35 Burst results for "macmillan"

Louisville cop shot during Breonna Taylor raid files suit against her boyfriend

Scott Sloan

01:17 min | 4 months ago

Louisville cop shot during Breonna Taylor raid files suit against her boyfriend

"Jonathan Jonathan Madeline Madeline was was shot shot in in the the leg leg during during the the deadly deadly raid raid that that killed killed Briana Briana Taylor. Taylor. Now Now he's he's filed filed a a lawsuit lawsuit against against Taylor's Taylor's boyfriend, boyfriend, Kenneth Kenneth Walker, who fired the bullet, they say Walker says police kicked in the door without identifying themselves ABC Steve Austin. Sami has more. Walker isn't the only person who says he didn't hear police announced themselves. This was an apartment complex, and there were other neighbors who say they didn't know that these were the police, either. This is an unfortunate and tragic case that will now Drag through the courts. There is still a question of who fired the shot. Forensic evidence hasn't been able to prove that Walker's bullet hit Mattingly, according to published reports. Walker's attorneys overnight say that they are shocked and this is the latest in the cycle of Police aggression, deflection of responsibility and obstruction of the fax visitation is today for Corporal and MacMillan. The funeral tomorrow is private. Today the family will receive Mourners from 1 to 5 o'clock. At Spring Grove funeral homes on Spring Grove Avenue, the 19 year veteran of the family of the county Sheriff's Office here in Hamilton County will be laid to rest. Tomorrow at Arlington Memorial Gardens after procession that begins around noon on Spring Grove Avenue this

Kenneth Kenneth Walker Briana Briana Taylor Jonathan Jonathan Madeline Mad Spring Grove Funeral Arlington Memorial Gardens Hamilton County Sami ABC Sheriff's Office Steve Austin Mattingly
Pike's Peak: The Complete History of the World's Highest Hill Climb

Past Gas

05:33 min | 4 months ago

Pike's Peak: The Complete History of the World's Highest Hill Climb

"Pike's peak is a giant among giants. It's the highest mountain in the front range of the rocky mountains. It is formed from billion-euro old granite. That's right. Billion with a B. and was first named by the native people who lived in shadow the called the mountain. Taba meaning son and they were the Tableau Watch meaning people of San Mountain. In eighteen o six, the mountain was quote unquote discovered. By American explorer lieutenant, Zevulon Yuan Pipe. These God I sounds like an alien spaceship guy. On. Doesn't look as cool as his name suggests I'm just GonNa tell you right now he was sent by Thomas Jefferson on a mission to explore the West and upon seeing the Mountain Zevulun apparently swore the mountain would never be conquered by man cars didn't exist yet, but it's safe to assume pike would have included them in his assessment as well. Given the chance it only took fourteen years. To prove old Zebulon Pike. Wrong. The mountain was first scaled by a European in eighteen twenty when Edwin James, a botanist and explorer successfully reached the summit collecting flowers all the way up quote the most notable day of the expedition for botanical collecting. Now, I don't WanNa give all the credit to Edwin. James although it sounds like he had a great time, I'm sure that one of the Taboada probably. Did it before him yeah. One hundred percent. Yeah attaboy watch like a a wildfire up their boot who was just like I'm GonNa Climb that today flowers. We're lovely but it was a Shinier commodity that attracted the first wave of settlers to pikes. Peak Pike's peak or bust was a common slogan of the Colorado Gold Rush of the eighteen fifties although is more of a marketing slogan. Do the prominence of the mountain gold wasn't discovered near pikes peak until later in eighteen ninety three, it won't be the first time that the mountain inspired the imaginations of those who climbed it in that same year after reaching a summit of the mountain and taking in the view Katharine Lee Bates wrote the Song America the beautiful. Describing Purple Mountain Majesties above the enameled plane over the years the mountain was commonly referred to as Pike's highest peak before finally being simplified just to pikes peak the next notable American to shape the fate of the mountain was Spencer Penrose, and he also might have been the one to introduce cars. Penrose had a name that sound like the bad guy in a murder mystery but he also had a job that would fit right into the genre. He was a mining speculator of the American West just like a murder mystery penrose had a history that could make you think you is both a suspect and a savior he graduated from Harvard but at the bottom of his class. His father and brothers were doctors and lawyers he decided to travel out west and try to make a name for himself at first he failed before getting a tip about some land near Cripple Creek that made him millions of dollars, and that's million dollars like in the movie this guy is played by Walton Geoghegan's. For sure. That's love that whilst. Yeah. And that's millions of dollars in eighteen hundreds money, which is like a lot today billions today. I Love Walton Gardens he's so. I feel like if I went to Harvard I'd WanNa, graduate the bottom of my class. Look I'm I'm the best on the rowing team but. Not great at socio economics I mean I went to. Harvard. So I'm pretty good at stuff but like I partied penrose settled. Colorado. Springs. The closest town to pikes peak was met a woman named Julie Villiers McMillan although. Penrose was by then in his forty s, he had sworn to stay a rich entrepreneurial bachelor but Macmillan proved to be grimes to his Elon Musk and the two got hitched in traveled to Europe for a lavish honeymoon staying at beautiful resorts around Europe inspired penrose to murder his wife what now? In fact, the inspiration was to open his own motel modeled after the places he had stayed specifically on the Mediterranean coast. This became the Broadmoor hotel opened in nineteen eighteen at the cost of three million, nineteen eighteen dollars translating to scrooge mcduck. Gold Coin Swing Pool amount of money in today's money. The Broadmoor was and is a seven hundred, seventy nine room Italian renaissance style palace with eighteen restaurants a golf club with three courses including one designed by Arnold. Palmer himself an automotive museum, the contents of which will soon arrive at this thing is like massive. It looks awesome. Yeah. I WanNa go to the odd more. Yeah. Let's do it. How do you feel? Seven hundred rooms every night. That's nuts penrose was no fool. He knew he knew that to attract people to the hotel you needed to do things great reviews on tripadvisor, dot com and promotional stunts. He set out to work on an ambitious project as he built the hotel, it was a two hundred, eighty, three, thousand, dollar gravel and dirt road to the fourteen thousand, one, hundred, fifteen foot summit of pikes peak with the idea of promoting tourism to the area and indirectly his own hotel.

San Mountain Spencer Penrose Pikes Peak Zebulon Pike Harvard Murder Edwin James Purple Mountain Majesties Colorado Mountain Zevulun Walton Geoghegan Giants Zevulon Yuan Pipe Katharine Lee Bates Europe Thomas Jefferson Rowing Cripple Creek Mediterranean
"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:42 min | 4 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"It was a brave man and she said I could never speak to him again I just dumped him. He's he seemed to me not to be true man and so women often played the role of cheerleaders in war and they that's made a difference. I mean there's a famous poster in the First World War that was all over Britain which shows a woman holding a child and beside her and she's pointing to a man saying women of Britain's say go and there are other such posters we expect you the men to go off and fight to save is and I do think that can be very strong motivating factor for people to oft ward and whole societies will have attitudes towards war may not all societies but we've seen it in the past and we can probably say even today in certain societies where schooling families, churches institutions tend to promote this view that wars. You know that if you look at some of the organizations setup for children before the First World War the boy scouts. Innocent enough today, and it's all about doing good works and so on and learning useful skills but the boy scouts before the first World War had a very definite paramilitary aspect to them. Young men in the boy scouts were meant to be ready to serve king and country and.

Britain
"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

05:48 min | 4 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"The great sociologists said, the war made the state, the state made war and I think that puts it very well. How exactly did that Happen Margaret? How did war make the state? Well wore made the state I think by increasing the size of the state but in. Order to make war, you had to be organized I. Mean you think of the organization involved in war and it is probably the most or perhaps just one of the most organized all human activities you think of the organization you need to get even a small body of people who are prepared to fight the training they need to provide them with the. Weapons, they need to provide them with the food they need to provide them with the leadership they need that takes organization that takes a mobilization of the resources of society, and so I think the way it worked was that as states goose stronger through war, they were able to extend that control over more and more people and they needed to extend. Also the type of organization they had the better, the organization better they became at making war, and so the to if you can't really say that one comes I I think the to really go along with each other. The Roman empire was created very large because of war and it was maintained by the threat of force but of course, it was also. Maintained because Rome had very good organization and managed to provide good government for a great many of the disparate peoples that live within the Roman empire and so it's hard to say that one comes I. It's a chicken and egg thing which comes first now you have written a wonderfully crafted store you draw lots of history did begin your account by. Talking about a forger who is spotty was found in a melting glacier some five thousand years after his death. But a lot of your examples are taken from the period since the end of the eighteenth century and you right that's because since then war has become not just quantitatively different but also qualitatively different. What do you mean by that I think modern. War Is. Different. Because it relies on different technologies and technology is another driver of war and of course of social development. But modern war has involved more of society perhaps than woes in the Paris and I think why that has happened is partly because of the changes wrought by the industrial revolution, it became possible to create very large armies and very large. Navies to maintain those large armies navies when you think of all the organization and the mobilization of resources that goes into that and it became possible to maintain them for long periods of time and the industrial revolution made that possible. I? Think there is a qualitative difference I think in the sorts of armies that are facing in the nineteenth century than in. The eighteenth century. Eighteenth. Century Armies in Europe and Europe has long and often disgraceful record of making a lot of war the small armies that fought in Europe in the eighteenth century with very small the generals didn't want to risk them and they fought in a different way. I mean some of the most famous generals the eighteenth century were famous. Avoiding battle rather than going straight into it. What the Industrial Revolution did is change the size and I think that's not just a quantitative change. That's a qualitative change because of the degree of organization at needs but also was happening. Of course with industrial pollution was not just enormous increase in output factories using assembly lines and using interchangeable parts could make rifles..

Europe Rome Paris
"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox. See for a podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States I'm Jim Lindsey Director Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations this week's topic is war. With me discuss how war his shape human culture and society through history is Margaret Macmillan marketing professor of history at the University of Toronto in marriage professor of international history at Oxford University. She specializes in British imperial history in the international history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She has written several terrific books including the award winning Paris nineteen nineteen, six months the change the world. Her latest book is war. How conflict shape US Margaret thanks for being here. Thank you for having me. I'm going to begin with a sense I came across inbreeding your introduction that really to baby sit up and take notice and you wrote we do not take war as seriously as it deserves. What do you mean by? That I think. I'm speaking very much I think as someone who lives in the West and I'm one of these very fortunate people who came just at the end of the Second World War, I was born and I've grown up in a very long period of peace and I think for a lot of us living in the West but not elsewhere, I should stress I. Mean there a lot of people in this world to know a great deal about war. But for a lot of people in in the development of the World War is something that happened in the past or happens very far away and I, think we tend to assume that perhaps it's gone out of fashion or it's out of. Our history won't ever happen again and I think we need to think about war most importantly of all, of course to stop it, but we shouldn't avoid thinking about it and I think we also need to think about it because full better info was often very much for the worst. It has shaped US societies, its shape, the world in which we live, and so to understand ourselves in our institutions and our values I think we need to look at the past and we need to understand the role that war has played in history. Let's explore that I think the animating question of the book is our Warren Humanity inextricably interwoven. Are they I would argue that they are I would argue that what? Evidence we have is that as far back as we know in human history, we have been organizing ourselves into groups and using violence against each other..

Margaret Macmillan professor of history Council on Foreign Relations president Jim Lindsey University of Toronto West United States Oxford University US Director professor
Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

04:48 min | 4 months ago

Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

"Hey there, this is Dale and I'm just tickled to death that you took a little bit of time out your day to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about our favorite things and self-publishing books. And you know, I don't say this enough, but I appreciate each and every single one of you that it's taking a little bit of time out your day. So with that being said we're episode 76 of this freaking podcast. I mean we've been going seventy six weeks straight. So that's freaking awesome. But without any further bloviating cuz we got a lot of ground to cover today when it comes to self publish books online. It can be so stinking overwhelming. There's so many options. We're not really sure which ones to go with what's the pertinent information that we need to dive into to get started, you know, is this going to be okay for you or is this going to be okay for me? Well, that's why I'm kind of demystifying this process and this is why we're working on a 15th straight episode has self publishing a book online. The solution when it comes to publishing to various platforms can be found through what's called aggregate publishing how to aggregate publish your works like this you upload your content to a given platform. That's an aggregate publisher. Then they send it out to various Avenues to say places like Amazon Apple Barnes & Noble Kobo Google Play books. So on and so forth rather than having to go to each and every single one of those Dash boards and uploading each one of them individually. You can just do it through one and I guess what your CPA is going to love you to the end of the year because you'll have 50 different w-9s to file with them and it's only just one that you can have to worry about. We're going to be talking about aggregate publisher today known as tab Volvo. I'd heard about Tableau a few years ago. When the MacMillan publishing company known as pronoun went out of business pronoun was an aggregate publisher and it was great. I really loved It actually brought me at a fair chunk of change and was distributing some of my stuff over to places like Google Play books when I couldn't do that. So I was looking for some solutions wage in Tableau was one of them but had a little bit of a hang up and you going to find out why a little bit of a hang up in just a second here. That's not to say that tableaus bat. Don't tune me out because that's actually pretty good news full disclosure. I'm just curating information here. So don't shoot the messenger have never used any of this stuff. So anything I say is an opinion when I say well that's good or that's bad. It's just from the outside looking in that I'm saying this I can say for sure I can say for certain that the alliance of em, an author's very reputable company that it's a non-profit organization run by Indie authors for Indie authors. They fully vet different services and part of those Services is off. Watchdog service and they have actually given Tableau in excellent rating and they're even an ally partner. So that speaks volumes to what they you have and what they bring to the table just to kind of summarize before we jump into things if you listen to my episode about published Drive Tableau functions much in the same way, but there's some deviations there's some differences than what they have with published drive. So before we jump in with all that, let's break down each one of the things they do what they do not do is they do not distribute audiobooks. Just going to get that off the table get that out the way they don't deal with audio books whatsoever. They distribute e-books and print books. Now. I'm going to save some of the stuff for last for instance. We're going to talk about royalties and how it's all paid out a little bit later because wage They're all the same royalties. So for ebook distribution and it appears for ebook and print book that they have 35 online bookstores and they also feed out to scores of other bookstores online. But part of those bookstores include Amazon Apple Books Barnes & Noble booktopia never heard of them before wage Scribd Microsoft. I thought that was pretty interesting. I had never seen anybody should be two Microsoft before overdrive and another one called readings and then they just say home and More in quotations. I tried to track down there and more to find out what these other 35 different platforms were but I couldn't find a job information literally couldn't find it anywhere. You're going to find out why there was some issues that I had

Partner Publisher Dale Google Apple Macmillan Volvo Microsoft
ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

Techmeme Ride Home

05:04 min | 5 months ago

ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

"Okay, here's what I can tell you. You can still use tiktok as of this moment president trump since we last spoke said he approved Oracle's bid for the US. Operations of tiktok quote in concept, and so essentially the US delayed the planned tick tock band by about a week as Oracle Walmart looked to take a twenty percent stake in Tiktok globals planned pre IPO round as well as of course, the deals to host talks us user data and computer systems quoting Bloomberg I approve the deal and concept trump told reporters Saturday as he left the White House for a campaign rally in Fayetteville north. Carolina if they get. It done. That's great. If they don't, that's okay too and quote the new company which will be called tiktok global has agreed to funnel five billion dollars in new tax dollars to the US and set up a new education fund which trump said would satisfy his demand that the government receive a payment from the deal quote they're going to be setting up a very large fund. He said that's their contribution that I've been asking for an quote Oracle plans to take a twelve point, five percent stake in the new tiktok level. While Walmart said, it has tentatively agreed to by seven point, five percent of the entity. Walmart's. Officer Doug Macmillan will serve on tiktok global's board of directors. The retailer said in a statement for of the five board seats will be filled by Americans according to the statement tic TACs. Owner Bite dance is seeking evaluation of sixty billion dollars for the APP, according to a person familiar with the matter Oracle and Walmart would pay a combined twelve billion dollars for their stakes. If they agreed to that asking price, the final valuation has not been set as the party's worked out the equity structure and measures data security. The person said terms are still in flux and the proposed valuation could still change and quote. Yet more about that flex in a second but more about that five billion dollar payment to the government. The president mentioned I. Guess That's the key money by another name that he was asking for all along except that seems to have come as news to at least most of the parties involved Oracle later confirmed it to a degree but quoting Dan primack on twitter. More about tiktok quote Payments Number One the Education Fund is not to fun trump's patriotic history project number two, the five billion dollar figure is not codified anywhere and no one expects it to be anywhere near that big number three, the five billion dollars to the Treasury is anticipated payroll taxes over an unspecified period. Of Time, there will be an education focused effort using tick tock short video format distribution tool, but there is no dollar amount tied to it with trump seeming to inflate the payroll tax figure with the Education Fund remember Tick Tock doesn't have five billion dollars at least not until its IPO wants to complete within twelve months and quote. So. Again has this all been Kabuki theatre make the president think he's getting his key money. Give a politically connected firm, a sweetheart deal, and even if the five billion dollars is really not going to be five billion dollars again, we have the president of the government forcing the investment of private property, giving it to favourite entity and essentially asking for a kickback exactly. What happens in Banana Republics Super? Oh and about that whole thing being inflex bite dance. This morning was asserting that it is maintaining majority ownership and control over tick tock global and will not transfer any source code or technology to Oracle or Walmart so essentially waving a flag saying they won. Quoting the Financial Times bite that set on money that it would maintain majority ownership and control of tiktok global contradicting statements by Donald trump oracle, and Walmart after it agreed a deal with the companies to continue operating in the US Oracle, the US technology group, and Walmart, the world's biggest bricks and mortar retailer said in a joint statement at the weekend that Tiktok level would be majority owned by American investors and quote however while they're state combined with the equity held by. Long standing US investors by dance might mean, American investors would be the biggest financial beneficiaries, direct majority ownership and control of the business is set to remain with the Chinese company in a statement released on January tat chow by dances Chinese social media platform. The company said tiktok global would be a quote one, hundred percent fully owned subsidiary. The company added that after raising funds ahead of a potential initial public offering, it would have an eighty percent stake in the company and quote. So maybe that wasn't a good thing to go spouting off about because this either means now the deal is really off. Because the Chinese side really doesn't want it or else the deal is off because the president isn't going to be pleased about that more in just one second or else everyone is just GonNa declare victory and. Meaningful has actually changed my money's on that but hard to tell at this point because to conclude. About thirty minutes ago. President trump. said, he would not approve a tick tock deal bite dance ceded control, and well I don't know.

Oracle Walmart Walmart President Trump Tiktok Global United States Donald Trump Carolina Education Fund White House Bloomberg Fayetteville North Treasury Tiktok Twitter Doug Macmillan Officer Dan Primack
Walmart Joins Microsoft In A Bid To Buy TikTok

Motley Fool Money

04:52 min | 6 months ago

Walmart Joins Microsoft In A Bid To Buy TikTok

"Shares of Walmart rose six percent this week and hit a new all-time high on Friday after the retail giant confirmed it is teaming up with Microsoft in a bid for Tiktok the wildly popular Chinese social media APP Tiktok his close to selling operations in the US Canada Australia and New Zealand in a deal expected to be in the range of twenty to thirty billion dollars. Andy, this is moving pretty quickly. So it's quite possible by the time people are listening to this. The deal is already done but. When I first saw this news. It didn't make any sense to me why Walmart would get involved here. Yeah I think that probably was a little bit of a shock to too many people but the thought about it kind of makes little sense. Chris. So just think about what Doug Macmillan. The CEO at Walmart has been doing in their e commerce business trying to have so much success even before the covid nineteen lockdowns and having that success partnering with for example, the likes to shop of five announced earlier on me well, more has a very large ecommerce presence when the larger sites out there they're ECOMMERCE businesses going gangbusters. Right now they generate a lot of profits and cash as Microsoft and so I think when Walmart is looking to expand their audience, maybe continue to compete with Amazon when it comes to third party sellers, they have four, hundred, fifty, thousand third party sellers, Walmart does that's a fraction of what Amazon does. So again, to expand its reach reach a different audience, take talk may not be so much of a stretch depending on what price they can get. Now there's there's big numbers being tossed out of thirty billion or so but that's I'd be surprised if tick tick talking get that but I see as a way for Walmart to really expand into different audience expanded advertising business and build out ECOMMERCE platform in a way that it hasn't it would be very tough to do on its own. Jason if you're a Microsoft shareholder, are you would you rather see Microsoft go all in on this or do you like the idea that a company like Walmart is helping to spread the risk around because they're going to pay for part of it? I mean mean I would rather see Microsoft just take this on its own I. Mean I think the bigger risk probably. is on Walmart side just given what the business does given given the history of the business kind of how it. Built itself up to this point and physical retail. So You know personally, I'd rather see one parties opposed to many but. We'll cross that bridge when we come to it it, it does seem like an odd combo. TIKTOK perspective I mean you you have to figure they tiktok or trying to figure out how to be more than just an ad play right? What we know about the business today, it's very little. We know they have a big network of people that use the platform. I mean, no, they don't make a heck of a lot of money and it's essentially just an advertising play and and that's a very tough space with plenty of incumbents that do really well already. But if you're not facebook or Alphabet, then you're just part of this sort of collective of mediocre businesses that are taking a little bit of what is a very. Big Hi there I mean twitter it's just kind of mediocre business snap. It's just kind of mediocre business in tick, Tock faces that same fate if they don't figure out how to become more than just an ad plays so so you've seen facebook with instagram trying to get into social commerce twitter's made some here and there with that with that as well as snap. Eligible that Walmart would view tiktok from that perspective and tiktok would be looking to do that. It's just going to be a very. Interesting situation if it is a consortium that ends up acquiring Tiktok, because you have more people trying to determine more companies trying to determine the fate, which typically can be a more difficult thing and a lot of speculation of Walmart might do with this but you gotta like the fact that Doug Macmillan is keeping his cards pretty close to the vest he's not. Really saying they're GONNA use it. He's not saying whether it's going to be part of the Walmart plus service that they're going to roll out later this year. Yeah. Not Surprising just the quality of management that Doug has been able to showcase in just the type of leader he is and will be very interesting on the pricing perspective how much they WANNA pay If the deal does go through there aren't very many platforms out there. I think they're reportedly eight, hundred, million users of TIKTOK. Imagine they're very active there they probably skew young. There aren't many platforms out there when you look at the acid base, this is one that that I think Walmart is one of the larger companies out there in the world is saying listen this is a place where we can maybe have some immediate impact in there and to to continue our our transformation too much more of a larger of a digital company.

Walmart Microsoft Doug Macmillan Tiktok Facebook Twitter Andy Amazon United States CEO Chris Canada New Zealand Jason Australia
Pacers fire coach Nate McMillan after four seasons

Dana Loesch

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Pacers fire coach Nate McMillan after four seasons

"To the Indiana Pacers have fired head coach Nate McMillan. The team had just announced two weeks ago that they were giving MacMillan a one year contract extension. But after getting swept in the first round of the playoffs, the team decided it was time to let him go. MacMillan had been the head coach for the pacer of the last four seasons, but was three and 16 in the playoffs, not making it out of the first round any of those years. Pacers president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard says. It was a very hard decision but wants to move in a different direction, and the search for a new coach begins

Macmillan Indiana Pacers Nate Mcmillan Pacers Kevin Pritchard President Of Basketball Operat
The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

All Things Considered

01:27 min | 7 months ago

The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

"Church in tiny Lake City, Colorado, needed a pastor a couple of years ago, Brendan MacMillan took the job and moved there with his wife and seven Children. I would say overall, the town has been very receptive of our family, and the reason is that when it comes to ministry and the role that I believe God has asked me to do then race doesn't matter. Not everyone in Lake City is white. In some here, we're proud one. About 50 of the town's 400 residents turned out for a black lives matter March in June. But nobody invited McMillan despite other faith leaders being asked to attend, he says. It sounds like potential Saturday night Live sketch and first is quite comical. But I would say that my feelings were hurt just a little bit, but more so I would chuck that office. Exposing some of the areas That might be problematic in like city or mountain towns. Blind spots we made this march is an act of solidarity, but we also do not do our best to reach out to black people in community. 21 year old Caleb Chambers was one of the organizers of the march in avoiding Organization of our black population. We avoided connecting with them and building relationship that ended up being Really hurtful. McMillan says he received heartfelt apology emails from the organizer's, but he still hasn't spoken to them. There is a

Tiny Lake City Mcmillan Brendan Macmillan Caleb Chambers Colorado
Levi's to lay off hundreds of workers as revenue plunges and losses grow

MarketFoolery

04:26 min | 8 months ago

Levi's to lay off hundreds of workers as revenue plunges and losses grow

"Shares of Levi's down eight percent this morning. After second quarter, sales fell more than sixty percent. There's a lot going on with Levi's Andy including some layoffs will get to those. This is one of those situations where. The online sales just could not make up for the fact. That Levi's stores were closed for roughly ten weeks yet. Chris Online sales ECOMMERCE. Business was up twenty five percent, and the actually in May the the run rate them. The may growth was eighty percent year over year, so it was some really nice acceleration. This is a quarter by the way that captured March April and May for the most part all those months are really the heart of the of the Cova pandemic. But overall revenues fell sixty percent year over year during that quarter, most of their stores were closed. For Up to ten weeks at a time there, so like you said the e commerce sales just really couldn't make up for the for the lack of of the regular retail sales. Lots of just worries about what was happening leave. They entered the the year of actually doing doing pretty pretty well. They were pretty excited that they're they're. They're a CEO chipper talked about how the the beginning of the year looked pretty positive, but then obviously they committed pandemic, really hit them, and then they ran a net loss of three, hundred and sixty, four, million, most of that was two hundred and forty, two million, due to a restructuring inventory, costs and other costs tied directly to the pandemic, so the good news is now that most of their stores North Ninety percent are. Are Now back open. However, one of the things that has many of us worried is just that the resurgence of some of the cases, the covid nineteen cases were seen around the country in the US cases spike gene on a per day level has them has leave is looking at up to forty of their stores and wondering how do we have to kind of re shut those down for the time? Being similar to what apple is, so? They suspended their share repurchase. They did pay a dividend, but they they. They are not going to pay that in the third quarter. And so, and they suspended their guidance for the year so. Tough Times leave is and other retailers Chris that came public about a year ago little over a year ago. They raised. Their money at seven dollars stock price and had a really nice day. ONE JUMP UP TO I! Think as high as twenty three, and now the stocks back down to thirteen, so we're really tough ride for Levi shareholders over the past year. And laying off somewhere in the neighborhood of fifteen percent of corporate positions, so that's one more cost saving measures. They're. They're trying to pull in terms of levers. twenty-five percent ecommerce jump, you know. Under normal circumstances that would be seen as really good, but we've seen plenty of other retailers. Come Out, andy and maybe their online sales don't make up for stores being closed, but they come a lot closer. We've seen any number of retailers, not just the the big ones like target and Walmart, but smaller niche players whether ECOMMERCE is in some cases doubling so I mean that's that's one thing that Levi's has to do an even better job of. Of over the next six to twelve months. Chris you got that right, so it's fifteen percent of their sales that's up from five percent last year, but only five percent so five percent was really ECOMMERCE, so so unlike I think so many the other companies you mentioned Walmart for example with what Doug Macmillan's been doing and target and Home Depot, and so many of these companies that are making these big investments in in the in the Omni Channel. Efforts to be able to sell directly to consumers through their channels online as well as retail whatever strategy it may be leave is obviously has a lot of work to do, and they're. They're talking all the right language now, but you know I think there's some some some hesitations doubt there. I mean the Haas family is still largest shareholder in the Levi's. Shareholder base by far. Across their their family, the on large amounts of steak, so so they have a very stable shareholder base. Maybe wither the weather this storm, but on the margin It's you know the the cost reduction. Chris you mentioned from the seven hundred positions or fifteen percent of their workforce that maybe as a savings of one hundred million per year. That's about two percent of their annual cost structure, so so it's it's meaningful in the margin I. Think, but it's not like game changer. They're really. They gotta make sure. They have a new strategy for how to sell her

Levi Chris Andy Chris Online Walmart Cova United States Apple CEO Home Depot Omni Channel Doug Macmillan
"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

02:59 min | 8 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Doing. Yeah and connecting with people not gonNA. Go out of style anytime soon. That's for sure Andy when it comes to advice whether you're. Getting it or giving it. Are there any pieces that you've really carried with you through the years or that? You find yourself giving to You know aspiring executives or other CEOS I talked a lot about authenticity and what I mean by that isn't. Just being open, I think it's really thinking about you know. What is it gives you energy. And how do you do more of that How do you solve problems so I? I know that I have a certain way I think through problems. It's just the way my brain works and learned to just lean into that like you know very clearly here. Here's someone thinks through this problem and here's what I'm GONNA do. I think that's really authentic when people know what works for them. And then they can speak very plainly about it. The other thing I try to convey to the team regularly and and other folks that will ask me for some coaching, or some feedback is I'm amazed a number of people who know how to say something plainly directly, because they have a knowledge around it, but get caught in this trap of trying to say it in a complicated way. That sounds smarter and I kind of view that as a middle management. Management Trap when you get into senior management meetings, one of the things people are always surprised about what they get their there. I like sea level meeting is how plainspoken everybody is that? They're. They're experts in what they do. They know what they're doing and they're just talking about it. In a way, people can understand. I think that's critically important to success, and so I'm always telling people. If you know what you're talking about just talk about it, just be clear. Wise words Andy. Final, call to Action Challenge or Anecdote that you'd like to leave with everybody today. What would that be well? I think we've we've talked about throughout this conversation. I mean I really think in a world that's becoming increasingly digital that empathy really matters I I believe that before I came to user testing. That's a product pitch. That's part of what I thought was interesting about coming here. I think we're proving that to be really true right now. With what we're going through a society and you know empathy matters. It can't just be that. We're all numbers. Were all data were all personalization algorithms? People matter and so I think anything that you can be doing to to be more empathetic to bring embassy and your life to bring empty. What's your customers? Your colleagues I think we all benefit from that and makes the world a better place, so think about you know what you can do to be a more empathetic person in a more empathetic. Partner with the people you work with and I think you'll find. It's very rewarding. I love it, Andy. This has been a great conversation. Thank you so much for sharing your insights and your journey with us. Thank you. Thank you for having me and I love the PODCAST, it's A. It's a great show, so thank you for all the work. You Do I. Miss Awesome. Thanks Andy. Daily all of our PODCASTS are created with love by our team at Michigan. Dot Org. We own operate a network of PODCASTS and a brand.

Andy Michigan Partner
"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Doing. Yeah and connecting with people not gonNA. Go out of style anytime soon. That's for sure Andy when it comes to advice whether you're. Getting it or giving it. Are there any pieces that you've really carried with you through the years or that? You find yourself giving to You know aspiring executives or other CEOS I talked a lot about authenticity and what I mean by that isn't. Just being open, I think it's really thinking about you know. What is it gives you energy. And how do you do more of that How do you solve problems so I? I know that I have a certain way I think through problems. It's just the way my brain works and learned to just lean into that like you know very clearly here. Here's someone thinks through this problem and here's what I'm GONNA do. I think that's really authentic when people know what works for them. And then they can speak very plainly about it. The other thing I try to convey to the team regularly and and other folks that will ask me for some coaching, or some feedback is I'm amazed a number of people who know how to say something plainly directly, because they have a knowledge around it, but get caught in this trap of trying to say it in a complicated way. That sounds smarter and I kind of view that as a middle management. Management Trap when you get into senior management meetings, one of the things people are always surprised about what they get their there. I like sea level meeting is how plainspoken everybody is that? They're. They're experts in what they do. They know what they're doing and they're just talking about it. In a way, people can understand. I think that's critically important to success, and so I'm always telling people. If you know what you're talking about just talk about it, just be clear. Wise words Andy. Final, call to Action Challenge or Anecdote that you'd like to leave with everybody today. What would that be well? I think we've we've talked about throughout this conversation. I mean I really think in a world that's becoming increasingly digital that empathy really matters I I believe that before I came to user testing. That's a product pitch. That's part of what I thought was interesting about coming here. I think we're proving that to be really true right now. With what we're going through a society and you know empathy matters. It can't just be that. We're all numbers. Were all data were all personalization algorithms? People matter and so I think anything that you can be doing to to be more empathetic to bring embassy and your life to bring empty. What's your customers? Your colleagues I think we all benefit from that and makes the world a better place, so think about you know what you can do to be a more empathetic person in a more empathetic. Partner with the people you work with and I think you'll find. It's very rewarding. I love it, Andy. This has been a great conversation. Thank you so much for sharing your insights and your journey with us. Thank you. Thank you for having me and I love the PODCAST, it's A. It's a great show, so thank you for all the work. You Do I..

Andy Partner
"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Of how I made the transition from From being a product guy to a general manager to to being a CEO prior to being user testing I spent just shy of three years and act on software, which is a marketing automation company in Portland. That was a company that had run. A business model that was pretty challenged. It was a month to month business model, and just didn't really have that kind of SAS revenue dynamics that I think makes us companies so successful, also Three years kind of moving to an annual business model kind of getting refocused on our customers, and then ultimately made the decision that. We wanted to. Consolidate that business into Portland. Where the engineering team was basted, really got to spread out before it got there. They were in ten locations around the world but only four hundred employees are pretty spread out and then Portland wasn't the place for me because my family is here in the bay area, which is where we started this story, which is why I moved out here, and so at that point You know the CFO who's based in Portland. stepped into the CEO role. And I moved over to user testing after spending a lotta time with the founder, and really being excited about the business, and about the opportunity to kind of really what the the ethos of the challenge we're trying to solve really spoke to me. And, so now I've been the CEO at it user testing for coming up on two years here. So two years into the role. What are some of the takeaways or are there any stories you'd like to share about? Some of your proudest moments so far. I spent the first part of my career I. Think just working on really hard product problems I think that was what was really interesting to me. you know one of the things I I? Share with folks that ask me about career success in being able to be fairly young. CEO questions How'd you get to this job at this point? In one of thinks I talk about is. I don't think the path to success is by always trying to cherry pick the easiest assignments, even the most visible assignments you know one of the interview questions I really like is tell me when you've been wildly successful, but significantly under resourced, and I think that's one of the things that really separates being successful in mid management to senior management. You know it's one thing to successfully run the project that the CEO of the company has said is the number one project in the company and you have unlimited resources. That's that's hard important again. You were given all. All the resources of a large company to make that happen. It's another to say hey I'm running this thing and it's been a problem and I've gotten creative, and we didn't have all the resources in the world, but we've really shifted the business, and now things are growing, and I think that was my, I, believe reputation at Oracle was was going into working on hard things and heart problems, and and getting good outcomes, it was one of the big things I went over to salesforce to go do as I said. It was kind of a a challenged acquisition. where, some of the original ceases on the acquisition, maybe hadn't come to bear the way the company had wanted i. find that really intellectually interesting you know working on something that is hard and and kind of has to be untangled and put back the other, but I also find as you get kind of through that Middle Management Tear. That's what senior leaders noticed they notice. Hey, here's a person who I didn't give them all the resources in the world. And maybe it wasn't my number. One priority cause I was focused on this other thing, but now this turned into a really good business and it wasn't. Wasn't because everybody came and said. Here's a here's everything you need. It was US proving that we can make something really successful, or maybe had been previously. And I really enjoy that and I think that's been a big positive in my career that that's just something I've been naturally drawn to yeah, and that's something to that Those experiences in those moments just can't be replicated. And I think the type of Camaraderie or culture that you build in the aftermath of realizing okay, we had ten x less resources than our closest competitor. Who was trying to do the same thing yet? We still pulled it off. That's the type of thing that you just that Esprit de Corps You can't get it any other way, right? That's right. I used to tell my my team at Oracle. I mean our Mo. was you know the meeting that everybody wants to go to? Let's avoid that meeting. Right where you get all eager beaver put in the hands of trying to get on the pet project. Let's go to the meeting. Nobody wants to go to about some hard problem, but if one of our. Our senior leaders is calling a meeting around this because it needs to get solved, let show up and fix that problem and you know that gets noticed over time. I think that is a a great way to build a team. It's a great way to build a kind of a work ethic, or on solving real problems, and you build really interesting skills I. Mean My my role at act on was not an easy CEO job. I think to go into a company that was. Needing to really change aspects of its business model but I learned a ton. I probably learned a lot more than if you have something where it's like, yeah, you know. All the dials are ten. In this things you know taken off. Let's great experience, but it's not a great way to learn things. What was your biggest takeaway from act on when you went from the month to month to transitioning to annualized? I'm assuming subscriptions. How did you persuade? And how did you help? move the market to an annualized. Contract the biggest takeaway for that was really just putting the infrastructure in place to go, do it you know we were marketing automation product? People don't roll out marketing automation for a quarter, and then turn it back off, and so in a weird way. It wasn't hard to customers. They look you're putting a platform in place. It's supposed to last. You know a decade, so you know paying for it monthly doesn't make A. A whole lot of sense necessarily and if you have cash, flow, concerns or something like that, and that's really selling too much lower end of the segment than we were selling into but going to being upfront like yeah, this is a platform for the future We're going to go senate together. You're going to invest in it. We're going to invest in it. You know we're GONNA. Come in and make it successful. I, think that was A. just kind of a step we had to take I would also say you know maybe the biggest learning overall for me and act on was and maybe you're a lot of senior leaders. Talk about, but I think it's something that really takes time to internalizes. There was almost never a decision. I wish I had waited to make You know the old adage that if it's a really hard decision, you're picking between either two equally good things or to equally bad things we should pick one, and if as an easy decision, you should just make the decision that really has proven to be true in my experience, maybe even more so than as a product manager, not think as product manager, Hugh managing a lot of stakeholders, but as I said not everybody really works for you. You and so you can kind of operate a little bit more in the gray area. I think when you're a CEO, really paid to make decisions. You don't run any part of the company. You have leaders at run parts of the company. Your job is to make decisions to make them clearly to make them. I wouldn't say quickly, but at least efficiently is maybe the right answer like if I'm not going to have substantially better information about something in the foreseeable future, then make a decision and I think. Think that kind of situation really taught me that that's critically important is a senior leader definitely and so let's jump over to user testing for a moment so i. think that it's easy to assume that we know how our users are using a product or service or a landing page or product, but in reality what they're thinking about, and the voice concerns that they have or you know getting a video of them. Reacting to something is is really difficult, and it's kind of at the forefront of. Of everybody's mind right now, honest customer feedback, that's the holy grail for iterating product. So, what is your testing? Do and where you all at this journey? Yeah, we're really in the business of trying to help bring customer empathy into companies. What our product does is allow you to have a set of participants, so people have opted in goes through and use your product while you can view the experience and what our participants do, as also narrate their thoughts while they go through it, so you could say. I'm a retailer and I would like to target a new segment which would be. Maybe recently divorced men who are of a certain age, certain economic status,.

CEO Portland Oracle general manager founder product manager CFO Esprit de Corps senate internalizes Hugh
"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

08:02 min | 8 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Andy Welcome to the show, thank you. So Andy. We liked to kick off every show by getting to know a little bit about you, and I'm particularly curious about your origins. Where'd you grow up at I moved around. A bunch in the Midwest is born in Niagara. Falls but I mostly grew up in the Detroit. Area. Okay cool yeah. My DAD's family's from Ohio south of Cleveland that little bit, so yeah I'm familiar with the Midwest and the northern parts of the country there Would you get into when you were in Detroit and he big passions or interests early on or what? What was life like there? The is big into sports, so we were. We are an auto industry family. My Dad worked at GM, and and then at eds, and it's Kinda we we moved all over the Midwest into plant towns, but through all of that the oldest of four boys in a six year span so pretty close together with with my brothers, and we were all hockey player so I played a whole lot of ice. Hockey is still play is easy when we're not under shelter in place quarantine. Get Out and play some hockey and. Golf sports and just that was most growing up was sports school? I love it and when you were playing sports when you're younger. Is there anything that you took away from sports that you still apply business a day to day, or you think that really helped, give you an edge in business. I think there's a couple of things that you learn. From sports I'm big into sports with with my kids and the experiences that brings I think. It's a rather unique environment. I feel like for young people in kids to have something you can work out in. Such clear progress. Where you can face adversity immediately, think of the what felt like big moments when you were kids. the puck on your stick with a not a lot of time left in the game or something down by a goal you know those are kind of pressure moments that are kind of think hard to create for kids in other circumstances as much and so you learn to deal with you know success and disappointment. You'll learn to be part of a team. Learn to kind of. Manage how to work well together how to how to overcome even disappointment teammates and things like that and having to regroup and come back the next week and play again, so I think those are really important life lessons, and I'm sure there are other ways to get those life lessons I'm saying it's only spoilt, but I think they're a great vehicle for for learning how to. Be Part of a team to be a leader to go through adversity. I think those are important life lessons. That you carry with you the rest of your life. Yeah for sure. So what brought you out to New Year in burlingame or thereabouts now what brought you out to the bay area? So I was with a software company called Stellan, which was a content management company that did web document management that was based out of Minneapolis which is where my wife and I lived while she was going to law school there and. Oracle had acquired that business and things in my personal life had changed my wife and I had had our first kid, and she was no longer working at the law firm that she was working at and I was shuttling out to the bay area every other week, and after a few months of that, it was like you know. Maybe maybe we should move and. I could be part of the kids lives while they grow up to, and so that made a lot of sense and so We kind of picked up and moved out here. Gosh probably a decade ago, now for tech jobs, but the main reason just being are wanted to be close to family while working in tech, and this seemed like the best place to be doing that. Yeah, definitely is. When you were getting established out here around a decade ago, did you joined salesforce right away? What was your evolution like wise? They're now I spent. Five years at Oracle and I think I spent the first. Year and a half of that in the Midwest shuttling out and then like I said Shirley after my son was born, moved out here but worked for Oracle for I. Want to say about three and a half years while I was out here before. Going over to salesforce I think it was something that I don't think I. Fully understood the dynamics of the ecosystem out here I moved out here I was just kind of moving out here to be closer to to my family, and not having to be on the road traveling, and it wasn't until I been out of your few for a few years, and you start to realize just how? How small the tech community can be if you start to think about you know. How many B2B product managers are there that sell enterprise scale products in I. Mean Even if you start to get to hundreds, let's not that many people you pretty quickly realize you're only a degree or two separated from everybody. That's when they kind of dynamics of living out here. Really take effect in that's. Not Too long after that's when I took an opportunity over to salesforce. Very cool, and when you were transitioning over salesforce what was the culture like at Oracle and then what type of culture did you find when you arrived at salesforce? Our the different were they were very different sized companies back than I think. When I joined salesforce, it was six thousand people, which is not a small company by any stretch, but Oracle was massive. I think you know we had already. Already done the Sun acquisition at that point, so it was a very very large company. I think like all large companies view large companies. There's no matter how top down they can be there. They ended up being a collection of smaller companies in some ways. I'm so I worked in a in a group that was fusion middleware was run by Thomas Current at the time. Who is now? The Google Cloud CEO? I think he's a phenomenal leader. I really enjoyed working in that group. I got a lot of leeway from Thomas to just kind of go get stuff done unsolved problems, but it was still a big transition going to salesforce. It's a very different culture but I've talked before about how it's very interesting that when I went over to salesforce, I was one of the. Early Oracle people over there, but over the last you know five to ten years a lot of people who? Have Gone to work over at salesforce. I just think the business model of SAS has a better incentive structure in terms of being more customer century. You need the customer to renew for the business to make sense so I saw some of the most hard nosed driven. You know sales, numbers, centric people that came over from Oracle that I felt like had fairly sharp elbows pretty quickly become extremely customer centric in the salesforce model I would argue probably Oracle's gone through that same transition internally now being more cloud centric as well simply because the business model in success dictates that you're more aligned with your customers. That's one of the big. Benefits of the SAS business model is you can still be very goal driven and have goals lined up more closely with your customers. I felt like in some ways that culture. was a fantastic culture, but I think it was a great culture in some ways, because the business model helped integrate great culture. Yeah and when you were taking those learnings and getting involved in your next journey, the next project curious, what was that? And then how did you make your way to become the CEO of user testing? Yeah I had a pretty interesting route to to do that. I was running. I went into salesforce to run A. Business that had been acquired, and then had kinda struggled a little bit and kind of finding its footing inside salesforce, and that was. The DATA DOT COM business. What I loved about running that was it was a completely standalone pnl because it was acquired business, so I went over to run. Production was promoted to being the general manager that business and it was like being a CEO. Inside this much bigger company, because I was running everything for my own data centers setting my own sales team reporting to me, which was really fascinating experience for from being a product manager where? The adage goes. You're kind of responsible for everything, but in charge of nobody is a product manager was interesting. Actually have an organization that goes and get stuff done. So I love that but the entire model for building success in that group was to get a scaled and running well and integrated into the sales cloud business kind of the salesforce automation core business of salesforce, and then integrated back into that business, and so in some ways you know not an on common story. Success was to work myself out of running a standalone business unit and then. Then to take a larger functional role in the company, so I do that for about a year as the COO of the.

salesforce Oracle Midwest Detroit CEO Andy Welcome Ohio Hockey Cleveland product manager Golf Niagara SAS Thomas Current GM Google general manager COO
"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:12 min | 11 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

"That'll just increase the number of bodybags so for sure. We need a much stronger. Better resourced and less politicized on all counts World Health Organization even though the World Health Organization that we have now is doing a great job not perfect great but for the United States and for all of our countries we need to I. We have to have surveillance systems at home and abroad. We also need to think differently about how we address this whole category of problems. We have a military and there's some kind of war whatever we don't D- mobilize the entire military. We have a standing military capacity. That is doing surveillance. That's doing training. That's developing capabilities. We have this big ramp up that we're seeing the world over now but if at the end of this when we will get to an end of this weather it's a year from now two years from now who knows what we have a vaccine that's distributed and people are feeling safer the danger is we're going to fully mobilize and then have to start from close to zero as we're doing now and so we need to have is an ongoing capability that recognizes that this the threat of global pandemics just like climate change destruction of our ecosystems. These are ongoing threats. And if we don't organize nationally and internationally to address them in a collective and ongoing way we'll be back to different versions of this conversation and we can't live that way exactly and that's why I think this is such an important baseline to potentially reset and try to figure out how the world deals with the next big threat. No matter what it is Jamie Mitchell thank you so much indeed for joining. Us My pleasure. How does the world learn from this? And how will history record this period? What can teach us about where we are. And what sort of a world will emerge will emerge into the eminent historian and Professor Emeritus at Oxford University? Margaret Macmillan joins me. She's also written extensively about us. China relations Margaret Mellon. Welcome to the program. I know you're in Oxford in quarantine or in lockdown like everybody else's you just heard Jamie Metzel talk about you know what what we're confronted with right now and whether we're ready. I just WanNa ask you first because you have written about. Us China relations on just to react for instance to what's happened but Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut He tweeted. China has too much influence at the. Who so we pull funding from the WHO giving China more influence at the W. H. o? Smart what do you make of this current crisis? I think it's putting onto strained relationship. That was already under strain between the United States and China and I found what Jenny. Mets seven very sobering indeed because. I think we are showing ourselves at the moment at least not very good at working internationally. An international problem. The relationship between the United States and China is probably the key relationship for the next decades. It's important because United States remains the world's biggest power including military power in China is a major regional power growing very fast and if these two countries can work together it doesn't mean they have to be friends. But if they can't what togethers icon cooperate together than the rest going to really feel the chill so leaders use whatever's disposal to you heard. Jamie met say cover up other say deflect from from from perceptions of failure over this other say is just like a big campaign rally to that. There is a pole in the United States that says is the Harris Poll says ninety percent of Republicans and sixty seven percent of Democrats. Believe the Chinese government is responsible for the virus spreading. What does one do when you're trying to have an adult global reaction and relationship to fighting this or any kind of massive global problem but then you see being your own people with this kind of distrust? Well that's the danger saying can end. Of course the Chinese I think handled outbreak badly. We know that they cut it up. They they let it get roots in Wuhan elsewhere. Much too much too much and they will not cooperative initially but they did swing around and they did cooperate with the WHO they did. Begin to cooperate. Internationally share information. I think we need to remember that. I think the issue really is is one leadership if you have leaders who are telling that people that the enemy is over there in the enemy is to blame for everything in this case. President trump blaming old is some China. I think that's when you get into trouble. And I think it's a natural human saying to look for something or someone to blame. I mean we look for scapegoats and China's becoming a handy scapegoat. Immigrants in previous epidemics have been handy scapegoats. And that's where I think. Leaders have to fight back against that. I mean leaders are not there just to listen baser instincts of that people are there to actually try and call them to reason. You know I wanted to talk about leadership with you and I wonder whether you have had a chance to sort of evaluate and think about who you think has emerged as a responsible or or admirable leader in this. You know there was a very interesting little meam going around. There was a graphic showing. Angela Merkel the New Zealand prime minister just into the Norwegian. Prime Minister Solberg on the Danish Prime Minister Number of women whose countries seem to be doing amongst the best because of the decisions they took. I just wonder what you. Where do you see leadership in those countries and I would add South Korean as well and I think what we're also saying is that it Mashes not just that you have leaders who will make decisions and who will talk openly to that people that what the issues are but you have citizens who trust their own governments and citizens trust that governments then. They will do things which seem unreasonable perhaps difficult. In Britain we more or less trust the government here and so we've stayed inside. We haven't gotten into the parks. We have done things that are not meant to do and I think trust is enormously important. I mean Sweden is going down a rather interesting wrote of not doing complete lockdown and. That's because by Swedish people trust that government institutions trust the government and its advises. Knows what it's doing and when you have when you have societies where people don't trust lead us then I think we get into real trouble. I mean some. Swedish statistics do show that that infections and debts a higher than some of their neighbors. But I understand what you're saying. They did rely on that social compact with people but when it comes to trust and leadership as you know very well. The Prime Minister of this country Boris Johnson was taken ill. He was taken to hospital. He was then taken to the ICU. Now he's out but in his video message often he said thanking the NHS that it could have gone either way. That's pretty dire. I mean he actually said it could have gone either way. The whole time the government telling us he was in great spirits he was interacting with the nurses. And there's been a pretty big backlash about the way they described his condition. Can you talk about that? But also compare it to your own great great grandfather. Great Grandfather. David Lloyd George who was Prime Minister and ill during the Spanish influenza of nineteen eighteen. Well in the case of Boy George. He was prime minister's fighting election campaign in November December nineteen eighteen and he may or may not have had the Spanish influence. He was sick and he had to be put into isolation in Birmingham where he was spending a Manchester. I think we're not sure but I think the word enough government officials and the cabinet was strong enough. The government could continue even though he was locked up or as Johnson. I think I think has suffered. Of course he suffered through illness. I think everyone is very relieved to came through but I think his government will pay penalty for not being honest at first and I think there are also paying a penalty the not seeming to know what they want to do when the virus began to hit the UK. And what I think is made a difference. In Britain as people trust things beyond the government they tend to trust the civil service and They trust the national health. Said it was extraordinary statistic when the National Health Service Osso volunteers. They were overwhelmed. I think they got something. Like seven hundred fifty thousand volunteers in the first rally's so I think it's not just a question of trusting a particular leader it's trusting the institutions in the organizations that surround that leader entrusting. You'll sell US citizens as well and I've heard you talk about The necessity in times of leaders being able to inspire and lift Maral to be able to inspire an lift the idea of hope. And I wonder. Because you're you're also Canadian. You've seen a very different reaction in Canada and in the United States to federal systems of as you've described it a much much much less infection much less catastrophe in Canada. Just north of the border can you? Can you try to sum up? Why you think that's happened. I've been trying to work it out myself. Because in fact when when the virus began to hit in Canada the Liberal government was not all that Popular Ingestion Trudeau. The prime minister's ratings were not that great they have gone up as have the ratings and approval ratings of the provincial premiers. And I think one of the differences and I've been reflecting on it. Is that in the United States. You have a federalism which a lot of people don't really accept and you had people don't really trust the federal government in Washington. I suppose that goes back to founding of the United States but perhaps also goes back to the civil war in the whole stress on state's rights and mistrust of of government in Canada. We have a federal system but it's tightly bound by shed values norms and by political parties which tend to be national and we tend to see Canada provinces working very closely with with the federal government. That time is when they when they call each other names but I think we have a much closer type of federalism than you do in the United States and I think it's coming out at the moment although the premier Province Ontario is a conservative. He's working very closely with the government in Oshawa and that's true of a premise across the country and we also have public health and and socialized medicine. That's made a difference because we've had a capacity in each province to respond to the challenge. We haven't got enough equipment. Nobody does but I think we're better off than many parts of the United States because we have public standards across Canada for the treatment. People should be having sort of equipment and provisions hospital should have and crucially Margaret Macmillan. Canada clearly was affected by SAWS came and hit Canada in two thousand three and clearly. They actually did this. Take lessons from it. They did bright their own pandemic playbook and followed it this time. Yes I think we did. We did learn from that. I mean I was in Toronto edited and the and the city was shut down not as much as it is now but it was quite shocking to us and I think we realized I think we we. We were right to realize that. We live in a globalized world. Canada has a great many emigrants great. Many people going to see families families coming to see them with very much like most countries in this world linked into a global community. And so we know that we cannot keep us safe that no drawbridges we can pull up that we if there is a virus pandemic. It's GonNa come sooner or later. And it's no point in trying to find people all countries to blame for that. These are things that ignored viruses. Don't stop at borders. I WanNa ask you what you think. And how you think. We're going to emerge from this. I want to just quote a little bit of a poem that did the rounds online by poet by the name of Kitty. Oh Mirror she wrote it. On march in March last month and part of it says and the people stayed home and they read books and listened and when the danger passed and the people joined together again they grieve their losses and they made new choices and dream new images and created new ways to live and heal the earth fully as they had been healed. That would be lovely. Leave do you do you see I mean is a pandemic historically a great re center. Can you see climate justice inequality? I mean neighborhood lags phobia I mean. Can you see the big issues? Somehow being reimagined I chance and I think they're really two things. One is that sometimes it takes a real catastrophe and it could be a war. Been epidemic natural disaster could be a financial crash to make us realize just how much we depend on each other and make us realize what's wrong. And what's right in societies and it does I think catastrophe does force us to rethink things. We've been doing and we've already. I think even before two twenty twenty with thinking that not not all was well in our societies. I think we were concerned about growing inequality we were concerned about the strain within societies but concerned about the feelings that people had that they were being marginalized and left out. And I think think if anything good comes out of this catastrophe catastrophe it will be that we will look more seriously at some of the things that we knew a half new. Were already wrong in UH societies and what I hope is we'll also look at the international order because we live on what is not a very big planet and it's increasingly links. What happens in one part of it affects what happens in other parts and I think we need to reflect a gain on what international institutions we have including the. Who but all the many others we have and to make them strong good not to disturb him because in the end. We're all in the same boat. And that's what really worries me. You can't put up barriers among some of the things that like epidemics and we have to work together and so I'm hoping that for all the rhetoric flying around moment some of it is is really dispiriting. I'm hoping that enough people around the what was said. Look this isn't working and we have got to work together because otherwise we're all really going to be sunk. Yes indeed that let us hope modern McMillan. Thank you very much for joining.

United States Prime Minister China Canada Margaret Macmillan Jamie Mitchell Boris Johnson World Health Organization Britain Prime Minister Solberg Chinese government Mets prime minister Connecticut Oxford University NHS Sweden Angela Merkel Senator Chris Murphy
"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:54 min | 11 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Unwelcomed Amanpour. Here's what's coming up today. I'm instructing my administration to halt funding of the World Health Organization. We regret the decision of the president of the United States to order. Hold in funding global outrage at America's move to pull the plug on the World Health Organization in the midst of a pandemic. I explore the dangers with who adviser Jamie Mezzo then and now from leadership to U S China Relations Historian and author Margaret. Macmillan.

World Health Organization Jamie Mezzo China Relations Historian Unwelcomed Amanpour Macmillan United States president Margaret America
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
Archway Health's Keely Macmillan Discusses Medicare Bundled Payment Performance

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Archway Health's Keely Macmillan Discusses Medicare Bundled Payment Performance

"During this podcast discussed with Keely McMillan Senior Vice President of policy and Solutions Management and archway health archways latest results regarding its participation in Medicare bundled payment arrangements. And we'll discuss as well see message related evaluation findings Miss Macmillan. Welcome to the program great. Thanks very much David. Great to join you. Thank you again. Miss McMillan's bio is of course posted on the podcast website. Very briefly on background since two thousand eleven. Cms through the Centers for Medicare Medicaid innovation has been fielding episode base bundled payment demonstrations generally define. These are payment models whereby Medicare pays a provider a fixed fee for beneficiaries care usually for surgical procedure followed by a limited time limited. Rehab period for example. Cms is currently fielding bundled payment for Care Improvement Advanced CB said Vance A DEMO. That includes thirty one inpatient and four outpatient clinical episodes the comprehensive care for joint replacement demo or CJ are covers l. e. j. r.'s or lower extremity joint replacements. I E hips and knees and there is an Oncology Care Demo that addresses cancer chemotherapy treatment in January besides evaluations were published And last June a second. Cj Our evaluation listeners may recall in February twenty eighteen. I interviewed archery health. Ceo and founder. Dave Terry with meat again. Discuss archways recent bundled payment results in related? Recent evaluation findings is archways Keeley Macmillan. So that keely. Let's go to my standard Opening question that is if you can give a brief overview of archway health. Sure sure thanks very much David. Archway halls is a value based care. Solutions Company. Were headquartered in Boston Massachusetts. And our mission is to first identify. Great Care and then evangelize it and we do that. By enabling providers to achieve it empowering consumers to find it and protecting those who deliver and pay for it so that includes providers in self insured employers and we partner with hundreds providers across

Keely Mcmillan Medicare Senior Vice President Of Polic Oncology Care Demo Keeley Macmillan Miss Macmillan David Miss Mcmillan Boston Massachusetts Dave Terry Partner Vance CEO L. E. J. R. Founder
Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

MarketFoolery

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

"Walmart's fourth quarter profit and revenue came in a little lower than expected. And am I the only one who looked at this report and was reminded of targets holiday quarter report because it kind of seemed like it wasn't bad it wasn't a train wreck but particularly the fact that video games and toy sales those segments for wall marked really dragged down the result more so than say e Commerce? Which was up another. Thirty five percent. Yeah I mean I do. I agree with what you're saying there. It made me think of target. Initially it also made me think of Amazon and really like Amazon really at a blowout holiday. Quarter the one thing I do think the difference between Walmart in target and I think the reason why the markets okay with this report basically flat. Yeah Yeah I mean I think really it is because of grocery I I think that when you look at the investments that Walmart made in grocery so long ago and I don't WanNa say skepticism. But maybe just sort of the furled eyebrows like. Is that really something that people want or is that? GonNa there was skepticism but there but now that's more than fifty percent of their. Us sales groceries. This is a grocery company in in so I think that's important because it's not very surprising to see the weakness and things like toys games and apparel very highly competitive markets in. We've we've certainly seen toys have been redefined just over the past decade thanks to technology. It's a bit of a different Market all together for that so I. I do think that they're strong. Presence in grocery helps to to mitigate any of the other weakness that we might see in a quarter like this and I mean it wasn't a week it was a little bit below expectations but I think there's enough to be optimistic optimistic about the you know toward the markets reacting to wait is today co. Doug Macmillan. I think deserves a lot of credit for a lot of different things and one of them is. I think he's just an above average communicator in terms of guidance. And also just in with this quarter alone. Just coming out and saying yeah. This wasn't our best and he in talking about e commerce. You see him. Start to ratchet that guidance back and saying look it's going to come in law. I would just point out that we've had. I don't know how many quarters in a row of Walmart growing their ECOMMERCE segment anywhere from the high teens to what we saw with this latest quarter. You know the mid thirty so even if that CO scales back its off of a much bigger base than it was two three years ago. Yeah I can't help but wonder if we won't see another acquisition at some point here maybe we will. Maybe we won't. I mean I do feel like they are. They're looking at this business more and more as an ECOMMERCE in a grocery play that also has everything else under the sun. I mean camps. Were were certainly below expectations. I think maybe the troubling part there it was because of transactions and average ticket I mean transactions in. Us stores were up one percent for the quarter. But I mean it was one half percent a year ago and An average ticket was was up less than one percent and I mean that was to two point six percent a year ago so I mean there were clearly some pressures they're in Walmart is is is a low margin business to begin with so you had to be really really aware of that kind of stuff. I mean I. I think you could be interesting to watch how I mean. I can't believe Mardi talking about this coming holiday season. But let's let's talk about that for a second because there is a big Gaming Console yes fresh cycle coming absolutely I do think there is Certainly potential therefore for them to to exceed expectations was he had the rest of the year goes but I mean you know this is a. This is a traditional retail story right. I mean if you look at Walmart I I always like making this comparison because it just tells you how the market views these different companies but walmart with a market cap of three hundred thirty five billion That's on five hundred twenty four billion dollars in sales and you look at Amazon which is now over one trillion dollars and that's off of two hundred eighty billion dollars in sales and so while Walmart grocery which is awesome grocery ain't aws in an producing those same kinds of margins and it never will But what grocery does is it keeps the traffic coming back and we're seeing more and more as this retail environment Sort of re reshapes itself Really the key is saying. Make sure you have people in those stores whether it's virtually or physically make sure you have people in those stores and grocery is one way to really really do that.

Walmart Doug Macmillan Amazon United States Mardi
#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

Latino Rebels Radio

09:04 min | 1 year ago

#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

"Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Mcmillan Roberto Lovato MPR Maria Hinojosa Brian Janine Ms Magazine Macmillan Salma Hayek America Folkloric Industrial Complex Miriam Gerbo Mary Ranchera Hollywood
Becky Quick and Walmart CEO Doug McMillon

Squawk Pod

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Becky Quick and Walmart CEO Doug McMillon

"These are the sounds of holiday shoppers at Walmart. The largest retailer in America bringing in almost four hundred billion million dollars in sales last year. It's also the biggest private employer more than a million and a half Americans work at a Walmart recently. Becky quick sat down with the company's leader Delaware Maryland. Ellen okay. That's just one two three four. Five McMillan's job is enormous. Think of those one point five million workers they call the associates and twenty one consecutive quarters of sales growth in Walmart stores. That's a streak. That Wall Street hopes will continue. And as you'll hear from Macmillan in this interview and in past comments he's made that will remind you of his job description. It only grows walmart has been thrust into the center of the debate on gun control in America following a deadly shooting shooting at one of its stores in August. A gunman walked into a crowded El Paso Walmart on a Saturday morning and killed twenty two people that location has only just reopened. Now the shooting shooting and policy changes since have made the job of CEO of the country's biggest retailer. A role of national importance will bring you all of this exclusively I beckon. Hi Katie I in this episode of Squawk Pod. Let's catch up with becky quick. Let's talk about Walmart. The biggest retailer in terms of sales in the US one of the biggest biggest employers in the entire world And run by a guy named Doug Macmillan yet. What cracks me up about Walmart is right around the turn of the century they hired and more people than anybody on the planet with the exception of the US government or the Red Army in China? That's still the case today They are a massive employer. They are massive in terms of their reach. I think about ten percent of. US retail sales are just walmart so ten percent overall US retail sales walmart. Doug Macmillan melon is a guy who started there when he was a teenager started working in one of their supply distributions warehouses. And he's been there ever since but he's done just about everything there. We are just getting news of some significant management changes at Walmart. Doug Macmillan has been named to succeed Mike do as president and CEO. This is effective defense. I you had all the stuff going on in Mexico last year with alleged bribery. You've had poor worker relations and then you had this Ohio Walmart recently. Which announced a food drive for its own workers? You can't deny becky that Walmart has been for deserved or not. The subject of a lot of men. How long when you've been covering Walmart is a company? I used to cover retail for the Wall Street Journal I started back in the Nineteen Ninety S. I think it was one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. It's crazy to think about the largest retailer in the world then kind of rebooting itself and deciding that it's going to create a whole new way that it's good that it goes about business

Walmart El Paso Walmart Doug Macmillan Becky United States America Wall Street Journal President And Ceo Nineteen Ninety CEO Delaware Us Government Mcmillan Ellen Maryland Katie I Mexico Bribery
Will artificial scarcity of library e-books push sales?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Will artificial scarcity of library e-books push sales?

"Ninety four percent of libraries offer evokes borrowers but now Macmillan one of the five five biggest book publishers in the. US says it's going to limit each library to just one copy for the first eight weeks after publication so get ready for longer waits to borrow awesome libraries and their users a protesting the move when I last checked nearly two hundred thousand people had signed an online petition against it. Just men west is a librarian in Vermont. She says the move is reflective of a lot of upheaval in the book. World Right now I think publishers are wondering what to do about their revenue model As more and more people go many more different places for content than just the Bookstore Amazon encourages them to lower their prices and lower their prices. Because they're kind of the eight eight hundred pound gorilla in this whole thing and so they're looking at ways. They can serve recoup some of the money they lose and in many ways some publishers. Look at libraries if we're sort of taking money from them by lending the books instead of making people buy them and so it McMillan is basically taking a risk that if they enforce this artificial scarcity by not letting libraries lend their books more people will gotten by their books. Macmillan CEO has said in interviews that the e book marketplace's kind of like that for motion pictures in the new releases. Have all this excitement around them for the first few weeks. And that's when they make most money through sales and they need that money to reinvest in new e books on new authors and illustrators in the whole ecosystem isn't that fair Libraries are willing to pay for these books. I don't understand why they are looking to libraries and saying oh well we know you want to buy dozens if not hundreds of copies of these books right after they come out but instead we think we're going to put the squeeze he's on your patrons and in fact one of our sources of free advertising now that there's fewer bookstores and not take your money in order to try to make it this other way way. Can you suggest a change. That would keep everybody happy. That would give libraries enough copies of the books but also keep publishers happy. I don't understand what the problem was originally sell. L. Books to libraries they are free advertising. McMillan is trying to get patrons to buy books from them directly and I actually number one. Don't think it's GonNa work out that way for them. And number two think it puts a squeeze specifically on more disadvantage patrons in libraries people. The WHO maybe can't read a print book for various reasons. Those people are not necessarily going to be the people that are going to go and purchase those books and so it's really doing is denying certain readerships access to their books. Who would otherwise be happy to have them through the library? Who would be happy to pay for them? And just give us tonight. Era of how important a publisher Macmillan is. I mean how much will patrons of a lab refill this change. Well it's GonNa be really interesting right now. Libraries are just kind of I'm sitting in waiting this thing The embargo basically went into effect. A week ago Some major library systems can county notably in Washington state has decided added to just not purchase McMillan books. Because they're grumpy about this and I don't blame them but we're not sure. I think if you asked most patrons you know what does McMillan publish us who their authors. They wouldn't necessarily know and it puts libraries in this really awkward position of having to explain this relatively complicated situation about the marketplace to patrons who really just want a good book. I'm hoping libraries can react especially by buying more print materials. But we're really not sure how it's going to affect affect readership and attitude towards Macmillan or the other publishers or e books genuinely until we see how this plays out. Do you think there's a chance here that Macmillan might end up backpedaling on this. I do I think it's entirely possible Sergeant the CEO of Macmillan was recently speaking at a meeting of the heads of state libraries. OBREE's like every state has a state library or department of Libraries within the state and the heads of those state. Libraries are kind of grumpy about this too. I mean really what it's about is access right. And this withholding access from the public in a general sense so he kinda trotted out his old. Like this. Why it's a better deal and we're totally trying to help libraries and You know that first copy we let you have is cheap. And it doesn't expire so that's super cool like restating his statement statement and I think the state librarians in many cases weren't having it they pushed back in their kind of friendly mannerly way and sergeant did kind of open the door for. We'll maybe this isn't the right way to do things which is not anything we've heard him say previously. And so I see that as kind for a ray of hope. They basically Based this embargo on kind of an experiment they did with one of their imprints which was tore books. They tried to smaller. Smaller embargo is kind of a test but tore books also publishes a lot of science fiction. Fantasy they have a rabid fan base. Who may be would purchase those books out if they couldn't borrow them at the library but realistically I don't think that's GonNa Happen for the rest of Macmillan's front list and so I think what we're hoping is this? Also also embargo experiment will not go the way they want and maybe they can sort of dial it back to having something. That's more in line with the way other. Publishers appear to be making this happen and also making it work for them from a business perspective. So it'll work for us from a library

Macmillan Mcmillan Publisher Department Of Libraries CEO Amazon Vermont Washington Eight Eight Hundred Pound Ninety Four Percent Eight Weeks
Walmart Ends Handgun Ammunition Sales, Bans Open Carry

Business Wars Daily

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Walmart Ends Handgun Ammunition Sales, Bans Open Carry

"This episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from Pitney Leabeau's. Try It free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit. PBA DOT com slash B W daily the UH from wintry. I'm David Brown and this is business awards daily on this Monday September ninth while you probably heard the headlines Walmart will no longer sell handgun ammunition in announced the change one month after twenty two people were shot and killed in a Walmart store in El Paso Texas. You'll also stop selling certain kinds of ammunition intended for hunting rifles but which can be used so-called assault style rifles as well. USA Today reported Walmart Mart currently sells about twenty percent of all ammunition sold in the US these actions it says will reduce that percentage to somewhere between six and nine percent. Walmart sells far fewer handguns ammunition. Currently the chain sells handguns only in Alaska. Those sales will end as well. The company stopped selling selling assault style rifles in two thousand fifteen and raise the age of all gun buyers to twenty one last year following the mass shooting in Parkland Florida in a memo to employees posted the Walmart website last Tuesday. CEO Doug McMillan said that he was moved to action by the El Paso shooting but also by numerous other events just in the past month alone own a few days before to employees were fatally shot by another employee in a Walmart in South Haven Mississippi since El Paso there urban mass shootings in Dayton Ohio and Midland and Odessa Texas all of which CEO McMillan referenced in his memo Social Media Lit up with calls for Walmart to get out of the firearms business immediately. After the passer shooting Walmart employees organized a walkout protesting Walmart's business and an employee led change dot org petition calling for Walmart restrict firearm sales and and both open and concealed carry in its stores received one hundred forty thousand signatures the Washington and Post reported Walmart is now asking customers not to carry guns into both Walmart and Sam's clubs in the twenty two states that have open carry laws in the memo. McMillan says it's doing so because workers and customers have been frightened by quoting here multiple incidents since El Paso where individuals attempting to make a statement and test are responsive responsive entered our stores carrying weapons close quote. He added that some customers carrying lawfully unintentionally created situations where employees call all law enforcement and evacuated stores by asking customers not to carry openly. Walmart is hoping to avoid future incidents. McMillan said the chain will continue to to allow people with permits to carry concealed weapons where concealed carry is lawful. Walmart said it will sell out its current inventory of ammunition. It didn't specify the size is or value of that inventory nor long expects to take before it runs out the chain is attempting to balance the new policies while still serving hunters and other sportsmen and keeping gun rights advocates in mind it will continue to sell long barrel deer rifles and shotguns along with hunting apparel and accessories gun control and gun rights advocates advocates reacted predictably with gun control activists welcoming these moves by the country's largest retail chain and pressuring Walmart to go further on the other hand the the NRA called Walmart's policy changes quote shameful still CEO Doug Macmillan wrote to the White House and Congress advocating for stronger background checks he called on Congress to renew debates on the assault weapons ban stopping short of endorsing the ban outright hours after Walmart made its announcement cement kroger the country's largest grocer also announced it would ask customers not to carry openly in its doors. The supermarket chain ended gun and ammunition sales in the months following the Parkland shooting. Walmart's biggest brick and mortar competitor target has been called the quote Liberal Walmart mostly for its stance on guns runs. It doesn't sell firearms or ammunition. In the early nineteen nineties it stopped selling toy guns designed to look like the real thing and it asked customers not to carry firearms arms into its stores five years ago in twenty fourteen. CEO McMillan says Walmart serves more than sixty percent of America's consumers in any given month month have given Walmart's pervasiveness. It's new gun. Policies may cause real change in part by spurring other companies like Kroger to follow its lead. One thing is for sure. These moves are certain to inspire even more intense debates between gun control and gun rights advocates. Hello from one this business Wednesday. If you like our show share with you could do that easily bright for most podcastone sir. Thanks so much for listening David Brown. We'll be back with eatables in this episode is brought to you by Centro online from Pitney Bowes Shipping and mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with sen pro online from Pitney Whitney bows with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your. Pc and you are back to business in no time. Try It for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds found scale but only when you visit P._B. Dot Com slash B W daily that's P._B. Dot Com slash B W daily.

Walmart Ceo Doug Mcmillan Walmart Mart Assault Pitney Leabeau El Paso CEO David Brown El Paso Texas Kroger Alaska United States Ceo Doug Macmillan Pitney Whitney Pitney Bowes Shipping Dayton Parkland Florida
Walmart changes gun policy.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Walmart changes gun policy.

"Coming up on the news Walmart's Walmart's changes gun policies after shootings Boris Johnson Challenges Jeremy Corbyn toback in October election action and we need help rescuers in the Bahamas face a blasted landscape. It's Wednesday September full aw I'm Anthony Davis Walmart is to stop sales of some types types of ammunition following recent shootings including one at one of its stores in Texas that left twenty two dead the head of the company said it would discontinue sales of some bullets that can be used in assault style weapons and those used in handguns the move comes amid increasing pressure on the company often cited as the largest firearm seller in the US Chief Executive Doug. Macmillan said the company had been listening. It's clear to us that the status quo is unacceptable optimal. He said in a note to employees and published on the phones website the firm also said it would discontinue handgun sales in Alaska the only places still offered offered such weapons the firm asked customers at Walmart and at Sam's Club stores to stop carrying firearms openly even in states where it's legally permitted it saying such actions have caused fear and evacuations. Mr Macmillan said we know these decisions will inconvenient some of our customers and we hope they will understand celebrities and politicians including several Democrats campaigning for president praised the firm's decision but America's Gun Gun lobby the National Rifle Association called the changes shameful and said the firm would lose business another major. US retailer joined joined Walmart yesterday. Kroger the owner of Ralphs Grocery stores changed its policy by respectfully asking customers to stop openly carrying guns is in stores where state laws allow it. Walmart's chief executive who also called on the US Congress to pass stricter gun laws said he expected the changes used to reduce the firm share of the ammunition market from about twenty percent to arrange of six to nine percent the company will continue to sell hunting rifles wasn't shotguns as well as much of the ammunition for those weapons he added. Walmart's decision follows two incidents stores in August in which a gunman killed twenty two people in El Paso Texas and a former employee killed two workers at a Walmart store in Mississippi this move by two major retailers. Ella's is the only specific change to come out of the recent shootings with the US government remaining silent on gun reform. The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson today demanded an October fifteen snap election after lawmakers seeking seeking to prevent a no deal brexit dealt him a humiliating defeat in parliament which he cost as an attempt to surrender to the European Union parliaments move leaves Brexit up in the air with possible outcomes ranging from turbulent. Not You exit to abandoning the whole Endeavour an alliance of opposition opposition lawmakers backed by twenty one rebels from Johnson's Conservative Party defeated the government on Tuesday on emotion allowing them to try to pass a law which would force a three month extension to Britain's E. U. Exit date a furious Johnson who resorted to insults and swearing in the chamber vowed never to to delay brexit beyond October thirty first and challenged opposition Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn to agree to an October fifteen election however he needs the the backing of two-thirds of MP's and opposition parties are united in wanting to prevent a no deal brexit before agreeing to an election. Johnson said his strategy was to get a brexit deal by an E. U. Summit on October seventeen and get brexit done he said the British government was making substantial progress yes and would succeed in removing the Irish border backstop however it has since been proven that negotiations with the EU of all but ceased Winston Churchill's Churchill's grandson an piece Nicholas Soames who has been an MP for thirty seven years stood up in the chamber to make an emotional announcement that he has decided assigned to step down at the election due to having the Tory whip removed from him for voting against the government over Brexit rescue crews in the Bahamas fanned out across a blasted landscape of smashed and flooded homes today trying to reach each drenched and stunned victims of Hurricane Dorian and take in the full measure of the disaster. The official death toll stood at seven but was certain to rise. He's a day off to the most powerful hurricane on record ever to hit the country. Emergency workers had yet to reach some stricken areas right now there are just has to lots of unknowns parliament member. Imran Lewis said we need help. Dorian meanwhile pushed its way northward off the Florida shoreline with reduced reduced but still dangerous hundred five mile an hour winds on a projected costs that could side swipe Georgia and the Carolinas an estimated three million people pull in four states were warned to clear out and highways leading inland turned into one way evacuation routes forecast has warned that Dorian is likely to cause storm surge and even flooding even if its core does not blow a shore with the threat to Florida easing and the danger shifting northward Orlando's airport moved moved to reopen along with Walt Disney world and universal to the North the navy ordered ships that it's huge base in Norfolk Virginia to head out to sea for safety and warplanes at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton Virginia will being moved inland to Ohio the NFC said today preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion you can subscribe to the news with your favorite favorite podcast APP or ask Your Smart Speaker to play the news with Anthony Davis podcast leave us a review on I. Teens and follow us on twitter at the news undisclosed podcast for daily updates. The news is an independent production covering politics inequality health and climate delivering delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Walmart Boris Johnson Anthony Davis Walmart United States Jeremy Corbyn Mr Macmillan Bahamas Chief Executive Dorian Texas Us Congress Brexit MP Langley Air Force Base Assault Alaska Florida Kroger Imran Lewis Hurricane Dorian
Walmart asks customers not to openly carry guns in stores

The Daily 202's Big Idea

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Walmart asks customers not to openly carry guns in stores

"Walmart will stop selling hand guns and ammunition for military style weapons and will no longer allow customers to openly carry firearms at its locations following two deadly shootings inside its stores. The decision is a blow to gun. Rights advocates some of whom have taken to showing up at walmart locations the last few weeks carrying guns on their hips in the hope that the retailer wouldn't change its policy in twenty fifteen under pressure walmart. Stop selling the military style rifles that have become common and mass shootings but it continued to own a large slice of the ammunition market about twenty percent overall. The company says that share could now fall to as little as six percent in announcing. This move walmart's ceo doug macmillan acknowledged the difficulty of the decision referencing the string of shootings including being another one this weekend and his own history of growing up in hunting culture but he added quote the status. Quo is unacceptable. The kroger supermarket the chain also told customers yesterday to stop openly carrying firearms in its stores and we're learning more about the latest mass shooting from odessa texas the gunman in that rampage bruce left seven dead on saturday obtained his assault style rifle through a private sale which allowed him to avoid a federal background check that would have blocked him from getting a gun he had tried ride purchasing a firearm but was denied via background check due to what authorities described as a mental health issue private sales which some estimates suggest account for twenty five to forty percent of all gun transactions aren't subject to federal background checks in the united states. That's why democrats want. Universal background checks so that this wouldn't be able to happen. Trump initially said he wanted stronger background checks but he backed off under pressure from the n._r._a.

Walmart Bruce Donald Trump Doug Macmillan Kroger Odessa CEO United States Assault Twenty Percent Forty Percent Six Percent
"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to amanpour. Here's what's coming up. Nations with allies allies thrive nation without allies with general jim mattis joins me former defense secretary gives me his take on leadership the current security challenges and working in the trump administration then there will be no pointless brexit battle fuels a constitutional crisis idea into that with british lawmakers and staunch brexit here john redwood and esteemed historian oriented margaret macmillan plus. I've been away an outsider. My life award winning author salman rushdie tells walter isaacson about his new novel and the personal tragedies that inspire his work welcome to the program everyone. I'm.

jim mattis salman rushdie walter isaacson margaret macmillan john redwood amanpour
How to Use the Word "Meticulous"

BM English Speaking Radio

04:20 min | 1 year ago

How to Use the Word "Meticulous"

"Medic euless, the meaning of meticulous is showing great attention to detail. Very careful and accurate with him English. Speaking radio channel loan. One new what every day and impressed, the world in this English gab daddy lesson. You will learn how to use the word metric Yalies via sure that this ESL lesson will help you to enhance your English cab Lori and speaking fluently and confidently. Medicalised is spelt as m the T I see you. Oh, you as Dr Menon started a new multi specialty hospital in the suburbs of Mumbai for the inauguration. He had invited a member of parliament naturally. He was very vigilant and he planned only arrangements medically wasn't it easy to understand this what listen carefully how we can use the wood medicalised in eight different situations. In h different sentences example, number one of eight India has carried out several successful space missions, each space mission is carried out, only after medical and secret planning. Moving onto example, number two eight MacMillan is a Formula one racing champion. He has to remain extremely fit and healthy naturally. He is very meticulous about his diet and drag to schedule example, number three of eight Premio auto LTd signed a joint venture with a Swedish company for this purpose attached to fulfill several conditions because the Swedish company is very medical about its brand image. Moving onto example. Number four of it. Mr. Shetty was elated since his team won the state level football tournament. Do you want to know how did they win the dominant Mr. Shetty and his team had made an elaborate plan and the team, medical Asli executed the plan on the field while now that's team work and excellent effort. Do you know that you can speak in English just like your mother Tunc getting that with that trainers for free evaluation of your English and train you to build on your English fluency to know more about English fluency causes log onto our web site, WWW dot B M consultants India dot com. Example, number five of it vandalism Vallone fashion designer he designs clothes for celebrities, and leading actors, he's always appreciated for his medical choice of the fabric, the axes, and the design itself. Example, number six eight do you know about radioactive materials where they are extremely dangerous and can cause MAs destruction? Obviously, this kind of material should be handled medically. Example number seven of eight Patrick game. Second in his previous mathematics examination, this time he was demand to top the exam and he medically practiced all the sums again. And again, and yes, he came out a topper lettuce understand, example, number eight of eight the hills Asians, are known for the natural beauty. But the roads in the hilly areas are winding and dangerous the tourist prefer to hire the local drivers since they know how to drive medically in those regions.

Macmillan Mr. Shetty Dr Menon Medicalised Premio Auto Ltd India Mumbai India Dot Yalies Parliament Vandalism Lori Patrick Football Vallone
"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is mornings on the mall continues on one zero five point nine FM and AM six thirty Washington small WMA L, you can't change the whole world, but you can be part of the change in the world for a child living in poverty by becoming a compassion. International child sponsor, you can choose a child to sponsor now a compassion dot com slash radio. That's compassion dot com slash radio. Hi, I'm Dr Alex McMillan, and we interact with these individuals a little differently with much more of a T L C approach. The MacMillan difference is impotent my highly trained staff treats patients like members of their own family. And we strive to make our most fearful patients feel completely comfortable whether it's taking a small pill to feel relaxed or sleeping through the entire procedure. Miller sedation dentistry services range from comprehensive and cosmetic dentistry two teeth in a day. Whether it's a single tooth or full mouth reconstruction. These implants are the new standard of care for tooth replacement and denture stabilization we can also tailor a treatment plan to fit your schedule and financial considerations. Isn't it time for you to smile? Easy costs.

Dr Alex McMillan MacMillan Miller
"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The slowest part is going to be from twelve to join the beltway now from garage door repair dot com, but WMA L Weather Channel forecast tonight. Low thirty six sunny tomorrow, high forty nine forty six at Reagan national. I'm Marie the Washington's mall WBAL. The number one weekend. A fear associated with previous dental experiences. Hi, I'm Dr Alex McMillan, and we interact with these individuals a little differently with much more of a T L C approach. The MacMillan difference, is empathy. My highly trained staff treats patients like members of their own family. And we strive to make our most fearful patients feel completely comfortable whether it's taking a small pill to feel relaxed or sleeping through the entire procedure. Militarization dentistry services range from comprehensive in cosmetic dentistry two teeth in a day, whether it's a single tooth or full mouth reconstruction. These implants are the new standard of care for replacement and denture stabilization we can also tailor a treatment plan to fit your schedule and financial considerations. Isn't it time for you to smile? Easy costs seven oh three five. Oh, three ninety four ninety online at smile. Easy dot com. That's smile. Easy dot com. The nation's gun show is back sex centers this weekend. Thirteen hundred tables over two miles of everything you need for the shooting sports and more the nation's gun show, Friday, Saturday and Sunday expo more info and coupons at showmasters gun shows dot com. Visit.

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"macmillan" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"Go to MacMillan podcasts dot com, and we've got links to Oliver shes fantastic. The other thing which is happening in tandem with podcast is the dramatic rise of audiobooks the audience audio books and seems to be really the fastest growing part of publishing these days. And I'm sure you you have a unique seat in a way to compare what you can do in a podcast versus what an audio book does. And when you think of those two mediums both of which can come through ear buds off of your phone. There's sort of delivered in a similar way. What do you see as the essential differences in advantages of those two mediums? Well, certainly we can think of podcast as an entry point to audio books. They are less of a commitment. They are free. They can actually give you great insights into book discovery podcasts can move at a more rapid pace. For example, the show. I was just talking about. We did an episode on what happened with the cavenaugh appointment right after that happened. So that we were able to be somewhat more nimble and take something that was really relevant and timely and gives them great content to our listeners. I think that's a little more challenging on the audiobook front that said there's a lot of interesting ways, we have sort of worked together with the audiobook team here still stars, which I think you've heard of his audio drama that was a project that we embarked upon with our tour. Science fiction imprint here and getting media and outside company headed by MAC Rogers, who's a really well known playwrights of scriptwriter and podcast writer. He wrote the message and life after which were to huge hit. Podcasts. So the three we all partnered together to create steal the stars. Which was an audio drama that we kind of call ocean's eleven meets arrival. It's a great great story. And we called it podcast. I so what we did. There was we worked with MAC and his team brilliant director, John that Jordan Williams, and we put together an audio drama. It was a fourteen part series. And we launched the podcast. I forecast fourteen member cast a great production values after we released that we continue to promote the podcast, but we took those audio assets. And we turn them into an audio book. We also did a live event where we recorded a prequel to steal the stars and included that as bonus content, which was kind of cool, and then we took those assets in also turn them into an e book and a trade paperback using a writer from the Gideon team to create the novelization. That's amazing. It's kind of I don't know if it's the reverse of the normal way of doing there is no normal way to have such a seamless integration of all of those platforms that that struck me as incredibly innovative thing that you did with steel the stars. I listened to it too. It was gripping. Oh, great. I'm glad to hear it at digital book world. We're both there in Nashville and McMillan was honored with best use of podcasting in book marketing, let's talk a little bit about smart things that MacMillan is done in that use the actually using podcasting for book marketing, so we have a show called. But that's another story. It's hosted by one of our senior vice presidents here who's also a New York Times bestselling author. We'll Schwab I think, you know, of well, we think you and I talked about him at digital book world, he does sort of a book discovery show. But it's got a twist he brings someone in and talks to them about a book that changed their life. So it's a really cool way to get. You know authors in here to talk about books that change their lives in a really meaningful and powerful way. He said guests like Sam Sanders. Mario Andrew and just great people who have really compelling stories to tell and they always talk about a book that changed their life. So it's it's it's done, really. Well, too popular show it's called. But that's another story. I'll give you a sort of a classic example. We have a host on the quick and dirty tips network. Her name is Ellen Hendrickson, Dr Ellen Hendrickson, and she's nationally recognized as one of the leading experts in social anxiety. She has a weekly show called the savvy psychologist, and she covers all kinds of topics related psychology. The show did really well we spent about an eighteen month period. Just really building her platform..

Dr Ellen Hendrickson writer Oliver MAC Rogers Sam Sanders MacMillan New York Times bestselling MAC Nashville Mario Andrew McMillan director Jordan Williams John eighteen month
"macmillan" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Condition. Hopefully MacMillan Inc. Twenty one St. recommends to side himself, and he has to fight back because he can't believe that people are actually saying this stuff about them for me. I would shut it down. Let other people do your fighting. But she went out and apologize right after and said, you know, maybe I overstepped, and I got a little emotional you think so Bob Woodward trying to sell some more box. Although he's selling a ton cut twenty two when he blames the media when he goes up in these rallies. I mean, they are all designed to raise the boiling point, raise the. Temperature. We have to look at what he does in what he's doing here. It's in plain sight in. Let's not kid ourselves. And he's stoking the fires and that serves his political purposes in his view, he wants to have this volatility in politics, and he succeeded he wants to change things his way, and when he can't get it through congress. He's put it out there making people debate it, by the way, here's the apology from Julie. I hop for saying the president radicalize more people than ISIS. I think this has been an emotional and personally painful time for me. I think I exaggerated, and I apologize for that. I clarified it apologized on the air. She went on to say, but I'll say it here again, this has been a very emotional and painful time for me, but I was absolutely should not have gone with such hyperbole on the air. I apologize. It's fine is, but that's the reaction is over the top on this president. In example. The president says I watch meet the press on Sunday. I couldn't believe it. Here's an example of this. The first one is going to be Chuck Todd, the one the other one is going to be Matthew Dowd. Former Republican under Bush and George Stephanopoulos, cut twenty we have a problem. And we have a president who doesn't seem to believe he has a role to play in dealing with it, and we put specific responsibility on the president. I think what he's done over. The course of the last few years is helped foment this at the center and unapologetically incendiary president untrammelled by traditional norms of civility. Yeah. That's why he sat down and didn't interview on FOX yesterday and said, I can't believe these headlines that kept without being covered. That's why I came out and said what I was thinking that with the president's thinking is I actually blame the media for vilifying me. And getting some of my supporters exercised about it. But don't want anyone kids you this gunman at the Senate glycated Trump hated the fact that he's tight with Israel hated that. He moved the embassy hated the fact that he has a daughter that converted in his son-in-law playing a major role, they'd they converted his daughter, and they have three Jewish grandkids. But the people's view of the president's always about the president. Now, the president's been accused of making everything about him. But you know, what the media makes everything about him an example, cut twenty-six Chuck Todd. We have a problem, and we have a president who doesn't seem.

president Bob Woodward Chuck Todd George Stephanopoulos MacMillan Inc Julie Trump Matthew Dowd congress Israel FOX Bush Senate
"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Affect you and your retirement goals always has been always will be winter and his team, can show you how to get the most out of your federal benefits while also building. In some protection for your retirement after all. You need to be prepared in, case, the rules change at, some, point in the future get the answers. To your retirement questions, today, call Windsor at, three, zero, one eight five zero zero six eight. Three for your free federal benefits review that's? Three zero one eight five zero zero six eight three or visit winter trucks dot com McMillan sedation dentistry started over a decade ago because I wanted to be able. To provide dental care to those individuals who had a fear. Associated with, previous dental experiences hi I'm Dr Alex McMillan? And we interact with these individuals a little differently with much more of a TLC, approach the MacMillan difference is empathy my highly trained staff treats patients like members of their own family and we strive. To make our most fearful patients feel completely comfortable whether it's taking a small pill to feel relaxed or sleeping through the entire procedure Miller sedation dentistry services range from comprehensive and cosmetic. Dentistry two, teeth in a day whether it's a single tooth or full mouth reconstruction these implants are. The new standard of care for tooth replacement. And denture stabilization we can also, tailor, a treatment plan to, fit, your schedule and financial considerations isn't it. Time for you to, smile, easy call seven three, five, zero three ninety four ninety online at Smile. Easy dot com that's smile easy dot? Com which do, you think is riskier for your pet scuba diving Squirrel chasing riding the Rapids Or drinking from, puddles twists and turns Or fleas and ticks it turns out everyday dangers are. What make being a.

Dr Alex McMillan MacMillan Windsor Squirrel Miller
"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

"The blogs the all right. But these these trusted more by people who think the telling the truth. And I think this is very dangerous. And in all the time it took you to prepare for these two research. These lectures and travel. What surprised you the most. I think I was surprised and quite touched by the concern that people had. And what I found was that people are very thoughtful questions and they were very concerned and they were asking the questions you've been asking, how do we avoid war? How do we build a society in which war isn't seen as default and how do we build trust in society? And a lot of them were young, which I found very encouraging do you as we sit here today, and we see what's going on between Trump and Putin and the other big powers China. Do you feel fear? Another big power wall. I don't want to, but I do sometimes. I mean, I just think it's dangerous when people start talking in terms of its possibility. And when you get the United States and China, I've had too much of people on both sides saying, oh, what we may well have to fight one day and that really does worry me. And if you start preparing for it and you know, just the smallness of the area where the United States and China now in a sort of strategic struggle, we'll take one plane to be shot down one boat to be rammed. And then you get the nationalist feelings on both sides. And that's really what happened in the first World War and just expand just a little bit on that. I mean, the difference between China and Russia, because right now the narrative in the west is that Russia poses the biggest threat to the west. I think Russia poses a threat to the values of western society because I think what Putin is doing, I think in Russia's using the tools of a weak power. I mean ecconomic disaster demographic disastrous too strong. Economically. The standard of living is going down. It depends far too much oil and the price of oil is down. It hasn't really managed to build up on an industry demographically it's got problems. It's both rate is lower. It's got a huge China sitting on it southern border, which isn't going to be a friend for very long. I don't think. And so I think right, what what Russia's doing is making mischief where it can, but that is very destructive of western societies. The fact that people are even talking about the possibility of the Russians swinging the American elections. The last presidential election over the Russians swinging the referendum vote in the UK is worrying and the. Subversion support for far right policies that is coming from Russia across Europe, these scary times, but it's really fascinating to listen to your lectures and to chew. Now professor MacMillan thank you so much the Mark of Cain. Thank you. That's it for our program. And remember, you can always listen to a podcast and see us online at Amazon dot com. And of course you can follow me on Facebook and Twitter, thanks for watching and goodbye from London.

Russia China Putin United States Trump professor MacMillan Cain Amazon London Europe Facebook Twitter UK one day
"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Support for NPR comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans who were excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate, shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop. But here's the crucial part. If rates go up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender to get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash Amanpour. Coming up people, power and conflict. My conversation with the renowned military historian, Margaret MacMillan on humanity's complicated relationship with war and how throughout history we are repeatedly drawn back into it despite the horrors. Welcome to the program. Everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. We'll often warned that those who cannot remember the past condemned to repeat it. The message holes particular resonance today with nationalism on the rise across Europe, democracies Morphing into autocracies from Asia to Latin America and civil war, plaguing Africa, and the Middle East old alliances appear strain. And so two is the past seventy years of geopolitical stability. That many of us have benefited from it is perhaps there for timely that prestigious British lecture series. This year is being given by the renowned military historian, Oxford University's Margaret MacMillan. She argues that war at its heart is a paradox. We are all appalled by, but also in trounced by it, war is devastating, but it also brings about huge social invention wore appeals to. The worst of human straits, but in spies ideals and qualities that are rarely seen in peacetime and above. All war is what happens when the things that we want to live for a worth dying. For I sat down with professor MacMillan to discover why war is such an integral part of our human experience professor MacMillan welcome to the program. Thank you very much. So you have named your wreath lectures Mark of Cain. Tell us about that biblical reference. Well, I think what we were trying to get it and I was trying to get was whether we are so deeply attracted to war and whether war is so ingrained in human nature and human society that we kinda scape it. And so the Mark of Cain is, are we are we doing to fight and you go back to Cain and Abel cater naval, yes, yes. And fighting between two people who were brothers fratricidal fighting, and you could argue that is one of the earliest civil wars. And so. I suppose what I was really trying to gauge in was this long debate about, is it part of human nature or not? What is it? What have you come up with? Well, human nature. I won't go into away because I'm not a biologist, but there are certainly those who would argue it is. I mean, I think we have to protect ourselves. Fear is a very important motivation. We will often do things because we're frightened. We will be suspicious of others. I think we still have those instincts. We are creatures after all, as well as sentient beings. But I think what is more interesting is whether human society itself is deeply engaged with war and vice versa, that once we began to get organized as a species, we seem to have ended up fighting each other. And I mean, you say that it is inescapable. It has formed sort of the fabric of our societies and let's face it wherever we go, especially here in in Great Britain and England on the continent. Every village has a monument. And of course, that goes back throughout history. War is venerated. Courage is venerated yes, and I find it myself. I mean, I don't think I could ever be a soldier. I think I'm much too, but I do have immersion people who do this and what war can bring is some of the worst qualities in people can bring the brutality of islands, the cruel to the malicious cruelty, but it can also bring out sacrifice nobility comradeship which makes it so fascinating. So it's something we'd Meyer. It's something that we fear. It's something that's with us. Let's just get to recent history and let's just get to what President Trump and President Putin would discussing which by the way we do not know in a closed room with only translates as we have no idea what geopolitical geostrategic deals were aware were not made, but afterwards in the press conference, President Putin described the world order like this. Let's just play a little bit of his sound bite. The gold war thing of best era of acute ideological, confrontation of the two countries is a thing of remote passes vestige of the best situation in the world change dramatically. So has it has the situation changed dramatically and all that hope and promise that the whole world had for a massive peace dividend after the fall of the Soviet Union. The end of the Cold War hasn't come true where if you look around the world, I would say, no, we have conflict some of them which have been running for years. You think of the conflict in the Great Lakes region of Africa, you think of the Syrian civil war Afghanistan has not been rumbling on for almost two decades Yemen is a country in crisis, and we have the possibility of wars among other countries. I mean, we still have an awful lot of preparation for war, and that doesn't mean we're going to fight, but it's still something that is very much there in our world I was struck by what you said in one of the lectures. You said that as you've just repeated the big powers big name. Nations are preparing massively for massive war, even though most of war right now is at a lower level. I think we have this very interesting situation where we have a lot of very lower level was where, in fact, you don't need sophisticated weapons. I mean, a lot of the fighting verandah was done with hoes and shovels, and a lot of what happened to the Hinga was done at a very, very primitive what we were very primitive weapons. But at the same time, we have these extraordinary leaps now with killer robots and killer drones and the possibility of artificial intelligence making human beings almost obsolete that it will now be possible to fight wars with planes that don't pilots. For example, the British just said, the next generation of fighter planes will not need a pilot and not needing a pilot in the next generation of weapons. Also lead us again to what President Putin said, and whether we should believe that the great power rivalry is over because we know that that he wants his fear of influence that he has bases all over the place. We see the very harsh rhetoric of war coming. Out of President Trump before he then turns on a diamond. Does other things do you see? What is the biggest threat? Is it cyber is it is it and where is the biggest threat? I think it's very hard to say where the biggest cyber think is, is the new frontier or one of the new frontier and the military on all the events countries are very, very worried about it indeed, and they're investing heavily in it because so much society's not depend on those 'electronic networks and those eletronic devices we take for granted and the possibility of suddenly cutting it off cutting off the power, cutting off the transmission between different devices. The the things that we use, our phones for a minute would bring societies to complete standstill. But I think what is also always worrying is that when you get great pilots preparing for war, they think of it defensively, you know, I'm defending myself, but it doesn't look like that from the other side of the border. And what I think is a real worry and human just sure accident, and people acting out of fear and misapprehension and MRs sumptuous, you know, I'm really fascinated by what you say about. The motivation for war on a personal level, the sense of honor, either a president or governments thinking that defending their people defending their country and you sort of desribed that sense of honor as if it was on a local level. It's what gangs do in LA. Oh elsewhere. It's the same kind of motivation. Well, I think it is in gangs at people who'd rather die than be disrespected, and that is riven a lot of warriors over the centuries. You think of the Knight's armor. The people off often the crusades, you think people in the first World War they would rather die. The looser honor. And I think you know, I think nations are still impelled by this. One of the reasons the United States is so obsessed with Iran is because rains humiliated them when they took those hostages at the end of the nineteen seventies. And I think this

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