types of platforms for commercial In that sense wow. That's pretty neat idea. Now it's an amazing idea totally it kind of its copied from B. Two B. Context and just brought it to it's kind of a digital marketplace fascinating company also the short timeframe timeframe that they kind of grew in another interesting trend that we see particularly coming more about in the. US is still all around. The aspects of in how mobility is kind of like the base of of everything that we're doing it's humans because mobility gives us the freedom to explore all of the things that we wanna do and the new up platforms micro mobility and consolidated mobility. Ask some interesting and exciting trends. What do you mean? By micro mobility the micro mobility is more of the different types of infrastructure that received coming into the marketplace that a facing difficulty in the building business business model around that transport. You between one to five miles see. Yeah so we work with the department transportation and transit and so so we so you know that their term is the last mile getting people that last mile last night ability for inner city mobility. That's a lot of terms that kind of describe this situation situation and T. L. G. G. just did a campaign for is it hoot in San Diego's over to this. Yeah so we were helping one of our clients to grow or to test invalidate a product hypotheses around in electrical vehicle commuting service in California in this case who drives to see how are certain geographical regions utilizing such service. is their business model behind it. What are the key? KPI's to to see. How would we be able to scale something like that? Yes that's what we just executed in the last three months so it's it's electrical vehicles that go around town and people car pool pool in IT zone it is. Yeah you kind of a cop pulled vehicle or you order it from A. B. Kinda destination. A few people in there. It's just a different more war oriented type of transportation. I wanted to step back and talk a little bit about your background. I found it fascinating. You disrupt things yourself. You're Lufthansa were. I believe you started as a flight. Attendants right yeah almost so in Germany. We have special educational program or in at the Times that I was doing it. Anyhow is big corporations offered work employment kind of situations in some of an apprenticeship and at the same time send as you to university so I was the lucky one out of a quite a few applicants to be picked for such paid kind of education and then after that I felt I was too young to to do the day to day business smart so I became a flight attendant actually traveled the world. And I guess I built my character at that time but you work to different positions and ultimately you pitched the idea internally of creating an innovation hub and you created a team seem to create digital innovation within the airline itself. So how easy or how difficult was it to get buy in from from a corporate perspective to just just jump in and say I want to create something totally new here. I think the time probably the time was somewhat right. We were a team of three executive assistance to the C. Suite and we kind of the whole subject of desert. Transformation came across our desk all of the time from like more external sources. It wasn't so widely discussed within the organization during a conversation that I had with the chief financial officer at the time where she asked I am how we potentially could deploy facebook within the organization we kind of use that moment to provide her with A. Pov of what tons. I should to be you know taking on in terms of digital transformation and that kind of opened the door for her to say. Hey you have a point of view. Why don't you built this point of view a little further and this is also how I met two G. M. because then he'll digi helped us to to build a pov come up with like the one of the first projects let's for digital transformation Philistines at and ultimately also the foundation of tens of innovation hop as the digital innovation unit from? This town's like you. So you had this pitch sort of in your back pocket ready that confer you so I I find that whole idea of enterpreneurship just really really fascinating. What advice would you give to? Let's say someone who works in the larger corporation who maybe has these goals and dreams of creating something something new within their organization any advice on how to go about that now go to the highest level and be assistant so I really believe with every Z.. Sweet Interaction I had as there are. They is an open ear and opportunity for this. oftentimes decision makers are somewhat detached hedged from the organization through the organization not because of their own interests. And so if you have a good idea and your little bit bold and you think you can really move the needle. Oh then you should pitch to whoever you think is most suitable for it and might have the highest drive to pick it up. And if you're consistent I'm sure you will find. I'm sure part of the equation was the people at Luther. John's a who were willing to listen anything within the lasagna structure or something that you would think companies would need to have in place to welcome ideas from bottom up. I actually think look sensitive to very smart things that created a bit of a A movement within the organization that not necessarily creates like soul crazy revenue impacts right away but definitely a strong cultural impact in which is on the one hand side created aside budgets where every employee could pitch their ideas to a group of people that was selected acted and had people from the C. Suite to some regular employees in them to decide upon whether the idea was good and then they would get funding due to kind of bring these tai-bo minimum viable product to live of the idea whether it was process improvement. A totally new idea of something and that me led to a lot of global movement to what's changing and becoming more digital and bringing things to live that maybe sit outside of the classical budget structure of big corporations.

China US C. Suite Ryan Lufthansa San Diego California John facebook T. L. G. G. Germany chief financial officer A. Pov executive G. M.
"managing director" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"managing director" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Hey everyone this is rudy. Fernandez some creative outhouse catrine. Zimmerman is the managing director of T. L. G. G. Consulting in New York a strategic digital consulting agency. But more than that. She someone who really understands the overall landscape of digitization our conversation was about what we can all expect to see in the ever changing digital world a couple of times in the conversation where I was just blown away especially when she talked about privacy issues. We also talked about trends and counter trends and how she started the innovation hub. At Luke Tonga. I really enjoyed the conversation and you will to check it out. Welcome to marketing. Upheaval marketing up. From welcome to the marketing people. My guess is Zimmermann the managing director of not L. G. G. Consulting in New York a strategic digital consulting agency catrine.

managing director T. L. G. G. Consulting New York Zimmerman Fernandez Zimmermann
"managing director" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"managing director" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Believers in the rise of the edge and distributed and decentralized computing with the the prevalence of distributed workforce's and best less workers. We are looking at. What does the future of a workplace look like and we continue to look at technologies which will be emerging like AARP are quantum computing blockchain computing? And just keep an open mind on some of these things so those are I would say some of the things. We are currently differently spending our cycles in but then we keep an open mind on twenty to thirty percent of the time and then on the consumer facing opportunities We are looking looking at the rise of millennials. What things do they care about? We're looking at new brands which need to get created for direct to consumer your product and service opportunities. We're looking at what are the direct to consumer healthcare opportunities. So I think those are some of the teams and trains as we are spending time. Today I'd love to dial into a couple of things you mentioned there. First of all you mentioned on the consumer side thinking about the rise of the millennials. What do they care about outs? And as you learn more about that. Finding the ideas that make a connection back to. Can you talk a bit about what you have. You and your colleagues have derived as as those things that they care about and and maybe tied that back to win investment or two if you care to that you have found align particularly nicely to that that that evolution yes. I think First and foremost right The millennials millennials the way they discovered the things is not search right like instagram is a platform for them. It's not facebook so if you need to get to them you you need to have a different paradigm which has discovery based rather than so based. That's I the second thing is They're very interested in company means and technologies. which do good beyond just serving their needs? So they're very conscious of the impact. The company will have beyond providing a product whether it's planetary health or for the goodness of mankind The third thing I would say is their big believers in ranking thinks horses owning them and be called this the experience economy. If you I will so those are some of the things. We are seeing With them the way they consume stuff the way they want to look for broader impact and where they discovered things. So let's let's look at some examples of companies in consumers which have done well for us First and foremost it's left which is community driven which has strong values and millennials really resonate with lift because of that and the company has been extremely successful because of that Let's look at secondly a company called posh mark which is the leader in mobile fashioned operating social marketplace Everything in fashion there is discovered through pictures and following other people so it's instagram meeting ECOMMERCE A toad example of a company. which is he's doing extremely well is growth collaborative which is building the next generation of proctor and gamble there? You go in and are providing writing household goods which need to finish every four to six weeks which are which are good for the environment and it's making a huge impact and they do a bang-up job of curation and the community educating others why to use these products over others so those Dr some examples which are top of my mind that I wanted to share all good ones. I appreciate that. Let's switch back to some of the areas as you described in terms of were to be investments. You mentioned That with Moore's law plateauing there certain areas That you've been diving deep. Eat more deeply into for opportunity. You mentioned augmented reality. Virtual Reality blockchain quantum computing. You reference artificial intelligence. I wanted to ask you first of all since it is businesses. Obviously business to business. These are Enterprises seeking enterprises or businesses seeking businesses as customers customers. And what do you find as you think about. The companies were purchasing the services or the products of your oil companies especially in the relatively early stage of their evolution since again you are investing typically in the early stage of their evolution. What what are the best kinds of partnerships that you have seen? What differentiates say a firm that that partners very well with venture back fairly early stage companies versus those that do not? Yes so I think. Let's look at a few examples of without naming companies right. Okay so so what I would say is I would say that our X. forward companies which are looking for cutting edge technologies to change the way they operate and they're tech forward in the sense. They're saying what technologies should I adopt. which little changed the way I operate and will increase my top line and my bottom line and give me a competitive more against the people like compact compete with on a daily basis so the startups? We have which end up doing extremely well are able to match themselves to these tech forward alward mean forward competence and win that match happens are startups are able to engage with these companies in really really understanding. What are their pain points? What are the biggest problems? They're facing. How should they package their products? How should they position their products? Folks how should they price them and these tech forward companies are willing to provide them that information because they know they can't build these solutions in house so when that manage happens right like it's a marriage made in heaven so we look far to our network as you know Mayfield has an innovators network of over two thousand companies. We are trying to always match establish companies who are looking for startups. Who can solve the real problems for with them and they can be early? Adopters these companies deliver on what they need. So it's a lot of patients. It's a lot of matchmaking. By even if you can get five ten industry customers talking to an early stage startup it can do wonders and when that product comes to market it it just hits escape velocity so rather than giving specific examples. I would say you're looking for more. And more tech forward. ALWARD companies who believe technology is the way their business is going to move forward and these are not IT companies. I'm talking about regular companies which relies that. Hey they can get Amazon. They can get crackled They can get facebook. How do they stay forward? Forward off other established Silicon Valley companies. Who are essentially eating into their markets? And they need be do beat technologies to help them compete with those big giants very interesting. Indeed I wanted to ask you a bit about how you remain. In current you have the advantage of a bright and informs team that no doubt or have a lot of learning agility associated with how they operate you also have a great advantage of being pitched a great number of ideas by very smart people who are looking to change industries and no doubt even for those that you don't invest in. There's a certain amount out of education and enlightenment. That comes from that I I wonder Of course please validate or or or dispel that those two categories. I assume I have those right. But I'd also love to understand how else you remain currents as to the evolution of opportunities as you contemplate how to How to translate back to opportunity for Mayfield so I would act things which as a team We try to do one We talked to in the B. B. Space A lot of potential customers really understanding water. They're keeping points. And where is the gap in existing incumbents providing solutions. So you're talking to real customers for your potential companies. Means you're going to find in the future and we have two thousand of those in our network so we are doing innovation briefings. They're coming to our offices. This is we are doing webcasts. We going on a road show with them. So that's I The second thing is We read a lot of what kind of tech innovation is happening in universities. What are the kinds of patterns which are coming? What are the kinds of research papers? One of the open source projects that are being developed in industry leading tech companies which the rest of the world is going to need and then thirdly right like like bringing in speakers from outside who can enlighten US weekly biweekly monthly basis on a continuous continuous learning. Part their curiosity and hunger is driving our need for understanding new area so those would be things on top of the two. You mentioned that is keeping US got it excellent. I I want to go back to some of the opportunities that you described in terms of enterprise investments that you were making each of the topics that you've mentioned Some more than others I think of virtual reality artificial intelligence quantum computing each of them. I'm have value propositions that are nearer medium-term but also each of them have long term in some cases you take a I for example you translate that through. Through two artificial general intelligence we may be decades away from it. And I'm curious as you think about opportunity. Is there a a rule of thumb that you use as to how near-term the the opportunity needs to be. Do you have Do you place bets. That may be you know what decade out Because the thinking that that that is being done by the entrepreneur requires broader evolution of the marketplace. Or do require that there is something that is potentially sellable in the very near term. I would say We take a balanced approach If everything is in the near term the big companies would be doing it right and it's really not an early stage rancher opportunity opportunity So we tried to take a balanced approach. Our belief is building. An industry leading company is a marathon. It's not a sprint. So be funded company. They'll have a product out because it's a paper and Pencil idea depending upon what they're building in twelve months eighteen months twenty four months sometimes thirty six months so we need to make sure based on judgment when they come out. Will there be demand from five customers in barely ten ten customers twenty cody. Because they can't solve more than that anyways right then five years from this starter in the market be a thousand listen customers. Ten years from this started with the market be hundred thousand customers so I think it's based on that belief because a startup can't handle title ten thousand enterprise customers near three or four or five. It's GONNA take time. So that's why it's an evolution of a company on what they can digest I because startups metoo focus too. They don't die of starvation. They die over indigestion. So this is a balance I if a company launches a product and has no customer demand the need then the entrepreneur. NBC Haven't done their homework. So we want back on evolving markets.

facebook Mayfield AARP US edge technologies instagram ALWARD NBC Moore Amazon
"managing director" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"managing director" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Our third part in a ten part series for scaling your start up. You can visit this week in startups dot com slash Cal. And I am here with managing director. Jackie deegan. Who does all of our education, which includes this week? Can startups is very podcast at launch which is our investment company and Jason demont who manages is the managing director of the launch accelerator. We have seven companies apply we have seven companies get accepted from hundreds of applications. We give them a hundred thousand dollars, and we work with them on these various shoes for twelve weeks and twenty sessions, and then hopefully, invest more from our syndicate. Okay. Let's talk about competitors. We're on slide. Six of seven, sir. Six point competitors should out on the celebrator. We don't only work with them for the twelve weeks. We work with them for the life of the company all these issues these issues up. Yes, definitely. And that's we're getting the knowledge from like this hard-fought knowledge that were sharing with you in in in. This is in our opinions this comes from scar tissue in a lot of cases and some big victories to so with competitors. Unless you're creating in a timely new market, you're going to have competitor. So Jackie how much do you think founder should be paying attention to their competitors and tease another? Metaphor were moving from boats. Two cars now, we use a car analogy so competitors or kind of like your rear view mirror, and your customers are more like your windshield. And Jeff Bezos has talked at length about this. He tributes Amazon success to obsessive compulsive focus on customer over competitor. So I think Jason your experience. Can you tell when founders not focusing enough on their customers like are there? What are the signs of that? Yeah. Some founders don't talk to their customers, which is crazy. Maybe they shield themselves from the customer support line. So one point here even in our own company. Somebody's like, I'll take you off the customer support you. I don't want to be annoyed by that knows like it's like five emails a week. And sometimes it's really interesting stuff. No. I don't wanna be taken off the support lines, please. No. And so it's usually because a founder is playing the role of founder CEO and are not actually passionate about what they're doing. And you know, I always try to be candid with people like is this what you really want to do in life. I love the newsletters. I'm doing at.

founder Jackie deegan managing director Jason demont Jeff Bezos founder CEO Amazon twelve weeks hundred thousand dollars
"managing director" Discussed on Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"managing director" Discussed on Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

"Show mccambridge managing director Stella recruitment. Thanks for joining me on this journey on Kevin the secrets of inspirational is the reasonable the sticky that is share the unique to any of these successful individuals and really unpack had the chiefs success in heartlands Alba's to do similar. Thanks. So thanks for tuning in and listening a hung enjoy the series. Pool. West thanks for joining us as part of the L, recruitment inspirational leaders podcast series just thought would stop from the beginning. And perhaps you could give us some context the bat. Widow stop and where you from. Picks him show. It's a role. So we'd stats thousand nine sort of property sid. I'm neat. Sam go in law and Craig way, she got Jimmy time. My neom business. Don't buy guy who ended up in jail was was it was pretty i-it's move in dates came to van law here. She's come with main cry and I'll say look at nothing to put towards at about nine money. He has Craig's that a couple of grand late zone have chicken. We've boo. Wait, a beater Niksic in your head a little business to get it. We started it from saluted nothing. It's grown really these days cry. We out taunt but low still in both of the business. So whilst others literally the threes and the beginning of that moment on beckon to Carinthia. Wow. And just to give us a bit of context about where the business got to air sort of how many people would just give us maybe a bit of an indication with businesses now. So you get back thin, basically the criminals because keep was back into on outlaws study set all on the would mega which would quite well in. So basically three months miss his grown time with now Sitton with us civil business over the close to eighty people. So it's a big little base nail ago. Sadie management middle management. United. We've got these staple here at so it's a pretty proud of your Thomas the count 'cause premise here. Nielsen straight. We moved to all we succeed in easy guy. Johnny. Working recently same of out here. And we literally counts anymore people mccown if it's stack will county cows, it's really cool to say, it's really proud to and just give the listeners bit of view, all total property works. Just give us a quick summary of what the business as he does. So cool businesses. Go reach so big industrial sheets. We are not nine frights. Those are the people district goods outta so waiting upgrade them them. But ruse on them. Which is basically shock window. So, but the hamlet Burkan the lights we cross the range billion roofing of big industrial shades in Houston. Pliant finance wanted to they said a couple of months, and we will look at Rachel. Rachel slot. We could get the numbers stack up. We have our own civil business which season of the all. Sinoe basically can create signs of mobile where winning big very reactive foyer on people. And I think is the drawing of the shift in construction counties due to rhythm. So pavement down with diggers and trials saying is trying to weigh in on it just wants this dollar contract, which is really coat. Yes. So one is to massive. So the the ideas in the process of the strategies why? Fantastic main maybe just technical of stiffs back when you finish school. What was your vision? Or or, you know, your idea of we career would go or what it might look at that point until. The truth is. Might sue the grows, but we didn't end Barry Saint approaching minutes here exceedingly leave school. We we didn't have the greatest upbringing this families. So it wasn't a little correction sixties way. And so. What I was going to hiding. He goes on daily baby white, you know, and so. And when drove a track little bit instead of Remo ad for me. So I had no vision. I didn't know what I wanted to where I wanted to bay schooling in. Three with it. So I had that transcend to you mentioned that you you started a company, and then yet your part of maybe put in a position where it was a little bit challenging before you meet the goal is to kick off with Todo property works. But witted the the sort of inclination to start your company come from. I worked for a party management, salmon. I don't really Aina and he sold that. And. The company was a little bit out residential maintenance on the model rectum which involvement in Memphis got commercial in released Greenwood man, also gonna do it on my island. And I'm a stay needed something. They took it see clients with me and one of those flaws closet

Sam Craig Barry Saint Rachel slot managing director heartlands Alba Kevin Carinthia Sitton Remo Aina Nielsen Johnny Thomas Memphis Houston Greenwood Jimmy three months