35 Burst results for "lung cancer"

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 1 d ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent. Okay. So in addition to being a a Georgetown educated a lawyer, you also are the granddaughter of Ashir, crapper. Talk to me a little bit about what this means having that in your lineage also opted those are the things that ground us that people don't see and don't hear about since asked me a little bit about that. Yes. So my Popo is I called him now is from the deep South. So like beyond Daddy Alabama Louisiana, my maternal side is Alabama in my paternal side is Louisiana so. Shout to be onset I'm Louisiana both sides. Okay. So he migrated from Alabama, to Ohio, in the late nineteen forties part of the great migration like many black people go live in Chicago and Detroit and the path as to how we got. There was the our parents and grandparents came for opportunity and you know he dropped out of school when he was six years old because he had to work the fields, but he could never go back to school but. He still was able to reach the middle class work in a factory in real heatless taught me the importance of hard work and made me promise to go to school for as long as I could because he couldn't and that's why I continue. I went to the first family to get the undergraduate degree. Then I got the Masters Okay Papa be done. He was like Oh is that he can you go further. Pressure. He lived to see me graduate from law school, but it was a promise I made him. He'd he'd passed away from stage for a lung cancer but I will him through the White House so that was one of his last trips. Through the Obama White. House before Obama left in mayhem that promise that I will continue to keep going in idea but he taught me the importance of hard work and perseverance and that's what I'm doing. So I may not have the most money here is a congressional candidate I may not come from the wealthiest bag ground but I come from a background of hard workers in no one will be desert hymns

Barack Obama Georgetown Congress Obama White House Louisiana Alabama Obama Administration White House Instagram Efron Cory Daddy Alabama Louisiana Clarkston President Trump Robbery Michael Copy Dayton
How a Law School Dropout Builds Profitable Companies Using Virtual Assistants with Ravi Abuvala

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:32 min | Last month

How a Law School Dropout Builds Profitable Companies Using Virtual Assistants with Ravi Abuvala

"Ravi say what's up to fire nation and sheriff something interesting about yourself that most people don't know what is going on fire nation. Thank you guys for lending me your ears I've been listening to this podcast for quite a while now, and it's a little surreal experience to be on this end of it. So this morning I'm thinking I listen to this for very long time and I'm like I. Know John's GonNa. Ask Me something that a lot of people don't know and like any online digital marketer. Open Book and so I was like what? So I'm going to share with you guys on that literally one person this entire world knows and it's funny I'm bringing it out on this block Seo but about a year ago in July of Twenty nineteen, I had this weird edge and I ended up actually selling all of my stuff in. Florida about a week including my caller just junked it and I moved to. Spain and I lived in Spain for about forty five days and I was just hopping coastal city council city working on businesses, work my clients, and while I was in a coastal city. In Spain I'm not GONNA say what? So people don't look up when I'm about to tell you my walls in a coastal city in Spain I don't drink. I drink a few times a year and I was out at this pretty cool jazz club and I was like two three in the morning, which is in Spain when they're just getting started really and there's a brawl breaks out right where I'm at at the bar or ordering a soda at the Bar and just abroad but breaks out right next to me and ends up at, I. Try to break the brawl up the police come. they come up to me I speak decent Spanish because I've lived abroad for a while but not good enough to get me out of the situation I I actually end up spending the next three and a half hours in a drunk tank and a small jail cell in a coastal city in Spain and it took him a while to you if I had to give my find my password and it showed all that stuff and I finally got out of it and The only other person that knows someone that met me the next day and they wonder why looks so off By parents don't know nobody knows that stories. So yeah, I'm on our convict in Spain. Okay. Well, this is only a couple listeners. So fire nation keep it to yourself here like not a big deal. So. I WANNA start off on a little bit of a somber notes because as I shared fire nation during the introduction, we're talking about barshop way to millions but in many of us have dealt with some one in our lives that we love who dealt with some form of this but your Dad Ravi had stage four cancer. So talk to us about that and how that situation. Caused you to throw it all away. Awesome questions. So whole life was going to be a lawyer and that was that was the goal was law school was the number one priority, and in order to be a lawyer, you have to take what's known as a law school admission test and you had the really score highly on and if you WANNA go great law school which I did. And so I took a year off after graduating from college and I was about to start studying for this also emission tests in about three days. After I graduated I, got a call from my dad who lives in Atlanta Georgia. I was in Florida at the time and he told me news he was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer and like John Says, you know everyone here has experienced cancer somewhere the other, but it's like when it's yourself or someone as Close Your Dad, it's a whole different experience and kind of threw me. For a loop and so I ended up packing all my stuff up moving to Atlanta. Georgia, and for the next year I would wake up at four am workout until five. Then from five to eight, I'll be studying for this law school admission test than about eight to five I'll be doing Chemo and radiation with my dad every single day. Monday. Through Friday and then when I got home at about six, o'clock, I'd be studying until eleven midnight every night back again on a law school admission test. So it was quite a surreal experience. I'm really really blessed to say my dad's been about two years in remission. So just actually visited him in Savannah Georgia, two days ago I was just seeing him but what it really did open up for me was. How fragile life was I was kind of going down around that I think somebody else wanted me to go down and I read a really awesome book called the subtle not giving of an economy I was just like, okay I'm doing this for all the wrong reasons and I decided you know what I took the law school admission test spent eighteen years preparing for it. I actually scored in the top ten percent of test takers in the United States I got into my dream schools, top schools in the nation. and. Then I said you know what? I'M GONNA go work at a talion restaurant down the road and try to figure out this entrepreneurship

Spain Ravi John Says Atlanta Florida Georgia Savannah Georgia United States Talion Chemo
Lighting Designer Howell Binkley Passes Away

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last month

Lighting Designer Howell Binkley Passes Away

"Have some sad news from Broadway. Hamilton lighting designer Howl Brinkley has died. He was a 10 time Tony Award nominee and two time Tony Award winner, winning his first back in 2006 for best lighting design in a musical for Jersey Boys. Before picking up a Tony for Hamilton. That was 10 years later. Binkley died in Jacksonville, North Carolina, after a three year battle with lung cancer. He was 64.

Howl Brinkley Tony Award Hamilton Binkley Lung Cancer Jersey Boys North Carolina Jacksonville
Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

All Of It

00:49 sec | Last month

Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

"Officials say improved treatments have helped lower lung cancer death rates as NPR's Richard Harris reports, The trends are also driven by a decline in cigarette smoking. Death rates from lung cancer have been falling for decades. But it's been tricky to tease out how much of that is because fewer people are smoking and how much is due to improve treatment. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that new drugs introduced in 2013 are playing a role. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute found that only about 20% of people who take these drugs have a long term response and the majority of people who are diagnosed with lung cancer still die within two years. But the drugs help enough people that it shows up in the death trends. Another class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, introduced in 2015 also appears to be beneficial.

National Cancer Institute New England Journal Of Medicin Richard Harris NPR
The Children Of Smithfield

Latino USA

06:11 min | Last month

The Children Of Smithfield

"In. March of Twenty Twenty might amend is was living in Lincoln, Nebraska she was working as an administrator at a public school. And then she got a call from her mom it was about their upcoming vacation she called in and asked me to call in and cancel the flights and see what their options were and I. think that's when it kind of hit me that corona virus was in Nebraska they had planned to visit family in Mexico but they decided with the virus it was a bad idea for her mom to travel. Might as mom had recently lost a kidney to cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy again, this time for lung cancer. It's been about a year and a half since she's been on last the latest treatment and that one seems to work while the spock's in her lung they're not necessarily getting bigger and they're slowly shrinking. But the doctor did say about it's it's a long process slow process and then the family made a decision, my parents both have jobs at a meat packing plant in Nebraska because their mom could be exposed to the corona virus at work they decided that mom should not go back to work. I think I just always worry. About not having her. Her Dad. He returned to the plant for financial reasons but might have was worried if her dad brought the virus home, it could be deadly for her mom. And I started asking him like you know what kind of protection are they giving you? Do you have face masks? He said they're giving us masks and I said, what does the mass look? He said it's like the beard net, but it's a full faced one and so then that's as like that's not gonNA protect you. You're still breathing in air through those holes like that does nothing. For my this was the first red flag and then on April sixteenth the meat packing plant where he worked a place called Smithfield confirmed its first case of Covid nineteen. That's when. My Dad started to. Kind of get scared to get I is kind of like it's not it's not here yet. And so when we heard about those first cases. It was very like it's here. It's real. From footer media, it's leading USA I Medina Hoarser and today the children of Smithfield speak. Throughout the early days of the covid nineteen pandemic, there was a lot of concern about the nations food supply specifically, the meat industry's supply chain. But last spring is cases of the virus surged in meatpacking plants across the country. It became clear that conditions in these plans were often unsafe. And that many of these now deemed is central workers worked speaking up because of their status or fear of retaliation around a fourth of all meatpacking workers are undocumented. and. So instead now it's the adult children and other family members of these meatpacking workers who have started to band together to advocate for their relatives. Might menaces parents work at a plant owned by Smithfield that's one of the largest meatpacking companies in the world. In April she joined with other quote children of Smithfield in the town of Crete Nebraska to begin demanding safer working conditions for their parents and relatives. reporters. Marianne Andrey and Esther. Honi have been reporting and following, Midas? Story Esther. Is going to pick up the story now. Myra is a woman in her late twenties with an athletic build an intense Brown eyes. And she's warm but she wouldn't say she's the social one in her family. I definitely consider myself as shy this whole time we've been in quarantine. I've been okay because I enjoy my time alone at home she says it's her dodd that's always been the extrovert he doesn't like to be quite. he's always talking, but he wants to jump into every conversation super affectionate and he's always like grabbing us and hugging and kissing those in like messing up our hair like that's his thing he wants to. Miss a bar hair and kisses at the same time in her family says always more of the caretaker. She has two younger brothers and she's always looked out for them when my second brother was born. I was babysitting him all summer and so he was a six month old than I was fifteen. I was the one in charge of taking care of him and I think a lot of. My character was built from being the oldest sibling just around the House I. Always was told like you have to be the example for your brothers kind of pave the way as a family always spent a lot of time together partially because they moved around a lot when she was little Mara's parents used to work as migrant farm workers. I was born in Washington stay in my parents picked fruits and other crops like potatoes we would move between Washington state and Idaho back and forth she was in third grade her parents emigrated from Mexico and later became US citizens heard they could get better and more stable work in Nebraska in meatpacking. It we need to move around anymore. But as a little kid, she was nervous about leaving her school where there are lots of other bilingual students. I just remembered in Washington stay they taught me in Spanish and English half day English half-day Spanish and so here I remember like my biggest fear I wasn't sure if I knew English said, do I really know English? Obviously I knew English but it was just not the atmosphere I was used to

Nebraska Smithfield Twenty Twenty Mexico Lung Cancer Washington Lincoln Administrator Crete Nebraska Medina Hoarser Marianne Andrey Mara Myra United States Brown
HereAfter with James Vlahos

Alexa in Canada

03:39 min | Last month

HereAfter with James Vlahos

"Hereafter is uses conversational ai to help people save and share their life stories interactive way if this is something we've been doing in older technologies for. Since time began practically I by oral history than recording in books than photos, videos, audio this anyway, we can sort of capture the essence of people and passed along to the next generation. As the idea of hereafter is, will we have haven't new canvas have a new medium we have boys computing. That's a way to. Get People's voice and then share their stories memories, dreams, songs, jokes, wisdom all of that in a back-and-forth manner. So it's non new longer just you a nerd experience of reading somebody's biography or memoir. It's even talked to Avatar of somebody a legacy Avatar. Hear their voice talking back. So. That's the the essence of the company as the inspiration was very personal. It was back a few years ago. My father had been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. And we knew right away that he had a matter of months to live, and the first thing that happened was I did a district conventional oral history project with him, recording him talking all about his life and. Had these hours and hours recordings got them. All professionally transcribed had a binder full printed out as his words at great resource for this inert resource and that was right at the time that I was getting more involved with conversational AI and researching the book and realizing, Hey, you know there's a new way to. Share this information, and for me, there's a new way to sort of you know I was I was desperate like had Michael Hold on I'm losing my dad do I hold onto him in this? Admittedly, a very incomplete way compared to having the real person, but but some way to capture some part of his essence and keep it around. So I did that I created this conversational agent that you could access on Facebook Messenger. Messages with it, and you could get little videos and audio clips as well and I called Bath The dad bought, and that's really the. Basis that for everything discounts sense. and. So while I mean. Obviously. It's a very personal story. I'm just I'm just trying to think all the questions that come to my mind about this. What did you think about this? When you when you shared this idea with or did you share this with them? I did. It was very important for me to get his permission for some foremost but also the permission of other people in the family because I knew right away like I think this is a cool idea. I can see that it's a little bit of a weird idea. So I wanted to talk to everybody about it. and his own feeling about it like this was a man who was staring down data in some ways didn't care either way. Because you had bigger concerns. But he and he didn't get it either I was like a chat wechat by I don't get it But when he finally kind of came around to it, and when I finally demonstrated an early version to him. He really got it and he said I while like. Sounds like me those are things that actually would say or have said. And I like this idea that it could be shared with kids and grandkids in the future.

Michael Hold AI Facebook
Accountable Leaders  What The World Needs Now More Than Ever | Vince Molinaro

The LEADx Show

03:29 min | 2 months ago

Accountable Leaders What The World Needs Now More Than Ever | Vince Molinaro

"Please welcome Dr Vince Molinaro. I am been smaller, narrow and I. Want to welcome you to this session of accountable leaders. What we really need in our world today. As I said I've been smaller narrow when I'm a leadership advisor and I work with leaders around the world. Really helped them understand. What's the kind of leadership? They're going to need to be successful in challenging time whether they are leading to. New Strategy whether they need to. Lead a turnaround or whether they're dealing with a lot of change in their environment, and in today's world, we're all been offended because of Covid, nineteen and whatnot, and these conversations become even more critical. My Journey in this work. And I've been in the leadership industry for most of my career, but in recent years going way back, to July of two thousand thirteen when I launched a book called leadership contract, and at that moment in time I began to talk about this idea of we need a leader to really step up. Demonstrate Ownership, so they can inspire others to drive results. And what I found was that companies are struggling with their leaders. There were investing a lot in leadership development, but But? They weren't seeing that. Translate into stronger leadership, and that led me to write the leadership contract and the thing that drives my passion is being with leaders helping them really get clear on what it is. They need to do strategically what they need to do. From an execution standpoint and see them come together to lead their companies to create compelling environments for their employees or customers in their stakeholders on when that happens, I think there's nothing better in the world in that. That's what drives my passion. But since that time. I've traveled around the world twenty five countries eighty cities, just in the last five years alone, and in that time I've had the opportunity to talk to many many leaders around the world about their challenges and being leaders, and we have to understand that we need leaders to be stronger than they've ever been certainly the last three months. Have DEF definitely shown that, but the reality is that they're not. In. What's behind that? That's what I've been investing my energy, my research, my work in my writing on in the last little way in the last a while. All of this work. All of these insights really come down to one question. And this question is one that I've engaged many leaders in conversations. What does it really mean to be a leader today? It's a pivotal question. I have to ask that question very early in my career when my very first job I've mentor of mine. Lost her life to lung cancer. A disease she believed. was created by her working for most of her career toxic management culture. And when she revealed back to me where she believes so adamantly that the disease, she was fighting. Was a result of being in a toxic management culture. When she lost her life, it was a pivotal moment for me in my life, my own life I needed to pause and think about. What does it mean to be a leader? In what is leadership? Really about and I didn't realize it at that moment in time that set me off on a journey that I've spent the better part of two decades on to understand. How do we create great leadership in organizations?

Dr Vince Molinaro Advisor
Health panel may open lung cancer screening to more smokers

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Health panel may open lung cancer screening to more smokers

"Health panel wants to open lung cancer screening Toa less heavy smokers. Shelly Adler has the details. In 2013 the US Preventative Services Task Force said current or former smokers who had gone through a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years or an equivalent amount qualified for the screening starting at age 55. Now in draft recommendations. That task force says it's time to expand screening to those who smoke less and to start a little sooner at age 50. The proposed change comes after a newer study found those people are about as likely to benefit as thie, heavier older smokers. Shelly Antler. Washington 20

Us Preventative Services Task Shelly Adler Shelly Antler Washington
Karyopharm Moves to Expand Selinexor's Label

Breaking Biotech

03:22 min | 3 months ago

Karyopharm Moves to Expand Selinexor's Label

"This week we're gonNA talk about some updates from Lasko. Twenty twenty and then I'm going to focus on either as well as another company called, carry farm, so we're doing a little bit of a cancer focus on the show with this episode last episode. And yet should be should be a pretty good show, so I hope you're keeping safe and everything's going well for everyone. I know that the US in particular has been dealing with a lot right now. Not GonNa get too much into that, but I'm GONNA touch on it for the sake of the market, but. With Dell, let's get right into it. So the first thing I want to talk about is some news from Moscow. And one company in particular that I hadn't mentioned, but they seem to be. One of the bigger winners is adapt therapeutics ticker symbol ad, and they showed phase one trial data of ADP A to m four where fifty percents of patients with Sino you'll. Sarcoma exhibited partial responses. Now they also showed some data in believe lung, cancer, neck, and head cancer, and then also with melanoma, and a lot of these patients had responses so I think it's not only due to the soil sarcoma data, but for a lot of solid tumors they show that they're molecules able to lead to some kind of response, and the shares traded wildly high on this news up one hundred twenty eight percent, and then they didn't offering and as I brought this kind of stuff up before in the past. Seeing positive solid tumor data is huge because the market is gigantic I'm GonNa talk about this later, but in lung cancer non small cell lung cancer, the patient population is like two hundred and eighty thousand patients per year. So when you're thinking about companies that are likely to see big increases in stock you know. Are they looking at solid tumors? That's a big thing that you can ask yourself and if they're going to see some positive data in that than maybe you should think about how you WanNa. Play it. So good to see that from them might might do deeper dive in the future, but another company touch on is allergy therapeutics, and specifically they are a company that is doing an off the shelf cell therapy. And the data they showed isn't in it off the shelf car. T. Therapy so aloe five zero one and they were looking in relapsed, refractory, non Hodgkin Lymphoma, and the to specific subsets of that was deal. As well, as F. L.. And for all of you who've been watching my show, you'll know that as of last week. You understand clearly that deal is aggressive form of non Hodgkin Lymphoma whereas NFL or Informa- is more of a slow growing. Or an indolent non Hodgkin Lymphoma, so in both of these forms, which is better than just seeing it in say the version they saw an overall response rate of sixty three percent and thirty seven percent were complete responders and I believe this is in line with traditional car. T. Therapy in all explain in a second with off the shelf part means, and just before going to that. They also saw that around thirty two percent of patients saw site time release. Syndrome, which is also I. Think in line with some previous. Cardi therapies so. The benefit here really, and he's been approved for a few years now, and it's seen a lot of success, but those therapies aren't autologous cell therapy, so they need to get the patient. Take the blood from the patient isolate the cells, edit the cells, and then infuse them back into the patient,

Solid Tumors Lymphoma Twenty Twenty Lasko Sarcoma United States ADP Dell Moscow Sino Informa NFL
Jimmy Cobb, 'Kind of Blue' drummer for Miles Davis, dies

Brian Lehrer

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Jimmy Cobb, 'Kind of Blue' drummer for Miles Davis, dies

"The last surviving musician featured on Miles Davis groundbreaking album kind of blue has died at the age of ninety one percussionist Jimmy Cobb died yesterday at his New York City home according to a Facebook post from his wife the calls was lung cancer ward in Washington DC Cobb began playing with Davis's jazz combo in nineteen fifty eight the year before they recorded kind of blue nineteen fifty nine album also featured legends cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane and with more than four million copies sold it is the best selling jazz album of

Miles Davis Jimmy Cobb John Coltrane New York City Facebook Washington Cannonball Adderley
Jimmy Cobb, Washington DC Native and Last Surviving Member of Miles Davis’ ‘Kind of Blue’ Band, Dies at 91 in New York

America's Morning News

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Jimmy Cobb, Washington DC Native and Last Surviving Member of Miles Davis’ ‘Kind of Blue’ Band, Dies at 91 in New York

"News Jimmy Cobb percussionist and the last surviving member of miles Davis's nineteen fifty nine kind of blue groundbreaking jazz albums has passed away his wife Lena T. commonality on Facebook that her husband died Sunday at his New York City home from lung cancer he was ninety one years old born in Washington DC Cobb was a drummer on the kind of blue jam session headed by Davis that also featured cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane it's the best selling jazz album of all time Cobbs is he in his band mates knew the album released August seventeenth nineteen fifty nine would be ahead to have sold more than four million

Facebook John Coltrane Cobbs Jimmy Cobb Miles Davis Lena T. New York City Washington Cannonball Adderley
Essential Workers

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:03 min | 5 months ago

Essential Workers

"Everyone Card if this is the indicator from planet money. Minerva allers is a security guard at a hospital in Manhattan New York. She says the emergency room. There unsurprisingly has been full of cove nineteen patients and that working. There can be heartbreaking and also kind of scary. I was telling someone the other day I said the site. This invisible cloak of darkness like we now work at night so is dark it. But now it's just like this heaviness in the air nervous fifty-three she's Puerto Rican works night shifts. And she commutes to the hospital in Manhattan from her house in the Bronx and she's well aware that working in New York City Hospital. Right now elevates the risk that she herself will catch covered nineteen our but that every the you know I haven't eighty seven year old mom in my house that had lung cancer and now she suffered copd. I get scared every day that I'm gonNA come in and make her sick members job involves keeping the other people who work in the hospital safe and as a security guard. She sometimes has to try to calm someone down if they're being rude or aggressive in doing that when the aggressive person might also have a highly contagious disease means her work is just unavoidably more dangerous now and what. I mean by dangerous because sometimes people have covert and they're compliant. Sometimes they just not so now you have this person. That's me combative. And you have to figure out a safe way of dealing with that now. Tens of millions of workers throughout the country have been forced to work from home to help slow the spread of the virus and tens of millions. More have lost their jobs in now suffering unemployment. But there's also the other class of workers workers like Minerva who've kept on working even when they have to leave their homes to do their jobs even when their jobs bring a higher risk of catching the virus because their jobs have been deemed essential jobs by their state or local governments on. Today's show we look at. Who does these essential jobs and we discuss what the rest of us

Minerva Allers New York City Hospital Manhattan New York Manhattan Bronx
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"The widow of country singer Joe Diffie denies conspiracy theories that say he did not die of the new coronavirus emerges are loaded with the latest some social media users are claiming the Joe Divis death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen

Joe Diffie Diffey Tera Joe Divis
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

60-Second Science

03:16 min | 5 months ago

Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm wait gibbs. All imagine getting screened for early stage lung cancer simply by taking a deep breath from an inhaler and then peeing into a cup. Sangita Baccio a professor of Health Sciences and engineering at MIT described. How that might be possible in Ted Talk? She gave in two thousand sixteen. What if you had a detector that was so small that it could circulate in your body? Find the tumor all by itself and send a signal to the outside world. It sounds a little bit like science fiction but actually nanotechnology allows us to do. Just that his idea was to invent nontoxic nanno probes. That doctors could put inside your blood or lungs or guts to detect a tiny tumors. When they're easier to treat before they grow big enough to spread throughout the body and damaged vital organs. I dream that one day instead of going into an expensive screening facility to get a colonoscopy or a mammogram or a PAP smear that you could get a shot. Wait an hour and do a urine test on a paper strip in two thousand seventeen bought. His team reported a proof of concept experiment in nature. Biomedical Engineering that demonstrated Nanna probes like this working to detect early stage ovarian cancer in mice and now the group has refined this technology further to create a screening test for lung cancer. That is more sensitive than the C. T. Scans used today. The team of Harvard and MIT researchers described their work in the April first issue of science translational medicine lung cancer accounts for nearly a quarter of all cancer deaths in the US each year in large part because most cases of lung cancer are not caught until after the disease has already spread to other sites yet win lung. Cancer is caught and treated early the majority of patients survived the disease for at least five years but ct screening for lung. Cancer is not widely used around the world. Because it's expensive. And more than ninety percent of positive tests turn out to be benign growths not cancer. So this kind of screening leads to a lot of unnecessary and invasive biopsies in. Battista study which was done on mice genetically engineered to develop lung tumors very similar to those seen. In people the Nanna probes were able to detect tumors about fifty times smaller than other screening methods and it produced. No false positives. The NETA probes are designed to release reporter molecules when they come near certain kinds of lung tumors. Once released the reporters pass into the blood get filtered by the kidneys and then exit the body in the urine. The group is now working to repackage the nano probes into a form that could be inhaled as a powder or through a nebulizer if that succeeds then the technology will have to proceed through several years of clinical trials before it could be used to screen people for lung cancer. And I hope that what this means is that one day we can detect tumors in patients. Sooner than ten years after they've started growing and that this would lead to earlier treatments and that we could save more lives than we can today with early detection.

Lung Cancer Sangita Baccio MIT Nanna Biomedical Engineering TED Reporter Professor Of Health Sciences United States Battista Harvard
"lung cancer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Better health lung cancer treatments I'm Fred bottom rush Limbaugh's new battle against advanced lung cancer has many asking about the journey device ahead for lung cancer patient almost a quarter of a million people get lung cancer in the United States every year Dr Keith not hi missus new character Rastaq surgeon that's about seeing those university hospital the vast majority of people with advanced lung cancer will be treated with either chemotherapy or radiation therapy or a combination of the two and the it's very effective in shrinking the tumor and can actually provide a cure as well though that is in the small minority of patients our goal is not just secure the tumor obviously we'd love to do that if we if we can and that's the goal for every patient but the reality is in most people we're going to shrink the tumor decrease the symptoms and provide as long a period of survival is possible stretch that out the months hopefully even two years eighty five percent of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking if you're smoking stop if you're not smoking never start but if you're smoking you can't stop for god sakes go get a screening test suite sixty seconds to better health I'm Fred bomb cable excuse time is seven fifty Roger Brandon the Stiefel traffic center let's put a pretty nice morning Tom All Things Considered and all the weather starts to move in but I a lot of folks I don't know if the record to Kansas city for the Super Bowl parade today or put aside stay home because they knew the weather could be back this is not that bad on the highways which is fine those who do have to get some place because north.

Limbaugh lung cancer United States Dr Keith Roger Brandon Rastaq Stiefel Tom Kansas
"lung cancer" Discussed on Joey Hudson

Joey Hudson

03:34 min | 11 months ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Joey Hudson

"lung cancer" Discussed on Joey Hudson

Joey Hudson

12:00 min | 11 months ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Joey Hudson

"The answer studio president go to Air Technologies Merritt Gant. Welcome in the morning show. Thanks for having me appreciate you being here. You Know I. I love telling your company's story because I'm not sure that people understand the importance of having their homes tested for Radon. So let's start at the very beginning and if you would just quickly tell our listeners listeners. A what rate on is because it's not something that you can see What rate on he is and why? It's important for them to have you come into their home and do the testing sure well radon. Joey is a naturally occurring gas. It comes from the breakdown of uranium two thirty eight minerals that are found in our soil. All across the Carolinas us and as that uranium breaks down it produces these right on Cape Bronx and the problem is these products are invisible. You can't see them. You can't smell them you you can't taste them So you've got these radioactive particles floating around in the air Virtually unnoticed you know when I started talking King About Your Company and and what you do merit one of the things is some of the research that you provided for me and of course you came out to my home and you tested my home as well but when i read the fact that Radon is the is the second Is the calls also of cancer lung cancer. A just behind Smoking cigarette smoking. I was blown away because I'm thinking and I and I had an aunt who as a child I was seven or eight years old. I had an aunt who who died of lung cancer. She'd never smoked a she. Looks very healthy and I just remember You know our family always talked about well. You know. One eater didn't smoke. How does she get lung cancer? Now we don't know I mean this was back in the seventies. We don't know what caused her lung cancer. But quite often you have that and And so when I read that that one of the possible causes of this was raid on. I was just blown anway absolutely that. That's the same response that we had When we first discovered rate on and when we first started developing this business snus We were blown away to that Radon could be in your home and you'd never know it. As a matter of fact we tested my parents House that was initially when I homes. We tested tested and They had built this beautiful home. Lived there for seven eight years and I came back at twenty point two Pico curious So is about five times higher higher than what the EPA recommends and so. We had been living in that unbeknown to them For about seven to eight years I mean basically it's is a silent invisible will kill killer absolutely yes and so and you know a lot of people they don't know that It gets a lot of in kind of in the real estate market. You know you wanna Kinda stay away from deal closers and so. There's kind of this idea that. Oh it's not a big deal. It's not a big problem So outside of that I don't think a lot of people people know about the dangers of it Arcturus. Talk about what your company does. Of course as I mentioned you've been out to my home and you did the test a walk us through from from the Tom that That I call Unison Merit Dino. I want you to come out to my home. What's the process? Sure so. We're we're GONNA come out. And we're going to deploy what's called a continuous rate on monitor and joy. That's important because you could go when you could buy a a do it yourself kit at home depot or Lowe's and you could deploy that yourself the what you're going to see is with the do it yourself kit. All you see is a number when we come out we deploy this continuous right on monitor. You see hour by hour. What you're right on levels are and that's important because we've had customers that had low levels of radon it had a low average But we notice for about a six hour period in the afternoon when the customer was coming home. They're radon was actually spiking very high. And so the time that they were home lounging around the house. That was when they were having having the grace exposure but outside of a a professional test. You never see that and and I just got to say you know married and I didn't know what to expect. I had never sir tested for Radon. We didn't even know that your device was in home. I mean you left it for a couple of days. You came back And I was able to see a graph view. showed it to me exactly. No fortunately for me mine was on the lower levels up but I had no way of knowing that until you came out and tested it and it's is just so important. If you suspect that you could have a problem and really you don't know if you have a problem because again It's odorless you can't see it And and You just don't need to take the chance with your family's safety so I want encourages to contact. True Technologies. Let Merit come out and test your home Now let's talk for a minute merit time with me today. Mary get gant with the With True Technologies President of the company. Thus talk for a minute about when someone to task test and and let's talk about the accuracy of you testing versus you mentioned the home testing Talk about the accuracy of that. Yes a right now call us right now. How do you tell them no seriously anytime a good time to test? You know if you're I'm trying to sell your home. It's time to test trying to buy a home. You should definitely have tested so you know exactly what you're getting into and if you're happy with your home then it's your forever home. You should definitely test. Because that's your where you're living we're exposed to and your your health and your safety is invaluable. Oh I mean you can't put a price on that and so definitely want to watch out and take care of that A good way to contact us. You can call US locally at five to three true so were not our sec enough as easy to remember so five to three true okay and of course you can Find them on line as well. Your web address WWW dot eight three three true air DOT com. Okay and again check this out do your own research. Don't just take my word For it but to do your own research of why you should have your home. Tested for Radon Let's talk for a minute Merit about you mentioned. Maybe if you're buying a home or if you're selling your home quite often this is something that realtors would want you to do. Sure absolutely and and you know a lot of people. I think there's a box you can check. Do you WANNA rate on inspection and oftentimes. That's glossed over. But I always encourage people have your home tested. If you're selling home you definitely want to have it tested because you you then have control. You know what's wrong. You have the leverage if you're buying a home you you won't have tested exactly so you know exactly exactly what's going on. I mean what you're going to be getting yourself into. That's the old you know my wife has is saying. Don't ask a question Unless you know the answer The answer that that's a perfect example. That all right so meritless say that you do the test yesterday and and you have some higher levels of right on what do you do then so what we do. Is we come in and evaluate the home and we and we evaluate it for a mitigation type system and and I say evaluate because not every every home has the same. Your home's going to be different than my home. And so every mitigation system is going to be curtailed per customer per their their home. And what is is your home look like how is it built. What are we trying to accomplish? How lower we trying to go? And so it's unique process where we come out. We evaluate the home for the best system to reduce the rate on and produced the best indoor air quality. You mentioned that every everyone's home as different as true. I mean you have some people who maybe has a crawlspace on people who may have a basement does that matter. It doesn't so the best way to mitigate or get rid of the rate on so to say is called called active soil depressurization and basically Joe. Your House acts like a giant vacuum on the soil. So you've got this negative pressure that's drawing gas from up under your house and and it really doesn't matter whether it's a basement or crawlspace all kinds of acts the same even slab and so what we do. Is we come in. And we create a vacuum on the soil That's greater than the vacuum of your home. And we draw the right on in the gas out from underneath your home when we discharged from up above the roof at a safe level. Now with me. Today Merritt Gant. He's president of true technologies. And we're talking about the importance of you having your home tested for radon gases as I as we mentioned them into those is is a silent killer. You can't see it you can't smell it you don't know what's there unless you have the test. I it it could have been there for years gone totally undetected until you decided saw to have merit come out and and do the test in your home and support it because again. I can't stress. How surprised I was when I learned that rate on is is the The second leading cause of lung cancer second only to cigarette smoking and do your own research again if you don't If you don't believe me but so this is why you need to have merit come out and and and test your your home. And then let him recommend what the solution for you and again. As as you mentioned this can lead different for everybody True Air Technologies is a great company. Mayor's been out to my home and Let's talk a minute more here. You're about Let's say years ago you had your home tested and years ago another company did the mitigation You'll come back retest retest and if there's an issue you'll help them out with with Maybe our Justin that mitigation rightly so a lot of our phone calls joy. We actually get from other customers. Who have had had? Maybe they were buying a house and they had high rate on and company came in and put in a system and then they call us a couple months later or a year later and they say hey. This isn't working or the rate ONS high. We we remeasured in its high. What do we do and so we get a lot of calls like that? We go out we evaluate the system. We figure out. Why wasn't it working Sometimes it's a matter of again. Every house is different so we see. Sometimes we see these cookie cutter type systems. Put in on a house has slapped on Nair thinking this is GonNa work and and really we need to dig a little bit further and identify. What's a better solution? How can we better handle this problem? so we can come out and do that as well. We can evaluate it come out proposed solutions or lower that rate for you and you know we have a pretty big footprint here we we have a wad listening area. A half a South Carolina Western North Carolina Northeast Georgia. Is there any particular area of our listening air. That's more Susceptible to having right on and others surreally we've seen high rate on all over the state We've seen it up here in the upstate. We've had calls out of Columbia all the way over to the coast. I'll believe it or not and all over North Carolina The the best thing to do is to test your home Because you might have rate on in your neighbor doesn't it's really based based on what's in your soil and how's your house constructed and like I said every homes constructed a little bit differently every home breathes a little bit differently and draws air a little bit differently so every home is going to be different as it pertains to rate on your mirror. Thank you again for being with us today. A quickly will more Tom. How do my listeners? How did they reach absolutely slowly? Call US locally at five to three true and again that's five two three three two eight four and online and online at www dot eight eight hundred three true air dot com their Gantt. A president of true technologies up next Dr Karl. Her poster with a hidden treasure Christian school joins us to talk about an upcoming coming event there banquet of light coming up November the fourteenth. I'm Joey Hudson this week in Bolt back in.

"lung cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The long if you have lung cancer lose the breast or. pancreas or liver kidney or bladder or prostate for primary metastatic cancers of course every patient is different and every patient needs to come in so much of a sale I'll just call doctor leader when I ask him in a minute it doesn't work that way we're very serious about every patient and you can't get an answer on the phone and you can't get an answer on the radio you need if you're serious about the cancer to come in and spend an hour and if you have the documents great otherwise we'll get the documents if you haven't had all the good testing like this man was at three famous hospitals and no one did a pet scan no one knew they were operating on his abdomen and abdomen abdomen don't got a pet scan to see that the cancer travel to the chest this is the work we do and when you sit down and think about it's only logical if you have a cancer you might want to come here first or better yet com when you have an issue if you have a suspicion of a cancer even just a suspicion of rising PSA the brass of mass in the long these are the patients we see every day and we accept most insurances Medicare Medicaid my name's doctor Lieberman I would introduce myself in a few minutes if you have questions you can call us our office at two one two choices you should get a paper and pen so we're going to give you information that you're probably want to write down so have a paper and pencil handy madam sector leader Monroe talks soon we'll be right back.

lung cancer Lieberman Monroe
"lung cancer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"A revolution in lung cancer treatment is happening at the James, we're proving lung cancer isn't solely defined by location and stage, but rather the individual molecules in genes that drive it simply put there is no routine lung cancer. That's a world renowned specialists put their expertise towards treating one particular lung cancer, yours at the James, we go beyond the routine to prevent detect treat and cure, your lungcancer to learn more. Call one eight hundred two nine three five zero six six. Our services over the top vendor. Har- fireplace, masonry and roofing. Go to vendor hard dot com. Professor Cunningham been break. Let me bring my friend. I love more than the mid south legend when I was a kid in Pittsburgh. We had a cat name reach hordic. Stride, the radio dial like latter-day colossus of roads. And know that you're that cat. Chintzy? Nice to finally meet you can I ask you one question. I've always wondered about you. Well, let me let me get my mind together. Please go ahead. Holly order your skyline chili. Oh. Broadcasting. Voted. So certain friend of mine is a national radio talk shows texted me yet and says the great one can't say, okay. I forgot about that guy. Give me his number. Let's get them on my.

lung cancer Professor Cunningham James Pittsburgh
"lung cancer" Discussed on Undiscovered

Undiscovered

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Undiscovered

"But for like, the laymen or something who just doesn't read these studies or for the science journalists or whoever else out there who's taking your daughter. And then then sensationalizing it on the internet. I think that's where there was some sort of misunderstanding that's caused a bit of panic. It's difficult to address. Right. I don't write for audience. I wouldn't know how I I write for scientists. I right for clinicians for really specifically other epidemiologist. The journal Clinical Oncology is not it's a subscription journal yet. No. Main audience should not be lay audience. I I'm writing for my peers, and it's mostly understood that there's not going to be enough men. There's not going to be enough people in this study to examine this of be Biden's or anything else with lung cancer among non smokers. There are no lung cancer cases about nonsmokers. There's so few that we can't do any analysis among those and anti just Jesse don't get the wrong impression. Like, Ted definitely care. What lay audiences are getting from his research? He knows the journalists are always going to be sniffing around his papers, especially when they have interesting results like this. So that's what we do is sniff. This is why he writes up press releases that in case in case, a journalist gets wind of one of his papers. They have something that's written. Or we we have something that's written in our language in terms that we are more likely to understand. Thanks, Ted actually asked head for one more thing. He couldn't really analyze the. Nonsmokers the never smokers because they didn't have the typical power. I kept badgering him until he gave me the data. Like, I knew it's dangerous to conclude things from just data points that have not been statistically analyzed. But I wanted to know like men who never smoke and take these vitamins. Did anyone get lung cancer zero cases of.

Ted lung cancer Clinical Oncology Biden Jesse
"lung cancer" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"A back to diet exercise. It's really I got a twelve year old son. Who knows the difference between a candy bar and a hard boiled egg. He just any knows what they do. He just doesn't wanna eat the hard poll. Right. Right. And we all we all know pretty much know, everything just don't do it brings up a really interesting question or topic which is over the years of talked about it. But it's for some reason kids come up again quite a bit. And that is this idea that changing people's behavior is not about learning. It's not about learning that you need to just stay with diet exercise. You just don't have to know the facts because knowing the fact doesn't change shit or stop smoking because you know, it's going to cause cancer, and you learn all the details about coronary disease and vascular disease and lung cancer. COPD still people smoke, right? The goddamn thing. So if you're going to and this is back to some of the nonsense campaigns. We've had over the years for changing people's behaviour. If you're gonna change behavior you have to I attract them in you have to do something, entertaining, then provide them with a narrative story where there are consequences portrayed in a relatable character like somebody that like them, and that they really can see some reality shows work well for teaching people because you see what happens. So the shitty choices and people people are dumb when it comes to realizing recognizing what they're viewing. But they don't want to do is change. And if they learn the material, I don't wanna change. But when they experience in a narrative, and sort of experiencing the consequences in that story, the motivates them to change they suddenly become teen. Moms good example. I look try raise baby to possible. Not me. I don't wanna go through that. They they don't. They don't think I'm going to be encumbered. It's a financial burden that is look at the story and the consequences another seventeen year old ago. Well, should I to do that? People change their behavior. Yeah. It'd be nice. If more people that again, how what he bring up smoking. I bring up diet. Everyone knows smoking's bad for you..

coronary disease cancer lung cancer seventeen year twelve year
"lung cancer" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"Lung cancer treatment who does that help certainly doesn't help those people with lung cancer it doesn't even really help those people there now let's again just add layers of making this thing a little bit more complicated let's say we both cure both okay we both have cures for long and bone cancer however they make it cheaper in that country for bone cancer treatment and we make we make it cheaper for bone cancer they make it cheaper for lung cancer okay but we're but we're both making all of them now they start they start charging a twenty percent tariff on our bone cancer pill okay so now for their country the cost has gone up however their own companies can compete more now because they they don't make them as cheap as our company do but so so it's good for that company right it's good for the company and their country that's making their cancer pill because they don't have to compete with the lower cost anymore right so it's good for one special interest who does it fuck over one special interest over here and everybody in that country that's who gets fucked over for it now likewise would you say let's respond by helping out one special interest here and fucking over everybody else here.

lung cancer twenty percent
"lung cancer" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Yeah so again point one eight versus twenty to thirty yes mocking causes lung cancer meet caused cancer data don't bake in a day for your whole life increase your risk from five to six percent of getting calling cancer yeah based on if you even believe the data which is and the other thing about that data that makes it unreliable especially with regards to meet is who has been eating meat over the last thirty years okay these are people who don't listen to their doctor's orders obviously there they've been shown to be people who don't exercise as much tend to be fatter tend to drink more tend tend to do everything wrong they're the they're what we call in science the non adheres they cannot adhere to anything they don't wear their seatbelts you know so those people that and they still did it yeah care about their health and all these bad habits so that's what you're measuring in meat eating so if you see any greater risk of disease if you're seeing it it's it's it could be anyone at factors and they can't really control for them in these studies they can't go around and say like you know tell me about your risky behavior in so so that's awesome mix that data unreliable so i don't see any rigorous by that i mean clinical trial data showing that meat is bad for health in fact there are bunch of clinical trials that i've just been reading that show that looking at lean meat versus regular me not lean so all of your radio vascular risk factors look better on regular meeting compared to lean me isn't that amazing.

lung cancer cancer thirty years six percent
"lung cancer" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Mom did yeah uhhuh so you know until we could be old enough to work ourselves and you know help out it yeah it was challenging hit hard condition he did him multiple heart attacks and throughout his wife yeah he got when in one thousand nine hundred eighty one he had surgery and then he lived eleven warriors in his heart he didn't he didn't i of heart attack he died of lung cancer from his chewing tobacco he won cancer from the chewing which a lot of people don't know you can do but you can you can get lung cancer from chink tobacco was his brand oh my god i should remember probably something like that can knows in kano it was a pad he had a wide all the time and he wouldn't do it in front of us he would go out in the backyard and tobacco and gawad and his mouth yeah this southern you know southern but it came in a pouch in the little brick i i can remember the hand exercise it'd be can't remember the generic why because i hated it and and because i knew it was dangerous somehow and also he'd he was somehow shamed of it and so he would go in the backyard i just remember a a little plastic on below right yeah yeah yeah and that was that was his thing yeah boos no he went through a little period of that and and then i think he was he had tremendous self restraint he was somebody who you know the doctor told him don't do that right so he didn't.

lung cancer kano
"lung cancer" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"The risk of people and i was i'm not sure whether there's a drug company involved masking this question because they don't know the answer can i'm not a lawyer so i asked questions i don't know the answer to the questions before i ask him lung cancer sometimes especially with women by things that you can't really predict the smoking is a way that you can sort of predict lung cancer and pulmonary problems but there are more and more women who are developing lung cancer many more than men and one wonders why that is well they they've caught up in the smoking area is that what it is you're not says smoker and you still get lung cancer well you know what else are you putting into your lungs what else he you breathing in the work place and women are working in areas where traditionally they weren't getting exposed to the things that the guys were in the workplace so it's all of these but lungs are interesting organs they get exposed to so many toxins and in the air as you breathe and not only do you get cancer but you get chronic inflammation so i also be worrying about things in addition to cancer from all these toxins that you're breathing in chronic exposure to foreign bodies in the lungs does nothing to help you breathe long just creates chronic inflammation beats up the lungs they don't work it makes it harder to breathe and no one has figured out a good way to you have a happy life as you get older without good lungs personal myers squibb has claimed her breakthrough.

lung cancer
"lung cancer" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"15 of 26 percent so that's estimated at two million three hundred seventy eight thousand six hundred fewer deaths than would have occurred at the end of that span in 2015 if the death rate had not changed at all if it had stated its peak that's a really good side and now some of that is somewhat artifacts ewell but most of that is due to increase in treatment increase in early prevention so new cases of cancer it varies from for men to women men and women gift different types of cancer not surprisingly the top type in men as prostate cancer women don't have a prostate so we don't get the and the top type in females is breast cancer men do have breast and can get breast cancer but it's not nearly as common number two for both of them is lung cancer or lung and bronchial cancer number three for both males and females is colon and rectum number four is actually quite similar in men it's a urinary and bladder cancer and women it's eh uterine cancer and then it goes on from there thyroid melanoma and they vary but those are the top causes our cases i'm sorry but deaths what do you think is the most common type of cancer that kills you in both men and women lung cancer lung cancer is own both men and women and that's kind of different because historically more men died from lung cancer than women but now it's it kills it's still kills less women per year but percentage wise it kills 25 percent of cancer deaths and women are lung and branca's and 26 percent of cancer deaths in men are luck in london broncos and then it goes to prostate and breast colon and rectum and the number four leading cause of death cancer deaths is pancreas cancer and slow lung cancer is going down great because absolutely and that that's part of the reason that all cancer has gone down lung cancer.

uterine cancer branca lung cancer london 26 percent 25 percent
"lung cancer" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Or or just look at pictures online of not gonna go to that extent but just see what it does and some of these graphic sort of emotional picture or read an emotional story on account of someone who's apparent perhaps who who you know got lung cancer from smoking and diarrohea or something but get get that really strong emotional connection to to this need to change that it gets very very important and not something that a loud he will skip entirely so that's that's number one number two is kind of related and also very much tied him with the have patients theme and that's not to start immediately i know a lot of times when we when we want to make a change we get inspired to make a change we've because we've seen it in movies read about in books or whatever we have this idea that that change just happens and you get inspired and suddenly a switches flipped and you're never going to partake in some sort of behaviour again or you're always going to partake in some sort of good positive behavior for now on and that something happens a switch just flips is of is really good analogy there unfortunately that's not really true i mean it does happen in some cases but the problem is when you try to do that and it fails and he tried again and it fails you eventually training your brain that when you make a commitment to start something or stop something or whatever it is that commitment doesn't mean very much right because it's very easy to fail a couple times at trying to lose weight and then you know when you get inspired every few months to say okay starting today i'm on this diet and you know everything's going to be different now on and then that exact same day you don't even make it a full day before you cave because you have a plan before it but more importantly that you haven't trained your brain to associate importance to this because you've tried this so many times and quit so many times that uranus thinks okay it's another another change attempt not a really big deal so the way to reverse that and this is where some patients comes in.

lung cancer
"lung cancer" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on WEEI

"Cancer and someone who's never smoked epidemiologists have tried to find the other causes and i guess some have been found other occupational exposure is in he'll of sand crystals are really am or as best us exposure to high dose of radon but i don't think this explains all of the lung cancer nonsmokers out there and in fact a lot of the folks i see young nonsmokers there's just no environmental exposure there can really explain why this happened are there inherited risk factors for lung cancer we're trying to figure out uh a law of the historic studies have looked at lung cancer in general and in lung cancer in general the dominant respecter is smoking and so we found some genes that make you smoke more but again that doesn't explain by young nonsmoker i see who has lung cancer and her sister had lung cancer at her mom had lung cancer were trying to now find new gene means that might explain these rare but unique family so we have a trial ongoing to study inherited mutations in a gene called egf are we know egf are as an important driver of lung cancer but really rarely it can actually occurred a patient jeans and can cause a dramatic familial risks syndrome so i think one of our ongoing efforts is to revisit the question of inherited risk now using what we've learned about lung cancer biology to focusing on these unique families where it appears were current lung cancer is occurring in various relatives that actually never smoked what research are you working on to try and understand other risk factors for lung cancer a lot of wide use to try to looked at the outliers and that people that don't fit these may be rare genetic subtypes of lung cancer we're we're trying to find them targeted therapies one outline our group were studying right now as young lung cancer young lung cancer is one percent of lung cancer but there are motivated group they're online there are looking for an explanation as to why now what's the store with them because they are different and so we have this in fact remote enrollment study where patients who are diagnosed with lung cancer.

Cancer lung cancer one percent
"lung cancer" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Discovery

"I am of moga organ an old there's more murray i regard in a very different communities afterward gop guys marlboro allowed screen or drained figard's day when as morbid feel relaxed its mid morning in martin's come outside onto this busy street in the financial district of montevideo nervously drawing on his cigarette like millions around the world he's addicted to the nicotine in tobacco i'm sure you hear the warnings twothirds of smokers will be killed by the habits eighty to ninety percent of lung cancers caused by smoking non maybe people the southeast never uttering oneself won't happen to you this is uruguay foremost cancer hospital the national cancer institute and smokers who are fifteen to thirty times more likely to get lung cancer are grimly well represented here specialist oncologists dr eduardo la salvia explains why lung cancer is so deadly ruin the lunka's he's out of abuses of surgery then you know that these visions usually these are owed one here what's the biggest problem in diagnosing lung cancer because berlin is that in the first stages the gaza res you'd would vote silent silent under you don't house it does not make you go to the doctor so when you row the ulysses advanced yes is leg digital do the bigger for an iceberg for many years the guns is growing anew to know about it and went through know in sled a nominees for a lot of a lot of the art dealer named her way to deal with a lot of little private dina what's the nam fifty four years roberto is a patient here and he's being treated for lung cancer your emphasized that smoking when i was fifteen years old off the eighteen i was smoking a packet a day them more a more onto by the time i was thirty was a smoking three packets a day six months ago roberto a construction worker went to his doctor complaining of arm pain but the diagnosis was late stage lung cancer it's incurable his doctor is the director of the national cancer institute dr wilson go lamar how do you feel when used when you see patients and you know that actually this entire problem is preventable i feel happy when i get to tell them there is good news that they are cured cancer free.

figard martin montevideo nicotine gaza lung cancer director lamar cancer gop dr eduardo la salvia berlin roberto fifty four years ninety percent fifteen years six months
"lung cancer" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on Discovery

"I am of moga organ an old there's more murray i regard in a very different communities afterward gop guys marlboro allowed screen or drained figard's day when as morbid feel relaxed its mid morning in martin's come outside onto this busy street in the financial district of montevideo nervously drawing on his cigarette like millions around the world he's addicted to the nicotine in tobacco i'm sure you hear the warnings twothirds of smokers will be killed by the habits eighty to ninety percent of lung cancers caused by smoking non maybe people the southeast never uttering oneself won't happen to you this is uruguay foremost cancer hospital the national cancer institute and smokers who are fifteen to thirty times more likely to get lung cancer are grimly well represented here specialist oncologists dr eduardo la salvia explains why lung cancer is so deadly ruin the lunka's he's out of abuses of surgery then you know that these visions usually these are owed one here what's the biggest problem in diagnosing lung cancer because berlin is that in the first stages the gaza res you'd would vote silent silent under you don't house it does not make you go to the doctor so when you row the ulysses advanced yes is leg digital do the bigger for an iceberg for many years the guns is growing anew to know about it and went through know in sled a nominees for a lot of a lot of the art dealer named her way to deal with a lot of little private dina what's the nam fifty four years roberto is a patient here and he's being treated for lung cancer your emphasized that smoking when i was fifteen years old off the eighteen i was smoking a packet a day them more a more onto by the time i was thirty was a smoking three packets a day six months ago roberto a construction worker went to his doctor complaining of arm pain but the diagnosis was late stage lung cancer it's incurable his doctor is the director of the national cancer institute dr wilson go lamar how do you feel when used when you see patients and you know that actually this entire problem is preventable i feel happy when i get to tell them there is good news that they are cured cancer free.

figard martin montevideo nicotine gaza lung cancer director lamar cancer gop dr eduardo la salvia berlin roberto fifty four years ninety percent fifteen years six months
"lung cancer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"lung cancer" Discussed on WTVN

"Living as possible even though sometimes it seems like hardware visit be vocal speak at dot com to your voice that's evoke must be capped at the we used to think all lung cancer was the same now we know that each tumor may have a different genetic makeup several different elective a types of lung cancer have been identified my performing molecular testing on lung cancer tumor doctors can try to determine what's causing cancer to grow it's a different way of looking at lung cancer because lung cancer can affect anyone the young or old smokers for nonsmokers you or me knowing the molecular profile of my tumor hope determined my treatment options anyone can get lung cancer and not all lung cancer so the same talk to your doctor to see a molecular testing is appropriate for you visit lung cancer profiles dot com to learn more that's lung cancer profiles dot com a public service of six leading lung cancer advocacy groups with support from pfizer oncology according to the centers for disease control and prevention one in three americans could have diabetes but you're twenty fifty the ymca diabetes prevention program as part of the cdc's national diabetes provincial program and the goal is to prevent the onset of type two diabetes by helping people reduce their body weight and increase physical activity take control of your health to find out if the ymca diabetes prevention programs available in your area and to learn if you qualify to participate visit ymca dot nets less diabetes a public service from the ymca of the usa.

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