35 Burst results for "malala"

"malala" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:45 min | Last week

"malala" Discussed on Here & Now

"Dea. Hadeed thank you so much. you're welcome. Thank you tanya. And you can see that british vogue cover of malala yousafzai as well as a link to the article on here now dot org in eighteen. Ninety seven the daring belgian commander. Adrian does your lodge set out to become the first explored a visit the earth's magnetic south pole. He didn't make it the commander and his crew got stuck in the sea ice and instead said a different record they became the first people ever to spend an entire winter at the bottom of the earth. Not everyone escaped with their lives or their sanity. Julian sanctum is author of a new book about the expedition. It's called madhouse at the end of the earth belgium journey into the dark antarctic night. Julian welcome thanks very much for having me so. What did people know of antarctica at the time in eighteen ninety seven. How uncharted was it. People didn't even know if it was a continent. It was believed that it. It was very likely to be an ocean covered with ice the same way that the arctic is that hasn't been an expert series expedition of any kind since in the last fifty years. The its fauna. It's flora its geology coastlines. Were all but unknown at that time and so it was quite a daunting proposition. For a couple dozen men. Many of whom were in no way prepared for this to explore the great white unknown. No doubt they were a bit of a rag. Tag group weren't they. I mean they didn't speak the same language they had very little cold weather polar experience. What was it like on board. The ship was riven with Divisions of french-speaking walloons didn't get along with the the dutch-speaking flemings Then there was the resentment between the the sailors. Which were you know. Some of them were a notch below pirates in terms of discipline And the norwegian sailors that detroit Brought in because of their experience of cold weather and then there was no psychological. Screening the way. There is today in these sorts of missions. And i think it's important to say there were also a couple of scientists on board and after they sailed south for many days and weeks even The guy who did make it to antarctica they made twenty landings and every delighted everybody to be in this place that they had only dreamt of. What did the scientists find. When they got off the ship they found a world out of fantasy. It was just a a and it's it's one that i was lucky enough to visit a couple of years ago. In december twenty eighteen. I traveled to the zero straight which is named after the commander of the belgian and it is one of the most sublime places on earth. It really and it hasn't changed. At least it hasn't appeared to change in the last hundred twenty years. Of course the ecosystem is slowly breaking down and being threatened by climate change but it looks identical and what they found was a landed. It looks like the imagine if the himalayas somehow the had risen halfway up the himalayas and the animals there were not at all. We're not used to humans. And so they could approach them and the science discovered more than one hundred new species. Many of them were insects but for a scientist must have been pure bliss but later that bliss gave way to get to terror as when they drifted into the bellingshausen see on their way to the south magnetic pole and by that time. The winter i said started to set in. Will you took the words right out of my mouth though. The bliss turned a terror. Because at that point the commander had a choice right. He could have either turned back or sale deeper into the ice in deeper into winter. Why did he keep going because he knew he was gonna get stuck. This is one of the questions that i endeavored to solve with this book. He knew that if he turned back without having achieved the goal of reaching the south magnetic pole that he would be lambasted in the belgian. Press or at least he thought he would be in. That scared him more than the prospect of spending winter in the antarctic. He knew that if he managed to survive the winter he and his men would become the first to spend a winter in the antarctic and so that in itself would be something to boast about in expeditions of this kind. Great stories are as valuable resources. Gold wow so that's like pure hubris right. I mean how unprepared was the crew for what happened on on may sixteenth. Then when the sun goes down in doesn't come back for seven days. Well i would say that only one man was prepared for that and that man was frederick cook. He was the ship's jin he was an american. He had spent A few grueling winters in the arctic among the inuit of greenland even he was very much opposed to the idea of wintering in the is in fact everybody but the commander was which is why. It's it's such a baffling decision. That your would have sailed to the south. I mean that set the stage for a really horrendous experience in among the men because they felt that this was something they had no control over they felt betrayed and in addition when the sun sets and the cold sets in their bodies and minds began to break down and they were subjected not just to scurvy but to a sort of a mysterious polar malays that made their heart rates. Beat a radically. The the muscles atrophied they sank deep into depression and some were brought to the brink of insanity in two men actually Lost their minds. One of them never recovered It was a an incredible ordeal. It's thanks to cook and his ingenuity. In fact and he had an idea of what was going on he actually introduced penguin meat into the cruise diets. Much to their disgust. Actually but it helped indeed. He thought back to his time among the annual it and realized that they had a traditional diet of fresh meat and access to Vegetables or fruit for much of the year that they didn't exhibit the signs of scurvy. And so he reasons Quite brilliantly that there must be something in fresh meat that can all of the body needs to ward off the disease and he was right. Wouldn't be for another couple of decades that we'd realize why he was right into the. You know the meat of all animals. Barring a few exceptions like human guinea pigs contains vitamin c. And those who took his advice did much better and those who refuse to swallow the revolting penguin meat which he recommended be eaten raw by the way kept on sliding down the slope of scurvy and disease that if you don't intervene leads. Inevitably to death. So how under those conditions did they get out well again. Our friend frederick cook by convincing the men somehow possible that they might extricate this ship from a flow of is more than a mile in diameter. the it was baffling to them at first. This idea was ludicrous. It was almost as if he had suggested that. They flap their arms and fly home. I mean they hit even tried to blow the ice up with bombs and that didn't work. So how how could any plan work. Well yeah he thought is cook over the time when the sun was absent had come to revere the sun and so he he wanted to find a way to let the sun.

antarctica may sixteenth Dea december twenty eighteen Adrian seven days first two men today british twenty landings first people frederick earth more than one hundred new spec one man Ninety seven one One belgian
"malala" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:47 min | Last week

"malala" Discussed on Here & Now

"Headlines gay news joe biden. Donald trump refused to do all four years. He was up at the white house. Just issued a proclamation stating therefore i. Joseph r biden junior president united states of america virtue of the authority by the constitution and the laws of the united states do hereby proclaim june twenty twenty one as lesbian gay bisexual transgender and queer. Josh was amazing. And what kind of things does he have a lot as you can. You can probably hear so. The question is really. I love what josh does. I love all of these journalists. Who are finding ways to reach out to audiences by talk. Take a topic to talk. The nieman lab is looking and tracking journalism trends and tiktok stephanie on their radar and they keeping a list of journalists and publishers. On tiktok there are hundreds of them out. They're not all as successful as the ones that we kind of aired today for you listeners. But what they're doing is they're looking for the audience of the future. Peter like the new young listeners. For here now. Where will they be there. Probably on tiktok right now wherever the viewers where the listeners so although the apps might change or the most popular apps might change i predict that journalists and news organizations wherever they are whatever the app might be journalists will try and beyond that app as well so i think what journalism is out there for as long as tiktok his popular and journalists will look for something else because the relentless so maybe the maybe the future of journalism and not so much fat.

joe biden Donald trump Josh josh Peter today stephanie four years hundreds white house i. Joseph r biden queer tiktok lab june twenty united states of america president united states one twenty
Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II, dies aged 99

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II, dies aged 99

"Prince Philip the tough minded husband of Queen Elizabeth the second has died at the age of ninety nine his marriage both defined and constricted his life placing the irascible tough minded Philip three steps behind the queen in public even if he was the head of the household in private and the dominant figure in raising four children his life spanned nearly a century of European and British history starting with his birth is a member of the Greek royal family in exile and ending with him as the longest serving council temperatures history Philip once credited the queen's amiable cards have pulled a long and happy marriage take it from me the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance he was known for his occasionally racist and sexist gaffes in one particular comments activist Malala Yousafzai who fought for women's right to an education he mentioned why he thought children go to school establece Philip also headed hundreds of charities and funded programs that help you to school children have challenging outdoor adventures Karen Thomas London

Prince Philip Philip Queen Elizabeth Malala Yousafzai Establece Philip Karen Thomas London
Malala Yousafzai to produce content for Apple streaming service

the NewsWorthy

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Malala Yousafzai to produce content for Apple streaming service

"Nobel peace prize winner. Malala yousafzai is taking her passions to the small screen. the twenty-three-year-old activist will work with apple. To produce dramas comedies children's series documentaries and more that will stream on apple tv plus yussef. Cy told reuters introduce people to new voices and perspectives and she hopes young girls will be inspired by her work already. Use of cy has spent years promoting girls education when she was twelve. She started blogging. The bbc about what it was like to live in pakistan under taliban rule a few years later she was shot in the head by taliban gunmen fortunately she recovered and kept fighting against girls. Oppression at seventeen. She became the youngest nobel peace prize laureate ever. No word yet on when her shows and movies will drop on apple tv plus so stay tuned

Malala Yousafzai Yussef Apple CY Reuters Taliban BBC Pakistan
3 female journalists in Afghanistan are killed

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 3 months ago

3 female journalists in Afghanistan are killed

"Someone shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning state. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, One of the women was shot nods for he. Me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and Even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported her cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan as Isis been responsible for other attacks like this Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much for an anxiety and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things too. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war. Sharing power and those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people. Might be critical of the negotiations or critical. The Taliban, who frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular when they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Taliban Kabul Canada China Afghan Government United States
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 3 months ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Someone shot and killed three Afghan journalists yesterday, all three women worked at a TV station. Assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning state. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, one of the women were shot. And as for he me she was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported our cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much fear and anxiety, and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things toe. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war by sharing power. And those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people who might be critical of the negotiations or critical of the Taliban, who, frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular. When they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the chaos, do

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Taliban Kabul Canada Afghan Government China United States
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 3 months ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, One of the women was shot nods for he. Me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother had women hate me. He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should being opposed by conservative relatives and even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. He supported your cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now, Isis says they killed channels and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. But they're likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much real anxiety, and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things too. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war. Sharing power and those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people who might be critical of the negotiations or critical. The Taliban, who frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular when they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the chaos, do

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Steve Taliban Kabul Canada Afghan Government United States
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

01:55 min | 3 months ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning, ST. All right. Suppose I should say good afternoon to you on your side of the world. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. No. One of the women was shot Naz for he me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and Even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported her cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much for an anxiety and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The

Jalalabad Afghanistan Islamabad NAZ NPR Shana Malala Isis Canada China Kabul
CA school district's board resigns after unknowingly talking about parents in virtual meeting

WGN Programming

02:19 min | 4 months ago

CA school district's board resigns after unknowingly talking about parents in virtual meeting

"School board in California resigns over there. Negative comments about parents during what they thought was a virtual private meeting. News nations. Felicia Boulton joins us from the newsroom. Now, with a look at some of the video that captured that candid conversation Felisha, where debate those board members were caught slamming parents on a meeting that they thought was private. It was public. The video is now drawing backlash from the community. Are we alone? Yeah. If you're gonna call me out, I'm gonna you up party. That's just me. Has happened during the Oakley Union School District War beating last Wednesday. During the conversation, the board's president was heard ridiculing parents who wanted their Children to return to in person learning. Here's more of what was that? They want to pick on as because they want their baby sitters back, right? Evade e totally hear that because My brother had a delivery. Yeah. My brother had a delivery service for medical Maybe one of them clientele. We're parents with their kids in school. Uh, so when you guys well, you got your kids at home. No more fighting no more. Yes, Malala. The letters. Her family's three on the board members issued a statement saying, quote as trustees. We realize it is our responsibility to model the conduct that we expect of our students and staff and it is our obligation to build confidence and district leadership. Comments failed you in both regards, And for this. We offer our sincerest apology. They went on to say Please do not let our failure and judgment cast a shadow on the exceptional work that our teachers Administrators and hardworking employees are doing for the students of this district. They deserve and will need your support as you move forward. The district superintendent says the school board openings will temporarily be filled by members of the county Board of Education, new members will either be elected or appointed. However, that might take some time.

Felicia Boulton Felisha Oakley Union School District Malala California Board Of Education
IS says it killed female TV anchor in eastern Afghanistan

Here & Now

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

IS says it killed female TV anchor in eastern Afghanistan

"Afghanistan, where gunmen have shot and killed a female television anchor this following the killings of two other Afghan journalists last month. NPR's D. Hadid has the latest Malala May, 1 was a journalist and an advocate for Afghan women and Children. It wasn't clear why she was killed by gunmen who opened fire on her car shortly after she left her house Isis militants active in the area, But so are the Taliban journalists, activists and security officials have all been targeted by shadowy gunmen in recent months. MPR's DEA Hadeed reporting from Kabul.

D. Hadid Afghanistan NPR Taliban MPR DEA Kabul
"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:50 min | 11 months ago

"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

"We can keep leaders. Accountable. How can ensure that they stay committed to this? You know one of the. UN Sustainable Development actually to one is focused on quality education for all and then women's equality. The UN hopes that we would achieve this by twenty thirty, which is now just ten years away and curious how you think we can actually do the work making that happen..

UN
"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

04:46 min | 11 months ago

"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Be honest I I had so much energy I was like fifteen sixteen hours, just traveling around the world that was in refugee camps I was in Nigeria was speaking out for the Gulf War veteran by Boko Haram. I went to Iraq as well and I have been to. Brazil has been sort of traveling around the world because I want to meet the guys in allow them to raise their voices provide them apart from where they can seek out. In terms of that, it was quite a lot for me. Because still a school student I now travel and give speed somewhere then the next day all have applause in homework to finish out on night like finish my work in university honest. I did not too much academic pressure on myself. I allowed myself to have fun as well. We glad I did I think I needed that to just spend more time with friends and just sort of be like other students, but at the same time I gave my vacation diamond on my ESTA quantity. My Christmas Lauderda- to. That I do I definitely. Can imagine that it must be hard to live the life of a normal college student on as someone who is as renowned as you are in so that's incredible to hear that you were able to find that balancing college in the way that the average person doesn't. Actually. They have found that young side of myself. I was always surrounded by much in the end those a lot from that, but this was a foster ended. I was engaging with people of my age. Will I love to talk a little bit about your work in house? Connected to this moment thinking about on education for girls, communities around the world have been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic in so many different ways, and could you talk? Talk a little bit to how this global health crisis has impacted access to education, specifically hundred percent like covid nineteen is affecting people globally, and that includes young as well. I'm the Malala Fund we did research and looking into cases like Morla and the research shows that are more than ten million girls who are at risk of losing their education. These are guys who currently would drop out of their schools and mid. Never be able to. To return to their schools, either because of Eilly manages because of those cultural barriers that they face, vans are more likely to prefer early marriage for them than their education, but also a lot of them would be needed into workforce, because they will be a financial option for for the family, and these are the guys who are really vulnerable to being trapped in that, and they may never be able to return to school and this is. Is What happened in the case of Ebola is, but there were many girls who did not return to their schools, and.

Brazil Iraq Nigeria Ebola Malala Fund Eilly Morla
"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:00 min | 11 months ago

"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

"The CEO of Boston Consulting Group Rich Lesser recently sat down with the head of Ted Chris Anderson to talk about the road to recovery and the unique opportunity it presents in the fight against climate change. Stay tuned after the episode to hear a highlight from that conversation. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and welcome to the Ted, interview with the final episode of the season. So I. Think we all could use the dose of courage these days and today's guest has it in spades. In Two thousand twelve Malala Yousafzai was thrust into the global spotlight age fifteen, when the Taliban attacked nearly killed her, because she had criticized the group and their opposition to girls' education. Malala has founded the Malala Fund and travel the world to advocate for girls' rights to education. In twenty fourteen, she became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and in twenty seventeen, the youngest ever U. N. messenger of peace as of the summer. She's also a graduate of Oxford University. Listening to Malala I just I found her seven sparring some moving. This actually the first public interview. She's given in many months. She explains what the pandemic might mean for Girls Education. Safety and health around the world she understood, caused the power of working for change at the local, not only the national level. And she also reveals a bit of her regular self, the young woman who felt the pressure of becoming a global icon at age fifteen, but you can't wait to relax with net flicks. The activist whose role models include very girls she speaks for. My colleague Whitney Pennington Rogers Current Affairs Curator at Ted interviewed. Before a live virtual audience at Ted Two thousand and twenty here is Whitney. I am absolutely thrilled to welcome Malala Yousafzai. Thank you so. An, you know first and foremost. Congratulations on on your graduation. That is amazing. You recently tweeted that there will be lots of sleeping reading and Netflix in your future, and so how's it feel to be finished with college? And what have you been up to these past couple of weeks so honest? Meigs is really long. They were a month long exams and I was just exhausted. I needed a long long break. Right now I am allowing myself to saying that okay. You are allowed to do this for a bit because you need a bit of rest in a bit of break, so so far it's spending time with Family v setting my room because it's still looked like a high school guys room and I was like I'm a graduate now..

Ted Chris Anderson Malala Yousafzai Whitney Pennington Girls Education Malala Fund Malala Boston Consulting Group CEO Meigs Taliban Netflix Oxford University U. N.
"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

03:17 min | 11 months ago

"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

"And i remember when i was a blogging as an eleven year old girl sharing my story of what my life was like under the taliban and a lot of people get a lot of people listened to a disappointed me so that so many stories out there where guzzler twentieth by you and when you see their commitment that passionate and the hard work is just incredible how good boys and men to buy into the importance of empowering girls and women when my has sort of been advocating that your wishes his story of how he was celebrating the birth of his daughter wild his relatives. Everyone else was telling my mom. That next i and hopefully she would have a son when i was born so my father has always said a brigade me as his daughter and he was special about gaza education. So when have mental models who are openly and vocally feminists toll. Not just vava tell people that women are equipped men but the practically short. I think that's the men we need. Who win say that. They have given equal opportunities to their daughters. They will allow them to do any jaw. There will allow them to have access to the same opportunities as boys have. There's so many ways in which men can happen. They're very much needed. Because when we talk of on a bigger scale that's where the problem lies so when we talk about the decisions that are made in a room and mostly these these decisions about women what you see the dead men sitting on that day. but then there's a lack of women's representation there sometimes no woman on the table. So it's important that we provide room for women to beyond those decisions about their future. Their body are made so women's presence women's voices are very much needed. And i hold that men and boys need to stand up for that and defend women's a pointing. Let's take another question. I understand that. The number of girls attending school has improved. Greatly at the quality of education is often sorely lacking. What are your thoughts on the best ways to improve the quality of education once the girls are able to be in school. Hundred percent agree in when we talk about the gonzaga school. That number is in millions. But the guys who are in school in are not learning that number is also in millions and that is concerning you know in in future there would be a more than a billion goes who would not be ready to participate in the task for requirements. That are needed. Thank so there. Is that concern that if does not receive quality education. They're not receiving education about that. They might need in future. They will not be ready to participate in the economy. And also i personally think that we need gender sensitive curriculum. We need awareness about sexuality. We need awareness bald person prediction. And i think this is very much needed especially for young girls. So they're like teaching. The malala fund focuses on one is financing flirtation. There's a huge gap in that s. That's what we have been pushing for. Second is quality of education and with that good working with local activists as well looking through technology in making gender sensitive and the last is challenging social norms. That prevent us from windsor school. Once they were questioned..

taliban gonzaga school gaza malala fund windsor school
"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"malala" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello i'm chris. Addison and welcome to the ted interview with the final episode of the season. So i think we all could use the dose of courage these days and today's guest has it in spades in two thousand twelve malala. Yousafzai was thrust into the global spotlight age fifteen when the taliban attacked nearly killed her because she had criticized the group and their opposition to girls' education india since milana has founded the malala fund and travel the world to advocate for girls' rights to education in two thousand fourteen became the youngest recipient ever of the nobel peace prize and in two thousand seventeen. The youngest a you n. Messenger of peace as of this summer. She's also a graduate of oxford university. Listening to malala. I just i found her seven sparring so moving. This is actually the first public interview. She's given in many months. She explains what the pandemic might mean for girls. Education safety and health around the world. She underscores the power of working to change at the local not only the national level and she also reveals a bit of a regular self. The young woman who felt the pressure of becoming a global icon at age fifteen. But you can't wait to relax with net flicks the activist whose role models include the very girls. She speaks for my colleague. Whitney pennington rogers current affairs curator at ted interviewed before a live virtual audience at ted twenty. Twenty here is whitney. I am absolutely thrilled to welcome. Malala yousafzai thank you. It's been so on't and first and foremost congratulations on on your graduation..

Yousafzai malala fund and travel the wor Addison milana ted taliban chris oxford university india Whitney pennington rogers Malala yousafzai whitney
"malala" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

13:45 min | 1 year ago

"malala" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"When you are just chilling with Malala What shows do you watch? What does she like? What's Your Friendship Blake? I'm closer but I'm very close to her family as well. So it's been a lot of you know going and eating delicious food with her mother. Who is an incredible cook and her brothers who are just very funny and mischievous and as for her you know she's also very funny? She's a great sense of humor. She loves cricket. I remember this one time we were at the Clinton Foundation. Together and America. Ferrera walked up and ugly. Betty had been one of them shows. It was syndicated again. It's in the Swat valley so she'd grown up watching it and she was like you're not ugly betty. You're pretty pretty buddy. He's actually So when did you decide to take a shift towards now ventures so I had become interested in startups at Stanford Right. It was impossible not to I. I was surrounded by startups and in Pakistan I was seeing sort of the pitfalls of the nonprofit sector was very dependent on. US aid in particular era. As I saw the pace of innovation around me in Silicon Valley as something at the intersection of this and what I've been doing back home so at the point where I knew that you know Molo Oh is safe and healthy. The Malala Fund was now an established organization. The question for me was. Do I see my long term career in the nonprofit space then the answer there was no and I had been pulled back into the. US had been living in Dubai. With Mackenzie I'd been pulled into building an organization. It was a nonprofit if it but it was still a startup so my peer group was women building companies and I noticed how hard it was to raise money. If you're a woman if you were person of color if you were building something that had emission right that you were brave enough to boldly articulate and perhaps standby even when sometimes it was a tough decision. So I I was more and more interested in playing a role there. I decided to create an Angel Fund to start doing that to start investing in people that I believed in and I called it now. Ventures and I was fortunate to partner up with angels out in Silicon Valley Ans- over the last two years I've invested in ten companies. Eighty percent female founded all of them have a social mission companies like Parsley health out of New York wellness integrated with healthcare by humankind and other New York based company creating plastic stick free products for the body and home company. Out of San Francisco called PA. which is a a platform for carbon credits? So it helps measure and trade trade carbon credits helping businesses go carbon-neutral and it's been really interesting experience. In particular I think helping startups think through their mission and their impact. What makes you want to write a check? So I- invest early and it's about the people and it's about believing that the team has the skill to shoot not just start something but to grow it. And it's about knowing that their values are strongly aligned with my own in terms of they're gonNA make decisions that ensure that if this company succeeds this the world will be a better place right. So what is the outcome if this company is actually a success and is that good for the world or is that bad for the world and to me. That's a critical question. I also keep lens on diversity. I've never called my fund diversity city fund but as a woman a person of color. My network is very diverse and I tend to know amazing people who happened to be female and so that's been another Orlands that I've applied. How do you balance when you're working with your portfolio companies and also with your company which we're going to get to the the trade off that comes with what you just mentioned which is what's what's good for the mission versus the bottom line? I think that you have to find the happy be medium. I think if you do that then you're at a tremendous advantage. Young people are saying I WANNA work for companies that give me a sense of purpose. I'm I'm your half of millennials. Say they've ruled out working for a company because of its values or standard of conduct ninety four percents of consumers say they would switch brands to one that supports a 'cause now of of course that doesn't apply. The prices are significantly higher. Or you know. They're they're not in love with the brands. You still have to have a great product at the right price point. He'll have to have I. Product Market Fit. But if you're able to do that and give people a sense of purpose because I think now our generation is really looking to find a sense of identity in How they consume in the past? We found identity and family and faith in community. A lot of that in America I think has been somewhat eroded and we're disconnected and researching four sense of purpose and we want that purpose in everything. We want our deodorant to be clean and made by women I and free of plastics. We want our shaving razors to be talking about issues surrounding body hair and the shame that that's been been used to create amongst women and most of all we want our work to be not just a place we come to pay rent but to find meaning and belonging and companies that means that are able to harness that I think are a real advantage what I will say that takes thought. It's not a simple as business as usual. Let's donate you know. Quarter of a percentage to charity. That nobody's going to object to it's really about looking at each part of Your Business. syncing how do I do this in a way. That's better for the world. So if we're doing brandon design you you know what are the politics of design. What are the ways in which the design choices we make can be used to amplify voices that have perhaps been other D- I think everything you're saying it is made easier if you're in a position of leadership if you are founder? CEO An exact team if you are an employee at a company and he want to to find that purpose you want to create impact. You want to help especially in a bigger corporate company to start creating that change for our listeners. What is your best advice about how to shepherd up? Yep So speaking up rate I mean when I think back even just to my decision to start the Malala Fund I called my boss up McKenzie and I said I've decided sided. I've got to quit. And he turned around and said Okay but lettuce support you for a while. Make the ask. I didn't even make the ask. So I think and coming up with a concrete proposal and getting a group of employees excited about it and going to management and saying hey you know I know. We're doing a packaging redesign. I know nope this really great female founded firm that creates plastics repackaging. It would really mean a lot to us if you would consider engaging them. What's a mistake that you here? See people make when they try to instill impact organization suspended management or or employees employees. One is just not asking asking right just assuming like they don't care about this stuff often they do and they're just you know there's so much going on right so if you go with an idea. That's actually actionable. Often they will care. The other is not giving people a chance right back to that same thing right which is like oh I would go to them but this is not their thing or you know. They're just motivated by money. So I think this uttering that can sometimes happen between employees and management that I've seen as well but actually trying like actually giving people a chance and saying hey I don't know if this is an issue you care about but I'd love to raise it with you. I'd love to hear your thoughts about it or if you don't care about it if you can't do this will you explain to me why before. I just assume that you don't care when we started talking. You mentioned the tendency of young people to think about things in terms of absolutism elitism. I'M GONNA say we're all GONNA give us the benefit of doubt that we're all. We're all still relatively young you in particular. How do you think about that? Now I think I see things in a far more nuanced way you know when I was young I thought I could end human suffering. I know that I can't and human suffering however I also know now that some some of the smallest things I've done have become some of the biggest things I've done right so starting a summer camp in a remote part of you know Pakistan for a handful of girls I still remember I think I applied. I WANNA say to UNICEF for funding for it. I needed like a couple of hundred dollars to cover the costs of combination and food and for larger proposals. They say well. How is sustainable? which is a question I would ask anyone? How does this continue and sustain Galon? I said well it isn't. It's really intended to address just one issue and raise the profile of this one issue and it became one of the most sort of scalable sustainable things I've done so I think just you know holding room room for the unknown in our business. We talk about growth through our business plans and our technologies and I've learned that scale can be so much more unpredictable that it often comes from a single idea story or act of courage just keeping the space for that talk to us about your most recent the idea. Yeah so a couple of months ago I launched a company a start up. Call Dr Place. My Co founded it with my husband and a friend of ours. It's a mission driven ribbon ECOMMERCE company that creates products for the kitchen that are rooted in culture and tradition. And we're trying to think about impact and everything what we do. Whether that is removing plastics from our packaging sourcing ethically from artisans in women owned factories but most importantly through our storytelling. So I'm an emigrant. I'm Pakistani woman. I'm a person of color Muslim. Like take me two parts of this country and to be very much the definition of the other and I've made my home in this country three and I love being here. I came to this country right as Obama. President Obama was being elected and I stayed in this country and the recent political climate Emmett and I've seen this division in the sense of separateness and otherness. That's arising and what I've always believed is when you cook a meal together and you sit around a dinner table bull. You don't just know somebody. Is You know who their grandmother was or is home cooking cooking together eating together as bedrock of culture and dignity and I love and it's something that we're losing in the sort of convenience culture so we've been creating products and telling stories the challenge that that inspire people to cook more and with each collections we partner with the community and put a nuanced lands on a story in a culture so we partnered with Mexican Americans. I'm around Christmas and celebrated nausea. Wena we partnered partnered with Chinese Americans around Lunar New Year where moving forward to talk about Muslim American culture and the diversity of that and the different foods that are included in Muslim American culture like soul food. Most people don't realize a lot of Muslims eat soul food. I love this idea in a very excited to see how this continues to grow. I'm fascinated fascinated. What is it like you've been a solo founder? You've been a co-founder what is it like to be a CO founder with your husband. It's really great We Are Matt Great. Unless it's terrible ray and and that was our thing you know my husband and I we always connected deeply on work on ideas and we've always been each other confidence and we always were like. Should we do. This are willing to completely mess up everything and eventually we just did it mainly only because we loved the idea and we felt we could both bring different pieces of the puzzle together better than anybody else. We knew being an entrepreneur doing something that is so so consuming. It's all of you right. It's all of your brain. It's where you are highs lows and to be unable to share that with your partner I think can be challenging in the past when I've gone off and done things on my own and I'm traveling and I'm speaking in Paris for two weeks on my own doing something super exciting and now I've come home home. And and he wasn't there..

partner Malala Fund America Pakistan founder US cricket Clinton Foundation Obama New York Betty Ferrera I Angel Fund San Francisco Swat valley Dubai Silicon Valley Mackenzie UNICEF
You Know Malala. Now, Meet Her Mentor Shiza.

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:15 min | 1 year ago

You Know Malala. Now, Meet Her Mentor Shiza.

"We welcome Shiva Shahad to skimmed from the couch. She is a social entrepreneur activist and investor before four founding now ventures a seed fund for mission driven companies and our place an ECOMMERCE company. She's a CO founded the Malala Fund listeners. Maino Malala Story. I'm sure you do. She was a student and an advocate for girls' education in Pakistan and survived being shot in the head by the Taliban Malala Malala then became one of the most powerful voices for peace in the world and by her side. She has a harness the power of Melilla Story and created a global full nonprofit to advance the education of girls around the world. Shizue has focused her life and career on making the world a better place and we are very excited to have her with us. Today welcomed skin from the couch. I'm so excited to be here. I Love Skim thank you we were just saying. This is our first interview of the decades. So what are we to kick off. I'm very curious you such an impressive resume and you've done so many things that we're going to get into but what is not on your linked in profile that we should know about you. I think that I Show up a lot. You know as I look at my career path and the things that I've done. It's very often been a decision to show up in the moment if I were to draw a line through all of the startups. The projects whether in the nonprofit space or investing is often been sparked by an article. I read in the newspaper or somebody that came Aiman reached out for help and asked me to join them or an issue that I saw in an industry and I'll sort of decide. Maybe there's something I can do to help. And it leads me down this path of founding a nonprofit when I had no intention or going back to back assigned to secretly create a summer camp com for girls being denied an education or founding. Unethical sustainable cookware line. It always starts with the sort of fire in my belly this passion and very often in a sense of anger when there's injustice so yeah I guess I would just call myself a serial show or upper I like that. That's a good good take on a card Let's start with how you grew up because my first question is you have done amazing things that hopefully will have a lasting impact in the world but worry like a kid Roy your family like what kind of education you have you grew up in Islamabad. I was a quiet kid I grew up in a loving home in the capital of Pakistan Islamabad. I come from modest. self-made family I was fortunate. I was given a good education and tremendous amount of support from my parents but I was also growing up in a country that has many social challenges. It's ranked the second can worst place to be born a woman. It has a second highest number of children out of school in the entire world. And I think I recognized that difference that I had so much opportunity in most girls and women didn't and I wanted to understand it so I ended up spending recognize that because your mom or your dad showed you that or does something you observed on your own. I don't think my parents pushed me towards it. They are charitable and generous. Actually we run an orphanage now but at the time that I was growing up they were you know working hard to build a life for their family. They didn't impose it on me. They sort of gave me a lot of space to be myself You said you were shy and curious. What would bring you out of your Shell? I think the space to be myself so my siblings are ten in eight years older answered big personalities and so in their presence. I think I was very quiet. And then I got very involved in social activism work and when I did that It felt like it was my space to speak up. I sort of found my voice you know. Is this weird activist child child you know organizing protests and giving interviews and getting really involved. I'm very curious going up in Pakistan and this wise has this was a pre nine eleven Pakistan these social opportunities for women were never strong as you mentioned with those alarming stats but it was also different than Pakistan. That we've known in the last twenty years. You know all kids dream about what are you going to be when you grow up. And I'm also an astronaut president. An actor writer doctor. Did you dream like what you're GonNa be when you grow up. I wanted to make a real difference particularly in my home country. I wanted to make things better for women for people who were oppressed because they were perhaps of a different faith or within within Islam. I wanted to make a change through storytelling through nonprofit work through empowering and employing women and you know the thing about being young. Is You really believe in absolutes. And when you get passionate about making a difference when you're young and you see this. Now I think with the rise of teenage activists in America's well it's all consuming it is a sense of right and wrong and a deep passion about fighting injustice. And that was me growing up you now. My friends were sneaking out to parties and I was sneaking out to protest and Yeah are your parents like we wish he would just go to a party. I I think so. I remember once I stunk. Up to protest and It was a small protest so my face. I was photographed and put on the front page of the national. The House like walking around the House hiding the newspaper. And then my my dad got a phone call in the front page of the newspaper and they laughed about about in. That was when I knew that while they wanted me to be safe I could probably get away with it as long as I was safe. You ended up coming to the. US for college. You went to Stanford I'm really Makarius. What that transition must have been like coming from Pakistan thrown into the heart of tech entrepreneurship? I'm just fascinated what that transition must have been like for you. Yeah it was. It was hard it was hard not because it was American culture. That was foreign to me American culture. So pervasive evasive united grownup washing friends and cheers. And there's no you do not watch shares. I did know because I love cheers. And you make fun of me for liking it. I still watching coaching it. Okay well I I watched whatever was available you know they would package these. TV shows and like send them over to Pakistan and they would advertise all. These American can products that weren't available in Pakistan yet like dominoes pizza. I grew up being advertised. Domino's pizza I've never had it in my head. Yeah I feel like in my head. It's better than it will be so. That's pretty good It's gotten a lot better College is a time when people you're going to school to discover who they are here. You are already kind of a step ahead in terms of you know that you're passionate about things you have grown up protesting testing and then you fly across the world to go to school. Yeah I mean it was hard because it was this very undergraduate focused experience right Stanford Sanford is a. It's a college town. There's no sadie where you can sort of. Go Out and hang out with non undergraduates who are doing other things and immersed in the world and I think I had one other Cassani in my class and I was sort of you know on this path and I felt very sure of it now to be clear I didn't have it all figured out right in my path would change tremendously in the years. That followed So it was hard on the one hand on the other hand it was a tremendous privilege. I mean here I was now in a school wall then made me part of a exclusive club that put me in a class of twenty students with Condoleeza Rice. The your she left office so now I was just as you know. Middle Class girl from Pakistan had all this access and opportunity and I felt that I had to use that platform to amplify the stories in bacchus on that I was hearing during that perhaps other people in America weren't so it sort of lit a fire in my belly that was there was even deeper. Had your siblings gone to school outside of Pakistan yes so my sister had studied in the US for her master's my brother had started out in Pakistan and then transferred two years then. When did you first hear the name Malala? So I was sitting in my dorm room at Stanford I was reading about the insurgency in Pakistan. which at the time was probably at its peak? Sort of what you're awfully. She's has an nine two thousand eight. Actually actually I would say. There is a town in the north of Pakistan that at the time had been taken over by group linked to the Taliban it's called Swap Valley and the Taliban Alabama become increasingly violent had begun blowing up girls schools and in January. Two thousand nine declared an all-out ban on female education in the Swat Valley so here I was getting incredible education in less than three hundred miles from where I grew up. Girls we're being told they couldn't go to school and it felt deeply personal and it felt like a story that I could amplify to make a difference so I was studying it reading up about it and I came upon a diary written by a schoolgirl from the Swat valley. And she roach this is my plea to the world. Save my school. Save my swamp valley and I was just shook to my core four of the diary of Anne Frank and I began to research to figure out who this girl was and I got to know that she was a little girl. Names Malala and her father other Zero Dean Ron School. I don't even recall how but I called my contacts and bags on and said I want to know who this girl is and I. I remember calling her father from my dorm room at Stanford and just being like Hi. Here's who I am.

Pakistan. Malala Malala Maino Malala Malala Fund Shiva Shahad America Shizue Stanford Swat Valley Islamabad Taliban Anne Frank Aiman Condoleeza Rice Stanford Sanford ROY Dean Ron School Domino President Trump
Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

The Vergecast

09:47 min | 1 year ago

Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

"Bills Brain three part documentary. Nfl I just watched it this week. Tell me how this project got started because you have you got a lot of access to gates and it's obviously Dan netflix unusual structure. You know three one hour episodes. Don't tell me how it came together so I was making the film waiting for Superman and we were almost it's done but it felt like he was missing. Voice and waiting for Superman was about public education's like how does this sort of failure of our public schools effect business and you know what better the thing to talk about. Someone who's in Silicon Valley or at least the business of Silicon Valley. He's obviously in Seattle but what does that do to growing the best business in in in America. How do you find talented educated. People had at his failure of our schools of some of our schools. I should say many are do really well but how does that effect are growing economy in in in the tech business. So I went up an interview bill. He was so great and so surprising that that I was like wait a minute this this person the needs to be reconsidered a because to give us the backstory. I was a I got a Macintosh nineteen eighty-four. It was the first person in my dorm Brown to get one. I think it was like ten had arrived at Brown in everyone of my floor huddled around this magical computer so I was a Mac. I was an apple guy and I always thought Steve Jobs is cool and Microsoft was just like for the business people and so I sort of held Bill Gates in my mind at arm's length that was like he just business guy. Maybe he's a monopolist. Maybe he's not but but you know I like. I like Mac and so what I finally met him. I was like wow. There's something he's doing right now. That needs to be understood. He is he's really changed his public image and I don't WanNa get into into that part of it because the weight inside bills brain is structured literally inside of every episode. It's almost like a thriller of the project that the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing doing whether that's toilets or nuclear energy or vaccinations then there's like the history which is what most people kind of assume you're going to get right. We're GONNA GONNA tell the story Bill Gates from start to now but there's this like thriller component of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation happening inside of it. How did you decide to like like musicnet structure. Go started filming and I actually got lost. I don't know how to make this because a lot of the work. They're doing a super complex. In also initially dramatically. It's not just add water in the story tells itself right and so I was experimenting with this kind of way of cutting back and forth between his biography in the work that he's doing and the first time it worked was when I in its in episode two I think is when he's trying to figure out why cases of polio keep popping up all over Nigeria in Afghanistan Pakistan and why past efforts was it failed and how he used sort of his brain had he delvin to sort of like crack that because people been trying for years they thought they were getting close and then it doesn't work it. Would I thought I'd do is show bill in the early days in highschool cracking the class schedule. It's sort of a famous story where his private private school asbill a sophomore. I think ask him when he's a software and then he does it in his junior senior year but they say you're. You're good at this computer thing. You know there's a famous terminal school only one terminal any school in State of Washington say. Hey you're good at this coatings and can you code the class schedule at lakeside aside and so he and Paul Allen Staple night figure out how you know because his lakeside had merged with girls school so they had all these different classrooms different for campuses and Bill Paul us sort of their brains and they're sort of algorithms to cracks in the same way he cracks the algorithm or tries to crack the algorithm for a radical polio he did things like digital mapping in predictive analysis on where cases of polio would show up so the story telling the whole story retelling for all three episodes follows that one example where we cut back and forth between something some way in which his brain worked or or something revealed in his character actor is historical story with what he's doing now to reveal how his brain works and how you know how he solves problems so you obviously got all this access testable to Melinda. You got a bunch of archival footage. I guess you would call it of them. When they were young when they were dating there's Video Ville hugging kids when they're babies as which broke me like you don't ever see that side of him. How did you go about getting access to build. The product was kind of the condition that I make for any movie. When I flew complained to commit to page talk him into doing it might get loud. It was like if we're if we're GONNA do this. You got to open up to me. I won't ask any questions to ask. I will put everything on the table because that's you know that's what if you're going to do a movie forgot to go make make that effort you open yourself up and the same thing. I did with bill and I have to save all the people I've ever made a movie about. He was the most open in the least concerned about Oh. Don't go there. Don't get this right. I mean I went. I went right into you. You know the depositions for the case. You know there's pretty harsh stuff in there about how the world sees him and I put all if even if you go and watch the trailer of the trailer in the opening of the move of the series is is this guy a good guy bad guy you know one. One voice calls him the devil I really wanted to say I want to put it all table. Say who you know. Let's let's put everything on the table and let's let's consider this man. Today did bill get any edit control. Do they get to say they didn't want anything in there. Now what I do is for every movie all when I get a cut that I like I'll go show it to people so I showed to Jimmy page edge or anyone else or Bano or Malala just because I wanna make sure that I didn't miss something or it didn't miss categorize something and often in every case you sort of. They say oh well. You know what there's another another piece that story that entail you and usually gets better but nothing was. I didn't take anything out that I didn't WANNA put in so there's sequence your time in the antitrust apiece. There's a sequence where you ask him if he was arrogant in step position. This is great because you know. This is a heavy topic now. We actually talked about it on this podcast. All the time like like are these companies to powerful should get broken up. Microsoft was arguably the first the current president of Microsoft Brad Smith. He's just read a book about basically asking being the government to regulate tech companies. It's very interesting but it he bill gates was the first as you note in the documentary. He's he stepped back from the operations operations of Microsoft to handle trial he gave this famously bad deposition and you ask him if he's arrogant and he he was like well look when you're a twenty year old billionaire. Maher sometimes when when you were getting answer. Did you sense that he was that he was shading or was he just telling you what he thought. Who's absolutely shading you. You Watch it. What's what's fun about watching. The movie and we put the full answer in is that he didn't WanNa say he was hacked arrogant. The Fun thing about making a movie is one of my agree. Teachers taught me this about storytelling is that you know that the filmmakers job is to plus two. The audience's job is for that sounds like a really pretentious film film school way of saying it but the idea is I ask if he was arrogant. He gives an answer. It's up to you and the audience to say and decide whether he's arrogant or not so I like to put that in there and let the audience decide for himself or herself. Do you think that arrogance however he wants to think of it is an asset to him and his current work. That's a good question. That's a really good question. I'd have to let him answer that. I mean I think intense focus. I think being very certain I think maybe with a touch arrogance. Get to this place where you're cutting through a Lotta bullshit so that is an let me let me qualify this answer by this is my answer not his answer but I do think that affect of people in the world have to cut through bullshit they have to cut through group think in their own group in their own company they have to cut through how the bureaucratic nature of a big company slows things down so if arrogance Y- like five percent or twelve percent arrogance and certainty and bull headedness it is effective. I wouldn't mind that I think sometimes a director of documentaries has to be bull headed and arrogant sometimes but then you have to sort of you know put guardrails ells on yourself. You have to have a few on that so that you don't go too far and I think clearly see footage in there. From the early days of Microsoft will they'll clearly went too far. Your gifts and that's actually the one the one piece of documentary that I I don't know how interesting it would be to everybody. I kind of understand why it wouldn't be there but it's very interesting to me is Microsoft soft was a ruthless company with gates at the helm and you you wave at it a few times right by their competitors date they crush them obviously netscape and eh interest trials there but there was lots and lots of other stuff they did to ruthlessly destroy their competitors along the way and that was all bill. was there a moment where like. I need to focus on that that stuff more or say. I just need to say at once and move on. There's other stuff. That's more important you I mean the the the the focus of the series is really not about that. I put enough enough in there to acknowledge it and say this happened but it wasn't an expose of the tactics. Microsoft in this period of time and so did just like the movie doesn't get into who all the details of the entrust case it doesn't get into all the details of why bill thinks that they were maligned nor does it get into all the details of why people think Microsoft is wrong. That wasn't the focus of the series. The focus of the series is a character study of a guy in in what is he doing with his life.

Bill Gates Microsoft Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Paul Polio Silicon Valley Superman Seattle NFL Dan Netflix Brown America MAC Apple Washington Steve Jobs Nigeria Jimmy
Mozambique, Zimbabwe cyclone deaths exceed 300 as UN boosts aid

Fresh Air

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Mozambique, Zimbabwe cyclone deaths exceed 300 as UN boosts aid

"The United Nations spokesman says the UN intends to ask the international community for money to help deal with the aftermath of a devastating cyclone that hit southern Africa spokesman Farhan hawk saying that is one of the worst natural disasters. Hit that region. In living memory cyclone came ashore overnight into last Friday morning, and flood waters are still rising there. Torrential rains? The extent of the devastation in Mozambique Zimbabwe and Malala is still being

Farhan Hawk United Nations UN Mozambique Zimbabwe Africa Malala
"malala" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"malala" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"If you were trying to convince somebody who was anti immigrant anti refugee have you found anything that you can say to them that shifts them or do you find a way that you can speak to people to try and help them. See the humanity in this plights, I've been trying to get her while, and I think it is difficult to convince people, but I think. For me the best way to know about is. I think oftentimes people do not know enough. They do not they have not met refugee, and they have not talked refugees and what she has gone through. So I think it's important for people to actually going to people, and it's the best way to integrate, and my father often says that if you want to know about a Muslim man or Muslim person do not know them through the news. But rather go and visit your next door neighbor, who's a Muslim and talk to them. So I think talking to people is important, but also go and look for facts and figures of how immigrants and refugees contributor to the global economy's in how for instance, take the US how refugees and immigrants have built this country at the level that it is right now. And also just look at the human side of why people leave their homes, and it is not that simple. It never their first choice. And it is often the difficulties they face that that pushed them out of their houses. And for me personally when we were leaving swat valley. Our hometown. That was because there was it was not safe to stay. There are lives at risk. And we did not know where we're going. We did not know for how long, but we knew that we could not stay. There was no more choice, but to leave our homes, the one of the reasons to to buy this book is because of the stories that are truly amazing, and we'll written another reason is because the proceeds go to an amazing 'cause and that is foundation which focuses on education. Why did you specifically choose that? Why why is the of fun specifically going after education of all the things that you could have done in? Because I remember the time when my own education was banned by these extremist groups called the Taliban. And and I remember waking up. I think ten years ago exactly ten years ago. It was the month of January two thousand nine that. I woke up one morning and education was completely banned. And nobody was allowed to go to school and the ad is that my Fisher was taken away. From me, my dreams taken away from me. I was just limited to the house. I could not go inland. I could not go in study. I could not go and become a doctor or a teacher in engineer and for many the only way towards empowerment is learning is getting their education doing the job and then standing their own two feet. So for me, it is it's education is crucial for every goals in parliament. But also the fact that if half of the population of the world does not get education. If they are not empowered. The the world is losing the all losing so education is crucial for me, especially of women because when we educate women this allows us to grow corn Amies educating all of to secondary level would add up to thirty trillion dollars to the world economy and helps us to. Climate change. It helps us reduce poverty fight against child. Marriages the cultural norms and traditions that are out there. That are discriminating women that has so many advantages and. And I was one of the victims. And I was one of those guys, and I know that it is crucial for all those to go and learn and also the benefits that education brings to the world as well. And if is children's education is equally important, especially the young who often time in the refugee camps. They are forced to get married, for instance, in Lebanon, forty one percent of their seed in effigy goes get married before the age of eighteen. So that's why we started Malala fund and the work is focused on the education of girls, especially complete education, not just.

swat valley Malala fund US engineer Lebanon ten years thirty trillion dollars forty one percent two feet
"malala" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"malala" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Thank you. Oh, thank you. Thank you so much for being here. You know, it's weird. I'll tell you a little personal story. You will one of those few human beings who walks the planets and is seen as a saints. Like, you seen somebody who is better than the rest of us because you are you on eight right? But then this was really great. So we kept Malala weights because we're running late today. And so you in. Nice things about me. Liking. But then like, and then you tweeted a picture throwing shade at like, she's a sitting on the side of the holding my book, and she like Trevor who is who is this guy in Wisey late. And I was like I forget that you are a person who's like also having fun in life. Sometimes people only treat you like a day. It's he doesn't get a bit weird. When you're talking to people. I have really good friends, and they're very nice too. Completely normally very many just like Madonna. I don't care if it was the door. No. Like, you know, my scene of St. live throw qisas said the deadlines if I miss it, there'd be like, not happy. I would be terrified to be your teacher in school because no because you have a Nobel prize and then like Malaga's in your closet Malala. What you like to teach the classes like, yeah. Will. Nobody ever bring that up with, you know, no, not investing view. Oh nice. You don't bring it up either. No. I couldn't scared, but you haven't Nobel let me tell you something I'm going to teach you a little bit about swag. If you have a Nobel prize, you should start every sentence with Nobel prize, even if it's not necessary, if you're at Starbucks, and then like, what would you like you say, well as a Nobel prize? Oh, I'll have the venti. I think one of the reasons people are drawn to you. And your story is is not just because of the journey you've been on. But because of the the focus you bring to other people's journeys, and this book, we have displaced is another example of that Maija, Ernie and stories from refugee goes around the world. Why did you feel the need to include other stories of the known? I mean, you'll stories are ready. So amazing why bring in others. Now, if you already know about my story and displacement was part of my life in Pakistan, and then also moving to the UK. But I'm have met Gaza around the world who have been displaced who have lost homes and often people talk about refugees and immigrants in numbers and figures, and we hit about refugees, but we near we never hear from refugees. And for me, it was swimming board in that we hear from these goes hear their stories and get inspired, and they showed zillions, and bravery and courage, and I think they have overcome these difficulties..

Nobel prize Nobel Gaza Pakistan Starbucks Trevor qisas Wisey Malala Malaga Maija UK Ernie
"malala" Discussed on The View

The View

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"malala" Discussed on The View

"We are really strong women people to hear what women have to say. And that's us. That's what makes the show so good. We will back you up. We will stand with you. Anybody who's anybody who wants to make it to the next level in politics has to come on this show. I feel like there's no better time to be on a show. Like this to stand up for those things that you believe in. It is up to all of us to continue the conversation. Do you wanna do? I'll see you on the few. So you want on the you on the view? That. Ahead. The youngest Nobel peace prize winner ever Malala Yousafzai on why President Trump ignore immigrants running for their lives to America and new year. New you deal. I thought it might be nice. If we gave you an idea of actually who might have won something Golden Globes. So Glenn Close won best actress for drama the wife Christian bale best actor in a comedy for vice bohemian rhapsody won best drama O Rami Malik run best actor drama green. Book won three awards. Best musical comedy best director and Sheila Ali for best supporting actor a stars born to best song. Carol Burnett won the first ever Carol Burnett. Oh, won best actress.

Carol Burnett Golden Globes Rami Malik Sheila Ali Glenn Close Malala Yousafzai Christian bale Trump director President America
"malala" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And here he is author of liberalism is a mental disorder Trump's, war and, God faith, and reason Michael Savage Mark Season To wake you up My favorite songs Edith Piaf Malala just let it play This way to the We has nothing to do with, any of the topics but it's very entertaining Fabulous Fabulous. Singer in, fact I still listen to it from time to. Time if you look at, it it's kind of a silly. Song Come in the cafe and sit down at table. Is, that kind. Of stuff, songs as simple but it caught the attention of. France and the world in, one thousand nine hundred fifty nine And of course the original French version was the biggest hit others recorded them in other languages And we're. Not, talking about this at all We're talking about other topics but I just felt like being. Charming for a minute on the, Savage Nation we're talking about abuse of children which, is not a charming, topic of, the, brain damaging effects of marijuana. Toxicants occurring marijuana smoke things of that nature, but I wanna know read something to you That was written so long ago and. Yet sewed well describes the vacuity nature of the, media today and the entertainment world I've read it to you once before but I think it wasn't heard a lot of, people I bought a bunch of, books for my vacation which I didn't go on and. I, still have the book sitting, here I read them at home instead of on vacation it's much easier to. Read it home because I don't, read in the sun to begin with and I, hate the sun so, I don't, go, on vacation much more comfortable. To sit in my house and read anyway It's by Honore de Balzac lost illusions written so many so many years ago lost illusions by. Balzac written well when he wrote it was back. In the eighteen eighties I believe it not exact date it's unimportant illusions purview was published eighteen thirty seven eight hundred forty, three okay so he's describing this great writer I've collected Balzac things ever some eighteen years old And so I want. You to. Listen. To what literature was in those. Days compare it with what passes for literature today And he's describing a woman Dancer an entertainer and he says her face was of the noblest Jewish type that long oval face of pure fair ivory with lips, as Scarlett as a pomegranate and they Xinha's delicate as the edge of a Cup beneath the islands with their curving lashes burned is of jet from which could come languishing or sparkling glances as occasion offered those is sunken in an olive circle, was surmounted by arch black, browse on the ivory forehead crowned by bands of ebony. On which the lights were glancing satin, thrown a wealth of thought which seemed. To be that of genius and yet like many other actresses Coralie without wit in spite of her green room repartee without education beyond her bourgeois experience had no talent except the intelligence of the senses and the. Perceptions of an affectionate woman no one can write like this anymore now This is in translation you can just imagine how good, this is in French but he describes completely the vacuous nature of our entertainers of today who looked so intelligence and are empty and we look at them as though they know what they're talking about and they don't and when I say entertainment, of course I also mean, the entertainment news complex which is the same and we. Wonder why we hear such triple coming, out of their mouths because they're very. Much like this actress described by him in the eighteen forties beautiful but empty and that's not the rest of the story that's the beginning of our number two on the Savage Nation where we begin with abuse. Of Ivers speaking about what happened in. Pennsylvania Let's hear.

Honore de Balzac Savage Nation Michael Savage Edith Piaf Malala marijuana Trump France Ivers Coralie Pennsylvania writer Scarlett Xinha eighteen years
Trump considers posthumous pardon of boxer Jack Johnson after call from Sylvester Stallone

News, Traffic and Weather

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Trump considers posthumous pardon of boxer Jack Johnson after call from Sylvester Stallone

"Now dot info crews now dot info president trump tweets he's considering a pardon for jack johnson after hearing his story from sylvester stallone abc's brian clark with more on johnson who died in nineteen fortysix first black world heavyweight boxing champion jack johnson was one of the first superstar athletes of the twentieth century it was known for living large and was married three times to three white women johnson was charged with violating the man act for his relationship with his second wife that law prohibits transporting a woman across state lines for immoral purposes it's designed to inhibit prostitution but johnson was convicted by an all white jury in a verdict viewed by many as racially prejudiced it's been a year in prison senator john mccain's leading advocate of a posthumous pardon for johnson brian clark abc news a controversial former nfl quarterback recognized with an award from an international human rights organisation saturday here's abc's dave packer amnesty international giving former nfl quarterback colin kaepernick it's embassador of conscience award for his take any protests of racial injustice that launched a sports movement and might have cost him his job in its acceptance speech at amsterdam cabinet calling police killings of blacks and latinos in the united states lawful lynchings adding radicalized oppression and dehumanisation is woven into the very fabric of our nation previous recipients of the award include south africa's nelson mandela and young women's education advocate malala yousafzai this is abc news komo aaa traffic and talked willow state patrol working your car bus accident northbound i five to one hundred eighty at that is blocking and of course this weekend it's the revive i five construction project two lanes coming into northbound seattle from the south side where we do have ramp closure some i ninety two cherry street right now still some heavy traffic northbound into the city and in pierce county state route eight n shaker church motorcar ditch accident police have set up a perimeter around the area to search for the occupant your next report at ten.

Nelson Mandela Pierce County Amsterdam NFL Senator Sylvester Stallone President Trump Seattle Jack Johnson South Africa United States Colin Kaepernick Dave Packer ABC John Mccain Prostitution Brian Clark
Colin Kaepernick, NFL quarterback, honored by Amnesty International for inequality protests

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Colin Kaepernick, NFL quarterback, honored by Amnesty International for inequality protests

"News time coming up on five thirty nine an nfl star whose career was sidelined for the way he advocated for better race relations in america is being honored by a leading human rights organization amnesty international giving former nfl quarterback colin kaepernick it's embassador of conscience award for his take any protests of racial injustice that launched a sports movement and might have cost him his job in acceptance speech at amsterdam kapernick calling police killings of blacks and latinos in the united states lawful lynchings adding radicalized depression and dehumanisation is woven into the very fabric of our nation previous recipients of the award include south africa's nelson mandela and young women's education advocate malala yousafzai dave packer abc news program donald trump celebrates nearly two hundred fifty years of us french relations by hosting president emmanuel macron at white house state dinner tuesday the festivities begin monday when the president and the first lady and macron and his wife dine at mount vernon george washington's home along potomac river in virginia tuesday morning the president will formally welcome at role during an elaborate ceremony on the white house south lawn mr trump is the first president in nearly one hundred years to end his first year in office without receiving a foreign leader on a state visit an actress on the tv show smallville about a young superman pleads not guilty to sex trafficking charges wcbs correspondent mike smells reports that allison mack is accused of recruiting women into a self help group and were then forced to have sex with its leader keith ranieri remarry allegedly with the help of mac would handpick women to be a part of a special group that would get direct teachings from rene the admission for getting in was to handover sensitive information about themselves including nude photographs and the rights to their assets prosecutors say those women then ended up as rainier personal sex slaves branded with his initials on their hip mac would allegedly received some type of financial benefit for recruiting the women mack entered her plea in brooklyn federal court a hearing is scheduled for monday wbz news time is five forty one that means it's time for sports with charlie bursar on from the get dot com sports studio good afternoon bill bruins.

MAC Brooklyn Rainier Mike Smells George Washington Mount Vernon White House America NFL Charlie Bursar Rene Colin Kaepernick Keith Ranieri Allison Mack Virginia Potomac River President Trump Emmanuel Macron
"malala" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Job. These invitations have revolutionized how you find your next higher. In fact, eighty percents of employers who post on ZipRecruiter, get a quality candidate through the site in just one day and ZipRecruiter doesn't stop there. They even spotlight the strongest applications they receive. So you never miss a great match. The right candidates are out there, and ZipRecruiter is how you find them businesses of all sizes, trust ZipRecruiter. For their hiring needs right now, our listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free. That's right. Free just go to ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash super soul. That's ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash super soul. ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash super soul. ZipRecruiter the smartest way to hire you have been called, you know, now wherever you go, people say, and even as we introduce you hear wills, she is the bribes, Carl in the world now made the bravest girl in the what does your heart say when you hear those words. I think I did a brave thing that I spoke out for education and then even after hours attacked, I spoke out again. So it's is defined as Badri for me. Baby is when you speak up and speak out for what is right, and it's all responsibility. It's not that we do something give something extra and do a favor to our community. I think it's all duty and we should do it and we must do it. And however you define it, it's our duty to speak out for tonight. Where do you think you started to embody that? I mean, obviously, we see in the wonderful film. He named me Malala that from a little toddler, you're crawling around in the classrooms and you're listening to your father teach. So obviously the way you were raised had a lot to do with how you felt about yourself and the strength that you hold for yourself as a young girl and a and a growing. A woman. But where does what does that come from? Because the thing that you say at the end of the movie is so powerful. I'm not going to give that away. But when you say you work to become this girl? Yes. But who really inspired me was my father and my mother, of course, and I when I would listen to my father speaking out for education and speaking out for women's, is it just really inspired me. But then sometimes we just think that the fasten hold bring, the change would be very special and he'd be like Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, and they're very special people. They can't be among us and we don't realize that they are just normal people. People like us and the lower on not haven't done that much yet. And it's my my dream to be like them in the chain. They have brought in society that I can do the same and it's like the beginning of the journey, but it's really to believe that that they're just like, you. And it begins from a small step and when you it's, it's helping the community. If you are truly that embolden, once you start, then if you are strong commitment than you can do it. Malala journey is featured in a documentary by Oscar winning filmmaker Davis Guggenheim called. He named me Malala. She's also written a bestselling memoir called. I am Malala. I love where you say. I know God stopped me from going to the grave. It feels like this life is a second life. People pray to God to spare me and I was spared for a reason to use my life for helping people. Do you believe that? Yes, I strongly believe that I believe that this life is totally for a purpose and that is helping people let is doing something for the world and doing something for the betterment of the society and for girls and this. This is a second knife. This is a new life. You say when people talk about the way I was shot and what happened? I think it's the story of Malala a girl shot by the Taliban. I don't feel as a story about me at all. Does it really feel kind of separate from you? Sometimes thing one reason for for this is that I don't remember the incident? Yeah. So it does not make me feel like I was the guy who show. But she was just Malala the girl who was shot by the Taliban. She's, she has got this definition. She's she's not someone else for me for me. I am this person with a heart with strongly believes that doing something for your people is important and you should do how as much as you can. You say that you've never been angry at the men who shot you. Never not a moment. About an atom. Well, I think that in order to go forward, it's important that you have love in your heart and I want to have love in my heart. I don't want to have any hate any bad feelings in my heart and that that's what makes me more happy if I never had a why me moment.

Malala ZipRecruiter Taliban Badri Davis Guggenheim Martin Luther King Oscar Nelson Mandela Carl one day
Everything We Know So Far About Tiangong-1's Crash to Earth

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Everything We Know So Far About Tiangong-1's Crash to Earth

"For a new travel destination you may want to think about saudi arabia the kingdom this week will start issuing tourist visas for the first time and npr's shacking northern reports from tehran in eastern saudi arabia saudi arabia may have to work a bit on its reputation as a fun tourist destination it's an ultra conservative kingdom abayas the black baggy floorlength gowns are no longer compulsory but it's extremely rare to see a woman not wearing one in public alcohol is banned as was music and theater until recently and female tourists under twenty five must be accompanied by a chaperone but there are some archaeological treasures in the kingdom and the government plans to build resorts on small islands in the red sea building tourism industry is part of the government's effort to diversify saudi arabia's economy and provide jobs jackie northam npr news dhahran saudi arabia wall street's reopening after the good friday holiday with word from china on tariffs beijing announcing today that it's raising import duties on us meat and produce in response to president trump's hikes on steel and aluminum this is npr news the nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has left pakistan she and her family boarded a flight bound for london today after a four day visit her first since of taliban gunman nearly killed her in two thousand twelve she was shot in the head for advocating education for girls a chinese space station has re entered earth's atmosphere most of it was destroyed upon re entry with its remaining pieces scattered over the south pacific as npr's rob schmitz reports the united states joint for space component command reports that the tango one station reentered earth's atmosphere northwest of tahiti at around five sixteen sunday afternoon pacific time the chinese government lost control of the spacecraft a couple of years ago providing drama in the past few weeks has it became clear the school bus size station would soon hurdled earth on its own chinawatch tianwan translated his heavenly palace in twenty eleven to cruise of chinese astronauts visited it in march of two thousand sixteen china's government announced that communications with the space station had ended but did not provide details a second station the tangle to remains operating in orbit rob schmitz npr news shanghai there is new information about a deadly crash in northern california authorities say the data recovered from the wreckage of the.

Chinese Government Taliban London Pakistan Malala Yousafzai President Trump Beijing Jackie Northam California Saudi Arabia United States Rob Schmitz South Pacific Donald Trump China Tehran NPR Four Day
"malala" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"For supply management releases its manufacturing index for march today and the commerce department reports on construction spending for february taking a look at the futures this morning they're all in the red the s and p five hundred down seven and a half the nasdaq down forty the dow currently down eighty points at this hour bbc news time five thirty nine eight lynn residents left homeless by a two alarm fire on the street but it's wbz's kendall buhl reports it might have been worse were it not for the quick actions of fifteen year old boy peter fade jews apartment on the third floor of the multifamily houses heavily damaged only some of his possessions salvageable but it's not loss you hear in his voice when he talks about the fire he escaped in the early hours of yesterday morning rather it's the pride he has an his son anthony who sprang into action to help his dad and neighbors get out stepped up to the plate and everybody else safe lady downstairs had a couple of pets you know a couple of dogs and you know it's like i said i'm i'm just glad that i have him and that's all that matters all eight residents and their pets were out by the time lynn firefighters arrived the red cross is helping some of those displaced authorities say the cause of the fire appears to be electrical kendall buhl wbz newsradio ten thirty the world's youngest nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai is headed back to england following her first visit to her native pakistan since he was shot by the taliban in two thousand twelve malala spent four days in her home country flanked by heavy security she visited her childhood home or she was greeted by friends and former classmates holding flowers and with human rights activists in islamabad malala now heads back to oxford university to continue her studies and philosophy politics and economics after seven years in space the mission is over for.

commerce department kendall buhl anthony pakistan taliban bbc peter lynn malala yousafzai england islamabad oxford university fifteen year seven years four days
Fox's Ingraham taking vacation as advertisers flee amid controversy

Shop Girls

01:28 min | 3 years ago

Fox's Ingraham taking vacation as advertisers flee amid controversy

"Host says she's taking a vacation this week as advertisers flee her show because of a twitter war with a parkland shooting survivor fox news anchor laura ingram earlier this week tweety david hogg rejected by four colleges to which he applied and winds about hog fired back asking his nearly six hundred fifty thousand followers on twitter to boycott ingram's top advertisers the list of companies pulling as now includes big names like expedia hulu nestle and johnson and johnson ingrams issued an apology to hog sane in a spirit of holy week i apologize for any upset or hurt my tweet caused him or any of the brave victims of parkland abc's kenneth moten malala yousafzai arrived in her hometown in pakistan today for the first time since being shot by the taliban in two thousand twelve this is abc news okay more americans turn first in the morning a start their day go on tell them robin warning america short good morning america laura good morning america take them robin let's settle good in your morning with abc's good morning welcome this shot girls on mytalk one zero seven one i'm elliot caplin with my mom harmony and hope is here to hire everybody wow i'm so.

Laura Ingram Tweety David Hogg Twitter Expedia Johnson Ingrams Taliban ABC Elliot Caplin Hulu Kenneth Moten Pakistan America
"malala" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Un ambassador she runs a fund that advocates for girls education she's a humanitarian superstar she's just twenty years old and in pakistan she's controversial influential and she's arrived at an interesting time elections are just months away on twitter people ask is malala hit to improve the ruling party's image maybe she's improving pakistan's image the country took a battering by president trump he loudly accused pakistan of harboring taliban insurgents the same people who shot malala right now there's also a movement among the pashtoons therapath cassani minority and they demand equality malalazo pashtoon she supported them before but if she says something here it's more powerful this is martin dour his an activist with the national movement if you have support from your own people also as someone like malala speaks in your support than it does make a difference for others sing malala return is a sign that things are getting better and pakistan that speaks to us that circumstances in this country of change for the better machar's eighty is an education advocate himself he is also a columnist and co host podcast it's called how to pakistan he acknowledges pakistanis pile a lot onto malala she speaks so eloquent kneeling so passionately so i think we all want to push all of our agendas we want a brighter future malala stated agenda is women's empowerment here she is speaking to reuters the white house prophet vs your business when we us women should be in involved in the economy they should be doing business as they should be getting jobs in should they should be speaking out for themselves she says she wants pakistan to do more for education in a working class market in islamabad most people agreed the only vocal dissenter is mohammad taqi jobless i've got better yeslam malala doesn't follow islam but a woman hubbell's towards us on crutches she has a disfigured leg phoebe ramat is thirty two skill style she can't read or write but she says she has two daughters and she wants them to grow up like malala brave and educated dea hadeed npr news islamabad the trump administration has added a new question to the twenty twenty cents is it asks is this person a citizen of the united states this is the first time the census is included if citizenship question since the.

pakistan martin reuters united states Un twitter president islamabad mohammad taqi twenty years
"malala" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Malala gets to do something ordinary she doesn't get to be ordinary she's a nobel peace prize winner she's a un ambassador she runs a fund that advocates for goals education should humanitarian superstar she's just twenty years old and in pakistan she's controversial influential and she's arrived at an interesting time elections are just months away on twitter people ask is malala hit to improve the ruling party's image maybe she's improving pakistan's image the country took a battering by president trump he loudly accused pakistan of harboring taliban insurgents the same people who shot malala right now there's also a movement among the pashtoons there are pakistani minority and they demand equality malalazo pashtoon she supported them before but if she says something here it's more powerful this is martin dour his an activist with the pustule movement if you have support from your own people also as someone like malala speaks in your support them it does make a difference for others seeing malala return is a sign that things are getting better in pakistan that speaks to us that circumstances in this country of changed for the better machar's eighty is an education advocate himself he is also a columnist and co hosts a podcast it's called how to pakistan he acknowledges pakistanis pile a lot onto malala she speaks so eloquently so passionately so i think we all want to push all of our agendas we want a brighter future malala stated agenda is women's empowerment here she is speaking to reuters prophet was a business when we said women should be involved in the economy they should be doing business if they should be getting jobs in their should they should be speaking out for themselves she says she wants pakistan to do more for education in a working class market in islamabad most people agreed the only vocal dissenter is muhammed talking gabor malala doesn't follow islam but a woman hobbles towards us on crutches she has a disfigured leg phoebe ramat is thirty two skill can't read or write but she says she has two daughters and she wants them to grow up like malala brave and educated dea adid npr news islamabad the trump administration has added a new question to the twenty twenty cents is it asks is this person a citizen of the united states is the first time the census is included citizenship question since the.

Malala pakistan martin reuters united states un twitter president islamabad muhammed twenty years
The Latest: Nobel laureate Malala returns to Pakistan home

BBC World Service

01:54 min | 3 years ago

The Latest: Nobel laureate Malala returns to Pakistan home

"Winner must be sworn in within twenty four hours of his declaration whoever he is he has a divided nation to reunites the nobel laureates milana yousef zeh has returned to her hometown in pakistan's swat valley for the first time since she was shot there by islamist militants six years ago it wasn't clear whether should be able to visit the area because of security he consents malala is on her first trip back to pakistan and has said she wants to return permanently once she completes degree at oxford university in britain she said she had no immediate political ambitions and was happy with the work carried out by her charity hundreds of people have taken to the streets of the california state capital for a fourth night of protest over the police killing of an unarmed black american the crowd gathered outside sacramento city hall before merging towards the state capitol building demonstrators chanted the name of stefan clark as well as those of other victims of police shootings an independent topsy on the body of the twenty two year old found that seven of his eight gunshot wounds were in the back or the side contradicting the police account that he was shot because he was moving towards them live from london you're listening to the latest world news from the bbc the head of the international olympic committee thomas bach said the north korean leader kim jong un is committed to sending a team to the tokyo olympic games in two years time speaking after talks in pyongyang mr bark said the ioc will propose that athletes from the north and south korea should march together now the games the main opposition party in the democratic republic of congo the udps has chosen its new leader and presidential candidate in the delayed elections now scheduled to take place in december he is felix tshisekedi.

Felix Tshisekedi Tokyo Thomas Bach Sacramento City Hall California Britain Yousef Zeh Pakistan South Korea IOC Kim Jong Un BBC London Stefan Clark Oxford University Swat Valley
IS 'Beatles' say removal of British citizenship harms chances of fair trial

News, Traffic and Weather

01:27 min | 3 years ago

IS 'Beatles' say removal of British citizenship harms chances of fair trial

"Brought to you by south coast tax two alleged members of an isis terrorist cell complaining they can't get a fair trial abc's mark remillard reports the terror cell nicknamed the beatles for four british nationals who traveled to syria and would become internationally known for gruesome beheading videos in which they're british accents could be heard this is james right forty earlier this year the last two alleged members were captured and now say because britain revoked their citizenship they can't get a fair trial diane foley the mother of james foley who was beheaded by the group tells the ap she wants to see justice served in open court eight deserve to be held in solitary confinement for the rest of their lives the bbc says the us and uk or discussing what to do with the men mark remillard abc news said very from that huge chinese space station could reach earth this weekend abc's with johnson explains the unknown chinese components only adding to the mystery most of the space station expected to burn up in the sky still debris could land over parts of the us from northern california to new york the odds of getting hit by piece of falling space junk experts say one in a trillion now the space station is projected to reenter the earth's atmosphere on sunday morning pakistan's nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai has arrived in her hometown of mingora for the first time since the taliban militants shot her there in two thousand twelve for advocating girls' education security visibly beefed up in the town this is abc.

Johnson Taliban Malala Yousafzai James Foley Britain Mingora Pakistan New York California Mark Remillard ABC UK United States BBC AP Diane Foley Syria Beatles
"malala" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"malala" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the pbs news hour the pbs newshour comes on after the world is afternoon at three o'clock here on cake i'm marco werman you're with the world we saw some poignant moments this week in pakistan nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai is back in her home country for the first time since being shot by taliban militants on six years ago for security reasons information about her movements and whereabouts is being kept mostly under wraps but my bbc colleagues are kinda kirmani was able to meet with her for a few minutes and he asked her out feels to be home is emotional asian everything i see is valuable to me even just this warm air i value it and i'm enjoying it and i am just so happy to be home and to put my feet on on this land again and i think this was right time the government also provided support the pakistan army for supporting security are you scared all here waltz malala is hugely admired across the world and in pakistan she also has a lot of critics here i'm scrolling through people's comments on the bbc or do facebook page and there are a lot and lots of people abusing some like this one call her a cia or western agent others allege she faked the attack against her how does it feel when you when you read those kind of comments i say i just wanted to understand like who why do they oppose me and what is it easy behind it i want very future for this country that's why i started speaking out for education that's why i did not fear anything and i said even if the terrorist attack me it does not matter i will continue speaking out and it did happen and i continued my my campaign for girls' education so my focus is only working for the good it's two hundred million people and i know that ninety nine percent more than ninety nine percents stand with me support me they believe in education they believe in their daughters my focus right now is continuing my work to me fund in making sure we out to as many goals as we can and one hundred thirty million girls who could not go to school right now to ensure that they can get quality education malala yousafzai undeterred talking there about returning to visit pakistan this week she was with the bbc's sikander kirmani.

pakistan army bbc cia pakistan marco werman malala yousafzai taliban facebook ninety nine percent six years
The Latest: Nobel laureate Malala returns to Pakistan home

1A

02:06 min | 3 years ago

The Latest: Nobel laureate Malala returns to Pakistan home

"Danaher of the bbc and vivian salama of nbc news and there are a few people on this globe who whom we know primarily by their first name and one of them is malala the winner of the nobel peace prize who has visited her home country of pakistan for the first time this week the first time since the attack on her life back in two thousand twelve at the time she was only fifteen years old she was shot in the head by taliban militants for speaking out for women's education here is a part of her acceptance speech for the nobel peace prize i have found that despite me in many different ways some people call me the gut who was shot by the taliban and some the gun who fought for her right some people call me nobel laureate now however my brother still called me that annoying bossy sister is fine as i know i'm just a committed and even stubborn person wants to see every child getting quantity education wants to see women having eight one rights and who wants peace in every corner of the world vivian salama you are one of our pennells who has spent time in pakistan what does her return to her home country mean for her home country oh it's significant obviously she's become the symbol of fighting for women's rights fighting for human rights in general and someone who she's gone out on the world stage and portrayed pakistan as pakistan is to a lot of these people and really if they're so you know she she's a source of great pride for so many people in the country obviously there are elements in the country who also are against what she's doing and that's how she became known to us in the first place.

Danaher BBC Taliban Vivian Salama NBC Pakistan Fifteen Years