18 Burst results for "lincoln douglas"

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

05:17 min | 11 hrs ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"And and this could be a much more blatant answer that I just don't understand. Why is it automatically? The people that have a problem with third party voters? You're going to get Trump elected. I don't know if there is there. Is there no crossover from the other side that maybe That vote could have went to. I don't know. I just I don't know why. That seems to be the line where a third party vote is a vote for Trump wins. When there seems to be so many people on both sides generally turned off right by the entire process and by these candidates, I think it's because the activation of the anti trump crowd is so passionate and so So driven that they view as any vote. Besides the one that they want you to vote is a vote in the wrong direction, which all due respect. I'm going to vote the way I want a vote, right? Um Lincoln and Douglas really started the history of the debate. Like when I debated in high school, I was I did Lincoln Douglas debate, and that was You had a point that you would argue. You would make your three points. Your opponent would try to refute your three points. And then whoever was whomever was successful would win the debate. And they did that. Because when late when Lincoln I believe was running for president Was it, Stephen Douglas. That was running against him, and they had a series of passionate yet respectful debates. What happened last night was the exact antithesis of a Lincoln Douglas debate the rest of the world and the rest of the galaxy. If there were aliens somehow watching Chris Wallace fail to take control over that thing last night, which I don't know how he could have Without a without a cattle prod. It was an embarrassment. It's an embarrassment that these are our candidates. It's an embarrassment the way they handled themselves. It's an embarrassment the way it was set up where you have rules, yet they're going to run roughshod over those rules. What A nightmare of a debate I felt in, you know. There are a lot of details, which I'm sure will dig into later. But I felt bad for Wallace at times, because, like you said, I don't know who could do anything differently, right? And maybe a times he went it Trump a little harder than he wanted by. Maybe if you want to break down the tape, but for the most part when he tried to keep it, you know, just keep it. Civil Jordan. It was like it times. Neither one of the candidates even realized that he was speaking in those moments when all three of them were talking at the same time. I wanted to jam an ice pick in my eye ball all the worst. And in order for Chris Wallace to do an effective job, he would have had to have had the respect of Donald Trump, and he obviously does not. I, at first was very frustrated with Chris Wallace as a moderator, because I didn't think that he was doing a good job. And then I realized short of muting their microphones. What could he have possibly done to do a better job? I'm open to hearing about it at 77 5791025. You gotta live. Hello? Who are you? Follow me. Yes, ma'am. What's your name? Hi. My name's shirt. Hey, Trish. Nice to speak with you. He's John. Andrew. Trish. I'm along. Commissioner, you know, first time calling Yes, but I just want to let you guys know I love your energy. You guys make me laugh and smile every day you thank you. I was just I'm just Ah, I don't want to bring in anybody down, but I've just been Ah, just been feeling down for the last couple days. Sorry. And I just need something to pick me up. I lost my road crew outside on my TV outside and I've been trying. Ah! Cannot down the strip. And I would love if you will play. A piece of that just picked me up for some reason, definitely will. But can we go into how you lost your Roku outside? What happened? I don't know. Well, but Ah, we had to replace the outside TV with our bedroom TV because I guess the wind blew everything down. And, ah, the TV's broken shatters No, Roco. Yes, but the rogue who came in and out but I guess his out completely way have been able to but we haven't been able to get you know the full signal. I'm Roku man myself. So I understand that I've never used a road crew, but I I am feeling your pain. And I take it you like are thunderstruck because you're a lightning fan and your your site that that I'm so excited? Yes. We got a lightning banner outside and everything. Will you love me? Yeah, I'm so I'm so in it. Well, then you're definitely gonna want to listen to your gut feeling going. Nobody listening at 4 30 when we make our unveil. Or at least I.

Chris Wallace Donald Trump Stephen Douglas Lincoln Douglas Um Lincoln Trish Trump Commissioner Andrew president
Fresh "lincoln douglas" from Clark Howard

Clark Howard

00:12 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "lincoln douglas" from Clark Howard

"To be Maura like a blinking Douglas debate, with the candidates asking back and forth each other's questions, But for a Lincoln Douglas debate to work, you do have to have debate with adults involved. 62 degrees in Atlanta. Clear and cool tonight Lows. 54 Sunshine Tomorrow High 77 Atlantis Most accurate in dependable forecast is coming up with Georgia battleground state for the president, Vice President Mike Pence today. Rallies in Cobb County Vice President Mike Pence began his remarks to the Faith and Freedom Coalition is Road to Majority policy conference declaring.

Mike Pence Vice President Lincoln Douglas Faith And Freedom Coalition President Trump Maura Cobb County Atlanta Georgia
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Dot com and we've been talking about the nature of trump supporters I think it's in some ways a reflection of the nature of trump I'm also asking the question if trump doesn't participate in the debates yeah I'd ask the question last hour of time does which is been the bases that help him or hurt him I think maybe a larger question is does that help or hurt the democratic process I mean debating has been yeah it has been a feature of every presidential election in fact probably hasn't been a feature of the majority of presidential elections but you know starting certainly with the Lincoln Douglas debates day there has been that which weren't for president by the way I believe that was for the Senate but the the idea of presidential candidates debate each other something that really came into full flower with the election in nineteen sixty in fact I think that might have been the first major debate in the sense of the last century and you know pretty much continued and trump might be on the verge of killing that tradition so the question I suppose is what what does that portend for you know the future of our of our political system so Hey all as an awful lot of stuff here so let's pick up some of your phone calls and get on with this Serra in fort worth Texas a Serra what's on your mind on many gaps he becomes more quick and yeah I am now I'm I'm learning with the whole family of reporters hello my inside out I email sign in how laser eight that they're they're not bad people sure but our our but I will say them horrible I'm fine yeah one day and bring back I can put together and snap your information in there yeah I a in I mean that's a huge part of their homes pitch I mean that's that's where he started with with the wall which was dog whistle racism and then you know this from red sauce is also were Viktor Orban started Hey you know that's unfortunate and and and I you know and the thing that really sticks with me from watching John say because movie the brain washing my dad which I think is over a Netflix now is any wherever it is the Netflix are prime it's easy to find the was that her father was this kind loving guy and he started watching fox news and he turned into an angry paranoid curmudgeon and then when they finally basically took away fox news from him and I don't recall at the end of the movie how they did that I think they might have said that the cable company and dropped or something but he had basically a diet or a a fast you know he he he was not able to watch fox news for for a few weeks and he woke up from his trance and became a decent person again which was just breathtaking at the end of the movie you know he's hugging her Anne's be yeah and and and he is that is you know politically rational now also say yes fox fox news there there are times when I've called you know obviously in my fifties my my parents are older and there are no hard I've got a granite I'm gonna try I can't talk you can spark new you coming on and yeah and I had to you know give them any kind of play but let big problem yeah that built building them trump support and now that they're actually actually tried it and my opinion I think there are you will will porting terms weren't you can't turn the fox news anymore yeah yeah well that's see you know he's got a a Burr under his saddle about Chris Wallace now and your worship Smithson ship Smith finally resigned and now it's Chris Wallace is gonna try and beat up Chris Wallace is going to be interesting just to see which way you know the the Murdock family takes this thing because you know a fox news is either going to end up I think it's going to either end up being a pure propaganda organ or they're gonna start dialing back their propaganda but we'll see Serra thank you for the call the other thing that we want said forget out is that I'm in my fifties and and the way the states are going with the with the the women's out abortion sap mmhm well I understand that because it's not right yeah yeah I'm with you thank you Sir for the call Richard in Sanford Colorado a Richard what's on your mind well quite a few things but first of all want to say thank you so much for the work that you do on behalf of the force the state you know the media is with the trump only this business powerful concept is mentioned of American in exceptionalism the constitution which has been the shrines and our nation's what you're psyche doing for almost is two crucial hundred years thank you was very declared important to be dead and and I buried appreciated or so Donald Trump as enablers would secondly like us to believe wanted to in say the immortal that words of trump Stephen supporters Cole bear are more like trump and is easily insane forgettable clown posse inaugural pans speech basically thing Grateful compared Dead America fans to a dumpster fire I don't know what the insane clown posse is at a thing or is that just a phrase that that's actually a Detroit Michigan based band.

trump
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

"Plausible. Oh by this example douglas constantly pointed out that if lincoln were correct that the founders wanted the nation to be uniform in in its principles throughout all of the the colonies then turn states what that would have done is what made all the states pro slavery because when the constitution the two shenice formed only massachusetts has banned slavery by that point in time right for example new york doesn't pass gradual emancipation law until seventeen ninety nine their slaves in new new york until the early eighteen twenty s so douglas would constantly refer to this historical truth which is yes the nation began with mostly slave holding states he uses that to make the argument that there's a principle at stake here here what he calls popular sovereignty and therefore they never intended any may major principle to be imposed upon the entire country except the principle people of you get to vote up or down but nobody gets to tell anybody else how to vote one st votes one way and other states and other way but lincoln points out that yeah yeah that may have been the case historically. Nobody can deny that but the founders did in fact intend for the country to be a free country and in order for it to be a free he country yes it can make concessions and compromises in the short run but to be a free country notice how established structures political structures pictures even constitutions on the basis of principles that unless we keep alive those principles those structures can be turned to anti i small are republican or anti-democratic aims. This is what made douglas's so-called don't care policy so <music> a lincoln used the word insidious it was insidious because in the eighteen fifties for slavery to become national. You did not have to take up. You didn't have to preach the expansion of slavery. You didn't have to make a moral defense of slavery. All you had to do was convince. It's free white northerners not to care what people who didn't look like them what happened to them. When they were taken to territories. He says you do that. You teach whites in illinois and all the way up to maine that it shouldn't matter to them what happens to a few blacks in nebraska aska or oregon or kansas and he says this is basically a fatal comple- that's what's going to nationalize slavery because if we accept the dread scott opinion the the congress doesn't have the authority in the territories to deal with that domestic institution and therefore territorial legislatures. Don't have that authority then the only thing left is <hes> mm-hmm. If the constitution says you have a constitutional right to possess people as long as they're black deriving in a weird way from the fifteenth amendment according to justice tiny than the only thing left is the states and if the states have a practice of banning slavery but the constitution russian has been interpreted to vest any american with the right to own slaves. Guess what the supremacy clause of the constitution is going to mandate. It's going to mandate that you could take take your slave to new york or illinois and it become a practice that that state cannot contravene all that's left is lincoln predicted in his house divided speech eighteen fifty eight is a dread scott to just one more case that doesn't deal with congress or the territories it deals with the state and what states can under the united states constitution do or not do. That's what bothered lincoln..

douglas lincoln new york united states congress illinois massachusetts scott maine nebraska oregon kansas
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

We The People

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

"Consent. He called it. The sheet anchor of american can republicanism but douglas thought consent was everything. It's like turtles all the way down for douglas it was consent all the way down lincoln saw them the abolitionists as well as douglas is only wanting to see one side of the coin of the declaration of independence and lincoln saw them in both and understood americans as having to see and grab hold of both both equal rights as well as the consent by which you secure those rights so that that's that for me is the platform upon which we have to understand anything about lincoln's constitutional vision and his constitutional critique antique of douglas he thought and painstakingly laid out in his cooper institute address of eighteen sixty that it was a constitutional position that he was on. It was a firm one it. It wasn't just a moral one. It was a firm one precisely because he could cite the founders both their words and their deeds in the revolutionary sorry period and the early american constitutional period constitutional actions legislative actions that showed that they had the political grounds and constitutional grounds by which to secure moral ends like freedom. I had mentioned earlier right. According to the constitution congress was not allowed to deal with a particular commodity and unfortunately at that time that commodity was human beings out of all the things that congress could do in terms of inter national national trade to get the constitution and to keep knows south carolina and georgia in the union they had to compromise and say fine congress does has the authority to trade with the indian tribes and nations as well as foreign powers except for slaves slavery we will will not allow congress to touch the importation of slaves until january i eighteen hundred eight and even then congress would have to if they didn't want to will own behold the slave holder president thomas jefferson in eighteen o seven signs of bill to take effect as soon as constitutionally permissible banning the import of slaves into the united states january one eight hundred eight..

douglas lincoln congress constitution congress united states cooper institute thomas jefferson south carolina president georgia
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on We The People

"The consent of the government and in this case it meant that consent had to happen through states the open thing was what about territories do congress get to tell territories what got to do or not and lincoln would site history as well as principal to explain that congress did in fact have the authority to regulate those institutions in those territories tories he cited the northwest ordinance of seventeen eighty seven which was re inaugurated under the first congress of the united states when it was obviously i is put forward by the congress under the articles of confederation perpetual union lincoln would site that he would say congress's efforts to prevent slavery from entering the country eighteen wait wait equated it with piracy and eighteen twenty all of this lincoln cited from the founders from the founding generation to show this moral anti-slavery anti-slavery impulse or impetus that they eventually wanted as lincoln puts it to put slavery on the course of ultimate extinction for him mm-hmm the lodestar of the country for understanding those compromises in the constitution was in fact the declaration of independence what he called the spirit of seventy six he said the spirit of seventy six is antipathetic to the spirit of nebraska the nebraska the bill which became the kansas nebraska act of eighteen fifty four. Thank you so much for emphasizing lincoln's reverence for the decoration of visitors to the constitution center's new civil war exhibit no that he stood before independence hall in eighteen sixty one and said i would rather be assassinated on this spot then abandon. The principles of the declaration sid the dread scott decision. Listen had come down in eighteen fifty seven and chief justice tawny infamously held not only that african americans have no rights which the white man is bound to respect but that congress had no power to pass the missouri compromise because it violated the property rights of slave owners what was lincoln's position about the dread scott decision what was douglas's response and how central was that to the constitutional discussion in the window estimates the dread scott decision of of <hes> eighteen fifty seven was intended to end once and for all the entire question of slavery in the united states and whether it could be extended to the territory's roger twenty who had been part of <hes> president andrew jackson's kitchen cabinet <hes> had been appointed to the supreme court he was the chief justice was eight years old. He <hes> was a southerner from maryland a slave state he himself own slaves. It's <hes> and <hes> he had <hes> issued his decision. Within two days of the inauguration of james buchanan a pro slavery democrat as president buchanan had behind the scenes <hes> worked with the <hes> supreme court justices hostesses to ensure of what the decision would be and that it would be the one that he wanted tony's decision declared not only that a black man had no rights which lightman was bound to respect but that was a historical <hes> interpretation of what what he said the founders believed and so he what in saying that he was citing original intent he was appealing to the concept of original original intent of the constitution <hes> and <hes> he said that also the second point that congress had no role here here that was the <hes> sin qua non the essential position of the southerners in the congress and throughout the south that congress congress could not prohibit slavery that they could not rule on it at all and that therefore according to tawny people could bring their slaves into this territory now this was a a not only a an a blow against lincoln can the republicans and their position but also against douglas now each responded <hes> vary lincoln a completely really oppose the decision although he said that republicans had to obey the law but he would do everything he could to oppose <hes>.

lincoln congress united states scott douglas president nebraska lightman james buchanan republicans kansas principal tawny andrew jackson maryland missouri
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I gotta say it's funny to me how this conversation because a couple years ago I was so on the other side of it, I was a dogmatic person in the, it's not good to be bored what you want to be doing swimming information all of the time. Like I was very dogmatic and the person actually change my mind on this was called Newport in April, and I've had him on the podcasts before if people to go back to listen. But one of the arguments he makes that I found very persuasive was that you're also training your brain that among other things. If every time you begin to feel the first hint of boredom, you turn it off. You go and fire, Twitter, whatever. What you're training, your brain to be is to never tolerate any level of boredom to to become very anxious in the absence of immediate distraction. And we talked about this a little bit like it steady state. But my concern is that it's not that that that Newport is right that were neuro plastic that were always training ourselves in one direction or another. I mean, I always think. About this is like the the weird example, but people talk about the the Lincoln Douglas debates and folks like leaving their house to go into these four, our debates, they were extremely long, the and and quite technical in oral cultures. People just paid attention to singular things for much longer periods of time. I'm not saying there are an incredible advantages to being in our fast paced culture, but I do think we need to consider the the the meta level of what we're doing, not even is this a useful thing to do in the moment, but aggregated over the number of times we do it is teaching your brain that you can never be bored. I go into two restrooms, and I'll see a bunch of dudes at urinals on their phone. Oh, this is the worst thing that the level of teaching your brain to never be distracted..

Newport Twitter Lincoln Douglas
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"First round in and had this deal with my parents if I didn't win one of my first two turnament at least place than I would quit. And I had this distinct impression walking into my very first round of debate that fall in feeling as I looked across at my Ponant the there was no way that they could have out prepared me. And so I knew that whatever they said I would have five arguments against, and it was this incredible knowledge that that it's not that you can be lucky and turn your luck around. You actually make your own luck. And for me, that was a profound lesson because I placed in that tournament and I placed in the next Trinite and it was like that it just never stopped after that. And I had a losing record also my freshman sophomore year, and it's like I turned it around junior year, very suddenly, and the main. Difference was that I was willing to out work out, do every competitor who walked in through that door. For people who don't. No, the format and I'll be honest. I've been surrounded by an surrounded by, but certainly in the same universities and so on where debate teams existed. But I've never seen a debate competition. What what is, what is the format. So it's a bunch of nerdy kids dressed in suits holding briefcases, and then maybe that's changed, but that's what it was back then. And then you have a a resolution that's been announced nationwide. And that resolution is generally has some philosophical almonds to this is also Lincoln Douglas style debate, and you have. A few months out. So it's one person against one person. It's individual and its value based. And so you're really debating philosophy. So an example of one debate that we did the principle of majority rule ought to be valued above the principle of minority rights or resolved that education is a privilege and not a right so. So all of these debates are really surrounding not a specific policy, but it has some application in the real world. And what you're trying to debate is a philosophical underpinning behind that statement. And what I loved about debate was you are actually forced to debate both sides. So you had to have cases ready for both the affirmative and the negative. So pro the resolution and against. The resolution and the format is the affirmative goes up and talks about this resolution says all the reasons that that they support it, and then there's a short cross examination where the negative then cross examines the affirmative asks questions of the -firmative. Then the negative gets up and talks about all the reasons that they're against the resolution and then goes point by point against all of the arguments that the affirmative made and talks about why they're wrong. And then there's another cross examination of the -firmative against the negative, and then the affirmative gets up for rebuttal negative gets up for a rebuttal, and then the affirmative does closing arguments, sort of shorter and shorter speeches towards the end. And how is the outcome determined? What are the parameters. So so it really depends on the turn aside from aside from courtesy to seek points. It's all about courtesy. There's two different types of tournaments actually when when I was debating one was where you had parent judges in that, I would say, really the style of speaking. Your flare really would come into play. Your sense of humor wasn't really just a line by line arguments. There was also a places where he would go where college students were. The judges or experienced coaches were the judges, and that's where really the line by line logic becomes much more important than just the style of your debate. So it really depends on your audience and you had to read the audience correctly, and do they just VIN. I say, I, I choose a or b or do they have to rank sort of Olympic style one to ten in some fashion. So you only have two debaters that you're you're judging and you vote for one of them and and in some of the rounds, you have just a single judge and then in another an in the the breakout rounds semifinals you, you might have a panel of judges. And they can't confer. They're just sort of voting individually on who wins..

Trinite Lincoln Douglas
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"First round in and had this deal with my parents if I didn't win one of my first two turnament at least place than I would quit. And I had this distinct impression walking into my very first round of debate that fall in feeling as I looked across at my Ponant the there was no way that they could have out prepared me. And so I knew that whatever they said I would have five arguments against, and it was this incredible knowledge that that it's not that you can be lucky and turn your luck around. You actually make your own luck. And for me, that was a profound lesson because I placed in that tournament and I placed in the next Trinite and it was like that it just never stopped after that. And I had a losing record also my freshman sophomore year, and it's like I turned it around junior year, very suddenly, and the main. Difference was that I was willing to out work out, do every competitor who walked in through that door. For people who don't. No, the format and I'll be honest. I've been surrounded by an surrounded by, but certainly in the same universities and so on where debate teams existed. But I've never seen a debate competition. What what is, what is the format. So it's a bunch of nerdy kids dressed in suits holding briefcases, and then maybe that's changed, but that's what it was back then. And then you have a a resolution that's been announced nationwide. And that resolution is generally has some philosophical almonds to this is also Lincoln Douglas style debate, and you have. A few months out. So it's one person against one person. It's individual and its value based. And so you're really debating philosophy. So an example of one debate that we did the principle of majority rule ought to be valued above the principle of minority rights or resolved that education is a privilege and not a right so. So all of these debates are really surrounding not a specific policy, but it has some application in the real world. And what you're trying to debate is a philosophical underpinning behind that statement. And what I loved about debate was you are actually forced to debate both sides. So you had to have cases ready for both the affirmative and the negative. So pro the resolution and against. The resolution and the format is the affirmative goes up and talks about this resolution says all the reasons that that they support it, and then there's a short cross examination where the negative then cross examines the affirmative asks questions of the -firmative. Then the negative gets up and talks about all the reasons that they're against the resolution and then goes point by point against all of the arguments that the affirmative made and talks about why they're wrong. And then there's another cross examination of the -firmative against the negative, and then the affirmative gets up for rebuttal negative gets up for a rebuttal, and then the affirmative does closing arguments, sort of shorter and shorter speeches towards the end. And how is the outcome determined? What are the parameters. So so it really depends on the turn aside from aside from courtesy to seek points. It's all about courtesy. There's two different types of tournaments actually when when I was debating one was where you had parent judges in that, I would say, really the style of speaking. Your flare really would come into play. Your sense of humor wasn't really just a line by line arguments. There was also a places where he would go where college students were. The judges or experienced coaches were the judges, and that's where really the line by line logic becomes much more important than just the style of your debate. So it really depends on your audience and you had to read the audience correctly, and do they just VIN. I say, I, I choose a or b or do they have to rank sort of Olympic style one to ten in some fashion. So you only have two debaters that you're you're judging and you vote for one of them and and in some of the rounds, you have just a single judge and then in another an in the the breakout rounds semifinals you, you might have a panel of judges. And they can't confer. They're just sort of voting individually on who wins..

Trinite Lincoln Douglas
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of the pioneers of transcription and he was actually the one who transcribed the lincoln douglas debates for lincoln and for a paper at the time and he was so important to lincoln in one of the lincoln douglas debates lincoln refused to start until robert hit was sitting in his seat in the front right next to lincoln because he was all the way in the back of the room at the time and couldn't get ford and lincoln said he's not starting until robert hit us is sitting there and so you know people helped hit through so he could get through and and so it was lincoln who recommended to the family that you know this is a relatively new thing this transcription but you know if there's a conviction it's nice to have documentation of everything that was testified in court a fascinating guy and this guy had the early stages of carpal tunnel from nascar fans in his hand i could actually feel is pain right i mean it's you know think about a steel tip pen trying to take everything down and you know one of the amazing things about the transcript itself has blanks at certain points where he couldn't catch what the word was and you know you see that because he took it in shorthand and then he wrote it out later in in regular longhand i guess it'd be called just in writing and and they were just points where he couldn't either redesign writing or couldn't get a word etc and that just sort of added to me to this sort of authenticity of the moment of robert hit sitting there and we included some of that in the book as well yeah no you did a good job dan abrahams with david fisher lincoln's last trial and i'm telling you guys you can be even a lincoln aficionado but most of us really never delved into this aspect of lincoln's life his abilities as a litigator and actually what the law was like in those days you think lawyers are fat cats go back to lincoln's times and they had these hard lives so what else dan abrahams are you up to you've got your tv show i do a live pd is a big hits number one rated show on cable we've follow police departments in in real time are the biggest thing i'm doing is really sort of rick i've recreated court tv in a network called lawn crime network and we are covering live trials with analysis in hosts who are all attorneys and you know abc i have a media you know a lot of a lot of exciting things but this book it's been a thrilling thing to to do well i'm glad congratulations enjoy and your son what six years old now six yeah he just turned six happy birthday to him and all the best to you say hello to your family for me and i will thanking donor pleasure i'm joan hamburg and you're listening to wabc ladies buongiorno i am a job on there and i own a small lenient in the region and in the summer while i'm waiting for the grapes to grow plump i told his for an american company called show tapes i think of their clients as they come off their cruise ships and they tried them to florence and i show them these most beautiful city with its bianca's eats michelangelo's each churches and its gold and then in the afternoon i think to my seat under the tuscan sun and drink my wife and at the end of the day when i say to them they smile and say that's joe new my.

lincoln lincoln douglas six years
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Year before on july six three hundred sixty five days before the declaration there was racially for the causes of taking up arms that's a justification so they already had a statement of principles which preceded the decoration which read which shattered trying to agree with them there dr arnn he wasn't having any of it no no yeah he he had this in common with margaret thatcher whom i was privileged to know she wasn't a scholar lack of course but if you especially when she was in her energy before her age came if you told a story about her i would my my main mode with her when i would see it would be to praise her and tell her great stories about herself she would often retail the stories because she could tell them better that's exactly it but but he makes his point that way it's it's an interesting dialectical approach let's go to what i brought up lincoln with him and i want you to come in on this at length after we hear it this is harry jaffa on lincoln's use and deck invicta invocation of the declaration in the gettysburg address cut number five let's begin with the first words for scored several years one of the main issues between him and douglas in the lincoln douglas debates which continued on into fiftynine and sixty as well was whether or not the we exist as a nation by virtue of the constitution that's douglas only by virtue of the constitution lincoln insisted no we exist as a nation in virtue of the declaration of independence so i go in several years is designed to reaffirm seventeen seventy six so that was the might say lukens last square to debate with douglas no interesting and so by declaring that though what is the import of such declaration well in eighteen fifty seven supreme court delivers decisions known as the case of dread scott that decision was one of the most destructive acts by any person or group human history the chief justice in his opinion said that's according to the founding fathers negroes media free or slave we're so far inferior that they had no rights which wakeman were bound to respect that as evidence for that statement he said that the proposition that all medicated equal to not include negroes so why did he go there dr arnn be more specific why why invoke on bringing up the declaration and he immediately goes to dread scott yeah well the the point is that is that first of all there are two kinds of consequences of the dread scott decision the first one is practical and political and it's massive because republican party what it was founded to do it was founded to eliminate slavery by constitutional means and so to preserve what the the partnership between what link what lincoln called the apples of gold in the pictures or frames of silver decorations the apple of gold and the concert frame in which it sit well the constitution didn't give the federal government power to eliminate slavery in the state and so they thought about this device in fact i'm very proud that predecessors remind help to think of this and hillsdale college they thought up most of the land of the country is not yet organized states we will exclude slavery from that and then flavor will be placed in the course of extinction and the dread scott insisted that the federal government doesn't have the power to do that right that means that it it destroys the republican party if it stand and it destroys any constitutional means to attack slavery so that's that massive but it's not the most important thing about it because of course it is a direct denial of the principle of the declaration of independence that the color of your skin could make you a lesser person right right so it undercuts both the tree nature of the union and also and because it does the second thing it undercuts the meaning of the nation and that thing see and that's a court decision right later in the civil war lincoln would arrest a bunch of people in maryland to stop them from commenting session in maryland and then the capital washington dc would've been surrounded because virginia went and and roger tawny issued a habeas corpus order to present these people so you could let them go and the guy went to the weather marshalls went to the white house and and the white house told him there in the fort so the marshalls went to the fort and the.

six three hundred sixty five d
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"For social research chairman escapade jewish thinker leo strauss became the first student of leo strauss strategy was himself revolutionary man because he was a jew in germany who had studied with martin heidegger very great thinker who was also a nazi and strauss had to run for his life effectively from his teacher and keep dot something's gone very wrong here with thinking we should start over any went back to the classics japa in nineteen fifty four roughly picked up a copy of the lincoln douglas debates in a used bookstore at didn't know anything about them started reading them in the store came back the next day to read smart as big decision to buy a book bought it the next day and he discovered in a few hours this is what his mind was like this is like reading a socratic dialogue you and i have been a lot of time on on lincoln douglas debates and dialogues right he saw the relationship and he saw that the business stephen douglas is relieved that justice constitutes the interest of who's ever strongest and that lincoln instead race question of the good or the right and that gave rise to very great book christ christ it it published several books one on qantas qantas aristotle about which he wrote his doctoral thesis and several on essays that are delightful church will love to read shakespeare and mark twain and find a political meanings of those i i wish as much as anything about the past that tapes of two courses on shakespeare that i had was professor japa could be available because they were just awesome well he was awesome when he came to my studio a decade and a half ago at that time already in his eighties and quite a remarkable intellect let's play the first of the many cuts we have harry jaffa in the studio all those years ago talking about the significance of the declaration of independence that we celebrate today cut number one i would say the two greatest events for human history in the history of the world of the unity of god on mount sinai and the thick of the unity of the human race in philadelphia the declaration of the unity of the human race what do you mean by that well the proposition that all men are created equal indicates that the human fan that there is a human family all races nations of mankind are part of that family that they are all the children of god and the the political character of the human race as such is shown by the declaration the american people in declaring their independence did something which was unique history the first place no political system regime ever had a beginning in which the principles of government where now as the basis for this particular regime but it was also the case that that the that the rights upon which they based their thirty rights which they selves declared that they shared with all men everywhere dr arnn we were going to break with dr jaffa there but but sinai in philadelphia that is always shocked people even fifteen years after i i played it yeah well he had this amazing elevate i was just marvelous to hear his voice i knew that man for forty years more than that and i just had never failed to learn in talking with him even when he was ordering me about she always did yeah he had this comprehensive and detailed view but tailed really only about the most important things and so he saw that it changed religion from the from the ancient religions of which we have record when the idea was that there was one god for every man he loved to read the passage from the promise to abraham you will i will be your god and you will be my people and this will be a blessing to all the nations on the.

chairman fifteen years forty years
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Gettysburg address cut number five let's begin with the first words for scored several years one of the main issues between him and douglas in the lincoln douglas debates which continued on into fiftynine and sixty as well whereas whether or not the we exist as a nation by virtue of the constitution that's douglas says only by virtue of the constitution lincoln insisted nowy we exist as a nation in virtue of the declaration of independence so i go in several years is designed to reaffirm seventeen seventy six so that was the last say the debate with douglas now interesting and so by declaring that though what is the import of such declaration well in eighteen fifty seven the supreme court delivered decisions known as the case of dread scott that decision was one of the most destructive acts by any pressure group human history the chief justice in his opinion said that's according to the founding fathers negroes maybe free or slave with so far inferior that they had no rights which way we're bound to respect and as evidence for that state prints he said that the proposition that created equal to not include negroes so why did he go there dr arnn show me more specific why why invoke on bringing up the declaration and and he immediately goes to dread scott yeah well the the point is that is that first of all they're two kinds of consequences of the dread scott decision the first one is practical and political and it's massive because the republican party what it was founded to do it was founded to eliminate slavery by constitutional means and so to preserve what the partnership between what link what lincoln called the apples of gold in the pictures or frames of silver the declaration is the apple of gold and the constitution the frame in which it sit well the constitution didn't give the federal government power to eliminate slavery in the state and so they thought about this device in fact i'm very proud that predecessors remind help to think of this and hillsdale college they thought up most of the land of the country is not yet organized state we will exclude slavery from that and then slavery will be placed in the course of extinction and trescott insisted that the federal government doesn't have the power to do that right that means that it it destroys the republican party if it stands and it destroys any constitutional means to attack slavery so that's that's massive but it's not the most important thing about it because of course it is a direct denial of the principle of the declaration of independence that the color of your skin could make you a lesser person right right and so it undercut both the free nature of the union and also because it does the second thing it undercuts the meaning of the nation and that thing and that's a court decision right later in the civil war lincoln would arrest a bunch of people in maryland to stop them from commenting session in maryland and then the capital washington dc would've been surrounded virginia went and and roger tawny issued a habeas corpus order to present these people so you could let them go and the guy went to the marshalls went to the white house and and the white house told them there in a four so the marshalls went to the fort and the general ford said okay good how are you going to open these gates i also asked joppa years ago why did lincoln even bring up the declaration in the debates or stephen douglas here's what he said cut number eight lincoln had to you as the whole anti slavery coalition that slavery itself was both impolitic and unjust this is a very difficult thing to do because opinion in the north as well so the south was very unfavorable to the rights of negroes the only way in which the expansion of slavery could be prevented by convincing majority and the free states who would consider majority in the electoral college that slavery was wrong had to do this without arguing for anything it'd be half of the rights other than that they should not be slaves can have to say repeatedly we went over this again that's a very hard recipe to mix and yet lincoln accomplished it oh yeah see that's right so douglas argument was the country's founded on the white some of us don't like slavery we don't have to have it we can just make ourselves but it's a morally neutral question according to your preferences and there was.

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The past fifteen years of the hugh hewitt show i have aired an interview i did originally a decade and a half ago with dr harry jaffa and that interview is is now not appropriate to rear because not only have i moved to the morning and the timing is off but dr jaffa has gone to his reward and so we're going to take the best in those hours and spend time with his student dr larry arnn celebrating the fourth of july and dr jeff and dr arnn would you tell people a little bit about harry joppa and why it is appropriate on the fourth of july we begin the day that we celebrate our independence by celebrating those conversations with him about this subject for jaffa was a scholar very great scholar of classical thought especially aristotle and america from the founding to abraham lincoln he did a great actor recovery in regard to lincoln and the founding biography he was he was born in nineteen eighteen is middle name is victor because of the victory in world war one the centenary of his birth in two years he he was very smart he went to yale studied literature an early among the jews wherever the aol his father random ran a saloon in in in where in manhattan i think professor john was very bright man in after undergraduate school eight discovered at the new school for social research and the german escapade jewish thinker leo strauss became the first student of leo strauss straus was himself revolutionary man because he was a jew in germany who had studied with martin heidegger very great thinker who is also a nazi and strauss had to run for his life effectively from his teacher and he thought something's gone very wrong here with thinking we should start over any went back to the classics jaffa in nineteen fifty four roughly picked up a copy of the lincoln douglas debates and a used bookstore had didn't know anything about them started reading them in the store came back the next day to read smart is big decision to buy a book bought it the next day and he discovered in a few hours what he's mindless like this is like reading a socratic dialogue you and i have been a lot of time on on lincoln douglas debates and credit dialogues right yes the relationship and he saw that the business stephen douglas relieved that justice just constitutes the interest of ever strongest and lincoln instead race question of the good or the right and that gave rise to very great book christ called crisis and a house divided published several books one on have an era subtle about which he wrote his doctoral thesis and several on essays that are delightful churchill love to read shakespeare mark twain and find a political meanings of those i i wish as much as anything about the past that tapes of two courses on shakespeare that i had was professor jaffa could be available because they were just awesome well he was awesome when he came to my studio a decade and a half ago at that time already in his eighties and quite a remarkable intellect let's play the first of the many cuts we have harry jaffa in the studio all those years ago talking about the significance of the declaration of independence that we celebrate today cut number one i would say that the two greatest events for human history in the history of the world of the unity of god on mount sinai and the to the unity of the human race in philadelphia the declaration of the unity of the human race what do you mean by that well the proposition that created equal indicates that the human that there is a human family and nations of mankind are part of that family that they are all the children of god and the political character of the human race as such shown by the declaration the american people and declaring their independence did something which was unique in human history the first place no political system regime ever had a beginning in which the principles of government where now with this particular regime but it was also the case that the that the rights upon which they based their authority rights which they themselves declared they shared with all men everywhere dr arnn we were going to break with dr jaffa there but but sinai in philadelphia that is always shocked people even fifteen years after i played it yeah well yeah he had this amazing elevate i was just marvelous.

fifteen years two years
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Okay now i understand this is a country where we once had the lincoln douglas debates and now we have hannity and kimmel's shouting homosexual slur slurs at one another but it's important to to just watch because people make fun of hannity especially like the intellectuals but hannity could teach them all lesson right here kimmo went out and he made fun of the first lady's accent she was reading books to children on easter and he made fun do we have that clinton oh i house easter celebration would be complete without storytime from our first lady never stop extorting because lie would be during the uncourteous just like a cat as plots of questions about this and beth about these in death here will you realize what this means you could be first lady of the united so so hannity goes after him on twitter to stop picking on a woman who can't fight back and he calls him mr harvey weinstein junior because he says he because of shows he did that he remember he had the man show and he was always doing these hoaxes on girls in the street and so he played a couple of them hannity to set i'm gonna just play all this stuff to remind you of who jimmy kimmel is in this world of metoo and he played here's a clip of kimmel going out on the street and playing this prank on girls who are going by it's called guess what in my pants now i've stumped something in my pants and you're allowed to feel around on the outside of the pants you had ten seconds to then guess what is in my pants ready.

hannity clinton twitter jimmy kimmel lincoln douglas beth mr harvey weinstein ten seconds
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Go back to a better tradition of actually disagreeing with each other i mean uh goes back some point him uh time but does it during the evening ham lincoln douglas debates they they would have huge crowds for hours on end debating the you know the future of the united states and particularly the flavor the issue of slavery and noone committed any atrocity or uh physical violence that those debates would be nice to have such debates ago i like to talk about your time of the us state department what was your your role there i was a young twenty eight twenty nine year old international economist in the bureau of intelligence and research i had uh top secret code word clearance uh so i wriggle all wrote or on and read all the intelligence and in you know in in the us intelligence community and worked both speeches and analysis for the secretary of state's uh i like i have a certain domain that i covered that had to do with eastwest and northsouth relations particularly revolving around certain commodities and un issues and it was quite fascinating tell him it was the cold war uh i know that you've written extensively about us relations with turkey um wh what concerns you about uh turkey and and and how the united states is dealing with turkey at this point both turkey is a longstanding us elliott had a a very critical role of course on the front line during the cold war um it has itself become a middleincome country of some size of some significance it straddles an important you know landmass between east and.

united states lincoln douglas bureau of intelligence elliott twenty eight twenty nine year
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The RobCast

The RobCast

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on The RobCast

"The um you are talking today about the lincoln douglas debates you had this is let me just look right here um um eighteen 60 you have also knows the great debates of eighteen 58 lincoln in douglas debate they go for hours they do um m seven debates it's substantive it's back and forth its policy it's you know what i mean like there was a there was a time when discourse about these issues yes so substantive it it demanded that you as a citizen were informed yeah it assumed the level of participation by the viewer um and it it acknowledge subtlety and nuance and the tensions and challenges of being a people can we get back there are you hopeful the and i don't mean to be like that we just need to go back to how they used to do it but do you think all of this fluff is actually setting us up four substance because i hope so i mean i hope so i hope that i hope that people like i've talked about in last part catholic put policy over personality like our our whole all of our political discussions need to be policy over personality like personnel he doesn't really matter that much is it should be like only policy that should be the substance and i think you see now lover hate him bernie sanders all he did was found policy i mean that guy let's get crazy scientists who never calmed his hair who's one hundred forty seven years old like like there was there was no purse there was no like nothing about him that was like super it was all mounting every time he opened now if you hate bernie sanders i don't care you have to admit like every time he opened his mouth it was like medicare for all.

douglas bernie sanders medicare lincoln douglas one hundred forty seven years
"lincoln douglas" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln douglas" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"And the famous lincoln douglas debates the northern democrats protected slavery with the same determination anand as the southern democrats so the slavery debate was not between the north on the south no it was between eight an anti slavery republican party and a proslavery democratic party north and south this is the historical fact but after the civil war when a defence of slavery became let's just call it embarrassing the progressives altered the but historical narrative to stick the blame on the south and you'll see in my speech that we're seeing relating to see what will be a pattern here which is that the left and the democrats take the on crimes their own crimes and they blame it on america they blame it on to south they blame it on the white man they blame it on everybody except the guys who actually did it america committed genocide on the earlier case middle america didn't do it think about it if america did things and and of all of america was was equally complicit in dump this will be going on obviously the reason that these things stopped is that some americans did gummy and other american stop them so in the case of slavery it was the republican party that stop there it was the republican party that ended it and you might say wait a minute well denies aren't you kind of being a little simplistic here isn't there are a lot of blamed the goal route words both parties ultimately a narrow isn't there are a lot of culpability and on on both sides and the answer is actually no no and what i mean by that is this a nineteen in eighteen 60 but you're of the civil war nor republican owned a slaves no republican on the slate what does that mean that means that all the slaves by the way numbering at that time four million were owned by democrats now i say this line in my movie hillary's america at its caused it caused a huge fewer on the.

lincoln douglas civil war america republican party hillary