40 Burst results for "london"

Fresh "london" from Pacifica Evening News

Pacifica Evening News

00:38 min | 38 min ago

Fresh "london" from Pacifica Evening News

"San Francisco's mayor of London. Breed has announced the city is spending nearly half a $1,000,000 on responding to the Corona virus pandemic. That money is coming from other services. That's why she's urging city residents that he'd public health orders to curb the spread and community transmission of the Corona virus Breed Warren's should the pandemic continue beyond next year. It would drain more city resource is Cape Phase, Christina Honest that reports San Francisco Mayor London Breed says she plans to spend $446 million to address the Corona virus pandemic this year through June 2021. That includes $56 million to boost mobile testing sites and the most impacted neighborhoods like the latte, next community in the Excelsior in the mission and the black community in the Bay View and Tenderloin. Reed ticks off a list of services that money will go towards this fiscal year. It includes $16.5 million in funding for communications and operations. 185 million for our health response, 62 million for food distributions and programs that are pit stops. 183 million for housing and shelter programs. It's important to remember that this funding really assumes that we don't see any major surges. If that happens, we will need to divert. Even more resource is and that's why it is so critical that everybody does its part, their part to stop the spread. Thiss stretches beyond June, and there's going to be even more of a drain on our budget next year. But the mayor warns the workable budget relies on federal reimbursements and cares Act dollars. San Francisco, like other cities and states is suffering a deficit due to the pandemic Breeds budget relies on reserves to close an estimated $1.5 billion budget gap over the next two years. It also uses $93 million from the General Fund. San Francisco has been on the government's watch list since late July due to increasing Corona virus infections as breed lists the latest numbers of corona virus infections and deaths. She suggests there's no going back to normal. As of today we have 7692 cases on DH. Sadly, 67 people have died from Cove. It Until we have a vaccine until we're in a better place. We know that we need to continue to socially distanced herself from one another. Where are mask as much as possible and follow our public helped guidelines. We have to start getting comfortable with it. We have to start changing our behavior. It really is. What's going to make the difference. There are some positive signs, says public health director Dr Grant Colfax. He says the rate of Corona virus hospitalizations air down and under indicators. Show a slowing of community transmission. We are currently carrying for 88 San Franciscans with covert 19 in our local hospitals. That is a slight drop from last week. Remember, it is an almost 25% reduction from our peak in July. We're currently finding about 85 new cases of covert 19 every day. That number has started to drop from its high point a few weeks ago, but it is still a cause for great concern. Anything above 50 new cases per day puts us in the red Zone. On our highest alert level. And we have been there for the past seven weeks. City officials are pushing.

San Francisco San Franciscans Mayor London Breed Christina Honest Dr Grant Colfax Bay View Warren London Reed General Fund Director
UK economy in recession after 20.4% second quarter slump

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 16 hrs ago

UK economy in recession after 20.4% second quarter slump

"Britain's chancellor me she soon not has painted a bleak picture on the domestic economy ahead following the impact of could be nineteen or most business sectors Jules figures showed the economy has contracted by Rachael twenty point four percent in the second quarter of twenty twenty as a result of looked on the measures put in place to counter the corona virus pandemic this slump follows a two point two percent quarterly contraction in the first three months of the year Britain's chancellor we she soon knock who's told reporters the challenging period lies ahead I said that hard times were coming and today's figures show the whole time to hear hundreds of thousands of people have already lost their jobs and sadly many more well all the tough decisions can't be avoided soon not promises no one will be left without hope or opportunity Charles the end of this month London

Britain Rachael Charles London Chancellor Jules
Fresh "london" from Clark Howard

Clark Howard

00:51 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "london" from Clark Howard

"Tomorrow? Would it be the breakfast bacon ater or the honey Butter? Chicken biscuit? No matter what you choose tomorrow's looking good. Participating. US Webbys accident taken well tomorrow East Germans and very living three stories about these three atomic control office in London. For me. That's a standing The last roast Ambien and sky like moving west that this proves that the fax reckon is coming sent to inspect this person to be scanned. Roofing, goofy, late roofing become skylight roofing. State farm unicorn military stories, alarm cameras since or is the lip cancer anus came? It was like Anton maybe stack a kilo.

Anton United States London
Democrats roll out prime time convention speakers

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Democrats roll out prime time convention speakers

"London Democrats have unveiling a long list of party leaders and rising stars who will speak at this year's convention and kicks off next Monday. NPR's asthma colleague reports the names run across the ideological spectrum from Bill and Hillary Clinton to New York Congresswoman Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. Other speakers include Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, the Obama's the former governor of Ohio Republican John Kasich and the former acting U. S. Attorney General, Sally Yates. Democrats had also previously announced a plan to highlight everyday Americans by giving small business owners teachers factory workers in front line health workers, prime time speaking slots. Last week, Democrats officially announced that Biden would deliver his speech from his home state of Delaware instead of the host city of Milwaukee. President Trump has not yet settled on where he'll be delivering his speech for the Republican

Democrats President Trump Senator Bernie Sanders Ocasio Cortez Hillary Clinton John Kasich Sally Yates Asthma Biden Alexandria London Bill Vermont Milwaukee Delaware Barack Obama New York Ohio Attorney U. S.
Fresh update on "london" discussed on WBBM Evening News

WBBM Evening News

00:31 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on WBBM Evening News

"Mitch McConnell, accusing Democrats of playing politics. More than 160,000 Americans have been killed by the worst infectious disease outbreak in more than a century. More than 16 million Americans out of work on entire school year for our kids is in limbo. Reading leaders say they rejected an offer to meet with Treasure Secretary Steve Pollution after he made it clear that the administration was unwilling to budge on the size and scope with a response package. There will be even fewer fans and first expected in this year's covert 19 delayed Kentucky Derby. Fewer than 23,000 fans were now expected at next month's Reschedule Kentucky Derby in Louisville. A new plan eliminates general admission and standing room only area Yes, with total capacity during the run for the roses, Limited to about 14% of the 2015 attendance record of nearly 171146th Running of the Derby was postponed from May 2nd 2 September 5th because of Corona virus. Jim Krystle to CBS News, Zealand's largest city is now under strict covert 19 security miss three days of lock down in Auckland as investigators they're trying to establish just how four members of one family who haven't left the country or had contact with any high risk. Populations came to be infected. The latest theory imported freight. One of the victims works at a cold storage facility owned by the U. S based company. AMERICAL Surface testing for the virus reportedly now underway. Vicki Barker, CBS NEWS London Magician David Blaine is added again. David Blaine's promo for his YouTube special on Monday, August 31st promises something magical is coming. His first live stunt in more than a decade, will be attempting to float across the.

Kentucky Derby David Blaine Mitch Mcconnell Steve Pollution Kentucky Jim Krystle Vicki Barker CBS Cbs News Secretary Youtube Louisville Zealand Auckland London U. S
Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 1 d ago

Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

"Somebody had to go I. It's no surprise that Covid Nineteen Delta Draconian blow to the oil and gas industry stay at home orders and line shutdowns of dramatically reduced the need for oil and gas prices and earnings plunged well. Now at least one giant oil company says demand for fossil fuels will never be the same again and it's taking steps not just to pivot, but to make itself over entirely. That business is BP the london-based behemoth last week, the one, hundred, ten year, old company announced a seventeen billion dollar quarterly loss and multibillion dollar writedown of its assets. But what generated headlines was its announcement that over the next decade, it intends to discard its identity as a fossil fuel business. Instead, it'll invest heavily in a wide variety of renewable energy technologies on its way to achieving net zero emissions by twenty fifty. Specifically bb says it will cut oil and gas production by forty percent over the next decade. At the same time, it plans to put ten times as much money into renewable energy investments as it currently does with a goal of investing five billion dollars a year by twenty thirty bio-energy hydrogen, carbon, capture and storage investments in electric vehicle charging stations are all said to be on the menu as our wind and solar. From. A business perspective the move does make some sense BP expects demand for oil to fall between fifty and seventy five percent over the next thirty years as the world attempts to slow global warming. In June BP officials acknowledged that the pain caused to the oil business by the pandemic isn't temporary. It's permanent. They say in a statement, they said covid nineteen would accelerate an existing transition to a lower carbon economy as country seek to quote, build back better meaning in ways less harmful to the environment. The shift is taking a toll on BP's employees. The company announced in June that it plans to lay off ten thousand people. BP's dismal second quarter didn't seem to faze investors instead they embrace the company's new renewable energy shift its share price leapt seven percent on the news stuart joyner an analyst at the market research firm redburn remarked that the move was major positive, thoughtful, and largely unexpected the New York Times reported. Unexpected too many perhaps, but close observers of the company may not have been that surprised. BP has spent the last decade clawing back from its disastrous deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. For obvious reasons, the company hasn't exactly been a darling of environmentalists, but quickly after becoming CEO in February Bernard Looney made a pledge for BP to achieve net zero emissions by twenty fifty it was the first of giant global oil companies to do so. At the time both socially conscious and traditional investors applauded BP's pledge Andrew Logan and oil and gas director at series a climate change advocacy organization said EP was setting a new standard for leadership in the oil industry CNN reported and Barclays analysts called the plan both fundamental and radical. Last week. Looney. said in a statement quote. This coming decade is critical for the world in the fight against climate change and to drive the necessary change in global energy systems will require action from everyone but so far oil giants. Exxon and Chevron have not followed suit indeed mobile continues to expand oil exploration and production around the world despite its own sharp drop in earnings. The Washington Post reported BP has attempted and failed at other eco, friendly initiatives over the years and BP will continue to invest in and make most of its money from fossil fuels for at least another five years. Still observers agree that this is the company's most transformative move yet, and the realities of business may give BP's ecoconscious strategy more momentum than has existed in the past. As reporter Steven muffs wrote in. The Washington Post for. BP. Is trying to get ahead of what climate change might forced the industry to do. Anyway.

BP Washington Post BB Mexico EP New York Times Exxon Andrew Logan Bernard Looney
Fresh "london" from KCBS Radio Afternoon News

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:16 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "london" from KCBS Radio Afternoon News

"Traffic leader KCBS. Mancini's sleep rolled six day forecast save big on select premium mattresses during Mancini's sleep world's 50% off mattress sale. Beautiful summer afternoon, little bit warmer tomorrow, but we need to talk about what happens on Friday. Triple digits are possible on a lot of the inland valleys and the National Weather Service this afternoon expanded that excessive heat watch too now include Portions of Santa Clara County, along with portions of Alameda and Contra Costa all the way through Monday. We'll see eighties so low nineties even by the bay and seventies at the beaches, Traffic and weather together on the Eights on All News, one of 69 and AM 7 40 KCBS case. CBS NEWS time. 3 20 San Francisco mayor London Breed just presented a $446 million plan to battle the Corona virus. This would cover the cost of treating the virus through next June for more on this and other issues that the city is facing at this crucial time. Return to the KCBS Ring Central news line and.

Kcbs Mancini Santa Clara County National Weather Service Eights CBS Contra Costa San Francisco Alameda
Lebanese prime minister resigns amid protests over deadly blast

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:27 sec | 2 d ago

Lebanese prime minister resigns amid protests over deadly blast

"Minister has announced his government is resigning. I'm Vicky Parker at the Foreign Desk in London ever angry protests in Beirut over the decades of corruption and incompetence so many there hold responsible for last week's deadly explosion, apparently bearing fruit. Lebanon's cabinet resigning Prime Minister Hassan DEA himself elected on a promise of reform. Acknowledging those promises haven't been camped. A storm with Hurricane force winds has flipped over

Prime Minister Hassan Dea Vicky Parker Foreign Desk Hurricane Force Beirut Lebanon Cabinet London
Fresh update on "london" discussed on Paul and Jordana

Paul and Jordana

00:38 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Paul and Jordana

"Time death and mental illness, the latter partly inspired by the deteriorating health of founding member Syd Barrett. The album's estimated to have sold over 45 million copies charted for over 900 weeks in total, and it's generally considered one of the greatest Albums of all time in the name Florida Georgia Line Georgia Line released their debut single in 2012 and since then I've become one of the most successful country music acts of all time. We've even been credited with helping to pioneer a style of country music known as BRO Country, which adds a touch of rock and hip hop into the mix. The van is a duo one members from Florida and the other, You guessed it, Georgia. The line. On the other hand, they say, isn't a place at all. It's a representation of where the two meet. Musically trivia Well, well was forming. They went through a six month long audition process to find a singer. Eventually, they found one in Annabelle win. She was 13 years old Being that she was so young, that band was forced to cancel the first states of a UK tour. Why Greater London Council said that if they played the at the time, 15 year old Annabella will be guilty of truancy. His profile. Russell Dickerson Dickerson was mourning May in 1987 in Tennessee. He grew up in and around Nashville, and by the time college rolls around, he knew you wanted to be a professional musician. After getting a degree in music. He was signed to a prestigious talent agency who helped get the music publishing deal and represented him as a performer. A few short years later his release and started picking up steam and.

Russell Dickerson Dickerson Georgia Florida Syd Barrett Founding Member Greater London Council Annabelle UK Nashville Tennessee
UK names 'Channel threat commander' as boat crossings surge

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

UK names 'Channel threat commander' as boat crossings surge

"The British government has appointed a former royal marine commando to try to stop people crossing the English Channel from France in small boats the government says that done Mahoney who currently heads the UK's joint maritime security center will work with French authorities on stronger enforcement measures including intercepting boats at sea Britain's conservative government has talked tough amid a surge in the number of migrants crossing the channel during a recent warm summer weather that on Thursday to under thirty five people were brought ashore a record number for a single day there is shockingly London

British Government France Mahoney UK Britain London
Prions And Infectious Proteins

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:11 min | 5 d ago

Prions And Infectious Proteins

"So today's topic is one I've wanted to address for a long time. It's the topic of Priante, a fascinating area of infectious particles that aren't. Alive, it's not it's not viruses or bacteria or or fungus, and in the days of cove it if you really wanted something else to have to worry about him. Here we go. Here's Priante and fascinating topic that has some very interesting routes and potentially some application to a number of important neurological diseases. So we'll say we're speaking with Dr Cassandra Teri. She's a reader in protein pathology at the London Metropolitan University in London so welcome to the podcast Dr Terry. Thank. You Kevin thanks for having me on. Yeah. This is really really good. I really appreciate you. Taking the time to meet with us because this is a topic that I think has. Just, so captivating. And we really need to start with the basics and there's a disease called Kuru. What is Kuru? and. Why is it important for us to understand pre-owned related disease? Okay. Yes. So curry is a really really interesting disease and. is. A disease that was found the tribes of people in. New Guinea. Um. What you what they used to do as part of that culture is when members family members of their tribe. Would die What they would do is they would actually. Senator. Eat parts of the of the of the person that had dead deceased. And And you know many years later when scientists looking into this, what happened was a lot of people down with this strange Strange symptoms the couldn't really work out why so many people within these tribes were getting these symptoms. So. When scientists eventually looked into it to try work out what was going on and they bend discovered the doing this practice this rich listrik cannibalism I'm what happened was essentially. A parts of the body such as. The central nervous system in the brain were eaten. By members of the tribe and those people who you know these parts of the brain. A parts of their body that were essentially infected with prions they got passed on to people who eat within the tribe. So essentially, what's happening is People within this community came down with the same disease Kuru. So it was it's been directly linked to the fact that. Members of this tribe were essentially add contracting this disease by ingesting m other m humans who had this these prions essentially I mean it's a fascinating disease unluckily this. The which list cannibalism has now been banned, it's not been stopped and there's been no more cases of crew and but it from a scientific point of view. It's very interesting to to see the actually this was one of the first reported cases of a transmission of a disease from humans to other humans. So this is why it's really Important to understand Karoo and from a scientific point of view because it shows prions can be transmitted. From humans to other humans. Now, you say, you say prey on and I've always said Priante and I've taken classes where said preempt is this like a tomato tomato thing like a UK okay. I try on other people, call them Priante if complete. Other. Correct pronunciations. Prions you can call them preowneds his. Just wanted to make sure I. got it right because you don't want to talk to a world expert and get it wrong. So that's a by. Could you tell us more about what is a PRI- on? So. They are essentially transmissible at infectious proteins. So they all proteins which are found within your body. And what they do is they can convert into a abnormally folded form of of the protein. And they can actually be transmitted. To species on cools disease essentially an infectious protein possible. It's really interesting stuff. So so you say they're naturally found in the body what is their role in the central nervous system? This is this is really important questions so. Obviously, lots of people, lots of scientists have tried to look at what it actually meant to be doing when they're not on the disease state, and actually if you look at mouse models, if you knock this protein out this off pc prion protein, if you knock your towels in mouse models. Mice. Absolutely. Fine. So exactly what it's doing in the body is not entirely clear. So there's lots of different theories are what it could be doing, but to this day was still not entirely sure what the prion protein does when it's not causing disease.

Dr Cassandra Teri Priante Dr Terry London Metropolitan University London Senator Curry Karoo New Guinea Kevin UK
"london" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | 5 d ago

"london" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"If you're planning a trip to Europe, you may have noticed that a lot of flights in the United States connect through London through. Heathrow airport, and sometimes you're left with an awfully long layover instead of wasting hours hanging out at the airport. Why not head into Lemon for the day we've invited. London guides, Steven Beck and Debra to join us and share their tips about getting into the city to make a damn it, and then getting back to the airport in time for your flight. Stephen, Deborah. Thanks for joining us here in our studio. So. Is it realistic to have a long layover? Let's see. You got a eight hour layover in Heathrow Deborah. Is it realistic to actually check your bag and go into town? Very easy. It's fifty minutes on the P- me underground. To get into central London and it's soon. You've got the the express. Heathrow express goes into. Paddington. Depending. And from there you've got the time outs, fifteen minutes, every fifteen minutes. So four times in our and you're downtown and less than half an hour. And, and when you can go into town, you can go out back the same way and just as reliable convenient. Yes. So Stephen <hes> most people would go through Heathrow, but it's also conceivable. You could land in Gatwick, London's second airport and yet because a good connection into London, a similar thing, the Gabrielle Express <hes> and that heads into Victoria in some ways if it depends where you want to be in London, but if you wanted to go to Buckingham Palace or Westminster that's even closer. So <hes> it takes thirty minutes. Okay. On the fast train and Deborah. No, we were discussing about leaving luggage. And building some time for perhaps maybe a delay. But you know an hour and a half, maybe a couple of hours. If it's got workings, if you allow that on either side and you've got eight hours. Yeah, you could afford in. London. When when you are going back to the airport as an American, especially, you should give a little extra time. I. Know The from the Airports in Europe, you have to go through security hoops to fly to the United States. Yes. Yes. You have to allow time also to get into, there's Gatwick Express but southern rail. One of the other train companies, they run a service into Victoria, which is about every thirty minutes. It's a lot cheaper than the guy he expressing takes about the same time. Okay. So there are ways to get quickly efficiently and economically into London a lot of people are stressed out by Heathrow because it is five terminals I. think generally when you go to and from the United States, use terminal five, is that right? Depending on the airline? Terminal to terminal five or. Four. Okay. So I've been trying from seminal three with virgin in Delta. Okay. If you're flying in and out of different terminals, how tough is it to connect the terminal? It's very easy. Follow the signs. It's really well signposted what about the practicality of your bags if you have a chance to check your bags through, that's the best thing. But if you're picking up your bag, is there a way to lock it up or do you check it onto the flight <hes>? You can't even check on that early to a flat out. I, don't think they have those baggage storage facilities Bernardo. We're thinking about this and talk about this. Heathrow, at sint pancras up Paddington. South. At. The airport. Don't take it into town. Yes. Yes. Yes. You can pre book as well. Online. You can pre book to leave your luggage. Should save time good tip

London Tower of London Buckingham Palace the Tab London Debra Westminster Stephen Victoria Heathrow Rick Steves Heathrow Deborah Public Transport Europe United States Paddington Bletchley Park Royal Raven Christopher Steven Beck Naby
Traveling To London

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | 5 d ago

Traveling To London

"If you're planning a trip to Europe, you may have noticed that a lot of flights in the United States connect through London through. Heathrow airport, and sometimes you're left with an awfully long layover instead of wasting hours hanging out at the airport. Why not head into Lemon for the day we've invited. London guides, Steven Beck and Debra to join us and share their tips about getting into the city to make a damn it, and then getting back to the airport in time for your flight. Stephen, Deborah. Thanks for joining us here in our studio. So. Is it realistic to have a long layover? Let's see. You got a eight hour layover in Heathrow Deborah. Is it realistic to actually check your bag and go into town? Very easy. It's fifty minutes on the P- me underground. To get into central London and it's soon. You've got the the express. Heathrow express goes into. Paddington. Depending. And from there you've got the time outs, fifteen minutes, every fifteen minutes. So four times in our and you're downtown and less than half an hour. And, and when you can go into town, you can go out back the same way and just as reliable convenient. Yes. So Stephen most people would go through Heathrow, but it's also conceivable. You could land in Gatwick, London's second airport and yet because a good connection into London, a similar thing, the Gabrielle Express and that heads into Victoria in some ways if it depends where you want to be in London, but if you wanted to go to Buckingham Palace or Westminster that's even closer. So it takes thirty minutes. Okay. On the fast train and Deborah. No, we were discussing about leaving luggage. And building some time for perhaps maybe a delay. But you know an hour and a half, maybe a couple of hours. If it's got workings, if you allow that on either side and you've got eight hours. Yeah, you could afford in. London. When when you are going back to the airport as an American, especially, you should give a little extra time. I. Know The from the Airports in Europe, you have to go through security hoops to fly to the United States. Yes. Yes. You have to allow time also to get into, there's Gatwick Express but southern rail. One of the other train companies, they run a service into Victoria, which is about every thirty minutes. It's a lot cheaper than the guy he expressing takes about the same time. Okay. So there are ways to get quickly efficiently and economically into London a lot of people are stressed out by Heathrow because it is five terminals I. think generally when you go to and from the United States, use terminal five, is that right? Depending on the airline? Terminal to terminal five or. Four. Okay. So I've been trying from seminal three with virgin in Delta. Okay. If you're flying in and out of different terminals, how tough is it to connect the terminal? It's very easy. Follow the signs. It's really well signposted what about the practicality of your bags if you have a chance to check your bags through, that's the best thing. But if you're picking up your bag, is there a way to lock it up or do you check it onto the flight You can't even check on that early to a flat out. I, don't think they have those baggage storage facilities Bernardo. We're thinking about this and talk about this. Heathrow, at sint pancras up Paddington. South. At. The airport. Don't take it into town. Yes. Yes. Yes. You can pre book as well. Online. You can pre book to leave your luggage. Should save time good tip

London Heathrow Deborah United States Debra Stephen Europe Paddington Victoria Gabrielle Express Steven Beck Buckingham Palace Gatwick Sint Pancras Delta
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | 5 d ago

beirut explosion latest news

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. But of course, everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, thousand people in Beirut homeless, five, thousand injured hundreds still missing, and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. The. Lebanese. breath volunteers, obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. Groups coming in different countries, sending their own firefighters medical support in, and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

West Beirut Lebanon Government Beirut Leyla Lebanese Government New Buildings Canary Wharf Lila Milana Timothy Mcveigh Oklahoma City London Prime Minister's Office Baabda Palace Beirutis Allen France Milana Allen Nash. Gymnasium Ohio Asha
The US will pay up to $10 million if you can ID a foreign election hacker

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:45 min | 5 d ago

The US will pay up to $10 million if you can ID a foreign election hacker

"Provide information on a foreign hackers who's been meddling with the US election and you could receive up to ten million US dollars as a reward. The US State Department says the reward will go to and I quote information leading to the identification of or location of any person who works with or for a foreign government for the purpose of interfering with US elections through certain illegal cyber activities well to explain that and tell us more. Let's hear from Elizabeth Bro. She leads modern deterrence program at here in London. Welcome back to the program Elizabeth and just describe what exactly the US State Department is doing. A good money on at. This is really fascinating program. So but the State Department is doing is essentially offering the same sort of rewards for people who Reports. People who who who are planning to interfere with elections in the same way that's the US government does with people who report terrorist. So it's it's essentially bounty on election interferes information. So how do you go about catching? A Hacker D I mean who we talking about here I mean he's he's going to be claiming the prize to begin to look at counter hackers. Is it a large authorities large private sector organizations or even a teenager in his bedroom? I think it may well be teenager in his bedroom so I think the most likely. Recipient of this money is somebody working with hackers who? May have been who who are in the process of interfering with US elections and we should remember it's not just hackers. It's people who are Spreading this information as well. It aimed at undermining confidence in elections and we should remember the people who are doing it are. Oprah are often operating on behalf of another government but they don't work for the government and that is the problem in the Western governments have it's so hard to to catch them because they are can relive just be people in their bedrooms. Working survivor freelance arrangement with a country, and so people like me have long been thinking about how D- How do we deter how how can we make sure that they don't engage in that behaviour I must say as a European. I just never thought of of the option of offer offering a bounty to to people willing to turn them in. But here this is what? We are getting or this is what what US government is proposing exactly. What does it suggest about the way that the Americans are actually trying to catch these people who who are trying to meddle with the elections. There is some suggestion that you know given the large amount of money ten million dollars, and that the United States might not quite be up to the job themselves. But so this is the interesting thing right I mean when you offer bounded it sort of indicates that you've tried other means and you're not getting anywhere and that's why. Are So often used by the governments to to catch terrorists because it's The government has failed them tend to catch him in other ways, but with election interference to fear of the ways that have usually been sought about the cyber. Cyber defender. Let's say in in in our Western countries. Keeping the country safe and also signaling to to perpetrators would be prepetrators if they commit their offensive acts that would be punishment but clearly, it's not the now for the recent, we can see it's not enough is that These activities continue. So clearly the the the the would be attackers and they and their is don't feel deterred by what's currently happening in the the problem was for the defender is that if you? If you're too heavy handed if you attack back than Jose escalates. It could it could really get out of control. So this is a completely different. Take on and I think it's it's one those Soviet uniquely American with this long tradition of of bounties and something that the property ripping countries won't engage in but but it has worked with with in some cases with terrorists that the US government was was trying to find. So I mean it sounds frankly it sounds completely crazy. Let's see they even Be Able to locate a few hackers. This way Elizabeth, how much evidence is said that the current US elections has already seen some international involvement and interference. So it's It's it's hard to quantify and the the reason that this is so difficult to serve you don't even need to. Successfully interfere with an election in order for that election to be to be tainted or poisoned or compromised. What's it's enough for people to have the impression that that's the election is being. Tinkered with by somebody and and that's the really frightening thing. So that was They've been very service both. Opponents both in the US and elsewhere that people whether such and such election in that country. was interfered with, for example, by the Russians, and and for something in here in UK, there was a recent poll where. Forty nine percent of people in the UK thought that rushing to with the brexit referendum. So it doesn't really matter whether Russia defeated with Brexit Brentford with mattresses at half of the population in the UK thanks that rushing to fit and then the referendum is already tainted by that and that is that makes this whole thing so difficult. So it's it and that's why program like this may not have much. Effect because what matters is people think in other countries interfering

United States Us State Department Elizabeth Bro UK London Oprah Brexit Brentford Russia Jose
Olympics Re-Lived: 2008 Beijing

The Tennis Podcast

02:39 min | 6 d ago

Olympics Re-Lived: 2008 Beijing

"Beijing Olympics of the first Olympics I watched extensively I vividly remember be home doing what she did in. Athens. But for sort of wall-to-wall coverage, it was Beijing for me and I just remember the venues being really cool. The bird's nest, the aquatic center looking futuristic and yeah I just lapped it up. Do. You remember the dramas at the opening ceremony. That's kind of a rule about a conic moments matt. I think that is the conic moment isn't it from Beijing? Yeah well, I would say you same bolt is the I call. Of this the sport yes I'm going. Non You talked about venues and several. Yes opening ceremony iconic moment. Yeah. They also remember all the re. There were lots of theories about the pollution in Beijing and that being there's always some sort of controversy drama in the lead-up. Olympic. Some sort of reason that's being peddled in the media may be completely legit often is about why the Olympics is going to be a massive massive failure. In Rio none of us were ready. We didn't get that with London twenty twelve here. I'm sure in other countries they did everybody was sort of united in positively about the Olympics but in Beijing was the pollution because the the factory I mean everywhere in China in factories in urban areas in China and they were well first they relocated. I know from personal experience, they relocated a lot of the most polluting factories from Beijing to other parts of the country in particular to Ching de. meaning that on my visits to Chengdu roundabout that time it felt like my throat was burning every time I stepped outside because the pollution in the smoke was so bad. In fact, the final of the champions tour event. that. I attended in D. had to be halted because nobody could see the ball. But In Beijing I mean the police was was far less bad than fit but they hid seeded the clouds in order to make it rain in the lead up to the Olympics to clear the air they were controlling the weather. Can come here and do that. Yeah. No, I remember thinking what if it's that easy to make it not reign. Why we faffing around with you know? All the time.

Beijing Olympics Athens Chengdu Roundabout China RIO
Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

BrainStuff

05:19 min | 6 d ago

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

"As I record this, it is August which here in the northern hemisphere means hours of outdoor time under the blazing summer Sun. But even though many of us do wear sunscreen to help prevent sunburn skin cancer and the kind of skin damage that the beauty industry calls premature aging recent researches found that we're not applying that sunscreen is thickly as we should hang its effectiveness by about forty percent. Sunscreen is rated for Sun Protection factor or SPF WITH SPF thirty able to block ninety, seven percent of ultraviolet rays, the higher, the SPF, the greater the protection although even SPF one hundred doesn't block one hundred percent of UV light. The problem according to this recent research out of University College. London is that few of US US enough sunscreen to enjoy those high levels of protection. Lead author entity young explained to US via email that to calculate ratings in the lab. Sunscreen is applied thickness of two milligrams of product per each square centimeter of skin. He said, an average woman has about one point, seven square meters or eighteen point three square feet of skin for a whole body sunscreen she will need about thirty three grams or one point. One fluid ounces with three whole body applications a day that's about one hundred grams or three point four fluid ounces. For reference, a fluid ounces roughly equivalent to a shot glass of sunscreen and a large tube of sunscreen holds eight fluid ounces of product. So a person spending a full day in the Sun should use about half a tube by themself. Are you using that much sunscreen probably not young and his colleagues estimate that our real life application of Sunscreen is closer to about point seven five milligrams per square centimeter at less than forty percent of the recommended thickness as a result or not getting anything close to the ninety seven percent protection promised on a bottle of SPF. Thirty. The good news from young study is that you can get away with using less product with SPF of fifty or higher. They found that even the real world application rate of point seven, five milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter if using SPF, fifty provided considerable DNA protection compared to untreated skin. So does that mean that you should run out and buy the most expensive SPF one hundred or spread your regular SPF thirty as thick as cream cheese on a BAGEL. We also spoke with Ivy Lee a board certified dermatologist based in Pasadena California who explained that you could. But that the best daily Sun Protection Strategy is to keep it realistic. Lee, said I tell my patients to go for the highest SPF possible. That feels good on the skin for daily use. How do you know you're really applying two milligrams per square centimeter? No one knows we don't want to induce anxiety over this we want to build healthy habits. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and exposure to ultra-violet or UV. Light is a risk factor for all types of cancer including melanoma more than nine thousand, three, hundred Americans die for melanoma every year. UNPROTECTED EXPOSURE TO UV light damages the DNA and skin cells leaving them more susceptible to skin cancer DNA damage can result from either a few severe sunburns or a lifetime of cumulative sun exposure. Incredibly the American, Academy of Dermatology reports that getting just five or more blistering sunburns between the ages of fifteen and twenty will increase your overall melanoma risk by percents. and. Lee says that although skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color exposure to UV, light can also cause premature aging they sunscreen use will slow the appearance of wrinkles and age spots for all skin tones. Healthy sun-protection habits include avoiding sun exposure during the peak between ten am to two PM wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses went outside and full sun, and of course, applying sunscreen on all exposed skin even in overcast conditions. For full coverage, Lee recommends starting the day with a cream or lotion type sunscreen preferably fifteen to thirty minutes before you step outside. Instead of measuring out of full shot glass of product, Lee tells her clients to think of applying sunscreen like a massage or can fully into the skin without missing a spot since body sizes vary and product spread. Differently there's no preset amount that works for everyone. Lease suggests reserving spray or powder type sunscreen for fast reapplication on the go the ideal is to reapply every two hours but lease as a more realistic plan is to reapply around lunchtime if you're going to be out all day. If you're heading out on water sanders snow more frequent applications are required because UV rays reflect off of those surfaces. According to Lee it's a myth that you can't burn the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. Also, tablets and other hand held devices reflect UV light too. So pick a shady spot if you're going to spend some time in the sun scrolling.

Skin Cancer Ivy Lee United States Premature Aging Sunburn University College London Dna Damage California Pasadena Academy Of Dermatology
South Africa reaches out to WHO for help with COVID-19 response

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:51 min | 6 d ago

South Africa reaches out to WHO for help with COVID-19 response

"Lecturer in international politics at. So seen in here in London Phil Clarke, welcome back fill just tell us what what what you picked out this morning the World Health Organization in South Africa's is a big headline. Yes, this is a story Emma that's running on Bloomberg and a and a lot of the international news type is this morning that's South Africa has really reached out to the World Health, organization and asked for some emergency help in terms of dealing with corona virus. So the WHO, today, sending, what they call a surge team. To South Africa, I've only done this in two or three other countries around the world. I'm so forty-three WHO experts landing in South Africa today really to help the South African government try to coordinate its corona virus response on the background to this is that South Africa has just hit a five hundred thousands of coronavirus cases that puts it in the top five inch infection writes around the world and there are real worries about just how quickly Karenna virus is spreading in South Africa. So yeah, that's why we're seeing this this whol emergency response today. What will this team doing? That they're going to be doing a couple of things. Firstly they're really helping the south. African. Government with with track and trace So this has been a real problem in South Africa just been very hard to set up a an effective surveillance system, full corona virus and then the second one is in fact, coordinating the kind of community response to Corona. Virus Encouraging people at the local level to go and get tested to stick to the lockdown measures the South African government had been really struggling with community compliance and said who is going to be helping with that as

South Africa World Health Organization Corona Phil Clarke Lecturer World Health Bloomberg London Emma
Meghan Markle's friends to stay anonymous in privacy lawsuit, judge rules

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:36 sec | Last week

Meghan Markle's friends to stay anonymous in privacy lawsuit, judge rules

"In London is ruled that Megan Marchal, the Duchess of Sussex, can keep the names of five close friends secret while she brings a privacy invasion lawsuit against a British newspaper High Court judge says for the time being, at least the court to grant Meghan Markle the order that she seeks. She's currently suing the publisher of the Mail. On Sunday over articles published portions of a letter she wrote to her father. After her marriage to Prince Harry Marchal asked the judge to prohibit publishing details of her friends spoke anonymously to People magazine. Them the alleged bullying she had received from the media.

Meghan Markle Prince Harry Marchal Megan Marchal High Court People Magazine Publisher Sussex London
How AI is Being Applied to the Stock Market

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:23 min | Last week

How AI is Being Applied to the Stock Market

"Hello and welcome to the Today podcast I'm your House Kathleen Mulch. I'm your host Ronald Schmeltzer. So today we're going to spend our. podcast talking about our use case series where we look at the adoption, I in various different industries and today, we're GonNa take a look at the stock market and the training on. Amazing. Other things like the stock market commodities and futures bonds and Blah, Blah Blah. So we talk about stark record. We're talking about the trading floor in general, but basically the stock market and it is the dream. It is the long dream of anybody WHO's in the financial trading industry to find the magical algorithm magical model that can predict the future of the market because if you can do that you basically when everything in life. Right because. If I can tell you the price of Amazon or apple stock or oil, or whatever tomorrow, I can lock in my buy low sell high sell high by. Then you went and you know what? There are very smart PhD mathematicians out there right now, who are working on machine learning models to predict the markets, right? So we should talk about. I think ever since there's been a market, there's been someone trying to figure it out in one way or another. Just. Technology helps but still hasn't cracked it. So like Ron said, we wanted to spend some time today talking about a and how it's impacting the overall stock market trading floor and that whole area recently adoption of AI in financial trading has seen an uptick and more people are starting to look into this wealth managers are using ai to help serve their clients better. Freighters are using AI and also Also, augmented intelligence tools to gain insights and flight market advantages. You know anything that they can get. They really try any slight gain, is worth it to them, and also many people are starting to see some real value from using ai just in general. So we wanted to spend some time to dig deeper into this and talk about how ai is being applied in various ways. So part of getting. Getting an advantage in the stock market, of course, was called Informational advantage. If you have to know something before other people know things. Then you have an advantage just goes all the way back to you. Even Barron Rothschild in London stock markets, how he used the supposedly passenger pigeons ticket information from the battlefields. You know that was like supposedly like one of those big innovations and it kind of carries. Carries through to the high frequency trading. We're like you can engage in micro. Senate? Like not even Microsoft, by Pico Senate seconds of advantage over someone else because you have the man, you could place that trade just before the other people place the trade. Then you have an advantage, right? So having information advantage is a real thing, but you know nobody really knows the future especially machines. So really. So what you can use, you could try to just build better models. You could try to figure out, could try to fill the basically figure out a better cause and effect like when you see something happening in one place, right? What does your model tell you about what will happen somewhere else or maybe something in the same market like when I see, let's see there's oil prices are going up does your Mama. Mama predict something with some high rate of predictability about what will happen in other market, and so this idea of modeling model changes for Stock Market for finance for risk levels, the is really able to really analyze things just a much higher level. It's basically just doing things that skill we talk about that with the idea of hyper personalization is one of the patterns just in general patterns and anomalies and predictive analytics. Systems can read all the news, they can look at all the social media. Posts, you know they could check every stock, it check derivatives on stock options that could check all those things. So companies that are really using a I are using it first and foremost to just be a massive intelligence gathering tool and synthesize all that information together, and basically try to use that to inform and influence their models and use those models to basically help do things at a much faster speed, and of course, is about speed right? The speed is incredibly valuable and so someone getting something just slightly faster getting that insight. Maybe you just haven't inside that nobody else has which is great in. You can act on that and hope nobody else notices, but a lot of time. But the truth of the matter is, is that you never alone there's too many people looking at too many things. So it's really about speed right and there are many many companies that are really building these ai tools to look at the complex patterns in the market and analyze those pens so that that's one big way is hoping right now.

AI Kathleen Mulch Ronald Schmeltzer Senate Barron Rothschild Mama Microsoft Pico Senate London Amazon RON Apple
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:38 min | Last week

Shenanigans Again

"In two, thousand, three Oprah Winfrey used her massive daytime television platform to warn millions of people that teenage girls were attending parties, wearing wild shades of lipstick and performing oral sex on boys. The boy with the most colors of lipstick smudges would win the accolade of his peers. These were called Rainbow Parties. The story was picked up by newspapers television stations across the country parents were panicking. There was one small detail that Oprah missed though. There had not been a single verifiable instance of a Rainbow Party F-. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling

Oprah Winfrey London BBC Rainbow Parties Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Mercury Theatre Tokyo National Gallery
Motherhood in a Pandemic with Tanya Moodie

Scummy Mummies

04:37 min | Last week

Motherhood in a Pandemic with Tanya Moodie

"Tennis about your family my mom and Dad. Both. In Ottawa in Canada, that's where I was boon. and my step dad as well. He's glorious. He's been my mom now for like thirty years. So he's very much a family and and then my brothers in Toronto he's an actress well, producer director and a creator and his what's in my brother's named Andrew and his wife's name is Tanna spelt the same way wow. So are they to ten meetings? There are two Chinese, and my partner's name is Andrew. Hang on. Boo. Hello. About two nieces over there in Toronto and then so my family here I've got a twelve year old girl named willow. And that's it. Excellent. Your twelve yard is just started year seven. Finishing. Because you've, you've got one on the way. Yes. I have just got a daughter in your six and we just had like the zoom. Deputy head. Of School and so we are just entering the kind of whole mine change. Our Periods come. Online David. It's really. Out of biggest the yeah I am too bracing myself because all the whole thing like she's been fairly hippie south London local primary school. Uniforms and all sorts of serious. Big. Thing. How's your first year being I mean it's been weird obviously and yes in a cupboard but. I have to say I'm one of the lucky parents in that. If she was a younger, I would have had to be dealing with homeschooling in an active way what I mean six actually the curriculum in your six is very hard for them. Obviously, it's straightforward because led up to it but if you're going to ask I mean I can't even do kind of long division. Wants me to help with something and I'm like. Well this is how I did today in nineteen. Seventy. Spending. Here's a calculator. By hand. And then it would have had to be way more hands on. Whereas the seven will I have found? It could just be a terrible ma'am. I do admit that. It could just be because I'm a very bad person but I basically done nothing. That sounds Dreamy I've done nothing. She's been in her room. Doing actual classes they have to sign in on zoom every morning at eight thirty, eight, forty, five. Yeah they do the full schedule of classes on say wow. And she has breaks they even do pe. She's got two room. She got my Yoga Mat. She's the whole Shebang but from home. And we still have the report cards and everything. So she's kept up. Wow and I just stood back and you can just like stop smoking the garden having been. Doing. I kissing by the garden shared. A room like she's. If you tips for the transition surviving the transition well I think I had to make sure I didn't get. Involved or helicopter around her social life because for me when I realized, it was that the most important thing is that socially she feels anchored. Yeah. All this concern about. This class that class her grades teaching did it, and actually at that stage is entirely secondary. It's about her making friends because that's the only thing for my daughter that she was concerned about. Her nerves came from. Will I make any friends because you didn't know anybody at hunters to to you know what I mean. And so I got on board with her to just focus on that and not be don't talk about. Other stuff. Parents would that we would get on the kiss in a twist about. The sleepless night. Yeah it's my business. So she'd be like, Oh, I want make Koshi. Will up he? Didn't. Give, confidence in the of the first day meeting and she went to school in the first week with a stinking cold. So she was a bit kind of glassy-eyed anyway she's patient zero. I think. It's nice. To know where we'd have. Yeah. So actually that was a bit of it ended up being a bit of an openness to meet some people could be sputtering away and go to are you? Okay she went no, I'm dying apparently made them laugh. You Bronte sisters.

Andrew Toronto Tennis Ottawa Partner Canada Deputy Head London Producer Director
Tips For Childhood Obesity Success

Healthy Eating For Kids

06:36 min | Last week

Tips For Childhood Obesity Success

"Hello and welcome back everybody I had a lovely week in Cornwall I. Actually Went Down Because my sister tied the knot with her brand new partner I. It was really really small ceremony I was really impressed. It was very strict guidelines and who can enter. The registry. The department and what is called the registry anyway. So it was very strict on if four people were allowed in. So I had a the honor of being the witness for my sister, and then we had a really small garden party I. Think it was like ten adults and a few kids my children, of course in amongst that group. So we had a lovely time and return to London where it's really hot and of course, during my holiday in Cornwall I. was invited by Channel Five. To comment on in childhood malnutrition, and of course, I was always aware that the new childhood obesity strategy was out but it had to turn it down because my family were really wanted me to have the laptop off. So I didn't get the chance to. Go on TV or whatever share. So I thought I would record an episode on some tips on how to work with your child. If you are worried that they are overweight or obese these because I know this is a really emotive topic I mean I can even see that amongst dietitians and other than nutrition professionals or doctors we're all divided we all have. Dif- way different boards and we have different ways that would like to approach it and deal with it but I guess the stats don't lie. The numbers speak for themselves. As so. If. It's something that worries you and you also have family history of diabetes or heart conditions or any other health problems and you would like to work with your child. To bring their way down in more home in the healthy range or wait that feels good for your child. Then I'm going to share a few tips with you in this podcast episode and I hope that it will be helpful for you. Now as always if you lie to work with me, you can book a coil. It's a free initial telephone call where I can take you through my nutrition packages and coaching programs so that you can decide if it's a might fit for you. Now I just want to put out. I'm not judgmental Dietitian at all. I was an overweight teenager I. Remember you know my parents always valued education. So my dad is a veterinary surgeon, for example. So he really valued education although my parents you know my mom now has a gym membership. and. They did. There are very conscious about healthy eating but they weren't really sporty family I remember playing badminton and Netball at high school but apart from that as a kid I. used to play in the garden and things like that my parents enjoyed walking. So we did lot to wargame. But apart from that, we didn't really want really an active family. We'd be interested in sport it was more about. I did a lot of reading rowing up and painting and things like that. But apart from that, there wasn't a lot of focus on sports which would have really liked because they're held the choices at herb very nutritious growing up. was never a doubt about that but I could have done with more exercise as a teenager. Big is clearly there is a genetic predisposition. To being a little overweight and so when I was sixteen I to Cobb running because I was really unhappy with the. My Body Fluctuate I. Didn't like the way I looked I don't think I've was away but I can't remember actually I am pretty sure I was overweight at one stage and so I started running I started reading a lot about nutrition and that's how I became really interested in this area. But of course, you know being a teenager of course. I felt for some of the nutrition nonsense like I did a two day eat only fruit detox type plans and I remember on was passing out in a aerobic exercise class type thing in an inner sensible enough not to return to something like that. But I can appreciate that today you are young children particularly young adolescents. They have access to a wide range of information. I didn't have social media I just googled or read magazines for. Weight loss and nutrition advice. But today there is just so much information out there and is really really hard. If you are a young adult or you have young children, it's really hard to sort of tease out fact from fiction. And it's a really really emotive topic and I completely understand what is like to be overweight and yes, you can have held. In you know you can be healthy adult or healthy child. For example in New Zealand, we have the Maori, population and population from. The Fiji Islands or someone population you know they're naturally. They have larger bodies, but they also have a higher. Muscle mass, and so we allowed a higher cutoff for their BMI which meant that you know we weren't too worried that they were particularly larger. However, some of these groups could also be at higher risk of being obese or overweight, but with health. Conditions associated with that. So kidney problems diabetes is a big one isn't it and problems of the heart and things like that

Cornwall Diabetes Judgmental Dietitian Fiji Islands New Zealand Partner Cobb Badminton London Netball
"london" Discussed on Foodgod : OMFG

Foodgod : OMFG

03:07 min | 3 months ago

"london" Discussed on Foodgod : OMFG

"Don't you <Speech_Male> tell me <Speech_Male> the color fucking <Speech_Male> cruel London fucking <Speech_Male> box <SpeakerChange> fucking <Speech_Male> stab us? <Speech_Male> Blue Clean <Speech_Male> Glue. So don't <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> stop <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> October <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> by <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> tattooed. So <Speech_Male> yeah he's <Speech_Male> Jimmy <Speech_Male> Rave Music <Speech_Male> Head hopefully we <Speech_Male> have a nice little <Speech_Male> sum. You're going to ended <Speech_Telephony_Male> a of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Jerem out <Speech_Male> a little. You know <SpeakerChange> five out <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know what you could do <Speech_Male> to really make him that he <Speech_Male> loves me. You could be like in <Speech_Male> one of the songs it'd be like an <Speech_Male> Eaton with the Food God. <Speech_Male> Why <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> can't we have that <Speech_Male> verse in? Somebody's <Silence> wrong <Speech_Male> done <Speech_Male> done <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> done. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> How would that <Speech_Male> be even with the food? God <Speech_Male> that's like a thing <Speech_Male> I'm GONNA <Speech_Male> go. Hey I'm pissed <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> pro <Speech_Male> record. <SpeakerChange> How <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> to the whole thing about <Speech_Male> God this whole <Speech_Male> fucking album <Speech_Male> and it should have been. I should <Speech_Male> have said something a <Speech_Male> little food. <SpeakerChange> That's <Speech_Male> something and I'm pissed <Speech_Male> abandoned now <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but it's not <Speech_Telephony_Male> too late. It's not <Speech_Male> late. Do announced <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it together <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with the Federal <Speech_Male> God and I feel like <Speech_Male> we should make up. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> there yeah <Speech_Male> I can see <SpeakerChange> tiger. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's a vibe. Even with <Speech_Male> the Food God. It's like <Speech_Male> a thing. Everybody <Speech_Male> knows the food. God <Speech_Male> every rapper. Every <Speech_Male> so you know. Everybody <Speech_Male> knows food. God <Speech_Male> It's like a <Speech_Male> fucking fun verse. <Speech_Male> That would go all over <Speech_Male> the place all over <Speech_Male> the press. I'd make fucking <Speech_Male> everybody <SpeakerChange> post about <Speech_Music_Male> a two <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> on. You're talking <Speech_Male> language. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Let's still. <Speech_Male> I still WANNA work. <Speech_Male> Drake dre was going <Speech_Male> to be my manager. But I <Speech_Male> know <Speech_Male> that he's too much of <Speech_Male> a big music guide <Speech_Male> that I don. I would have <Speech_Male> fallen through the cracks <Speech_Male> because those <Speech_Male> people are delivering hits <Speech_Male> for him all the time. <Speech_Male> I just have a brand. That's <Speech_Male> building a billion dollar <Speech_Male> brand but it ain't that <Speech_Male> fun for <Speech_Male> him because he loves that Music <Speech_Male> Concerts <Speech_Male> and the shows <Speech_Male> award shows <SpeakerChange> and all <Speech_Male> that so <Speech_Male> I was like I <Speech_Male> love <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> I love our energy <Speech_Male> best together. <Speech_Male> I'm so scared I'm <Speech_Male> scared. We do because my <Speech_Male> energy with them is probably better <Speech_Male> than even artists. <Speech_Male> 'cause we are like <Speech_Male> crazy <Speech_Male> house in chapter <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> hits instead of that. I love that <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right. We can't wait <Speech_Male> cruel summer. <Speech_Male> The shoes <Speech_Male> cruel London <Speech_Male> gotTa get them out <Speech_Male> Cruella London. <Speech_Music_Male> I got <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> what it's going to be. It's going <Speech_Male> to be a cruel summer <Speech_Male> and it's going to be a cruel <Speech_Male> but it's going to be <Speech_Male> a good crew London <Speech_Male> summer. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> That's what I <Speech_Male> call it. <Speech_Male> Exactly <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> guys <Speech_Male> thanks rank <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and don't forget eating <Speech_Male> with the <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Male> the FOO got <Speech_Telephony_Male> hold on now. We definitely <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> it with food. <Speech_Telephony_Male> God <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Soda. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Relax <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Joe <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> would defer God <Speech_Telephony_Male> at <SpeakerChange> Mar. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks right two later by.

London Cruella London.
"london" Discussed on 5-4

5-4

10:24 min | 4 months ago

"london" Discussed on 5-4

"Welcome to five to four. Where we dissect and analyze the supreme court cases that have left America cracked and barren like hot sunlight. Beaming DOWN ON. A drought stricken plane. I am Peter. Twitter's the law boy and I am here with Michael. Everybody and ran high. Today's episode is Kilo versus the city of New London. Case about eminent domain. The right of the government to seize private property. We received some criticism in our podcast reviews for being quote a bunch of libs millennial leftists proliferating quote politically biased tripe and we take this criticism very seriously. And that's why this episode. We are taking on a case where the liberals were in the majority. We also want to know other of US have described us as immature using. Gratuitous Profanity sanctimonious lacking respect for the practice of law. We will not be making any changes to address those concerns so in this case for liberals and Anthony Kennedy held that the city of New London. Connecticut could seize private property including the homes of plaintiff Suzanne Kilo and several others and turn it over to a private developer in the name of fostering economic development. And this is a showcase for hypocrisy from both the Liberals and the Conservatives on the court I think the liberals adopted the sort of narrow and formalistic interpretation of the Constitution that we usually criticize the conservatives for and the conservative descent goes with sort of context and policy driven rationale that they themselves usually reject as improper. Yeah and at the end of the day. Though we have two handed the conservatives here they were in the right and this decision gave a green light to local governments to seize property where predominantly poor people live and work and turn control over to wealthy private developers or private companies who have no meaningful obligation to do anything with the land so we walk us through the background here. What's going on in New London Connecticut? Yeah so the city of New London. Connecticut had fallen on some harder economic times back in the late nineties so the population keeps going down. People are moving away from New London and the city's tax base is therefore decreasing and the city leaders are looking around and saying okay. We really need a boon in economic development so enter a little mom and pop shop called Pfizer. The Pharmaceutical Company back in nineteen ninety eight begins construction of a major new research facility in new London and specifically There's a neighborhood in new London called Fort Trumbull and that's where the new Pfizer facility is being built so in response to Pfizer Showing interest in having a brand new three hundred and fifty million dollar facility there in the Fort Trumbull neighborhood. The city of New London re activates this old private entity. It's a nonprofit. That's run by the city. It's called the new London Development Corporation and they charged the new London development cooperation with developing the Fort Trumbull neighborhood and designing and implementing a plan for new economic activity that would coincide with the Pfizer plant development so that Development Corporation created a development plan for the Fort Trumbull neighborhood. It was a big plan. Includes Lake a Resort Hotel Conference Center a State Park New plans for building a museum eighty to one hundred new residences plus like a bunch of office and retail space. So in the year two thousand. The city of New London approved the development plan and authorized the Development Corporation to acquire the necessary land in the Fort Trumbull neighborhood to start developing all the businesses so development corporation turned around and the offered to purchase all one hundred fifteen lots that were in the Fort Trumbull neighborhood and those lots are both commercial lots and residential lots but when the Development Corporation offered to purchase all of the lots owners of fifteen of the properties. Refuse to sell. Now it's nine owners that become the petitioners here and the lead plaintiff is Suzette Kilo to Suzanne. Kilo is a working class person interviewers. Reporters mentioned that. She works two jobs She had lived there since. Nineteen ninety-seven another petitioner for example Named will mean a dairy. She was born in the house in nineteen eighteen. The House actually lives in in Fort Trumbull. She was born in that house and still lived there for her. Entire life was bitten had like lived there for years. Their kids next door did roots yet. You know these are lower class working class families and individuals. They had roots multiple generations. Like in and around this neighborhood on their properties they owned for decades. And so the petitioners here like the WanNa keep your damn homes you know. They're saying that the government can't just take their property and First of all handed over to a private corporation and second of all handed over to that private corporation just for a promise to in the future economic improvement pretty much the same reaction. I think anyone would have the government just like knocking on your door one day and being like right you gotta leave. We're here to build a hot enough. You heard about this but we have to help Pfizer out. He hadn't heard of a little company called Pfizer. They want your backyard. Some little like you know podunk city council men who have like Boehner's over the idea that their town is going to become this economic hub. Yeah You well. We'll talk about this in a bit later but like you know. The city council is the lowest form of government right. I can't think of anything lower Throwing rocks at Lake scoreboard. Wow there you go I take it back. School board is the lowest form of government but right above that city council. So yeah I mean they. They're facing off with these homeowners and on their side is one of the biggest corporations in the world. Yes yes so. The legal issue here is about the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment which states that quote private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation and so the question here is what is public use mean. Does it mean that you can just take suzette kilos house and handed over to some developer and say that it's for economic development or is it more limited than that public use historically had been interpreted to be equivalent to public purpose doesn't need to be public use like a park right. It's a little broader than that. It's like for the purpose of helping the public but not necessarily accessible to the whole public for example and the court holds that this is fine because the city had a comprehensive development plan and they seize the property pursuant to that plan. And you know they. The city had decided that the area was in need of rejuvenation and the courts should defer to them on that point and the they go on and on about how it's totally consistent with precedents and all that sort of stuff That we'RE NOT GONNA get too deep into because it's it's pretty right right correct anyway. Yeah Yeah and we'll get into that too. I think when we talk about the amish descent but the the gist of this year is what is public. Use mean under the takings clause and does it apply to a situation where they're just seizing private property and handing it over to some other private entity and the courts saying well. Look Yeah. Sure it's being handed to a private entity but it's for a public purpose right but like the new development something that will be available for anyone to use right. It's an office complex and some rain. Nothing else and if that's a public purpose then what's the private purpose right and I think the fundamental problem with the majority here if that's public then what could private purpose possibly look like. I using the reasoning of the court. There's nothing really stopping the government from just seizing a poor person's home and giving it to a rich person on the grounds that they have the resources to do better with it they can make it more aesthetically pleasing. They could start a business there. Whatever it's it's like making gentrification like a legitimate government and that justifies taking people's property right the sense right originally like the taking clause started it's like building railroads you know it's building highways. It's things that like. The government wants to do that. You can't build the railroad if the house is there. Sort of thing Anti extent that there wouldn't be like direct public ship in. If there's private ownership like a railroad they would become carriers where the public would have general access to their to them anyway so faint. The contrast between that. And what's going on here is is very obvious. You know you don't have to be trained in legal rhetoric or whatever understand the difference between building the railroad and building of an office. Park and judge always talk about limiting principles. What is the limiting principle this reasoning and there just isn't one and what I mean by limiting principle is what prevents you from going down that slippery slope of just taking a poor person's home handing it to a rich person or a rich company because they're gonNA gusty it up right and nothing? The majority says really makes it clear that that can't happen in fact. I think if you take the reasoning to its natural conclusion that can happen. Yeah absolutely yeah I think so and I think Justice John Paul Stevens. He's the one who's writing for the majority here. Really the only thing he says.

Fort Trumbull New London Pfizer Development Corporation Connecticut New London Connecticut London Development Corporation developer Twitter Suzette Kilo America US Peter Anthony Kennedy Suzanne Kilo Justice John Paul Stevens
"london" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"london" Discussed on The Leader

"From the Evening Standard in London this is the leader.

London
Akbar

Tell Them, I Am

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Akbar

"I remember getting to Karachi and Sunday. Everything changing the tension was lifted like literal weight was lifted. Often asked to how did we survive? Why did we survive because the train the previous train which will booked on from Delhi to Karachi and my mother just insisted? She said, no, I'm not taking the train. I need to buy some food for the journey, and lintels or whatever. And my father argued with he said, we've been not be able to get any place on the next train is critical leave. And she insisted and then he agreed and on, he would say this was a woman's into Shen being complement to our mother hand. What she did was she literally saved us because that entire train, all the passengers would then kill the slotted. I was fall and that literally my first memory and it left to deep impression on me as to why there would be so much hatred in people that they would want to both my bed nets and the siblings and myself. I've been back to its subsequently over the is one of my earliest essays at been home school. I was at boarding school. And I remember writing an essay, I must have been in the junior Cambridge, which is the equivalent of high school. It had description of a train compartment. And I described it as, as a cost Guetta death. Gos- Catta, a cylinder debt and the teacher, one of the fathers mocking the S his hit this avai striking image at vegetated from and I wasn't sure guy just used it in Ovid's stayed in my mind and then over the as I am constantly having a sort of dream. Not really nightmares but dreams of being a train, and there's another train moving at great speed and bosses me by my whole family in that train, and I feel help us, I feel my arms and ex-con to move have a cell phone, which doesn't work, but the message of the, the dream is that the other train just speeds by and I'm then stranded on my own without any communication with the entire world. And survey lonely feeling. It's only now in hindsight. Look back, and I feel like God, that is the experience. I lived through the same experience that I had my Hindu colleague, had inverse, which means her family was escaping from Pakistan to India and the same same sort of tension. Same sort of problems logistics, how you get out what you take with you. Who do you trust all the same issues she faced? And she was also a young girl than men. I was doing my piece in, in London at soya's I met her and at that time, a handmade very many Indians, and when we became friends, we began to swap stories and joke about each other's cultures. And, and she said, you know, that we were told it if you ever see a snake and the Muslim, you actually kill the Muslim, I because the Muslim is more dangerous more venomous than the snake an ice mileage. She said, why he's smiling as I said, I've heard exactly the same story except in my story to seek. The Hindu whatever and we both smiling, realize it. I experienced were like a a when when human relations break down to that level. These stories assume a far greater importance of their magnified inflated, and they in a sense, personify the behavior of the other, and that is very dangerous. It's interesting, you say that because I'm Pakistani, I grew up in Karachi, and I moved here. When I was twelve and I have never had negative experiences with Indian people are Hindu people, but I do feel somewhere deep down like this, this bias, it's so bizarre. You know, like I am so surprised as 'cause my partner is Jewish like, I'm very accepting and living that lack of hatred in my life in a lot of ways. But at the same time at like, I have this thing even though you live through this, like really time you didn't. You didn't feel that be ideas ahead the images. I had from the discussions, so my claws fellows from the people, I met about inducing, six vague negative. So I had to overcome that. In fact, wonder stand who these people were widely hated us why we hit to them, and that is when I met by Indian print, many as later in London, where really began to understand these people very much. Like us and in a sense experienced exactly as what we had experienced. So when I became adult and understood some of these different permutations and combinations of human relations, I began to get very involved in what's called interfaith understanding interfaith dialogue. And I began to ask questions and began say the people I meet a friend EBay, normally just like us. They just like me. So what keeps them away from me is my lack of understanding? I own prejudice on my own. Ignorance

Karachi Ovid London Gos- Catta Ebay Delhi Guetta Cambridge Pakistan Partner India
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Phillip Davis is a planner. Architectural historian, he's also the former planning and development director at English Heritage, which gave him unprecedented access to extensive photographic archive, allowing him to dig up images of what the city used to look like that created an extraordinary book, divided over four core themes, work wealth, poverty, and change this collection of around six hundred photographs shines a spotlight on the social conditions of the city from the eighteen seventies to nineteen forty five and what it was like to live here, whether in wealth or poverty. Philip join me earlier initially. A very small group of individuals form something with the society for photographing relics of old London, and they just went out with photographed into the jewel buildings, quantum out of which were coaching inns that were vanishing very fast with the oven to the railways became redundant into sees warehousing. So some of the earliest images taken by that group. But soon after what you've got the growth of the national conservation movement, Saudi for the protection of ancient buildings, national trust, and then in eighteen nineties, with the creation of the London county council, the el-sisi incredibly fall cited, move sense their own photographers around areas that were undergoing change to systematically recalled them as they were being demolished. And some of the most atmospheric photographs replaces places like HOGAN before the construction of kingsway and Aldwych showing the streets areas, buildings and people that lived in area before it was. Swept away. No. The reasons for the losses in when it hasn't seen the broken and cars on to get their copy because it shows the losses, everything from poured domestic, humbled Wellings through two palaces that were all lost along the way. But what was the key triggers for loss was the am vision to make the city more efficient to get ready for the train and the mode car? Was it the people didn't care about these buildings? Or was it just they were old. Many of them had passed their sell-by, whether whether a whole series of different factors that were driving the mental for change, and I think not lease between eighteen hundred nineteen hundred London grew had a phenomenal rates in eighteen hundreds a city of one million people by nineteen hundred. It was a city of seven million people bigger than Paris, Petersburg Berlin combined. So it was by far the biggest largest city in the world and that generating huge echo. Economic social environmental pressures. So you got all Jehovah's chronic poverty cheek-by-jowl with areas undergoing massive change with new infrastructure, the grace of the underground railway, for instance, fueling the growth of suburbs and major infrastructure changes in metropolitan improvements in the center of London. The creation of new roads like Shafi avenue will Rhode kingsway, Southampton row, sweeping through some of these older districts..

Phillip Davis London London county council director Rhode English Heritage Wellings Philip HOGAN Paris Berlin
"london" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

WRFR-LP Rockland

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

"London woo no iran madam one no two the.

London
"london" Discussed on PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

"London liu the man and big with the but ugh gold the hoo the lin the really one two them no the the former with the then the mm.

London
"london" Discussed on WFEB 1340 AM

WFEB 1340 AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on WFEB 1340 AM

"London yes right as a simple oh right simpson was on the phone having one we'll have more yeah russian some right.

London simpson
"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

"London whoa no the he no.

London
"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"London whoa no the he no.

London
"london" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"London payne jonzon and done jiang oh hey band so send a sir henry i am oh is does the good as a and then there's another he was named with phase no good news day i gene.

London
"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"London mm earned the lin two and indian two and hello emme and mm dan moment can and blood and and in the than egner thank you emme don't do it again the.

London
"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

"London mm earned the lin two and indian two and hello emme and mm dan moment minimal and blood and and in the than egner thank you emme don't do it again the.

London
"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

"London the months one one of ghana the are you listening we read fence wanted one in on he com me.

London ghana
"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on RobinLynne

"London i did wind and his oh well and i'll thrive and among and van der waals and god is this time of the raise do thank god this is the up and is found and is and that is what nick down these will come along iribe the what come on woman ever about it beck the reality this.

London nick
"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"london" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"London i did wind and his oh well and i'll thrive and among and van der waals and god is this time of the raise do thank god this is the up and is found and is and that is what nick down these will come along iribe the what come on woman ever about it beck the reality this.

London nick
"london" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"london" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"In london manana oh man the name one in london you and and the.

london