35 Burst results for "lia"

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:25 min | 3 weeks ago

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

"Some cannons have been around since the sixteen hundreds some of them were used on ships. The position of the sun triggered them to fire at almost exactly twelve. Pm so everyone on board would know what time it was in the seventeen hundreds. You might also have heard a son cannon in fancy park in england or france or even on a large estate where they were used to signal lunchtime in fact when son cannons were in style throughout the seventeen eighteen hundreds most of them were owned by european nobility and that how a son canon ended up in a small town in rural sweden the sun cannon in all to the body has its own tower. It's up on top of a hill and it looks like a fifteen foot tall version of a rook. That chess piece. that looks like a little castle. it's round made out of brick and there's a long narrow slot carved into the south facing side. It's been here since eighteen fifty three and it was built by the local barron and his family. The all those fats. These days it's cared for by a team of volunteers who call themselves the sun cannon club there a delightful gang of retired people who've taken responsibility for preserving the town's history but the whole organization is totally unpretentious and they're a little loosey-goosey when it comes to the foggy lor surrounding basan cannon but at least three different people including my grandmother told me this story back in the mid eighteen hundreds the barron and his wife took a trip to paris. Supposedly the baroness who was born. A commoner was terrified of boats so instead of making the relatively short trip across the baltic to mainland europe. They'd spent somewhere between two and three years. Travelling to france in a horse and carriage by finland latvia with wayne lia poland. You get the idea. I was able to verify almost none of the story. But i'm told somewhere between one and two kids were born on the way from sweden to france and when the family finally made it there and saw the sun cannon in a garden they thought would be kind of fun to have one of those to fire off parties back at home.

Fancy Park Sun Cannon Club Barron Basan Cannon France Sweden Chess England Wayne Lia Baltic Paris Latvia Finland Europe Poland
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:15 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"So yes. Of course friends family can come and share on. We can't stop that but what we are asking run. Today is three things. Firstly to consider limiting the number of spectators. They bring Secondly to ask that if they are having some friends and family come to support that those people take a lateral flight testing offense on thirdly were asking spectators to avoid congestion areas such as start finish line and to really head to areas along the call sweaters and pull him wide space such as the embankments or buying co in along as areas. And so hopefully we'll still have a good turn out but manageable safe turnouts because actually even in terms of the star lane. You've gripped everyone. Can i just say. I want to know where these names came from this year out startling. They've gripped everyone into different pain. So they've named all the different areas as well. There's lightning cheetah mexican chocolate sunshine remo- diamond. Now there's not. It's a theme there. I'm looking at going. What's the scene. What what is this. The recent thing of the participants shows We asked the participants to name the waves. I'm and the participants sent in lots of ideas for us on. These are the most popular names you say. It was the participants of chosen these names. Okay fine because i was thinking that it is one of the questions exam well is the colorado out there and i just can't work okay. Well that makes complete sense is complete random and sometimes when you do events where is There's always the added bonus the A few bars or cafes might come on board an offer a couple of little Sweeteners for afterwards gas in that happened again. This time isn't it has yeah. We feel really lucky and bar. Salsa era an official ball partner and so they are offering old finishes and very kind the volunteers as while a free glasses per second mock sale origins and they just have to go into the boss to say hi. Oh boss tadpole shows that meadow and they get that free drinks so yeah must have funky boss also. We are huge so grateful and when you did your mouth and your virtual marathe and did you have a drink at the end of it. I'd say it's half little celebrate. Triggering janea has little elliott lasted for sekkei. But then i made the mistake of Having a bath after us. I stood up to our the bath. I fainted so it was. It wasn't a great ending to the day. I have to be honest. This is the thing always seems like. Oh yeah let's celebrate. We drink but actually most of the time we just want a pint of on a pint of orange juice no. I don't even want water on orange juice. And i've always run the whole thing thinking. I'm just going to drink glass of wine at the end..

janea sekkei colorado elliott
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:29 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"Well i've been. I speak ice. Seek every every now and again. I've interviewed him many many times. And every time. I'm like so i have a podcast code. Run put and he kind of half's and i'm like no no no. I'm actually serious. I would like you to come on my podcast and we'll get there. Both of us will get a joint effort jenny. We're in this together. I think that's a good idea. And what do you think is so exciting about running in central london. Because i knew you know yes. You're right there. Where there is london meyerson on there are other events but none of them taken the central area with all those incredible arts and it's special to run in that area. Say say special. I'm i'm looking in central london. Say is kind of my regular memory is to run around big band. Saint paul's cathedral in epa take it for granted. I'm just always looking up taking in the sights just it this something so incredibly special about running around london's landmarks on I just i just adore. I guess that's why we came up with the idea of the name from Because it was interesting when we were creating the london landmarks. And i was looking at what every other race dead's a talks about london's monks but none of the other racist. I had the london. Market has the name And that's where they're kind of the idea came from the You know it needs to be the name because that is what everybody wants today. Yeah it's so true. Where are you from originally. I'm from the wairoa up north. Maybe that's another reason. We love it so much. i'm obviously glasgow. You're the world when we run a rheinlander. I still feel like i'm sightseeing. And i'm doing pretty much every day. And it never gets boring navigate spoiling. Say just it's just amazing. It's a it's like. See the sights from from a different perspective. It so it's yeah feel very lucky. We'll have about the world landmark or the glasgow landmarks or the edinburgh landmarks..

london Saint paul's cathedral meyerson jenny epa glasgow glasgow landmarks edinburgh
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:05 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"Lee. They'll be luther people listening to this episode whilst running the actual race so i know that we are recording this ahead of sunday but in your ears. Am i actually be sunday right now. So if you're running. The london landmarks right now. Go on you've got this. You've got this brilliant. And how to realize that i if you having a lovely time if you are running this thing to this you running at leah. Many people ask me that jedi. I would love to run it as i'm the race They i call on But i have Say it was my fullest. Yes best i last year it was. We were about two weeks into lockdown. I live on my own sad. It was at the time when if you lived on uranium one allowed to have an above us put boo so older laid on my first. Yes best buy. So what am i going to say. I'm going to go out and the lens half half-marathon did my best. I ran the and it was just. It's just a fabulous way to look back on my birthday and think that's why achieved on not say would you if you did early on. I guess all the roads would be empty so be lake. You're on a closed road anyway. Exactly the streets were absolutely dad's neighbor. The our tool so it was. It was a very very bizarre experience for i was. I was happy that i finally got to run the race. What tsinoys it's been such a stranger. Hasn't there and who i phoned. You know it might have been. It's been very difficult in terms of work and in terms of being at home but something has become apparent is that more and more people have been running more than ever. Have you find that yes absolutely. Yeah people are people. A lot of people have taken up running jovan lockdown. Our ballot was still significantly oversubscribed. We really some late release places. A few weeks back they snapped up. I think running is a become more remote popular. Because it's what are their free the the things that people were able to do a lockdown and say yeah we staff is definitely found a really good appetite for it. Have you always been a runner. Nine always no. I did my first kind of half marathon in two thousand nineteen. I did the royal parks. Half and then i decided as it was the fortieth london marathon last year and it was my fortieth say that walt betty to run the london marathon so i tried for eight of cancelled and then i did the virtual linda marathon last year Say that was a challenge in a half height. Fli the share..

leah Lee jovan lockdown london walt betty linda marathon
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:13 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"Earth do you come up with the root house we come up with. Wow we work. In partnership with an event management company back in two thousand and fifty. We started to look at creating the rates. We worked with human race for the first three years of the events and they have an amazed they had an amazing lady working for them at the time codes if nicholson she's a direct On the brief that we gave to avant was we want needs to maximize landmarks. And we want nathan minimize distruptions. Afl in london transport network. Because it's all about how quickly we can get. The rates reopens after the events. So if until this foot brave and she came away with this amazing rate that we all get a run on sunday. So it's a very expert task for signori together because needs to understand kind of she closed this rides. What will that mean for the this. Some wherever will it means. I for two excetera. It certainly wasn't me. I just gave gave the brief. We want as many as possible and she came up with it. Okay so talk us through then. Some of the landmarks. I i mean i knew the i've seen them. I knew i want to hear from you. Remember the some of the landmark. Say we've got You know the london. I big fan. Nelson's colin saint paul's cathedral. The tower of london will to leverage the shot. The kid cheese greater else Hakko monuments yet downing straight the royal coats of justice. Say many do you know who can i. Just say the one thing and this is what's amazing. I actually learned quite law by london's history from do must race i. There's loads of stuff. I didn't know like the bridge. That the women bill. It because as she run a ride. I presume you're still doing this. You put little facts up everywhere about different things by all the different landmarks and seagull. I didn't know that there's you running along. Then it goes. Look up now and you look up and you'd see like a grasshopper building. I didn't know that was the hair. Yeah exactly yeah. It's so i'll ostra plan for..

signori london nicholson colin saint paul's cathedral Afl Hakko nathan Nelson
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

04:51 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"But it's we've been planning this cave secure event for every year now and it's some it's it's been a lot of hard work but it's all pays off feeling really confident that sunday will be delivered absolutely excellently runners would be sites say staife i bet when you first set this up you never thought it would get as complicated as this never ever. I never went when we When we first created the. I guess we had no idea. I guess how popular it would be a no so how how complicated it would be in in our sergio. We would be dealing with the title constellation and payment after pace payment. It certainly been a learning experience. I've learned so much over the last year and a half I wouldn't change anything for the wild. It's been amazing. Well can i just say it is a fantastic event. I have said twice before is only happened twice before. So this is the third one. I want to new heroin air. Did you come up with this in the first place. How did it come about is quite a story say. Nc thousands and foreseen thomas raising about four million pounds a year and we sat selfish strategy. We wanted to double that to eight million pounds and in order to do that we need to come up with something. Really big to help to bridge that income and it was essentially my responsibility to find. What is that. tommy's would they terezin additional not million pounds. Look to everything. I should tommy's been. Charity shops across. The country should have an annual tv pale. Comic relief should tell me on.

sergio thomas tommy
"lia" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

04:42 min | Last month

"lia" Discussed on RunPod

"Hello there welcome to another episode of run. Todd i'm jennifer o'connor and you know what after eighteen months of events being canceled races being an all getting used to the virtual run will at long last. We're seeing the return of actual running events and have to say i am beyond excited at part runs back in some areas and we'll be back soon everywhere in a matter of weeks and this sunday those ends of people will take to the streets at long last to run a half marathon round the capital. Yep it is. The london landmarks half marathon. And so today someone who is equally delighted that the event is back. is the boss. The woman in charge of the whole shebang it is race. Director leah files hollow there. Hi jenny yeah i know that we we see each other at the start lane of this race. Euro was there. You're not running. Usually there cheering everyone on. But i can't believe. I haven't seen you in solo. I know it's been so long. The time we saw each year there was on the start line of two thousand nineteen. So it's been over two years. It's going to be amazing to see you on sunday on so excited. I can't wait i will probably be in tis they. I have to warn you from relief that it's finally happening relief just overcome with emotion. Finally finally. we're making it happen. It's been quite a rollercoaster via the really has. No if you're listening right now and you're going you might be going out on a training run a little kind of wayne d-o-n training run ahead of the event on sunday. Will you will. New things have been up on on and on and off. How many times has this event not been rescheduled jenny. I'm losing track. We were one of the first events that get cancelled last year. We were given a new eight last year after it got cancelled in march or september. But we wanted the only organization society to take the decision to not actually even announce a new day. Because we knew the we just had a gut feeling what september wasn't going to happen so we had today september. We didn't announce it then. We moved to march than we moved to. May finally this weekend threes time. It's going to happen on the first of august. I can't believe it. I mean it's it's so great that it is finally happened but i mean in terms of all these rescheduling. How much of a headache has that been for you. Oh it's been an emotional roller case. Really house for half to say the support that the city of london corporation west mid city council fell have given us have been absolutely unbelievable. They've been so accommodating And we feel so grateful to have their support in terms of administration..

jennifer o'connor Director leah jenny Todd london wayne west mid city council headache
Don't Call Leah Judson a Photographer

This Week in Photo

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Don't Call Leah Judson a Photographer

"What's the elevator pitch for. Lia when you're blading to people who you are and what you do well i think i think the biggest thing is and something that i've kind of over the past couple of years when defining myself ask for photography is not my superpower and i think that was something that took me a while to actually break. I think might be scary. Maybe for some people to sit like to claim that for themselves because my photography. I always wanted to go beyond just taking a picture of someone and moving on. I want there to be that intimacy that connection that just this continuation in this feeling of infinity for bat relationship with that person and i noticed that yeah. I can continue and get stronger as a photographer or in this new in this new upcoming year. Be a filmmaker for this project. That i'm putting together but in the end i think something that makes me feel really unique and can kind of stand out in the creators. World is my ability to really build relationships with people beyond just having them set for me and take a photo. So i think when i think about the work that i'm doing it really i don't know just i feel like i wanna be more than just a photographer and i find that photography sometimes can trap me in the spots. Make me feel like oh my work can never been more important than the image right and that it's so refreshing that you say that because i believe exactly the same thing and i the it's it's trapping yourself and limiting yourself in a lot of ways to say that i'm a photographer of russia's that may sound to say that i am a photographer because in the end you're not just a photographer that's like saying i'm a person that uses a hammer right when in reality you're you build houses or you do other things but the hammer is the tool to to tell or the in this case. The camera is the tool to tell stories. So you're you're essentially a storyteller or you know that kind of thing but then like you're saying you're also a psychologist

LIA Russia
Farmer Leah Eddie on Apples and Cherries

Real Food Real People

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Farmer Leah Eddie on Apples and Cherries

"Now let's go to sunnyside where we talk with lia eddie eddie. What kind of food do you guys growth. What are you what you actually produce. We produce apples and Sweet cherries and we have thirteen different varieties of apples. And i believe it's four or five different varieties of cherries. So it's a pretty pretty long seasons and a lot of labor intensive moments in life but it's good it's like a. It's a good feeling to be able to provide fruit and food on the table for families. So what's your. What are the busy times of the year for you guys with those two different crops. An easier answer is when is the slow busy all year round. It's pretty much. I would say of course during harvest but Season typically starts pretty heavy march through end of october beginning of november. Because like right now what we're doing is we are starting our spray season where sprain a lot of dormant oils and You know Pesticides to prevent Attraction and The lane of pests and everything We're also Planting were busy into planning what we did. This year is we had to take out a lot of our older varieties that aren't favourable in the market and also the styles of plantings. Because you know about twenty years ago. We started getting heavy into higher density planting and so a lot of people with the older varieties and the older style. Plantings are just not keeping up with the market and so we took out a lot of the older varieties in the plantings and were. We're currently planting cherries. Where i used to be

Lia Eddie Eddie
Mr. Chuggy and Me

Story Pirates Podcast

02:20 min | 5 months ago

Mr. Chuggy and Me

"On the night live in maryland gnawing run. Okay any bella. Ready lia randomly let sorta rise to viral video. Starting on your mark get set. You guys are just standing there. Why aren't you dancing. I was waiting for go. Why are you dancing now. She said go. Hi emma or not emily. It's it's not supposed to be serious. Mean how you do. One thing is how you do everything. I've read that on a mug. You sound like my gymnastics coach the secret to winnings consistency bella. There is no try only. Where are you going. i'm going home. Perfection is its own fun ben. Emily thought you were having a sleepover. Annie's a was until she and bella decided they weren't interested in becoming the biggest social media stars of tomorrow honey. Is this about you being in charge of the dances again. You're never on my side. I'm going to my rome. Did she bring her sleeping bag back. No i guess it's my turn to go get it and i'm gonna have to make small talk with annie's parents. It's not content with my life. I just want to be perfect. What would you like leamy. Let me grab my. I'm not your father. Emily missing row. You're not my father. I never seen my dad in princess. Closer holding a one. And my dad doesn't have a beard or am your fairy godmother mr shuki.

LIA Maryland Emma Emily Gymnastics Annie Bella BEN Leamy Rome Mr Shuki
DMX, Electrifying Rapper Who Defined 2000s Rap, Dies at 50

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

DMX, Electrifying Rapper Who Defined 2000s Rap, Dies at 50

"Has died. The AP is Oscar Wells. Gabriel Takes a look back at his career next came into the rap game right at the top. His 1998 studio debut. It's Dark and Hell is hot, started as number one on the Billboard chart. That multi platinum disc feature the hit rough Riders anthem, Get it Me Dog and stop being greedy and all. He dropped seven albums for them topped the charts picked up three Grammy nominations along the way he started in the 1998 movie Belly as well is an exit wounds with Steven Seagal and Cradle to the Grave with Jet Li. He and Lee were also in Romeo must Die with a Lia DMX. Emolia even teamed up for a song on the soundtrack to

Oscar Wells Gabriel AP Grammy Steven Seagal Jet Li Emolia LEE
This Is My Face and I'm Sorry

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

This Is My Face and I'm Sorry

"Would incite anger and strong emotions and people. But i to. This is now my common hairstyle or my usual and let it grow and people are like. I hate it. I hate it cottage shave. It and i was like i don't know it's just let it. It doesn't look crazy bad so hair. I don't know i i'm really much I'm sort of an anti getting ready person. I just kind of a big lia had a joke that was like This is my face. And i'm sorry you know so i kind of have that like yes. This is what i what i was made with. So we're just you know. I have to live with it every day. You can handle it for a couple of minutes. Yeah i'm the same

LIA
How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

The Small Business Radio Show

08:19 min | 7 months ago

How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

"During the pandemic the use of amazon sword but so has small business owners selling their products on amazon. Here talk about how they can help. Your small business is carry kucic. Who is the of small business empowerment amazon. The small business powered team is focused on driving. The success of amazon's small business partners and works with teams across amazon deliver programs. Investments that support their growth carries a graduate of the university of florida's levin college of law where she earned a juris doctorate degree shows holds in history of english from covenant. College carry welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me very so i could ask you. How did you end up being a lawyer from studying history and english extensive amounts of reading and writing. The really is i. You know when. I was In actually in high school had an opportunity to participate in a youth leadership program That included a track on the judicial system. And i just kinda got hooked on on everything that was involved in of course. Reading and writing is a big part to sorta leaned into those superpowers. I guess so. How did you pass from being a j. d. lead you to amazon and out small business owners. The phone question I do. I've today describe myself as a recovering lawyer. A my favorite time. Yes you know the thing that was fun for me about practicing law was you. You get to spend all day identifying issues in solving problems and so i really From day one enjoyed solving ambiguous problems. Where you had to figure out the root cause of whatever issue or opportunity was in front of you and then inventor way to the solution and so that took me from practicing law Up through a variety of roles on the business side where i've gotten to solve increasingly problems. focused on solving challenges For usually for others which leads to my my role today which is very good to spend all day everyday focused on helping solve issues challenges and make the world a better place for small businesses. I think a lot of people carry don't realize how many small businesses actually work through the amazon channel. Tell us about that So amazon in the us alone on amazon works with more than two million independent partners. They come in all shapes and sizes celena stores. They operate delivery service businesses. They use tools trim. Aws a build alexa skills. They published books with kindle direct publishing so amazon supporting small medium. Sized businesses is a fundamental part of our work there. It's a core part of what we do everyday. An extension of our customer centric culture. Our success depends on their success and our global head. Carrie i was gonna say in our in our store worldwide. We have over a million independent businesses selling in the account for over half of all products sold. And we've seen their sales continue to outpace our retail so we know that customers value them in this election they bring in an incredible way. The amazing statistic that over half of everything purchased on amazon is sold through independent third parties. Small medium sized businesses. That it's not really amazon. Really is the amazon marketplace right absolutely. Yeah the outlive sewing partners. The independent businesses bring those products role and bringing such a wonderful and diverse array of products across all categories. That customers enjoy now. Even i know most of us were surprised by covid. Nineteen who would know that once in every one hundred years right what happen last year but was my biggest surprise is that when ordered some from amazon. It couldn't get here in two days. I thought would never ever happen. Carry tell us about the challenges. They're really amazon. Face in the small business partners did during the height of the covid nineteen crisis absolutely right kobe. Nineteen created many challenges for small businesses. We you know despite it. We were encouraged to see that sense and through that time. Small companies have continued to grow with amazon. You know twenty twenty the number of us long medium sized businesses that surpassed one million dollars sales grew by more than twenty percents and more than thirty seven hundred surpassed him in sales for the first time. Which is just a really great business milestone for any prisoners owner. I'm those businesses have created an estimated one point one million jobs which is phenomenal. It's such an important part. Is you know what keeps our communities going and so we've seen as customers of increasingly shopping online on the past year. The businesses were using e commerce. House channel have continued to sustain grow. I'm in our commitment to supporting them. And adopting for the future has has never been more steadfast done a number of things both continuing work. We've been doing for years and new things. We did in twenty twenty to continue supporting them through that journey. And i think that's really the key role. The amazon plays a lot of companies have got into e commerce for the first time during covid nineteen and like all right. I'm gonna go set up a store. But they no incomes and i think that is really the key of getting involved in the amazon marketplace. Because you already have so many people looking for products right there absolutely One of my favorite stories. I think one of my favorite projects from twenty twenty was last year redesigned prime date support small businesses and we committed more than one hundred million dollars to help their growth over the shopping event through the holiday season and that included holding our biggest small business promotion. Yeah so during that promotion customers. Purchase dollars and products from participating. Small business selling on amazon. Ten dollars credit to spend on prime day. It's on a two week. Lead up to prime day. Small businesses included in that promotion generated more than nine hundred million dollars. In sales on prime day independent third party sellers had their two biggest as ever surpassing three and a half billion in sales which is nearly sixty percent year over year increase and even more growth than our retail business and then it also came with stories like the story of lia foods actually a seller based north aurora forty minutes outside of chicago and she makes african inspired spices but The fun part about her story. It demonstrates the power of selling on amazon and an event like prime day to find those new customers over to help those new customers find you. She shared that coming out of advent not only has she almost doubled her single day sales but her daily started trending upwards with all that new customer acquisition those stories. We really enjoy seeing so those who've never really men sold their price to amazon. What kind of rain moments are there. And what is it in a cost to market on amazon. Yes so our public schedule. So if you if any seller or someone considering becoming a feller looks online at those public public information fees range from eight to fifteen percent depending on product type and for business selling amazon. Really do that as a marketing cost because of the access to that three hundred million customers that it creates and then beyond the monthly in referral fees. everything's optional so sellers choose. What's right for their business. We offer as i mentioned a variety of services in programs than in its pick. What's right for you right so if you want to lean into advertising their options for you could choose what suits for your business if you want to move away from fulfilling your on products create more bandwidth for yourself to do other things there options to leverage by amazon into leverage the customer service support that comes without. So it's it's very much a choose your own adventure but each business owner can select the right fit for them and what fits their

Amazon Levin College Of Law University Of Florida Carrie Lia Foods North Aurora United States Chicago
Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

UN News

05:16 min | 8 months ago

Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

"The work of the un and its partners never stops to prevent human traffickers from exploiting desperate people in west and central africa as they embark on dangerous journeys across these heart desert in search of opportunities further north and in europe to explain what is being done to tackle smuggling gangs. I spoke to vessel coastal. He's the un refugee agency's special envoy for the central mediterranean situation of concern to us are refugees. War already formed protection in the country normally neighboring country or four gene but because of the issues relating to covid many lost their job loss sometime their shelter on some may consider moving on to try to find better protection elsewhere. One thing. I know that people might be keen to find out about how cold it has affected or impacted on migration. Because what's clear from the report released. Is that human smugglers human traffickers. They haven't had any trouble in going around the restrictions have they know absolutely. It's a market opportunity for smugglers traffic yesterday diversified. Their will for try to make some more attractive for these people to embark on those donates on in order to sit come vent a border closure in particular land border closure. They take higher risk on some of the people unfortunately trapping those journeys. Could you maybe tell me some life stories that are featured in your report from the u n refugee agency. There's one that really struck me a somali boy who was travelling unaccompanied from somalia to ethiopia to sedan and then to libya than ultimately to malta. Absolutely on we get to lia people like that they don't stop at the first country of asylum because editor condition are not there editor because they were confronted to incident in the first place. They arrive on the feel. It's not safe address some time. It's because the traffickers has light to them and told them well. We have a job lineup for you in libya. Make you cross through europe on. Those people don't realize that even before reaching libya they're going to get into trouble while crossing swatter countries because the so-called gentle smugglers actually turn very quickly nasty traffic years. Yeah let's just back that up with some data. I know you're report. Says more than five hundred people died trying to cross the sea from libya and twenty twenty often on overcrowded inflatable boats. So what is the. Unhcr the urine refugee agency trying to do with local governments when with local governments. We try to tell them to combat trafficking activity because there are too many known human traffickers that have never been brought to justice on that applies to many coastal states but we trying to work also with communities to tell them to offer another alternative that there might be other solutions on the weights too late when the people reach libya which wisden sarah territory because going to be tempting for people to want those boats on belief the traffic yourself telling them pretty. Tell me about some of your community initiatives. There's one that you cool telling the real story that tries to prevent smuggling and trafficking exactly debts targeting eastern africa mentally eritreans on somali we have mobilized diaspora in europe on the square to let people tell their story. What up to them. So it's sunny filter. Dissolve videos disarm chat forum where people talk to people in their language on. Tell them exactly what has happened to them to try to demystify. On debunk the narrative of the traffic use. Where's your focus at the moment because libya's being in turmoil for so long and it was such a poll for migrants. But we hear that bikini fast has a really growing displacement crisis to yes. there's been a significant increase. In displacement in the western side countries i mean most trillion people displaced because of the conflict. Not that many people leave the region. Manley malians few citizens from rookie. Necessa but many stay-at-home was displacing. Nesia stay nesia. They don't on baucom those dangerous johnny. So that's one area of focus western sale. The other one is the crisis linked to what has done in tigray recently over the last two months on the displacement weariness you appear on ensued. How can you tell me about some of the solutions for placing people who need international protection with their families and talking about family reunification. There are some pilot projects that you've launched with egypt sudan and others. Yes we try to look again at the narrative of many states saying you know but legal pathways exists. People need to use them rather than to embark on the dangerous journeys on. We realized that in reality goes legal. Press quiz extremely difficult to access. If you are refugee camp in eastern sudan you may not get the commission to leave the count to go to the capital city. Where you know. The unbe skilled the country where you have release may not be open or may not exist at all so what we try is facilitate access to the documentation on simply procedural four people. Could we quickly go back to the unaccompanied somaliland. Do you know what happened to him. He ended up in multi indian. Didn't he yes he did you. I don't know what happened to afterwards but the majority of those unaccompanied children from somalia depending where they come from. They will get a protective status in europe in principle

Libya Central Mediterranean UN Europe Africa LIA Somalia Ethiopia Malta Unhcr Nesia Baucom Sarah Manley Tigray Sudan Johnny Egypt
Supreme Sells to VF Corp. Will it Sell Out?

Business Wars Daily

04:47 min | 10 months ago

Supreme Sells to VF Corp. Will it Sell Out?

"It's an entrepreneur's classic dilemma. Can we keep the culture that makes us unique and made a successful and still sell our company. Nowhere is this dilemma more stark. Then with underground street where companies supreme which recently announced that it selling to fashion conglomerate. Vhf corp you know. Vf the ten billion dollar company that owns nineteen brands including north face vans and timberland well in case she were doomed scrolling in miss the big news last week. Vf announced its deal to acquire supreme. For a couple billion dollars it's bs big acquisitions since it bought timberland and twenty eleven also for just over two billion dollars bloomberg reported. Now you've probably heard of supreme but just in case it's a streetwear company. It sells branded. T shirts hoodies hats and their fashion. Ain't cheap. The label launched with a single skateboard shop. In new york city in nineteen ninety-four the brainchild fashion designer. James jeb jeb. Lia will remain at the helm of the brand supreme at big by doing everything. Mass market brands don't do it. Amplified scarcity in a big way. Supreme spent almost nothing on marketing building. Up word of mouth instead. According to cnbc it opened brick and mortar stores. So slowly that. Today there are only twelve around the world and you couldn't just walk in to make a purchase. No the only way to get supreme. Fashion was to follow them on social media like a hawk waiting for them to announce random drops of merchandise. Today those drops our weekly getting a spot in line for the privilege of buying anything was intentionally almost impossible at the height of their popularity. Wannabe customers would camp out in tents or sleep on the street to get a spot in line. The next morning teens also commonly spent a couple of hundred dollars to purchase online bots that notified in the second clothing dropped but that notification guaranteed nothing products could be sold out in less than a minute that strategy in turn created hot resale market t shirts and hoodies that originally so for sixty to eighty dollars could fetch up to a thousand bucks on ebay and other resale sites. The supreme red and white brand became so magnetic that the company seemingly could sell just about anything by slapping the logo on it from kayaks to a pyrex measuring cup to a brick literally. You can still buy a supreme branded brick resale sites stock x. It'll set you back. One hundred and thirty dollars though according to cnbc and just for fun and unbranded brick currently cost sixty six cents. At lowe's the company also pursued its famous collapse strategy. Working in tandem with the f. Corpse vans timberland. North face to create supreme branded footwear and apparel partners included designers like gucci and louis vuitton even colgate toothpaste has a partnership with supreme for vf. The deal signals a strategic. Step forward in what it is called a transformation plan in recent years. Bef has begun. Divesting less edgy products. Like work. where it's off wrangler into its own company and is building on its prowess in athletic streetwear. Its stock price surged on the supreme announcement. Its biggest gain in more than thirty years according to bloomberg. But here's the really big question. Can supreme keep expanding by making its products. Hard to get under the umbrella of a fortune five hundred company with its eye on global growth. Bfce's the street where market is a fifty billion dollar opportunity. Supreme reportedly earned half a billion in revenues last year the f. plans to add new supreme stores around the world. The new york times asked kent supreme. Stay cool while going corporate seemingly. The answer is yes. After all one of the country's biggest private equity firms the carlyle group bought about half of supreme for five hundred million dollars in two thousand seventeen that deal prompted the same kinds of questions about authenticity but supreme continued to grow. Not everyone sees a smooth path forward. However matt powell is a senior industry advisory at retail consultancy npd group. He told the website high snow by the streetwear market is based on scarcity scarcity and growth are oppositional. Oh and one other challenge ahead for vs. It'll continue to allow supreme to do its famous collapse with partners outside the f- like for instance the f. rivals levi's and nike from the outside. That looks like letting your new spouse still collab- with other partners does it. Not and of course we all know how well that can work out in the end. Success will rest on whether the acquisition will juice revenues and profits for both partners. The f. is confident that supreme can become a billion dollar brand. If that is supreme can hang onto the cool rebellious image it's cultivated since his unassuming launch or than twenty five years ago

VF Vhf Corp Nineteen Brands North Face Vans Timberland Twenty Eleven James Jeb Jeb Cnbc LIA Colgate Toothpaste Bloomberg New York City Bfce
Reparations: How Could It Work?

Science Vs

04:56 min | 11 months ago

Reparations: How Could It Work?

"On today's show reparations. Okay. Well, My name is Ebony picket I am a wife and a mother of seven. And four bonus children. So that's total of eleven. You'll hear some of those kids in the background. And Ebony is one of the few black folks in the country is actually been given reparations. It was because decades ago family was the victim of a horrible massacre. It happened in a small town by a lot of black people lived called Rosewood in Florida. And it all started on. New. Year's Eve in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two. So. It was a happy time. It was a time when they were celebrating and they were cooking and they have fireworks little sparklers. Enjoying another. A group of white people in a nearby town had become convinced that a black man attacked a white woman. And over the next few days, hundreds of them poured into Rosewood in a frenzy. Nobody really was expecting it from what we know. They just started shooting up the house from outside and that's what they did for seven whole days and they didn't stop until everything in the town was burned down. Every house was burned down to the crown. Some of our family members were lynched. One of my cousins Sam Carter, his ear was cut off they will keep it in the jar the white mob killed him, and then kept this man's Lia in a jar. Souvenirs, but it was very brutal. The local police just let all of this happen and many Rosewood residents ran and hid in nearby forests and swamps. There was there was no one coming to help for rescue and? That was in the data winter so they were in the cold swap. For seven days. Hundreds of people were forced to leave the harms and at least six black residents were killed. None of the black families went back they had to stop their lives ova. And Today Basically nothing is left of this town. No one was ever charged for the murders or the destruction of homes and businesses. Ebony said it was so traumatic that for years the families were afraid to even talk about what had happened. But in the nineteen eighties, the younger generation decided to speak out. Ebony family took the story to the media to politicians to whoever would listen and they hired a law firm who took their case to the state legislature asking the Florida government to acknowledge what happened and to pay restitution for by the survivors and their descendants. In other words. They asked for reparations. And they got it. Producer rose ramlet talk to ebony about this. Yeah. I read about it being passed as a bipartisan effort, which now seems like a miracle. Yeah. Right. That doesn't really have much anymore in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four when this bill was passed they would just nine survivors still alive and the state gave each of them up to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. What did it mean for the survivors the direct survivors when the bill was passed full of emotion. A lot of there were crying some of them were still afraid really even then. Even then. And for descendants like Ebony, they set up a scholarship fund it paid for her college. Education. I was able to actually get a bachelor of science degree in Occupational Therapy Kinda. gave me. You know kind of like a new life a new hope I was a books to actually go into a major that I could actually excel in and into well then. So yeah so it was great. It's great for me. While this reparations plan wasn't Pathak and some of Ebony relatives couldn't benefit from the program. This story shows us that use possible for the US to recognize when it's done. Something wrong. And pay up. So what would happen if this played out on a much larger scale? Because we're not just talking about one horrible attack in one small town. The idea here is that reparations would make amends for something much bigger. Slavery. More than two hundred years of enslaving people and using their free Labor to build the US economy. And while this idea might feel like a political nonstarter. It's starting to get some real attention. Almost a third of Americans polled lost yet said that they were in favour of reparations and a bill to study. This has more than one hundred and fifty signatures in Congress right now. So for us we're wondering. How on Earth to academics calculate how much reparations would bait? Like how do you put a number on that kind of suffering? And how would the US actually pay for it?

Ebony United States Florida Rosewood Sam Carter Congress Pathak Producer Rose Ramlet
How to Make This Winter Not Totally Suck.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:12 min | 11 months ago

How to Make This Winter Not Totally Suck.

"Hi Sober sellers. It's Lynn. Oh, my goodness one more week when this comes out, I will be moving in one more week. So yeah, I'm really excited had some hiccups along the way I don't know if you all remember living in an apartment buildings. That's where I'm moving from and moving to I'm not buying a house quite yet in my little village in evidently something happened to me every time I move and this time it was kind of a big one I was moving into this brand new building with four stories although I'm GonNa live on the second floor, right above the shops with. Florida ceiling windows kind of like a loft and wouldn't you know that Kovin interruptus happened? Yeah. So the elevator people can't put the elevator in and this is quite a complex project from what I understand even in twenty twenty, they are I don't know six months behind as what I'm told, and now I have to move into a temporary residence which I'm now wrapping my brain around but it's one bedroom instead of two bedrooms. So I have to downsize a little bit more than I thought I was going to and I might be in the. Apartment for about three months. So there you go Bobbin we've in our way through two thousand, twenty I'm still so very excited. So after some contemplation and some you know. Anger and disappointment whereas my feeling wheel and some other things I got through it and decided to make the best of it and that's what I'm doing. Now, of course, there's lots of stuff in between all there. So you know I have to pull out my tools from my buffer zone just like you do. which brings me to today's topic in the spirit of all of us who have moved before. Yeah. I'm expending a lot of energy right now and I'm excited and I'm busy and I'm forgetting stuff. So I'm trying to keep the next few weeks of podcast episodes brief or if I don't win that battle with myself, which is very difficult to keep things brief I'm going to choose things that tickle me and that I wanNA. Share you and I came across one of those just this week by a writer who writes a lot for the Atlantic she was on staff there and I haven't really followed her I'm not a writer follower type but I know I've read a bunch of her stuff. Her name is Seagal Samuel and the article I'm going to read you she wrote for Vox and you gotTA. Love the title how to make this winter not totally suck. According to psychologists. Many of us are throwing her arms up in the air and still going what the heck is going on here. in the United. States. Election will be shortly upon us and were quite uncertain about what that's going to bring. Nobody really knows t leave readers all over the place but crazy stuff keeps happening day by day. So we'll just see ultimately the goal for those of you listening as you well know for me is to share with you how are we going to cope with all this? Tabei Day week by week sometimes minute by minute and second by second. So. That's why I love this article. And I thought today. y'All might forgive me if I kinda just read it to you. You know I can't help myself from jumping in and give him my own little take on things which Typically you'll hear me change my tone of voice or Interject Lynn here my plan is that you'll actually be able to decipher that. And enjoy the little nuggets of wisdom that is Samuel has shared with us. Again the article is shared on Vox V. O. X. DOT COM. and. The author is Seagal I hopeful that I'm pronouncing that right but you know there's a fifty fifty chance of everything last name Samuel and it was published on October fourteenth twenty twenty. She begins I'm GonNa go out on a limb and say, you're probably dreading this winter. We know it's going to be harder to socialize outdoors as the weather gets colder. We also know there's probably going to be a surge. Yeah. In New Cova. Nineteen infections many of us are feeling anxious about how we're going to make it through. The lonely bleak months ahead I see a lot of people trying to cope with this anxiety by drumming up one off solutions y'all are going to love this. By a fire pit better yet by a whole house or like I'm doing move. Those may be perfectly fine ideas as far as they go but I'd like to suggest a more effective way to think about reducing your suffering an increasing your happiness. This winter studies show that anything we can do to direct our attention off of ourselves and onto other people or other things is usually productive and makes us happier. Said Sonya Lia- by Mirsky, a psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside and author of the how of happiness a scientific approach to getting the life you want. She goes on to say a lot of life's problems are caused by too much self-focused and self absorption, and we often focus too much on the negatives about

Bobbin Seagal Samuel Kovin Writer Riverside Lynn University Of California New Cova Sonya Lia Seagal TA Atlantic Professor VOX Mirsky
BTS Frenzy Drives Hit K-Pop IPO

Rover's Morning Glory

01:14 min | 1 year ago

BTS Frenzy Drives Hit K-Pop IPO

"Of money the seven boys of K pop sensations bt s while we were sleeping they each make sixteen million dollars before you up this morning. Agency big hit entertainment became a publicly traded company on the South Korean stock market. And in Seoul. Its first day of trading big hit shares reached two, hundred, thirty, six dollars. So fans tried to buy a share as a piece of them reveal Lia bts earns ninety percent of big hits revenue. Sexy. You buy in this stock me. Yes. You see anything in the news you by now but I do think that there's a part of seeing new stories in jumping ahead. A Long. Term Investment. I mean. The problem is what happens does management group when BTS BREAKS UP? The or no one likes him anymore as is pretty much inevitable with most south musical groups pumped up drop it. Did you buy some? No. They're pumping out hits. It's Not, a buy. Rubbers money.

Lia Bts Hit Entertainment Seoul
The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

"By corner of the world is very different and so I think I've kind of alluded to it on some of the episodes we've recorded up to this one but nick, you are my very favorite co host. So of course, I waited until you were back on the podcast so that we could discuss all the changes but I have recently shifted roles. So I quietly changed my linked in quietly changed my twitter and my get hub but I am the new engineering lead for the back end at text us. Congratulations that is that is huge right I don't even know where to begin but. I guess the best place is at the beginning. So how long ago? Did you kind of find your way into the world of Texas yeah. So ask the listeners know I've been at the trust for about five years, which was fantastic because I leveled up. So much of the trust, a lot of my conference talks that I gave came from the work that. I was doing at the trust I loved those working at a nonprofit affecting the arts and the Pittsburgh community because when I came back from San Francisco, I really wanted to get re-involved with Pittsburgh and there was no better place to do it with the trust being a small nonprofit and you know there was only so many places that I could grow up words. I decided to start considering my options, and so I came across Texas and text. US. Basically is a business class text messaging software and they're built in rails, which of course, is very important to me as the host of this show to continue working on ruby on rails. So you know I have bet my career on it. And the Texas currently serves the ASS staffing recruiting industries mainly though they also serve a lot of different industries but it's a really interesting and complex code base and they use a lot of the dry principles, which is that I was somewhat familiar with, but I hadn't worked one on one with. So how about you neck? Have you used a lot of dry rb? So when you dry principles, do you mean like actually using like dry rb and the dry rb tooling and the ghost? Yes heavily on my goodness. So I have literally just wandered so far as hearing about it in a podcast or you know and I and I, think I follow the maintainers on twitter and reading about five never crossed that threshold to actually using it even in a in a toy up. So House have been. kind of seeing that world is imagine it's quite interesting. Yeah. I'm coming off of a code base where we used a lot of service objects. So in some ways, there are some principles there that are somewhat familiar where you don't stack all of your logic into your models and controllers, but dry principles. It's just it's very clean and I'll tell you that during the interview process with Texas, which first of all was a really fantastic. Interview Process and I hope a lot of companies have processes like this it my process probably took I would say about five weeks and that involved a lot of one on one in conversations with their product manager the CTO, their chief architect, my partner, who is the engineering lead for the front end and just really making sure that it was a good culture fit and then I ended up doing a pairing session with the chief architect and. What was neat about it is that we tackled some very rails lia problems, but then as towards the end of the interview. He gave me some examples of how my code could change to actually reflect those dry principles and how that is how they manage the code in code base and I left that interview just ceiling. So intrigued about how I feel that I knew ruby on rails fairly well, but just seeing it in that sense it got me really curious and I was like this is this is. going. To. Be Great for my career. It must be amazing to get another set of eyes because I have to commend you you know. There's A. Strong trend in tech where people you don't hear the five years that often anymore. I don't think you you see is short as eighteen months to I'd say, even three years I'd look at unlinked and say, wow, that was a while. So so it's definitely you know there's all the. Normal aspects of changing changing a job but I think from a code aspect just saying these different ideas you know and. It's like a super learning experience all over again if you're around a bunch of intelligent people working in this code base and and especially with tooling that you may not have used before so must be. An absolute thrill.

Texas United States Twitter Nick Pittsburgh Chief Architect San Francisco House Product Manager Partner CTO
"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Twenty two. I said. It's which they can three and a half years for your case to even be heard, and that will the arena half years for you waiting to find out if you get life rally at three and a half years, sentence me to life. Hearings for about a year. And it was a big to do when I went to court, and I had braces and I went to the medical college to get my braces tightened, and that was a big to do I mean it was? I guess I shouldn't scream because it. It's surreal. There were people lining up the sidewalk on the for the entry into the prison or entering into the courthouse, and they were men with bouquets of roses, because they'd seen my picture in the newspaper and I have Indian features and people often mistake me for being from from the Southeast Asian continent and so and I. I was young and cute and so they. Were proposing to me and were petitioning with my lawyer to be able to marry me and save me, and then we would you know hoping I would take back to America once I was free kind of thing so I had going to court as a you know to be convicted of heroin smuggling, and I've got literally throngs of young men and mothers of young men. Waving and calling out to me cheering on me like a movie star on the red carpet. But Nancy, SAR a throngs of people who want still want to use you, but in a less creepy way than us right. Yeah. The American they want to use the American cars. Beauty of life. Is You're? Never ceases to you never cease to encounter a new way that somebody wants to use your. New Twist. Yeah, so but I I went I. Went to court you several times and The man will typically in that culture. There's a man and a woman accused together in a case. It's you know. They were intimately involved and committed this crime together in you know, and so that was assumed and encouraged by the jerk. Was a accused with me the Tony and so I would go to court, and they would be like you know due to wants some time alone. Turn your stomach. I was like Oh God. Do you know this man ruined my life? I'd never laid eyes on him until a day I was arrested. Real and people ask me like. Where's have you heard where Tony is? But that's like I. Don't give frats Password. That guy is I hope. He's running in prison. Still you know, but I mean I understand. There's a curiosity because he's. He's part of the story when I tell it on on national, geographic and so. Like it's technically. I could care but I really really don't care, and I've never asked or looked for it, but so went to High Court, and they asked me to lie about my age in order to be able to help me like if you're only eighteen now than you're under age when you were arrested and we would before i. Let you go. Like no I'm I'm twenty two I send my ID. Will will show that the American government can can confirm it like go. Paperwork can be forged. We wouldn't be able to rely on paperwork alone if you told us that you're on I was really and I said I really I'm flattered, but it was not gonNa let I wasn't going to feel like they were trying to lure you into a trap. Could show that you were lying. That would make it. I think my I. Think they were really they? There was a lot of sympathy for me in the media and I think they really were looking for a way to let me get out of jail here. Because the the the I would have thought that public opinion would have been hanger you. There was there was an element of that, but it was not from from what I gathered. which you know, my my perspective I'm sure was skewed, but it was a lot of popularity. Who thought you know the American girl? She's so young and she's so innocent, and let's let's. And unless you had a family who was serving time for similar crimes, you are very sympathetic. Describe what what you were feeling and thinking when? You were thinking. I'm going to be in here the rest of my life. What what is what is that like well? When I when I was arrested, and I I heard from the that they weren't going to be able to get me extradited. I said well. Look. You have to get me out of here. I'M GONNA. Kill Myself. I am not stay the it was horrible I didn't speak the language. At that time it smelled opportunity lay on, these people were just, and you were part of the and I was in my aunt cell, but I still I. You know when I went in the headed woman in the jail. You know spent a lot of time examining my chest like I might have been hiding something in my boobs. Really just been a lot of time as I really. Getting off a little friendly. Yeah, and so I. Just I want I was creeped out I. wanted to leave and and then when they sentenced to thirty years. is really knew that was going to happen a few days beforehand because they interrupted another drug case in the middle of its trial mid witness and A sentence of, thirty years because. The embassy said you have to have a precedent of setting of sentencing a woman from your country for similar case before you can send it to an American to whatever? So they, they stopped this woman's hearing and charged her finish her life. She got up and it technically but. The president that the president so I knew I was, she came back to the good news. Bad News. And I was like what she goes well. Bad News is you're going to get life? The good news is I'm GONNA. Technically because I just had the precedent for you and it was in the middle of my hearings. She rule really said that to you. Did you kick her in the face? No, no, she was kind of a tough through to strangle her with her Sarong No she came in, she was grinning. She's folding her cry. They have a Sarong. Even the term. Sorry. Yeah, her sorry, she had the convict sorry on, and she's pleading it and just grinning ear, and she's obviously here in a month at the most. Yeah how do you? Mike God. When all you know, I mean I I'm pretty good at not blaming the Messenger Yeah and let's not forget to your complicity in this. You know the fact that you yes, you. You were somebody who had experienced tough childhood, and and had you know certainly been taught a lot of fucked up lessons, but you still chose to do this stuff. Really and you know I I don't want to I. Don't want to gloss over that and make it. Make it sound like You're the victim and all this night. I get the sense that you feel that we are. Surrounded, by women who are in victims, and had been framed and had been I mean there was the occasional actual murderer who described killing the four year old son of her senior wife, but there was a lot of people who were there for you know had not done since eighty year. Old Woman could barely lift your arm up. Ever had accused of killing a man who was thirty years old. She couldn't have done it. What what did that feel like? Being around. All of that all those sad stories it was, it was it was very humbling. And I wrote I wrote a poem one woman because her her Her kids were taken away from her and she she couldn't take care of them, and they took land away, and it was. It was very. humbling and he gave me a perspective on you know. My, my life had a lot of crap in it, but it was not that kind of crap like not losing my family graph or not having no food on the table, and you know wrongly imprisoned and taken away from infants and having the women could only keep their kids to a certain age. Even the gentleman went taken to an orphanage, and the bureaucracy was impossible to get your kids out after that so even if they got out of jail, the chances of reuniting with their children was very remote and in. Bangladesh have the caste system like a and e assistance. From the lower caste you're, you're less than a citizen. If even that right. Yes, so it was I got a sense of perspective and I and I..

Tony president American government High Court America heroin Nancy Bangladesh Mike God
"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"And. Of course, I didn't go to the cheap places for food because I was American I want wherever they had dollar. Symbols liked dollars exempted yes okay. I didn't exchange by money until much later. someone said to get some TACO. It's a lot cheaper views. Taka and I said Oh. Okay? Yeah, sure trump different money here I mean just completely ignorant. I mean for all the studying. I did for all the honors student. I wasn't high school. It just I had no no training or education of what to expect overseas. So Let me skip ahead. Stayed there. How how do you know I? Thought I was having fun got sick. Had A steak extra days, which worked out for them, because the guy bringing the drugs was delayed. And then had a really scary experience. I was going to run away. The Guy was late. Bringing me the drugs. The day is supposed to leave. It was a last year. My Visa and house like you know what I am going to. Escape like I'm not going to do this I. Don't want to miss my flight. I've been I'm just getting freaked out so The hotel had a policy where you check in your luggage when you check in, and then once you pay the bill, they give you this little coin thing that says your bills paid and the bellboy. We'll take the coin and take your luggage out. See you're not supposed to run off without paying your bill. While I was planning to do just didn't have enough money to pay the lead state, too many days of the Fancy Hotel, so I told my suitcase and I like sneak into my room into the stairwell that they go down and go out like the service desk service entrance. You know, sneak out. While I run schlepping the suitcase. Full of all these roses that I got because someone at the hotel was offensive, any well polity roses and I look the First Amendment, even giving me roses as I'm. GonNa, keep all of them so I'm running on the stairs with a suitcase full of flowers and stuff and I get to the bottom finally panting, and I opened the door thinking it's going to be at the kitchener, some service area and it is the middle of the lobby. In the middle of all the glorious mirrors and go crap. Sounds like well. Head down and just Kinda. Go you put my suitcase out and I'm trying to just walk in of course all the bellboys looking for their tip money. This is their livelihood throng to me, Oh. Can I help him a meme? Can I help you? Help your bags and I was like? No I got it. Where's your coin? We will carry you. No No, no, no, I've got it. I'm going to carry the whereas my coin crap, and as this is all happening. The the Guy Tony that was bringing the drugs shows up and he is a very scary person. He's not Mr Rico. Suave eight that I met in Texas. He's intense. He's very hardcore and and he's spotted me and I was like. He came across news. Like where are you going? And he grabbed my passport out of my hand and. You're not running away. Here's your money. Go Pay Your Bill. Meet me out front. So I go out I go to pay my bill and they're like watching a your care. Okay, okay, and I said Oh. Yeah, yeah! I was raised at home that we didn't tell what my dad was doing abusing us. Because authorities aren't going to help you so I had this just mechanism and like you know, someone asks when someone asks you. If you're okay, you just say yes. You can't trust them to do anything so I didn't go to counselors at school when I was being abused, because they would break up the family and I didn't tell people at the desk I'm being coerced. So many things that a normal child I think would have registered and would have reacted differently because of what I went through I just Kinda. Head down took my punishment thinking that that's what I had to do. And so I did I. Through Shaw and he was mad and and I don't like anybody being upset at me. That's just my mentality from forever, even though he's in criminal. Until don't want him out at me for some reason like that matters. So, we went to his his guest house, which was the same guest house I'd been dropped off at which was how I knew that cab driver was a plant I was supposed to actually be. There would have been a lot easier. Part of why he was annoyed. But so he wanted to put them on my suitcase. The packages but I had all these flowers and too big metal vases that they come in. They were taking significant chunk of myspace and he says You can't take. These are GONNA fit throwing these away and I was like this is the moment. That I got some gumption. Worst moment was at this and I said no I. AM keeping those roses. You cannot tell me I have to throw them away. I'm keeping them their mind. They're staying. All right fine, then you're gonNA, have to wear the product. Is it okay fine I will? At this point that was the worst thing I get it done of your suitcase. You have some plausible deniability. There's so many reasons not to do that, but I decided to fight for my roses. Wow I know it's terrible, but so I put on this horrible girdle, and these packages of of the heroin were wrapped in coffee, grounds and spray opium perfume to kind of throw off the dogs..

Mr Rico Fancy Hotel Taka kitchener Shaw Texas heroin opium
"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Only thought our taxes in the last four or five years. So you believe that stuff? while. They're now. They can't prove how we're so quick. improver broke so I was unable to pay for college, and I'd gotten accepted, and still couldn't go so my best friend in high school she had she lived a few blocks up the road, but her parents owned that house we were we rented. We've have never owned a house. They'd never saved money it was you know somewhere, so she? Her parents own this house and she went on annual vacations like to know out here and things like that from Texas, and so, but she was bored. You know everything. She everyone and she got never had to work at it in her life and. And one of two children your life so excited she was like you've got so much drama like she would come and rescue me from the house like I would call her upset and and she you know. My Dad had gone off on me about something, and she would come into taking you out of here you're you're you're coming with me and we would go hang out at her in her bedroom, and and it freaked me out was in the morning she would get up and she had for a little tank top, and under on, she'd walk down the hall to go to the bathroom with her dad at the house and I was like. To close on goes, it's my dad and said. Right right normal. That's supposed to be okay so it. Really it was just it was I realized that that's like that's not. Everybody's experience and actually when I was in was your name or you don't have to say. Her sister didn't want me to mention anymore. She's passed since I got back so So I I. Just it was one. It's moments like that hit me and so in, but I didn't get into college. She says well, you know. Let's just without. She's I. Make You were both eighteen? We can move on an apartment. She had no desire to go to college. She was ready to put off here. She could she really kind of a party girl? Or when we went out to parties like the high schools, you know drama team I was all about drama high school, so I went to the senior cast party, and she would she would be the one that would get drunk and be smoking and start clinging to the really unattractive guy, and I was constantly pulling her off. Okay now it's time to go home and would drive her home, so we you I would. Would get silly to and when I was a bad night, she took me out and I got really really drunk and blacked out and apparently danced on the table at the male strip joint downtown. HOUSTON, and just in, but I apparently you. I needed that she liked. Let me just you know cut loose. And then she drove me home and took care of me that day I'll actually? She left me in her loan passed on her dress. Cheech let me sleep there. But but I was that was she was my my my Kinda, my anchor. You know I would go to her. And so when we moved out, she started modeling lingerie outfits, and doing the low raffle contest. That hotel lounges, and couple bars down in Galveston and so. I had eighteen years old. Of course you have acute figure who didn't look cute at eighteen so I did well at the crappiest place because I just was happy. Go Lucky La. It so but I hated it. I mean it was just that had been so painful for somebody who was objectified their childhood. It was. It's a weird. It's a weird thing. I think anybody who's been through childhood. Molestation can tell you it's. It's a weird thing. You want to be cute, you really. WanNa be cute in in recognized and appreciated, but then at the same time you hate yourself for being. For thinking about that and suddenly it's a bad thing. It's like you discover your POW power that you hate having, but it's powered on the less right and it's like. Is that what you like about me? Is that all the people I let me because I? Mean I I went on I to binge on facebook when I anyone else tells me I am sexy. I'M GONNA. Slap because I need more than sexy at this point and you know what a lot of men! I don't understand that the. Yes, women! Women want to be attractive with the THEY WANNA. Be More than that. They want to be recognized for their for their intelligence, their empathy or their sense of humor or something else. It's great to have the attractive thrown in as icing on the cake, but I think very few people want that to be the most important thing about them because it's going to change, you're gonNA. You'RE GONNA. You'RE GONNA. Get Old, and that's not going to be there forever, right? The thing I love about you most is disappearing every day. Diminishing as we speak so so so that was that was something I was doing after high school and I didn't I didn't like it, and I wanted to be to the commercials on TV now this is really it makes me laugh to think. But there was the Bradford Business School and they would show the girl like in her jeans and t-shirts. The board and you know she wants to do better, and then she goes to the Bradford Business Glenn. She comes out and that's executive suit with a briefcase. She's going, please. She's Bradford Grad and they had. Their my big dream was to have the money to go and become an executive assistant after graduating from Bradford Business School for. Instance I wanted a briefcase I wanted to suit and some little pumps, and so I went to the Bradford. School and they said it's eight thousand dollars and I was like Oh gosh. Okay well, we'll see and then I went back. And of course I didn't have to impending together bearing making barely paying our rant at this new apartment so. Said well. I'M GONNA. Start waitressing at this strip club. House like Oh, I could do that. I've always had fairly big top section, so I was like I should be able to get good tips if I go and waitress at a stripped so I went in to talk to the guy and he goes honey. With all of that you are not waitressing. You're going to be on my stage or you're not working here I. Don't know if he thought I was going to convince me. Like well, okay, then meet me a star. I was like well. I'm not working here because this is not going on display, so I was stuck once again, not being able to keep up with bill. No, they're making money now. Just let me stop you for a second what? Is In your mind, what was the difference between doing the lingerie modelling and and being in a strip club?.

Bradford Business School facebook Texas Bradford Galveston HOUSTON executive assistant executive
"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Contact your parents consent there, and then from then on the relationship between the teen, and the counselor is completely private, and it satisfies all legal requirements in all fifty states. And without any further ADO, here is replay of the episode with Lia mccord, my interview today with with Leeann mcchord. Is a couple of things I. Want I to tell you about it. At the end of the interview after we wrap things up. Lee had kind of this this weird look on her face and I said. Something wrong. She said well. There was something I wanted to talk about but I. I, didn't I didn't and. Let me run it by you. When I wanted to say and so she ran up by me and I said that would be great if you would talk about that on the air. So. At the end of the of of her interview, you will hear her comeback. We pick up the interview again and it's worth sticking around for because it's very brave what she shares and and I think profound and. I'm just really grateful that that I have guests who? Are Willing To. Risk the judgment of other people to share what they believe. Is the truth and is coming from from their heart and. And what she said made total sense to me as well so also there's a friend of hers that she talks about in the podcast who, since passed away totally unrelated to her story, but because her friend was involved in drugs. Her family would prefer that. The friend's name wasn't mentioned, so you'll hear me. BLEEP her friend's name throughout the podcast before we get to the interview with with Lia as I told you there's a survey you can take. Let's make it to know you guys a little bit better and i. go through there and I look at the responses that people have sometimes in every once in a while. I just feel absolutely compelled to read somebody's responses. On, on one of the on one of the shows, and so I want to read you. I just love the this This woman wants to be A. Her. Nickname is a porcelain She's in her twenties. She's a student at Nyu. the environment that she was raised in. She writes totally chaotic. She says that she is a A. She does go to therapy and she says after say my therapist is utterly amazing. my whole life people either ignored or simply to shocked ever respond to the details of my life. I always love hearing that when I see that somebody is going to get therapy, and and and it's working for him She has adhd and she takes. Stimulants for it and she says that that aggravates her her anxiety To the question, do you share your feelings with anyone on a regular basis? She writes. Yes, but I don't know if it helps share my feelings because i. have this awful habit of never filtering out my thoughts ever and I'm pretty sure defense people a lot I'm surprised I have new. I'm surprised. I have a few friends than I do. Let's see. What else did she say? What are the most common negative thoughts you have? She writes always worried that people are just humoring me that they pretend to be okay with me, but in reality think I'm absurdly fucking strange. It's not their opinions that that would frighten me, but the fact that I am just so blind to it like an autistic retired I also consistently. Consistently think I'm huge than I'm wasting my education. Then I'm trying to play with the real smart people, but I'm actually pretty stupid and have only gotten as far as I haven't academia on a fluke Oh and my overwhelming body hair I'm constantly loathing. How much hair I have for a girl and feel like it just gets worse and worse. fucking love this woman Describe any behaviors You wish you didn't engage in, but you do anyway. She writes biting my nails and eating my skin I'm not sure what that exactly means eating your your skin. She writes a digging into my legs with pins and tweezers i. hear, this is something Meth addicts do and my adhd. meds are a form of math, so make sense also eating too much procrastinating Oh and sitting on the toilet for hours waiting to poop because I'm not convinced I've pooped all I have for the day and then worried that my stomach is still building too much. Because of all the poop Oh my God, i. I can never get enough honesty. From. People like this another of behavior that that she says she She engages but but wish she didn't so much. She says masturbating a lot even though I live with my boyfriend and obsessively shopping only to return everything the next day. To the question, does anything 'cause? You feel ashamed She writes living in new. York City going to nyu on constantly consistently ashamed that I can't be as thin and toned. Is everyone around me? I feel like they're all looking at me and thinking that flabby bitch can exhibit any self control. How can she possibly be here right now? To the question, does anything 'cause you feel guilty? She writes I'm pretty materialistic. Especially when I'm feeling pretty antisocial shop for clothes, always imagining how beautiful I will look, so I can go out in the world again. People like me I'm actually a poor college student and I engage in this all the time while my boyfriend is struggling to afford food. Does anything 'cause you feel angry. She writes I'm angry that my boyfriend wants to be a woman I don't care if he ever switches his dick for vagina, but I want to be metaphorical for girl in the relationship and I get so mad that he exhibits no sort of chivalry or protectiveness towards me ever. To the question, if there is a god order some of the things you would say to God, she writes I would thank him for blessing me with more than enough food clothing, etc, and access to good people and a great education, then I would apologize for wasting at all. And then to the question, do you have any comments or suggestions to make the podcast better, she says. I want to thank you. Actually for this podcast launched on I tunes just as I was hitting very very dark place in my life. was just awesome to hear about people who were once in that exact place, but we're now totally social and usually pretty happy. Inspirational Shit never includes the gritty gross details that your podcast does, and it does wonders for helping me relate as I've been picking myself up again. It's nice to listen and remember how I felt during the old podcasts and measure my progress, so thanks well porcelain. I don't know you. But I feel like I know you and You fucking rock. Hair and all. Everybody I know is bizarrely beautifully fucked.

Lia mccord i. Leeann mcchord Lee nyu Nyu. adhd. York City
The Future & AI

Feedback with EarBuds

02:43 min | 1 year ago

The Future & AI

"This week's theme comes to us from Eugene Leventhal and is called the future and AI. Here's why Eugene chose this theme. He writes the increased use of a I to decision. Making has exposed amongst other issues problems with bias and the potential automating more than many might imagine. Here the episodes chosen by Eugene for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from with a side of knowledge, and is called on a I in. We need humans and Tiger King. It's thirty seven minutes long. Here's the description. After ai for the people CEO. Mujtaba Lena Conde's visit to Notre Dame had to be cancelled due to the corona virus. We asked her to join US virtually to discuss artificial intelligence bias, and whether Tiger King broke the brain of the netflix's algorithm. The next episode comes to us from consequential and is called the black box. It's twenty eight minutes long. In this episode inside the black box, important decisions are being made. That may affect the kind of jobs you apply for and are selected for the candidates. You'll learn about and vote for or even the course of action. Your doctor might take trying to save your life however when it comes to figuring out how algorithms make decisions, it's not just a matter of looking under the hood. The next episode comes to us from sleep walkers and his called chocolate chicken chicken cake. It's thirty five minutes long. If there's one thing that sets people apart from machines. It's creativity right. Automation may take over certain jobs, but what happens when algorithms start to learn from our work to create their own. In this episode, the hosts speaks with people using AI to generate films, poetry, music, and even recipes, and the founder of Google X. Sebastian thrown explains what's powering this new wave of AI? The next episode comes to us from ninety nine percent invisible and is called the Eliza effect. It's forty five minutes long. Throughout, Joseph Wise inbounds life. He liked to tell people. This story about a computer program created back in the nineteen sixties as a professor at Mit. It was a simple chat bot named Elisa that could interact with users in typed conversation as he enlisted people to try it out. Why inbound saw similar reactions again and again people were entranced by the program. And the last episode of the week comes to us from invisible LIA. It's called raising Devendra, and it's thirty minutes long. Here's the description. What happens when you treat artificial intelligence with conditional of? Those are the episodes chosen by Eugene for steam, the future and AI?

AI Eugene Leventhal Tiger King Joseph Wise Mujtaba Lena Conde United States Devendra LIA Netflix CEO MIT Google Professor Elisa Sebastian Founder
"lia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"Enjoy this more for shorter bursts, and just really accepting that. Makes Things more enjoyable overall like we pick our plan? Our trips around you know two week two maybe three week stints at a time. I think that's plenty long. For most people most people that's that's very long trip. You know so. We're very happy with that. At this point. I think one of my goals. When we have kids. They'd like to take them on liquor road trip for a you know a little while, but we'll see. We'll see how kids are when they exist. And I think part of that is just likely towards the end of our trip, wanting to take things slower like we were in Cleveland Mexico for for for months housing, and when we do these two weeks stands. It's never like we are going to go to Tokyo. for two weeks. It's like now. We Wanna see like WanNa. SEE MOUTH YOU WANNA. See you again. We want to see these images, and so we cram in it and so extended trips are really hard when you cramming like that because you're, you're packing up every other night and you are always on the move. which I like when I'm seeing a new country somewhere like Colombia where we've been several times now. I can hang out in the HANNAFORD couple of weeks. It'd be good in. Yeah, but yeah. Definitely we end up craving staying in one place whether it's at homer abroad, but we happen to really like where we live at home. So that's coming back to right now. Yeah, you've found your sweet spot where it's like all right two weeks. is if fast travelling new stuff new? New Adventures. You know that's about our threshold, but if we want to go somewhere longer, it has to be a slower type of travel. It has to be how sitting getting an apartment. Whatever or somewhere you've been that, you know so, you're not. You're not feeling like you're pulled in a thousand directions. Every minute has to matter because you've been there before which I think. For a lot of people that I've talked to in myself included that as you travel more, that seems to be how things start to shake out for everyone, but for a lot of people like I'm fine with fast travel, if it's finite, and and then I can go, and it's it's new, and that kind of energy keeps me going on the next train every other day. But. A. Lot of people prefer that. Let me let me bunk in a little bit. Let me enjoy this area. or Go back to a place I've been before because it's comfortable like you could drop me in Chiang Mai and sure it's changed since I was there a couple of years ago, but kind of like you guys with Columbia. Just like this is how I got my barber. I know my favorite places to go. I'm going to go here for launch. This is the best coffee, and so it is. It's a nice little second home and I could be there for a month and it wouldn't feel any different. It would just be like Oh. This is easy so. I wanted to talk. You mentioned Macho, and we always ask people biggest travel mishap, and so you talked a little bit about it of not of it, not being exactly what you thought. Give us the details on that because you did mention that that was probably in the end your biggest mishap of the whole adventure. Yeah I think definitely was I think you know like you said that was the nail in the coffin for backpacking South America. Even though we were able to hang on a little bit, we were just we're scratching. And We. Had Gotten altitude sickness earlier that month. and then we got to cousteau. We really didn't want to mess around with that, and so we were in cousteau for a few days. Getting acclimated like they say that you're supposed to. We spent a little more time and I think that we were in cousteau for six days, and we kinda got like we kinda got leg nested a little bit, and then the day before the height. This was like a big moment. I lost my trekking pants. Yeah Universe the. Laundry at the hostile. All my clothes back except for those pants and I. Think. The universe was saying. Please don't do this. Please don't do this and we went to the having an information session the night before you're supposed to go. and. It was all these like really big like through hikers in is a couple of that showed up late to the info session because they had just gotten off Rainbow Mountain. Everybody was so much better than is ended. This point we had we had been sporadically hiking for. Right like we were fit more or less when we started the trip, but all of these failed hikes under our belts had not helped us continue to stay in hiking shape, and like you gotTa to keep hiking. If you're going to be an hiking shape, so we were like four months out of shape, and everybody else was literally just like. Cross, Bennett goals. They'd come off like backpacker magazine covers like. This is amazing. They were all swapping like peak stories like. Beg Kalinin Jaro Blah Blah Blah I'm just over here like okay. I don't think I've ever actually two single peak we don't. have those in the bay area. By yes, so we told our guys we were like. We're really slow hikers and we got the kind. Santa Response that we always get which is like Oh. Yeah, it's fine. We have slow hikers all the time. And I'm like no. We're like really really slow like we are half of the speed of a normal person hiking I have no idea why, but we are. And there should us that it'll be fine, so we're so okay. I was ready to call it like I had a bad feeling and I was like I. Don't think we should do it if we don't show up. We're out four hundred dollars, and that's the deposit and that's it. We won't be out. The whole thing in Jeremy was like no. We're GONNA do it. We're going to finish it. It's going to be amazing. He this was the speech the Varsity Blues Speech Yeah Okay. So then we show up the next day we're hiking. And immediately fell behind the group. Just it was, it was never like we were never going to be able to keep up with. They were so fit, and they were all just chat and having a great time, and we're link. Huffing and puffing in the background is watching them disappear into the distance, and we like rolled up at lunch and we're like an hour behind everybody. We roll at lunch and we were like an hour behind and. With, the thing was argument was that we went with with a company that had the longest first day they like. A lot of companies are like we'll take a really easy to first day, and then like really get it in the second day. You know.

WanNa HANNAFORD Go backpacker magazine Cleveland Mexico Colombia Chiang Mai Kalinin Jaro Rainbow Mountain trekking Tokyo. Jeremy Santa Columbia Cross Bennett
"lia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"lia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"There's GonNa. Be a road out as though he's slowly creep down. This hill and Leeann tight, white knuckled like screaming into her face in an just turn around and go. You just got to cut your losses. Just realize it's not gonNA happen. He haven't learned from the thing clearly, but then against this this little. Loot smaller courtyard and I realized that like. There is no road in front of these houses. Everybody just walks here because it's a medieval town and so I have to do this like this whole loop around while I'm on a steep hill, eighty five point turn it eventually I, just had to life, and then I tried to go back up the hill and The inclined was too much degree up the car. We just keep going back because the cobblestone, and so I had to like I'd like fast and furious of this hill and I cried the whole time dry the whole time, but it was I didn't think scratching the car, so that was already broken, already broken headline, but. The car. That time. You didn't get a scratch on the car that Nice. Okay interesting when I read it when you said you job into a castle. IRA Crashed into a castle, you actually drove inside a castle, and then continued to go deeper down the castle yeah. I listen I've been with you. This happened to me in I too many countries to count where I've Gotten A. A. European rental car stuck in some like one way and you're like well I. IF I go this way of course is going to be right out there and all of a senior in someone's front yard, and like end in. You can't turn around. You're backing up. People are looking at you and you're just like what do you expect? This is a road or I thought it was a road, so. Oh. My Gosh, legitimately too many countries to count and I've crashed a car in France in the north of France South France, but yeah, so I've. We we we have our rental car chops for sure for sure so then are you guys have talked about this idea? I want to get to the Macho. Petri mishap, because you know we're going to get that in one second, because I but I wanNA talk about the ending of the trip, because we kind of touched about it with Jeremy and him getting excited to go back to teaching Leah. What was it for you? Because this was like your idea, your dream and you know as you said like you felt I'm not ready to go back to. Was it a bittersweet feeling for you? Was it one that you were like because I've I've struggled with this myself a lot when I come to the end of trip, not knowing how to process it, not knowing what to do, you know feeling kind of deflated that I have to come home. So what was the feeling for you? Because Jeremy was fairly excited to come back and reenter regular life. The end of our trip I mean it ended very similarly to the way that it started with a bunch of disasters. The! Couple of days of our trip I was in the hospital in Costa Rica. For an ear infection and we actually had to extend our trip a few days, so I think I was I. Think I kind of like that. It was inevitable. I was just like you know what I just WanNa sit at home for a while I think that for me. It was if we would continue doing this. And if we keep traveling I wanted to do things differently like I felt like okay. I've I've learned some things we've made mistakes we've. We've had so many disasters I was like surely we could do differently. We travel slower. We could instead of going back home and settling down. We could go to some cool digital nomad spot like Thailand. We haven't been Thailand golden in Thailand and I just for me. It was like. I needed to settle, but I wasn't particularly attached to it. Being back home where we had been and so that was my thought was like okay. We clearly leg this whole going somewhere every few days going somewhere every week. Now, working out for us, mentally or physically, I get that. What if we just run a bungalow or whatever? But that ended up. Being about as appealing as just having a house to live in an apartment to live in in one spot and just taking trips. So. I think that I had kinda come to the realization that something needed to change. It was just a matter of where it was going to where we were going to take a break, but we. We definitely both needed a break for sure. Do you envision in the future like something like that? Where you say all right? We are going to have a home base because that's how I feel now I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa. Be Nomadic I. Probably my guess is will never be nomadic like that again. where I don't have somewhere to come back to or I don't have a home somewhere. But where it is is kind of open. You know I'm like all right I could do I could do that I could do that, you know. Maybe there's a few places. Do you? Guys envision that that's something that might be in the future of art. It might not be oaken. It might be somewhere else, but we. We do have a home base somewhere. I think I really learned about myself that I thrive on routine I love stability a lot so even when I go on a trip I liked to come home and have some are so I definitely think. We will always have a home base. We aren't quite sure if that's going to be Oakland forever or if it's going to be somewhere else because we do you know thinking about family at this point where you know we're now both in our thirties. So. Scientists aren't thinking about kids and we're not sure where we might want to raise them. but I don't think that will ever be nomadic I. I, think we with the idea of like after where retired. Maybe we got like an RV or something or like. Do. Some longer trips. But even when we go traveling during the summer now because every summer, Jeremy's got about a month and a half. And if we go for the full month and a half, it's too much. It's about two weeks. We really like have a good time. At the end of the two weeks we both started to get really tired and just WanNa go home and sit on our own couch and relax and I. Don't think there's anything wrong that I know. It doesn't sound exciting cooler fun, but I think you know realizing that about yourself, and just knowing I enjoy this more for shorter bursts, and just really accepting that. Makes Things more enjoyable overall like we pick our plan? Our trips around you know two week two maybe three week stints at a time. I think that's plenty long. For most people.

Jeremy Thailand WanNa Leeann IRA France South France Leah France Costa Rica Oakland
Trump confident there will be a coronavirus vaccine by the end of 2020

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Trump confident there will be a coronavirus vaccine by the end of 2020

"President trump is predicting that there will be a vaccine for the coronavirus by the end of this year NPR's Mara lias and reports president trump likes to have good news to tout sometimes it's a drug like hydroxy chloroquine or possible therapies like UV A. light or disinfectants on Sunday it was an imminent vaccine at a fox news virtual town hall he said there would be a vaccine to protect people against covert nineteen by the end of twenty twenty we are very confident that we're gonna have a vaccine at the end of the year by the end of the year have a vaccine however top public health officials say the vaccine will probably take much longer and the president did admit that he may be wrong about his optimistic timetable if another country develops the vaccine first he said I don't care if it's another country I'll take my hat off

Donald Trump NPR Chloroquine President Trump Mara Lias
Treatments from Gilead and Regeneron Move Forward in Battle Against COVID-19!

Breaking Biotech

12:21 min | 1 year ago

Treatments from Gilead and Regeneron Move Forward in Battle Against COVID-19!

"Some glad to be back and have a good show for everybody. We're GONNA talk about a few interesting companies. That had some good readouts this past little while as well as ones that are upcoming. So we're going to start by talking about axiom. Therapeutics and their readout in Alzheimer's Disease Agitation. Or then GonNa move on and talk about Gilead add in all the updates. We saw their Endesa of your trials. Never GonNa talk about another company. That has some. Kobe related. Work going on which is regeneration. And I usually don't talk about mid large-cap biotech but regenerate is is an interesting one. Especially because I've touched on their main compound lia in previous videos so I thought I'd do kind of a deeper look into them and we're GonNa talk about that in big detail so with that. Let's just get ready to it. And the first topic I want to mention is acts on therapeutics so their company that saw a huge runup in twenty nineteen with the development of their drug. Axs Zero Five. Which is a combination of Dextrathoraphan and Wellbutrin and they've already seen positive readouts in major depressive disorder with this compound as well as a couple of other ones and they saw mixed results with treatment resistant depression. But I think they're going to move forward with some trials any way to confirm that data but what they also wanted to to look ad. And this is the data that in presenting here is the effect of access zero five in Alzheimer's Disease Agitation so one of the symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease is this agitate that comes along with it and it occurs in around seventy percent of all patients so that works out to six million people in the USA. So it's a pretty huge indication in one that I didn't really look at in serious capacity before I took a position because it was originally planned for that treatment resistant depression but I think the stock had a lot of potential. Besides that so. We saw a readout this week. That showed a significant improvement in this. Cma I total score in patients treated with excess zero five compared to both be appropriate riches or placebo and view pro free on its own. Didn't have a substantial effect on Alzheimer's Disease Agitation. It was only when it was mixed with desperate dextrathoraphan in excess zero five that it saw this improvement so this is very beneficial for the song. I think it opened on that day you know upwards of one hundred and change and then it fell back down. I think it closed this week at ninety but very positive for the company and they need to discuss with the FDA how they're going to move forward and whether or not this is GonNa be considered a pivotal trial for them so we might see some insights in their Q. One earnings call which is taking place on. May eighth but is definitely impressive for the company and this molecule is going to be a huge revenue driver for them once they get those filings through and get approval. So that's excellent therapeutics and I'm still holding onto the thirty shares that I bought so let's talk about Gilead and their drugs death severe. That's been investigated right now for the treatment of Cova Nineteen and the importance around rim of your has less to do with Gillian specifically and more to do with how it's going to be implemented in the hospital system and prevent them from being overburdened as states kinda revamp up their economies again because if from desktop here has an effect in it lowers the time in which patients need to be in the hospital. The chances of the hospital system being overburden reduces substantially since we can you know get these patients in and get them out quicker. So that's why remm desperately is so important and we saw originally that Gilead published a study with regards to the compassionate use only remedy severe and that was only a single arm study. That didn't have really great conclusions to be drawn from but since then we've seen results from four studies and I'm GonNa talk about these in some detail because we heard that Dr Bounty announced that there were significant results in that they're going to move forward and approve rendez severe for Cova Nineteen and we also heard on Friday that trump is going to announce the approved use of reinvest fear for this so the four studies that we got results for our this China study that was published in the Lancet and this was an underpowered study so they weren't able to find patients who enroll in this study so they just took the data can the study published in The Lancet. The next one is this. Niaid study that was also a randomized placebo controlled trial and then there were two phase threes. That Julia did call the simple studies. And this is to compare the ten day treatment versus the five day treatment and the reason why they did this I believe is because they don't really have the commercial capacity to produce unlimited rendez severe. So if they can show that the treatment of as severe works just as well with a five day treatment they can save more doses for more patients. Let's first talk about the China study which was published in the Lancet a little while ago and this was a randomized placebo controlled trial in Severe Cova nineteen patients and just to note that this was underpowered. Despite the fact that they did statistics on it there weren't enough patients to really get the power that they were looking for from the outset. And what we see here is that patients treated with Rendez. Aveer were more likely to die if you look at this. Kaplan Meier curve and the hazard ratio was one point two three. Which means that. If you were treated with reservoir you had kind of a twenty. Three percent increased risk of dying the other attract that. I'm showing here is the viral load. So one thing that I was hopeful to see is that Rendez released had an effect on viral loads and the one thing to note though. Is that these samples were taken only from the news. Affairs in the oral faring. So that's kind of your nose area and your throat but not your lungs. So there's a chance that there would have been a significant difference if swabs were taken or if they did some kind of leverage to get samples from the lung and see whether or not rendell spearheaded effect on viral loads. In in that capacity the study also looked at length of hospital. Stay in that was also not significant in this study although the safety was actually okay. So that's one positive outcome from all this but given that this study was underpowered. We need to take these results with a grain of salt. But it's not super encouraging. That REMM has no profound effect in these patients specifically but they also went ahead and did this. Niaid study so we look at bat study. They looked at one thousand sixty three patients and these were hospitalized. Kobe nineteen patients so still in the severe range. And here's what the press release said preliminary results indicate that patients who received rendez severe. Had A thirty one percent faster time to recovery than those who received Placebo and the P value here is less than point zero zero one specifically the median time to recovery was eleven days for patients treated with severe compared with fifteen days for those who received. Placebo results also suggested a survival benefit with a mortality rate of eighty percent for the group receiving Rendez severe versus eleven point six percent for the Placebo Group and the P value here was point zero five nine so this is the study that I think Dr Found. She was referring to saying that there was a significant benefit to rendez severe treatment. And I definitely see a benefit if this is the difference in the time to recovery. The survival didn't have a significant effect. But even if there isn't a significant survival benefit if there is a benefit to the time to recovery. I still think that is profound and we'll be able to help the burdening of the hospital system. Which is what I was referring to earlier in talk so we still haven't seen a lot of details in this. Study some stuff that I'd love to see. Our viral loads led to look at the safety to see more details in in the effects. Endesa there had so. We don't really know exactly what's going on. But this is the study that I think the. Us government is looking at to say whether or not it is a drug with an effect that will be rolled out in the country and it looks like that's going to happen even before we are going to see the details of that study but it is what it is and then the last studies. I wanted to talk about. Are these simple studies from Gilead and this is an open label trial that looked at a five day treatment or attend day treatment and the results are that the study demonstrated that patients receiving a ten day treatment course of Amdex aveer achieved similar improvement in clinical status compared with those taking five treatment course and the odds ratio here is point seven five with a ninety five percent confidence interval of point. Five one to one point one two on day fourteen so this is good news. It shows that they only need to treat rim desperate for five days and it's GonNa be not significantly different than they treated with ten days and we've been seeing a lot about Gilead having around a million doses of rendez severe before the end of the year so given that only five day treatment is needed. They're going to be able to save rim desperate for more patients. And that's a good thing because like I said I don't think Gilead expected at the beginning of the year have to roll out the commercialization of severe. But they're gonNA have to do that. Some capacity and in this way can be able to save some doses for a lot more people and I I put a little note here about the safety so breathe three or higher liver enzyme. Lt Elevations occurred in seven point. Three percent of patients with three percent of patients discontinuing rimmed as severe treatment due to elevated liver tests. So this is kind of a negative thing that is going to affect a decent number of patients because I think a lot of the comber abilities of Cova nineteen patients are issues related to their liver

Gilead Alzheimer's Disease Rendez Cova Severe Cova Niaid The Lancet Amdex Aveer Placebo Group FDA Kobe China Dextrathoraphan Aveer Kaplan Meier United States Julia Rendell Dr Bounty
Coronavirus epidemic 'far from over' in Asia-Pacific, WHO warns

BBC World Service

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus epidemic 'far from over' in Asia-Pacific, WHO warns

"A senior World Health Organization officials warn that the corona virus pandemic is far from over in Asia to kisha concise at countries that the subject the virus could not afford to let down their guard so long as the pandemic continues elsewhere this report from Asia Pacific editor C. lia happen to cash a concise that countries in

Asia World Health Organization Asia Pacific Editor
Lia Park and the Missing Jewel by Jenna Yoon

Books and Boba

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Lia Park and the Missing Jewel by Jenna Yoon

"Aladdin acquired debut middle great author Jenner Unions Korea. Methology inspired novel Leah Park and the missing jewel pitched as Harriet. The spy meets race to the Sun. This contemporary finally follows a twelve year old. Who was a part of a magical spy organization and must use her skills as she chases clues with your best friend to rescue her parents from an evil diviners spirit. Publication is scheduled for summer. Twenty twenty two re-re. Do you know which career mythology this is inspired by. Not a clear. Nothing with joy. I think we've mentioned as like multiple times on those podcasts. My my knowledge for Korean mythology and folklore almost non-existent ninety two. And that's about maybe it's a social world where it's like you have like the Fox spirits and the what do you guys call Goblins in the whole k. Drama Potter Right. Yeah took maybe yeah. Yeah but but the English title is Goblin Magical spy organization. I mean there were spy networks In like quote Unquote Futile Korea. So it might just be like a spin on that. I don't know sorry. I'm like a very uneducated person when it comes to Korean mythology. Yeah I have nothing to contribute. One of our listeners can witness or we can talk to one of these days. Yeah so next up little. Be Yellow Jacket. Bought North American rights to writer food long and illustrator and Rica's graphic novel black blood in a world where magic is outlawed a young age versus the Kingdom of Aliyah to rescue his sister. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one a lot of magic. I love it. We need it. We need a desperately time coming out until two thousand twenty one okay. That's for though next. Inky wordpress acquired debut author Kylie Baker's the keeper of the night and it sequel set in nineteenth century Japan that is haunted by the goddess of death. The novel stars a half reaper. Have Sheena Gami copy between her two worlds and belonging to neither as she fights monsters and struggles for acceptance. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one way so half reaper. Have Schnitt gummy. So like is that like some sort of hopper situation where you're half lake the Western death and half the the eastern gotTA death. I'm not sure it wasn't really clear. If like half the half Chigney Gami part was just like Explaining what should he got me was a three per half. She got me but like I am not sure that is probably what it is because there is a common in between the two so. I totally read that wrong. I thought it was going to be a battle between death. And he's a nominee the Japanese of death and this this percents pick sides. This is still cool. I guess not. Yeah I mean like there's a lot of cool stuff out there. That's based on like shinnied. Gummy Lor like. That's always call like bleach and like you. Hawker show which bleach ripped off their soul eater. There's lot there's also death node obviously lots of good stuff to pull from. But if you think about it are we always haunted by? The God of death is in a constant state of being. Just think about well in these times against so so deep Marvin next up MC Eldery Books Bought Twenty Twenty Morris Award Finalist Nafisa Assads. Why a novel? The wild ones a broken anthem for a girl nation. The novel is a multi perspective feminist narrative about a fierce band of magic wielding girls. The wild ones who have survived unspeakable things and are determined to save other girls from the cruelties and tragedies they have had to endure. Publication is set for summer. Twenty twenty one. I feel like there are a lot of these stories coming on now involving like a is which organizations like I think I think like May Matt like Magic Organization has always been part of literature. It used you're seeing an uptick for the next year or two years. Judging by like the book deals that people have been

Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Morris Japan Chigney Gami Sheena Gami Korea Methology Magic Organization Leah Park Aladdin Jenner Harriet Kylie Baker Hawker TA Writer Rica Nafisa Assads Marvin
"lia" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"lia" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"And I do a segment called schizo film Lia, which is a very creative way. A really creative name. But I'm before I get to get the film. I wanna do schizo book ya which I added on recently recommend books, and obviously wanna talk about yours called are you? Okay. And I'm gonna let you talk about it. But I really want to ask you about finding help in finding the right therapist. Because I know that's a lot of what your book is about an eye for the love of God cannot figure out how to find someone especially how to find someone on a budget. So just to you to tell me all about that. Yeah. So my book, are you? Okay. Guide to carrying for your mental hall is essentially a mental one. Oh one where do you start? What you even ask? What do you need to know often? We don't we don't know what we don't know new name. The questions to ask because we're like what what do I do in? So it's it walks you through what's the difference between mental health mental illness because I think people use them interchangeably in. They're not the same. And talking about what different types of therapists exist. What's good therapist versus a bad therapist? I go through all mental health professionals as well. Not just therapists, but social workers psychiatrists like what does that mean? In different types of therapy in also like the most common communication issues that we have that can harm relationships in how to get out of toxic relationships in the book is just like something that I hope people will use as a tool to figure out what they don't know and get the help that they need in educated empowered way, because I think people are always afraid to reach out. Because what if I go in say, nothing's wrong with me. Or what if I go in there like, oh, my God need to be in the hospital or try to see someone. I don't like them. How do I stop seeing them? Like there's a lot of random. How do I find someone like that's your main question? How do I it's overwhelming union? It's also it's already it takes a lot of effort to even consider that in usually when we're not doing. Well, we don't have the. Energy. And so it's just a very in layman's terms, it's not increasingly therapist e language it talks about how you do all of that. And so I hope that it is really helps people it helps them realize that they can be powered in can make healthy helpful decisions about their mental health. As far as how to find therapist on a budget..

Lia
"lia" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"lia" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"It's all about service y'all and giving back today and giving back to the community. So the has tag is. Now, you have a good day. Okay. We clear our require as water. Okay. Lia- water. So with that being sick. Important. Damon non guy looking like a theory, which I always seeing the NBA. But that's the next one looking like still do fun on my gosh. But then, but I don't look like Kodak bag, no way. So I like, well, whatever that's how. I mean, I don't know what you mean what What you you say. say? And why is the z z z shit. This is says he should. Anyway. So that being said and not understood right? We just got a couple of q TNA's which is questions leading. Lessons. Negatives ask and question one. We'll south Florida dunce, darling. Carista? Hey dumb. Miami of the city girls. We'll she ever make it home after her dumb ass left. The breakfast club. Interview went downstairs saw van with the Washington University bears logo on the side and hopped in because she thought the U and picture of a bear minute. Was her Uber. Oh. Oh. All right. I'm ask young Miami. From the city girls more on that later..

Miami Kodak Lia TNA Damon NBA Florida Washington University
"lia" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"lia" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"Fai red shoes if you don't me i'm kind of obsessed with putting my body into an outline state and i'm also obsessed with greens no i don't have time to be downing six pounds of kale and broccoli or get if is amazing because there's beats lorella spur lena macho green tea we'd grass ashwell donde which is really really good for your old tumor lemon coconut water to hydrate you and mint which is really really good for your digestion to try out or anti head to identify dot com type in the code angie lee at checkout and you save twenty percents off the entire store oh hail yes forget if dot com use the code angie lee and enjoy can't build it into a million dollar company all by yourself you'll lose your mind and that's not fun and then what did you really create now you want yourself a job that you hate and and sustainability and coaching i gave lia atip free ladies listening i gave lia tip a few weeks ago even about thinking of the longevity of the company and maybe you bring on coaches who you've trained in your systems at in your methods that you've created and you own the rights to them but other women who can learn from you and then they helped more people and now you're helping twice as many people in this world with their nutrition where you could only do so much in one hour and route you've built a company versus buying yourself a job and there's a toll those are those are totally different right and i mean to sit way into you know what an employee will do for you in terms of your energy as well not just what they take off of your your workload i mean how i'm being mentally stimulated by like minded women who are sharing topics that they care about the business and i'm.

angie lee lia million dollar six pounds one hour
"lia" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lia" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"Rose that like this skill will do x damage like annot hundred damage and then a imacs at four levels and maybe a level four is like four hundred damage but as like is early on in the game that's really powerful 'cause it's a lot of damage but as the game goes on imacs is a four hundred damage so like relatively speaking you kind of suck and if you focus on heroes that have attributes that could potentially scale infinitely or items that you could purchase that could scale infinitely you could you could suck and you could do so much better than people that make poor choices and the idea came to me because i think i just kinda do this thing but i'm talking to a lot of people on my kinda doing some business consulting for free because i i love it and people are are embarking on business idea lia's that the kind of suck or just really really difficult perhaps more difficult than they would need to be and i wanted to discuss scale and perhaps as a concept to keep in mind so that you could do less work and perhaps have potentially infinite upside yeah so to put a very general definition on scale something that doesn't scale well would be something where you put an hour in and you're always gonna get x number of dollars out ten days so ten bucks an hour you know you go work at mcdonalds that doesn't scale very well they're going to pay ten dollars an hour maybe you work your way up eventually but it's likely that you're not gonna make a whole lot more than that ever and you're still going to be putting in hours whereas if you build let's just say you you build a web app that lets people take picture.

lia mcdonalds ten dollars ten days
"lia" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

The Personal Computer Radio Show

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lia" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

"Services and a lot of protocols all at once it's overall band with this is one little cable it's overall band with his forty gigabits per second it can network computers at ten gigabits per second and a lot more my cybernetic house has six internet's all of them at one gay so here's a capsule of how the things i learned it nabc fit into my round the house has a network video recorder in the wreck essentially a windows ten system running blue iris software and connecting to thirty two hd cameras all external all ten eighty p all with power over ethernet connected through peo we surge suppressors all on one one gigabit network the envy are is configured with a raid six array of right after my hard drives that record win triggered to do so rate six means you could lose jude drives and the array remains intact and operating i'm going to add a seuss thunder both repeal lia dafter to that envy our box so it can direct attached to a second raid six ray in it's own rack mount case also with right optimized hard drives and that second ray we'll be the first arrays backup the backup to the envy are the surveillance systems network video recorder now the my sequel server is not a good fit for file based backup instead it uses a technique called replication to keep its data safe and obviously i'm going to make sure as i can that losses can't happen there hank often asked me about backing up the network of raspberry pi boards of one hundred boards age with thirty two gig micro as d cart now most of those cards carry less than four geoghegan we never right to those cards we only right to the my sequel database we can carry images or file and folder sets for each and every card in less than half a terabyte of memory in the my sequel server very.

seuss lia dafter ray geoghegan hank one one gigabit forty gigabits ten gigabits