35 Burst results for "leukemia"

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

Sounds of Science

05:43 min | 3 d ago

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

"I'm joined today by singer, songwriter and patient advocate, Gracie van brunt formerly based in Los Angeles. Gracie moved back to the Boston area before the Kovic pandemic. She's the recipient of the two thousand thirteen rare champions of hope patient advocacy. Award. From the nonprofit advocacy group global jeans at age two, she was diagnosed with a rare disease that I'm going to let her pronounce, and even before the pandemic, she was an expert at social distancing. She is here to share her story and her art welcome Gracie Hey. Thank you so much for having me what an amazing introduction. Thank you so much for being here. We're I'm really excited. This is gonNA. Be Fun. Yes, I'm so. Yeah you too. All right. So can you tell me about your disease and how is it pronounced? Yes. So it's called Schwartzman. Diamond. Syndrome. Like a Walkman, but just with an ass and then I'm in just like a like a diamond gem and then syndrome and it is a very rare disease that only affects I think around like five thousand people in the whole world how and I was diagnosed when I was two and now I'm twenty five. So it's a genetic chronic disease that is currently incurable. We are working on a cure for it, which hopefully can be developed soon, it is also life threatening. So the main aspect of the disease is your bone marrow and a lot. Lot of patients with SDS as we like to abbreviate, it have bone marrow issues where their bone marrow fails and We don't have enough blood counts really like we don't have enough platelets, not enough white cells and not enough red cells, which basically makes up your immune system So we get sick a lot quicker than a normal person would and we also a lot more prone to getting leukemia, which is a blood related cancer, and so the point of getting a bone marrow transplant would be to eliminate that risk. Let's start to talk about this and dig in Can you tell me about your song run ron run because I'm kind of obsessed. It's pretty great. Thank you. Run run run is a song that I wrote about my disease and having to live with it and confronted every day and The first line is my disease does not define me, but recently it's all I. can see and that is because three years ago in twenty seventeen, I got like a huge Epstein Barr virus. I just got really sick from having the Epstein Barr virus, which kind of like was the catalyst to me getting my heart transplant to use later, and so it's kind of just about having to actually confront my disease head on. which is something I haven't had to do for a long time because you know growing up after all of my hospital stints. I got gradually better and I was able to kind of dislike, put my disease into a little box and leave it there and On. A kind of live my life as a normal person. A. and. So when I got this Epstein, Barr in two, thousand, seventeen, it was a huge huge hit to my system. I was extremely sick for a few months and that ultimately led to me having to get a transplant but. Up, until then, I. You know I could be a normal teenager like do normal activities and. not really have to put a lot of emphasis on my body or my health. But because of this catalyst I'll say Really really. Forced me to take my disease out of that little box. I had it in and really really face it. So the chorus goes. To run run run just like I've always done and I leave it alone. But I, have nowhere else to go which is me really just like having to confront the fact that you know I'm still sick I will never be a normal bio typical person and I have to do this transplant for like to better my own quality of life and Just. Focus on. My health more than anything. So that's pretty much what it's about, and then like a little fun fact is. I had already written it before I got the news about my bone marrow transplant. So I had my doctor's appointment on December twenty, fourth two, thousand eighteen, which is like Yay, Christmas, time such great news. But so I had my doctor's appointment, and I already had like a little demo of this song done because Louis is my boyfriend and he's a wonderful producer and we had already been working on Um songs for my upcoming EP and then we'd already done this one. So the first thing I did when I came home was I actually just listened to this song to make me feel better.

Gracie Van Brunt Epstein Barr Gracie Los Angeles Boston Producer SDS Schwartzman RON Leukemia
Undruggable Drugs

a16z

08:54 min | 3 months ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
Take Back Your Life  Coping with Change

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:05 min | 3 months ago

Take Back Your Life Coping with Change

"For here today to talk about how caregivers can take back their life but also more specifically. We're GONNA talk about change in the changing roles. We face when we're dealing with somebody living with Alzheimer's so thanks for joining me Lauren. My pleasure thank you Chen. I'm glad to be here. There's a lot going on but The caregiving which I thought had sort of ended is ongoing My husband passed away three weeks ago and my son is in a medically induced coma right now dealing with both leukemia and he did get the virus so he's where holding positive that he's GonNa come through this so my my daughter and I are healthy and supporting each other through this. Well I can relate as you know. My mom passed away on March thirty first. It's a little bit of surprise although it probably shouldn't have been but other than that everybody's doing well we don't have any of the other issues that you're dealing with. Was I really appreciate that? You can take the time and enjoy me in the midst of all of that at some very One one of the things that I tell people because I'm seeing clients doing video zoom telephone sessions and I say it's very grounding for me because what can we do. That's part of the issue everybody's dealing with that. We feel very powerless and part of being a caregiver is we like to feel in control. We like to feel empowered. That we can make a difference that we can do things. So it's all very surreal for sure but I think it's very surreal for a lot of caregivers especially if you're not living with your parents or spouse or whoever who has out timers your caregiving role has changed in And it changed in a different way if you are living with your loved one because you can have the same outside support that you had previously so change happens whether we instigate it or not definitely evident right now our living in a pandemic and trying to figure out how we're going to restart our country and go back quote unquote back to normal. Even though I don't think that's going to happen I'm hoping for some improved normal. It will definitely be a different normal. Yeah I hope it's different in a better way absolutely and I think that it can be but

Coma Alzheimer Chen Lauren Leukemia
Rishi Kapoor, Bollywood Leading Man From a Film Dynasty, Dies at 67

Radio From Hell

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Rishi Kapoor, Bollywood Leading Man From a Film Dynasty, Dies at 67

"Rishi Kapoor Bollywood leading man from a film dynasty a wildly popular actor in one of Bollywood and that's the Indian film industry Bollywood's most celebrated families died on Thursday in Mumbai he was sixty seven the family confirmed his death in a statement Mr Kapoor had been diagnosed with leukemia in twenty eighteen was admitted to a hospital in Mumbai on Wednesday about the statement did not list cause of death the news rocked India just a day after another Bollywood hero the veteran actor your fun Colin died Mr Kapoor was best known as a romantic hero with the charm and charisma the quickly made him one of Bollywood's leading man of the seventies and eighties later he began taking on more supporting roles in notable character parts as

Mumbai Mr Kapoor India Colin Rishi Kapoor
Coronavirus: Trump retweets call to fire gov't expert Fauci

Rush Limbaugh

00:59 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: Trump retweets call to fire gov't expert Fauci

"Governor Wednesday Cuomo said then he wants partly to hold cloudy talks high with governors fifty Murphy two and Lamont about a regional Richard a wedding eventual at the weather re channel opening on seven but he says ten first W. there's O. a lot R. of information this report out there is sponsored to be absorbed by unbound you look around the world dot you org see right now warning there are young signs people people across across from from the the countries countries world world facing facing who who a a have have tough tough opened opened choice choice and and continue continue my my point point their their dream dream is is of of to to education education our our team team or or drop drop out out I I to to help help want want their their families families to to learn learn put put food food from from on on those those the the table table other other countries countries you you can can president president help help change change trump trump their their will will future future no no doubt doubt in in be be a a asked asked single single about about moment moment it it today see he how has far retweeted your support a message can go on Twitter at featuring sundown criticism dot org of Dr Wall Anthony Street Fauci right now the Dow from is Sunday down night four retweeted hundred thirty a message nine points on Twitter nasdaq that was is critical off thirty of Dr nine Anthony found and G. and the S. included and P. is down the hashtag just about forty fire found that is she brought you by opposed the T. J. Martell by conservative foundation activists joined in California the T. J. Martell foundation takes issue in with the fight doctor against found leukemia G. on cancer CNN and on aids Sunday your where he support acknowledged helps that facilitate putting social cutting edge distancing research measures that will lead in to place more effective earlier treatments and would save have more made lives visit TJ Martel dot org to learn about music's promise for a cure next news at two thirty breaking news at one starter David Lambert Michael riddle in the morning six to ten tomorrow morning I'm Jeff McKinney seven ten W. O. R. N. B. C. news radio station fifty nine degrees now it's two oh six W. O.

T. J. Martell Foundation W. O. R. N. B. C. Jeff Mckinney Tj Martel President Trump Lamont Governor Wednesday Cuomo David Lambert Michael Riddle CNN Murphy California T. J. Martell G. Dr Wall Anthony Street Fauci Twitter Richard
The Show Must Go On: Wrestlemania Is Still Happening

ESPN Daily

11:37 min | 4 months ago

The Show Must Go On: Wrestlemania Is Still Happening

"In the WWE. That is we say what our jobs are. Every day is to put smiles on people's faces all over the globe and we truly believe that and then this time maybe more than any other in in my memory people need those smiles right now more than anything that's WWE executive vice president. Paul Leveque better known as triple h talking about the decision to move forward with this weekend's wrestlemainia thirty six. It's the closest thing to live sports. That's happened in a wild but with no fans permitted the arena and concerns over the safety of the wrestlers and staff. What will the showcase of the immortals look like in the age of Corona virus? I mean at times. It's Friday April third this. Espn daily Greg. You're ready to talk wrassling. Damn Right Excel it talking about sports with funny named people trying to punch each other in the face. Greg Luzinski is a senior writer for. Espn you can check out. Lapsed Fan's guide to wrestlemainia on. Espn DOT COM. Yeah actually I wanted to ask you think. Most people know your name from hockey. How long have you been on the Wrestlemainia beat my wrestling a Bona Fides? Go back to when I was a we child watching Hulk Hogan and the more cartoonish W. F. which really sort of capture my heart as you know through the decades there have been times where it's been okay to say a wrestling fan and then sometimes when they've you don't mention it to a lot of people. I think we're in an okay dimension it part of wrestling right now. We're sort of a necessary to mentioned it portion because there's nothing else going on and wrestling is somehow improbably still happening. How is this even occurring? Well the way it's been occurring for the W. E. and their competition. A W which Ariza. Tnt network is that they've been holding shows in empty facilities but for me that means holding their weekly television programs raw and smackdown at the W. E. Performance Center a training facility in Orlando and what they've been doing literally holding it inside of an Empty Gymnasium. I'm the game triple agent. I would like to personally. Welcome you to the. Wwe Performance Center now. This show will be different from anything you've ever seen before. Sit Back Relax. And if you can't forget about the world around you and let. Wwe Do what we do. Let us put a smile on your face to start. That was a little bit awkward because the wrestlers would come out and they would look to the crowd. That wasn't there and they would do all of the usual pantomime they would do to get the fans excited except there was no fans getting excited. You see it doesn't matter if there's ten thousand fans at their zero fans because this is how I I remember that can only way I could describe it as it's like when you're at chucky cheese and the animatronic band starts playing into an empty room. It's still playing. It's still doing. Its own thing. But there's nobody that Iraq to it and that was like the first couple of weeks of this and also they've been utilizing more space around the performance center lake attacks in the parking lot and stuff like that to try to make it feel more than just trying to recreate something inside of an empty room derailed. Me With that chucky cheese analogy this. It's the it's the rock afire explosion ban. Greg get it right. There's nothing better than being in an empty room with the rock afire. Explosion Band and just hearing the gears clunk together. It's jarring but also satisfying so wrestlemainia. Thirty six is happening on Saturday. What was the original plan for the event the original plan was to hold wrestlemainia? Thirty six at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa and this was going to be a huge event for those who don't know it's not just simply wrestlemainia. Inside of a stadium. It is an entire city being overrun by. Wwe events you have the Access Fan Festival you have the WWE Hall of Fame Ceremony. Where wrestlers of old honored and put into a virtual hall of fame. Physical building doesn't exist quite yet and then also after Wrestlemainia the next day on Monday. It's tradition to hold Monday night raw in that same city so this isn't just simply one event on a on a on a Saturday night for The city of Tampa. It was a whole citywide sort of celebration for wrestling as of March. Third The W. E. and Tampa's mayor said there were no plans to postpone the event the W. E. said look the health safety of our fans and performance of our top priorities. But we remain committed to hosting Wrestlemainia at Raymond. James Stadium fast forward to March twelfth. Now you have Hillsborough County's commissioner less Miller saying he'll probably have to cancel wrestlemainia if the. Wwe doesn't make the decision itself because of the virus pandemic governor Rod Santa's that points that cities and counties should cancel mass gatherings over the next thirty days and so it was becoming a worse than worse. Look for W. E. to keep wrestlemainia scheduled framing Jamie Stadium on March sixteenth. They made the decision not to have upwards of sixty five seventy thousand people come to a stadium during a virus outbreak and instead moved into their performance center in Orlando. It's a two night event April fourth and April Fifth. How has wwe justified or explained their decision to go on with us? Well there's the public explanation and then there's the assumed explanation that the public explanation according to the WWe is that it is for the fans the fans are the lifeblood of the organization it is a panacea the fans to be able to hold this event. It is going to give them some comfort in a time of confusion and trouble. It's also going to be arrested for the performers themselves who you know are looking for some direction or looking for some focus in life during uncertain times. And that's sort of the the public explanation for this. If you know about the wrestling business you know that part of this is the fact that story lines that are going to have their big payoff. At wrestlemainia are a month long process. All the story lines all the action. They all run through. Vince McMahon they are on one track. And they're going to stay on that track through hell or high water. These are storylines narratives that the W has been planning to wrap up in culminate at Wrestlemainia happens every year and then they kind of moved to new stuff after that so from a function process to have wrestlemainia occur and wrap up which are the signature feuds and storylines of their season. If you will was a pretty important thing was there any blowback to all of this. Yeah I think there has been some in the rest in wrestling circles amongst wrestling reporters and and amongst the fans wondering okay. We are looking around the sports world. We're looking around the entertainment world. We're seeing literally every pro league every concert tour Disney on ice everything canceling out of concern about corona virus and yet professional wrestling roles on as a weekly television product so there is a bit of confusion. There're two why this continues while every other facet of sports entertainment seems to have stopped. What about amongst the wrestlers did any of them have reservations about participating in this one particular did so wrestler by the name of Roman reigns one of the bigger stars and WWe had a very highly publicized battle with leukemia? He left in October. Two thousand eighteen returned to WWE IN FEBRUARY. Two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and he's compromised so news started to break recently through some of the quote unquote dirt sheets in wrestling. The ones who report the rumor. Innuendo that Roman reigns was not going to be participating in his scheduled match against Goldberg for the Universal Championship at Wrestlemainia. Wwe basically said hey look. This is understandable situation. The health and safety of our performers paramount Sakiz. The biggest name that we know will not be participating but quite frankly until we see what events they air this weekend we won't know who else may have decided to pull out or had to be quarantined or any of that nature because they're being very clandestine about what the card will actually be the first wrestlemainia. That's taking place over multiple nights. It's also the first wrestlemainia that is going to be completely pretaped. So when did they take this weekend's event and what steps did they take to ensure the safety of the wrestlers in the people working on it? It's been a race against time for me. As I mentioned the performance center is in Orlando Florida Orlando Florida. Recently issued a stay at home order March twenty sixth that really closed out all the essential businesses. Just like we've seen all over the country so the WBZ has been racing. It's time to not only record wrestlemainia matches but also record. Future television matches programming as well as far as the safety of the wrestlers. It is a closed control facility. Stephanie McMahon the daughter of owner Vince McMahon who is the brand manager for WWe said to variety. Recently there's extensive testing screening. When you first come into the facility regardless of whether you're a talent crew member or anyone else if you have a temperature taken and you have a temperature over a hundred point four degrees you're automatically asked to leave also any wrestlers de out of the country or in contact anybody who's been out of the country you're not actually allowed to enter the facility. Either so they are taking some safety measures as far as trying to make sure anyone exhibiting symptoms isn't allowed in the facility or anyone who might have been exposed to corona virus through travel or relationships isn't allowed in the facility. Which is you know what you see from other companies as well but obviously there's no way to be sure without Virus testing whether anybody actually has the center of city so they tape this before the stay at home order. Does that mean this is going to be the last big event like this or is this something they're going to keep on doing? There is a lot of sort of mystery as to how these wrestling organizations are going to continue to keep on doing their thing. I'm not sure what the regulations mean for the performance in Orlando. I don't know if this is GonNa be it for their use facility or not. I can't tell you that. Eighty w their competition with also filming inside of an empty facility in Florida's well and there was news this week that they're gonNA be taking their show to some undisclosed to record matches going forward so I don't know if it's GonNa be a shell game where these companies have to start going to the few places around the country that don't have restrictions in place or what have you. But it's clear from both cases that even though they're putting a bunch of their product in the bag right now in our taping matches and episodes for future use on television. The show apparently is going to go on

WWE Wrestlemainia Wrestling Greg Luzinski Orlando Wwe Performance Center Espn Vince Mcmahon Tampa Wwe Hall Of Fame Ceremony Raymond James Stadium Paul Leveque W. E. Hulk Hogan Stephanie Mcmahon Executive Vice President Orlando Florida Orlando Florid
Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

"The Seattle based infectious disease research institute will soon begin trials on an investigational immunotherapy that could be a promising treatment option for covert nineteen it's based on immune cells in the body known as natural killer in case cells which are already used to treat leukemia multiple myeloma patients the immune cells to get the sites of active via affection kill the virus in induce an immune response that controls the if infection the trial will begin soon with approximately a hundred patients diagnosed with a coded nineteen infection

Seattle Leukemia Multiple Myeloma
Mixed reviews for administration's handling of coronavirus

The Ben Shapiro Show

07:18 min | 5 months ago

Mixed reviews for administration's handling of coronavirus

"All right so last night. President trump basically said to corona virus. I'm in control here. And Corona Virus said to you in control so things are not going great out there with the grown of the big problem of course continued lack of information. The testing kits were not widely available. We just don't know how many people in the United States actually have corona virus. We don't even know how many people abroad have for a virus. What we do know is that there's certain measures that have been taken the harsher the measure Z teams. The faster the Groenemeyer is brought under control. This is true in Wuhan. It was true in South Korea where you've seen a significant bending of the curve. That is what people are calling it. The curve being the number of people who are infected and then number of people who are dying this obviously means that people are now getting increasingly serious and cautious about going to wide scale public events. Now that if you're young and you go to a big public event you're GonNa but that if you go to a public event you may become a carrier or transmitter to somebody who is more vulnerable. Somebody with a pre existing condition. Somebody who doesn't have a strong IMMUNE SYSTEM. Cancer Patients Leukemia patients. People who are older. All of this is is deeply frightening. I mean there's no other way to put it. You look the news. It's hard not to be scared and the reason it's hard not to be scared as when you see Italy shutting down every public space like all public spaces except for grocery stores and pharmacies. No Church services going on in Italy no stores open in Italy when you see Israel shutting down not only all travel all public events over one hundred people when you see people trying to shut down public events in Washington state. Obviously all of this is predicated on the notion. That Corona virus is easily transmitted which as far as we know is true and also that corona virus is a lot more deadly than the flu which is far as we know is also true but it does differ based on age bracket. It is irresponsible reporting to suggest that every person who who takes coup gets corona virus is equally likely to die of it or experienced significant ramifications from corona virus the younger. You are the better chance you have of recovering from this end. Even if you're older the majority of the people who are getting it are indeed recovering. The death rates of even for people eighty yes. It's like fifteen percent which so unbelievably high really frightening. But that means that eighty five percent of the people getting it above the lady are recovering from Corona virus. But it is lack of information that of course is scaring the living. Hell out of everyone. And this means that president trump stepping into the fray and presenting. Some sort of plan here was absolutely necessary. President trump did that last night. He got some mixed reviews. Let's put it that way but first let's get to the actual news yesterday. The World Health Organization declared a pandemic of virus disease covered nineteen according to the Washington Post the WHO declared corona virus abandoning reflecting alarm. The countries aren't working quickly and aggressively enough to fight. Disease Causes Cove in nineteen. They're deeply concerned by both the alarming levels of spreading severity and the alarming levels of an action said W. H. O. Director General throws at Hunnam Aces for weeks now the WHO has hesitated to make pandemic declaration for fear of inciting panic or prompting some countries flag in their efforts. Even though many epidemiologist believed the corona virus had already spread to pandemic levels but on Wednesday. Tether rose noted the widespread scale of the outbreak. Said there are now more than one hundred eighteen thousand cases in one hundred and fourteen countries over. Four Thousand People. Forty two hundred ninety one at that count have lost their lives in the days and weeks ahead. We expect to see the number of coronavirus cases. The number of deaths and the number of affected countries climb even higher tomorrow said that the pandemic is not a word to be used lightly or carelessly. It's award. Misuse can cause unreasonable. Fear or unjustified acceptance that the fight is over leading to unnecessary suffering and death the. Who's announcement does not trigger any new funding protocols or regulations? Basically scares the living. Hell out of everyone is what you get from that. It's not that anybody then gets released. Funding thanks to like if you declared a national emergency in the United States that gives additional powers to the government. That's not the same thing for the. Who when they declare pandemic it. Basically has the same effect as Michael Scott going to the center of the office and shouting. I declare bankruptcy like okay. Thanks Super Helpful okay. Would that said the NBA has now put it season on hold after one player tested positive for corona virus are now finding out that a second player has tested positive for run virus according to the La Times the NBA on Wednesday indefinitely. Suspended the two thousand Nineteen Two Thousand Twenty season after Utah Jazz Center Rudy. Gobert tested positive for cove in nineteen. Just a couple of days ago. Gobert who apparently was coughing and locker room. He jokingly went around He. Pressroom started touching everything. Like as a joke. Started touching all the microphones. He started touching all the reporters stuff while turns out dude head Corona virus and now it turns out that another player has come down with corona virus as well according to the League. The test result was reported. Shortly prior to the tip off of tonight's game between the Jazz Oklahoma City thunder at Chesapeake Energy Arena. At that time tonight's game was cancelled the effective player was not in the arena the NBA suspending game. Play following the conclusion of tonight's schedule of games until further notice or now living inside space. Jam I if you remember the plot of space jam. All the players refused to play because they are afraid that they're going to be infected with the alien viruses locker room the NBA will use this hiatus to determine next steps moving forward in regards to the corona virus. Pandemic Mark Cuban. Who's the owner of the Dallas Mavericks? He came out yesterday. He said that he's going to try and find a way to continue paying his hourly employees which is really cool thing to do. Obviously the Lakers and clippers were considered favorites for the championship. Lakers landed in China for exhibition games. After an international incident. This was just. The end of last year Lakers employees are being advised to work from home for the foreseeable future. The clippers will not practice on Thursday. Meanwhile we're now finding out the Tom. Hanks Rita Wilson have tested positive for corona virus which is always good news and by good news. I mean just ridiculous in horrifying so even celebrities. Scarola CORONA virus falls on the on the blessed and the un-blessed alike as first reported by deadline the Academy Award winner and his wife or animal -cation in Australia for pre production of a film on Elvis Presley when they began experiencing symptoms hanks wrote in a statement first published by deadline and later share to twitter. We felt a bit tired like we had colds. That's body aches. Read ahead some shows that came and went slight fevers to to play things right as needed in the world right now tested for corona virus and were found to be positive thanks went on to say that he and Wilson will be tested observed an isolated for as long as public health and safety require a meanwhile as I mentioned we. We now have a breaking piece of news that Jazz Star Donovan. Mitchell has tested positive for virus as well jazz players privately say that Rudy Gobert had been clicked careless in the locker room touching other players and their belongings as well. So that's scary stuff. Reuters reporting the president airboats narrow of Brazil is being tested for Corona virus. We know the Health Minister of Great Britain has corona virus. So this thing is it is widespread it is. It is hitting a lot of people. It would not be surprising to me that if universal testing were available in the United States hundreds of thousands of people would have grown a virus. Already that would not be shocking at all the Brazilian government spokesman who met with President Trump last weekend and was pictured standing next to him has now tested positive for corona virus as well so you would hope that the president of the United States has been tested for corona virus. The Brazilian President mentioned is now being monitored for viruses scheduled for the week was cancelled. Both were with Donald Trump and Mike pence last Saturday at mar-a-lago as well so all of this is All of this is deeply disturbing. We're going to get to more of this in just one second and president trump's response which as I say is receiving at best mixed reviews and frankly those mixed reviews are

President Trump United States Corona NBA Rudy Gobert Lakers Rita Wilson Thousand People South Korea Italy Wuhan FLU Clippers Washington Post World Health Organization Reuters Disease Causes Cove Leukemia
Every Chapter Has a Lesson With Erica Courdae

Cafe con Pam Podcast

08:38 min | 5 months ago

Every Chapter Has a Lesson With Erica Courdae

"Without further ADO. Here's my conversation with. Erica Cordell Erica. Welcome to Gothic up. Bam How are you? I'm great thank you for me. Pam Thank you. I'm excited so we met back in. I don't know when at she pot gas in Atlanta. Yeah I WANNA say it was October. I swear like last year was a bit of a blurb but I think that they'd have been like over some time last year she had guys. Who Were there right. So that was a great event. I had a lot of fun. You're also one of the speakers and that was amazing am at home here with the war so so we might hear him when the mailman comes which I think it's about to happen. My listeners are used to. I happen to have a very special sauce for dougie. So we're good. Thank you so Erica. Tell us your story what gets through. Who Are you? What's your heritage? Where did you grow up in if I was to ask you like? Let's go back to the beginning. How did that happen? I'M GONNA trauma best to fill like answer it. I'm like wow. I don't even know how to fully answer if I don't dig into something. Please Hofer as because unlike I will dig for sure. Well I am black African American. I don't one hundred percent I'll be honest. I don't know that I have a preference between either term and the reason I say that is because I've had conversations with people that I know that live outside of the United States so African American seems like I don't understand right and so for me black and or African American both work. I identify as female. So she her. I was born in Baltimore Maryland. I have lived in some part of Maryland for the majority of my life. I am the oldest. I have a younger sister. Don't really talk to her very often but she does exist. Assault doesn't exist. He does. I are being the oldest always kind of puts you in that place of being used to having to replace of authority whether you want to or not and you're setting simple even if you're like can do what I wanna do and not have to feel like I'm I'm twelve. I just WANNA be a right. Don't think about this. I think it almost embodies those things into you subliminally. Because you're like I'm just so used to doing this. This is what I do so I always wonder how much of that is conditioning. Or if that truly is just who I am at my core but it's there I'm the oldest two so I relate it's things like I do I don't get it but okay it because people will say like. Oh what's different being the youngest or different being the oldest the middle and? I'm like Again I've lived here. Most of my life lost my dad when I was twelve. I was always a daddy's girl so for me I'll jump back. But the kind of surreal part of having lost him at twelve was that he was thirty seven when he passed away from leukemia. And so when it finally hit me twenty five years after he passed that I had been on this earth longer than he was first of all of. Oh Hell like it was. It was a little scary in that says saying time. It's like that means that I was given a gift and so it's very important to be conscious of what you do with gifts and so that was a big thing for me again. I was a daddy's girl. So it's like gotta make proudly do you. I mean I'm sure maybe you've worked on healing that part of you right the Lesser Dad when she was young so when Little Erica. That happened was it so because I've talked to people about grief end some people when they lose people young. It's like it just kind of happen and you don't. It didn't hit you like you said until you were older. You're like Oh yeah or was it like young at the time were hit you. It definitely hit me when it happened and it will still occasionally have a moment where I'll wake up from a dream minutes. Like oh he's around and it's like no he's not so occasionally reality. Checks will come in for me. I think it was like two days after my twelve th birthday that he was diagnosed and that was in September September eighth and it was January twentieth that he passed away so it was very quick so quick and so there were a lot of points that I had to figure out how to maneuver through it. Where like you know. He went into the hospital. It looked just like him nor his normal self and then when he came out of the hospital for Thanksgiving and I was able to see that this point my parents were divorced. My parents were divorced since I was five. I'm like youtube or crazy. Do not need to be together. Please do this. This is okay with me. So that's the contrast of that. I was like no. I'm okay with divorce thing that it's cool but when I saw him Thanksgiving and it's still something that is do struggle with the memory even to this day when I went to answer the door for him he was very loaded from all the medication and the fluids lost his hair and in that moment I knew who he was in yet. A didn't recognize him and that split second that it took for me to be like no no. No no no get it together. I think he caught it and it broke my heart that it was there. It wasn't that he wasn't aware but I think that he caught again. It was so quick. It WASN'T A. Oh my gosh what happened. It was just like and it was like it was just enough and so I definitely had those points where I had to come to terms with these things. I had points where I would still regularly call. But he could no longer speak sold. They would just hold the phone up. He'd have to hear me because he was on a ventilator so he couldn't speak to me anymore. I mean it got to the point that I you know I could see all of the things that had were that it wasn't him anymore and as a kids don't realize it as an adult you're like this is just a physical form but as a kid is just this is my dad so I just remember when that call. Kinda came through that Monday morning and it just so happened it was m okay day that year and I was out of school and so when it came through it was one of those where I don't know if I'm GonNa truly say it was a ghost thing but you could feel that the energy was kind of off and it was like you know you. Kinda knew something was coming ashore enough that morning. That call came through when the you know he had passed away and so. I remember being twelve and having my own grief and yet having to still comfort my mother through the grief because even though they weren't together I think they were each other's first love and there's a certain amount of something that just never goes away totally with that yes and so you know yes. I recognized it and I went through it but I've also kind of been this person that I'm strong enough to be able to carry the bags for myself and others and I ended up doing it sometimes to my own detriment but that was a moment where I couldn't even choose whether or not to carry them for myself and my mother. I couldn't imagine not you know right and being the oldest right so it just kind of like you know yet might Kinda suck but what do you do? Thank you for sharing sore and it was. Just you know comment the same thing even when my grandmother passed away when. I was seventeen because again you know what do you do? Do you watch those around you just? Kinda fall apart or you step in when you know that you can even if that means that you have to put your own processing on the back Burner Holy. How did you manage it to heal it afterwards? When did you because having carried maybe an old the oldest child to it's like you do carry the bags because it's you pick them up if we're if we're moving forward and they're dragging will you gotta pick up what's been dragging right exactly. I mean in some ways I think we all try to process as best as we can but there are some parts of is to an extent it never fully they never. He'll back it. It kinda will heal the La- certain amount of a scar so like any kid would has played on. Concrete knows what those brush. Burns feel like they scar. And there's little lump in the skin just looks a little different colors different. Whatever and so you can heal. You're never the same from it so I think the older I got. I was able to process what my relationship with him. Their relationship that I saw that he had with others around me even with with my own mother and just kind of seeing what it is to process somebody as your parent and what it is to process somebody as an individual

Erica Cordell Erica Maryland Little Erica Atlanta United States Baltimore Hofer Assault Leukemia LA
Caleb Zysk Went From a Full Time in Person Personal Trainer to Full Time Online - Here's How

Change Lives Make Money

08:09 min | 6 months ago

Caleb Zysk Went From a Full Time in Person Personal Trainer to Full Time Online - Here's How

"I wanNA have a brief chat about your background. So why don't we start there brother. So where did you start out in your backstory. So what got you into fitness and general. Okay so honestly like it all started when I was in high school because I was a three sport athlete in I was good like I was above average but then all of a sudden sophomore year kind of came around and I was like okay. Everyone starting to get better than me. They're faster they're stronger. Side figure out. Oh how to get there. And I found that in the gym I was able to work my speed and my strength and so forth like that really got me into like helping others what I was actually four I was diagnosed knows with leukaemia cancers kit and easy honestly. Don't talk about it a lot. Luckily because I was so young I don't remember a lot of it but I mean either way I've always had a passion for helping others ever since I wanted to be like those doctors. I wanted to be like those nurses. I hated hospitals so I didn't want to work inside of a hospital. saw how else can I help other people. I honestly wanted to go through physical therapy. And that's where I went to school for but however my last credit at my school that my college that I went to we do an internship and I did an internship at a place called fit body boot camp and I fell in love with the idea of helping people through fitness and I just fell in love with his so much. I was like this is what I have to do like. This is my ashes screens. Me Ravi do I love it so you started working at fit body boot camp. You started like you fell in love with fitness like from that point. Did you get a job autobody boot camp. We're like what was your journey to become a personal trainer. So I was that came for a little while and I decided to move on from there after like just for a little bit. Obviously just wasn't for me. It wasn't a best fit owners. I kind of clash just a little bit. But for their I went from place to place just going from location location. Try and find what was best for me but the the best part was that I was building a group of people that would go to wherever I went from gym to gym because I had a following those kind of the best arts and then I really started to find my stride aid or really get into fear I was like okay. I'm an amazing personal trainer when I found this gym called cricket fitness and it was different compared to any other workout Out because they specialized in twenty minutes twice a week and they had a robotically controlled machine. kind of met. You where you're at so play no matter your strength. No matter your fitness level you could I do and I thought that was amazing because so many people struggle which is free weights in trouble with machines but if you have a specific machine that meets you where you're at I was like this is Golden Bobby love it. I love it so you got into helping people. You started working at a gym. When did you kind of realize that like you know when I talked to you doing a lot of in person? So what for you was like the Epiphany Hicfa that made you realize like okay. I WANNA help. People want to transform people's lives but I actually want to do the online space. Well to be honest kind of all started. When I took this position that I just mentioned that quick it not only was? I believe trainer so I was in charge of almost all of the clients that was also in charge of marketing in sales. But I had no free time and I I was like Oh my goodness I'm just being overwhelmed and then one of my friends actually went through one of your programs and besides just that like I always knew that I could help more people online and like that's my biggest passion. That's what I WANNA do. That's what I want to accomplish yellow just being able to help more people always drew me towards it. But I didn't know how to get started. Yeah I do love it. Did I actually think that a lot of in person trainers struggle. This and I'm just laughing because I'm in my Car Gordon the podcast but I think that a lot of in person trainers struggle with this man I think a lot of imprison erzen trainers the reason that we get into fitness in the first place is because we want to help people but then I think a lot of imprison trainers are dislike stuck in this like this time for money trap and we're helping people. What what we're doing it at the expense of our own health? I know for me when I worked at a gym man. I was like I love helping people so much but being in the gym Mike. I don't know about you but like being the gym like ten twelve hours a day for me. I just built blotters Edmund. No one hundred percent. I said this to my girlfriend before I joined with you. I was like I love what I do but I am miserable like I was not happy I was beyond stress. Didn't the help that I was also in charge of sales and marketing for the whole gym itself. So like I had like a triple load. I was working seventy hours a week and I was like I need to find something else where I can still work towards my Ashen and still help people love it. Did I love it so I know when I started working together you'd already Alec Actually previously hired a business mentor and I just really WanNa touch like what was your experience experience with the other person did you get like what were you looking for to the program. And what did you get out of it and like what were some of the downfalls so I was looking honestly just for some guidance on on where to get started because I like I said I had experience with injuring trading. I know how to help people. I know how to help people lose weight and get to their goals but I didn't know how to build a platform or how to build my business online. How to get started? So that's kind of what I was searching for and I did find a coach and there was a great appeal because what he was is talking about was building a membership area. And that's what I did. And he focused more on getting more clients and not putting as much effort into each one. But that's not necessarily what I'm like do because I like to be there for my clients like for my clients right now like I was honestly scrolling through a couple of my clients messages in I was I've I best them like five times this week. Already and it's not just like to be annoying but it's like sending them something motivational on Monday just to get going and then used as like check in with the nutrition Wednesdays like a weekly check it and so forth like that thing is with the online or the membership in the coach I acquired. He wasn't there. He had like these mini coaches. That were just kind kind of in contact with him. Maybe once or twice a week. He's like okay. Here's a step by step process. This is what you need to do. And if you do this you'll succeed you'll find success but I wasn't finding success I was putting tons of money into it and it just wasn't getting to where I wanna be and it took me months to build this membership at four hundred. I probably invested or five thousand dollars into this membership flat or Tofte of getting the coach and it just wasn't planning out and I just put it on the back when I was like okay. I don't know what to do. I'm not getting the help I needed. So this obviously isn't working anymore for your dude and I actually. I remember when I reach out because I was working with Mason with whom he and Mason might watches or listened so mason my boy. He's crushing it. And I posted Mason in my story and then and you're like yo you reach out to Mason and then me and you're like yell like I'm GonNa be your easiest client like being. You chatted briefly but I imagine you must have been feeling some hesitation. It's beers ears. Oh like reaching out to mentor. Of course I mean I was afraid of investing again not only money but my time yet in feeling too carful. It's not just your money. It's also your time like I'm investing like so much time into this program and just want to make this work so bad and you tried so hard so it's a big fear man right exactly exactly exactly. I mean honestly the biggest thing was you talked about this. One of your last podcasts. The all in or the all out yet and with my first membership Irian my first coach. I don't think I was all in because I didn't have the guidance and I didn't have the help that I need but when you I went all in because like you mentioned it in your podcast you actually gave me me a shout out that I was like okay. This is GonNa work. I don't know what I'm going to do like I messed it. Everything I had into and I was like. Let's do this. Let's crush it. I'm GONNA do everything I can to make it work. I was working seventy hours a week. We get regular job and then I was putting in twenty hours on my online talking about Don. I love it Dude I love it I love it okay. So for you like what was was it like. What was the switch? Because there's a lot of trainers that are like half in half out there half cooked right now. Maybe they're in the program and if you're in the program. Listen I want you guys to get results Caleb. So how do you flip that switch rich what was it for you. What was the switch to have that all in mentality? I mean honestly like you said in the PODCASTS. It probably was. I invested everything I had like. I was like okay. Okay my buddy mason who you just mentioned seeing results. I'm either going to stay where I'm at like I'm going to continue to be unhappy. I'm going to continue to be stressed at my job or I'm going to go all in. I'm going to invest just everything I have and I'm going to give it my time. I'm going to be in the same spot side is like where do you WanNa be in five years from now. Do you WANNA be in the same spot. You're at right now or do you want to be farther ahead in the best way to grow to personally invest in yourself not just money but also time right exactly and that's the key man. That's what I want to change to get. It's like you can't just invest your money. You also have to invest your time. You got to put in the work like one systems there. It's got to work the

Mason Leukaemia Alec Actually Golden Bobby Caleb DON
Building the First CAR-T Company

a16z

09:46 min | 6 months ago

Building the First CAR-T Company

"We're here to talk about this new kind of therapy Carta therapy and what it means to be building a company that is delivering this Brand New Medical Paradigm for cancer treatment. So so let's just start by giving a little bit of background. What is your tagline of? Here's what Cartier's so counties and Culinary Kensington receptive therapies piece nations biggest gift that we give in terms of protecting us from diseases. Something called T. cells There are a subset of your blood cells white cells white cells typically prevent event infection disease so they always availing in protecting you A. B. Cell produces antibodies a T. cell actually hones in and gobbles up peptides abnormalities that are circulating in the system and the idea was. Could you combine the features of obese. Ellen T. cell together and that's where the Chimaera comes in so Chimera was an ancient Greek mythological figure right. There was a hybrid. I think of a female Lion Dragon and assert So the whole idea being could you combine And create a blend of something with the idea that you could create a therapies around it and and then the nub of the therapy really involves taking a patient cease else and we re engineer those t cells think of it like a GPS system in cells. The we've been able to engineer. We take cells from a patient. reengineer them we give them back and those cells detect cancer and destroy them a best analogy. I can give is like Qasim Card into the T.. Cells that SIM card that gets expressed on the surface of those t cells is very unique only dolls while number and that number is a specific acidic cancer antigen or a protein. That's abnormal protein. Themselves of cancer cells. Were able to get these T. cells to actually become killing machines in some ways whereby they are identified normal pricing themselves of a cell and they go and attack. So let's do what I call the patient journey and the cell journey so I'm I'm GonNa take a profile of a child leukaemia. You have a child of the age of three or four that they start getting bruising they go to their family practitioner the do a a CBC they look it up. Blood count and the have massive leukemia in terms of that wants celebration. Channel rapidly assessed based on chemotherapy and great news. They respond and most kids with leukemia. Respond really well to chemotherapy. Two Years Light of the routine follow up and boom the next on the ball all comes in. Unfortunately they're starting to now get leukemia. Breakthrough the mole chemotherapies provocative but then comes a point where these patients become a what we sign in. The oncology will refractory relaxing so they're refractory to any further. Chemotherapy are being into them. And they're relaxing because the diseases is worsening and so that patient is then brought in to have their blood drawn to see. Do they have that right. Surface Marker that you could create this engineer therapy for if they express something called. CD Nineteen then. We basically harvest out that t cells process called Afer Rhesus Webuye patient's exploded withdrawn through machine and it fills out the white blood cells. Those cells are then taken and they ship to a central manufacturing facility in the case of the University of Pennsylvania that she had their own manufacturing capability. So they do it on Saturday and remember. This patient is sick. So you've hosted comes to this. Als You then go through a process of seven to ten days where you have to reengineer themselves though cells go through a process of of self selection actions. The rice owls are extracted than excited. By certain degree technologies that basically made this cell's receptive state that you can then deliver Trojan horse into it the Trojan horses this payload that we deliver the Genetic Code that expresses this new surface. Marker called the cart on the surface of the south you. Dan Go through a process of three days. Watching these cells. Are they going to grow. And you know you cross your fingers and toes because sometimes it grow now you know these are cells that become fatigued and and they just don't have that umph energy this needed to grow. Then you have to harvest out the cells once they've grown then you have to freeze them. Then you have to ship. A Mild Kema therapeutic regimen is given to the patient we kind of call it conditioning And conditioning is that you want to get the patients in a certain state that they you create space in their body for them to receive these cells Eh consults to expand interesting given us one infusion and what you typically see he is a spike. In the patient's fever these sell stock to multiply very very rapidly and at the same time. They're pushing up massive amounts of protein. And they I start to literally attack the cancer wherever they say cancer when it's destroyed releases a lot of toxins and that manifestation self in something signed a Release Syndrome suroor constant and so having not patient available to be able to for example new. ICU unit if needed it requires a lot of Coordination Asians action right so you then go through that process and hopefully by three or four days using that window of is this visionary responded if you don't see the sunshine storm means the products not working. She look forward to an adverse event which is really weird and Madsen. Because if you don't see it you know the products not working twenty eight days later when the patient Asian is better the fevers subside. And you do a bone marrow biopsy various blood tests and you see over ninety percent of kids initially in the trials go complete remission after twenty eight days and the children out now out you know seven eight nine years now. Gus Persistent endurable gear. We hope that they remain in this state. Where these cells constantly in surveillance in the body so should a signal? A rise of abnormal processing these cells can then attack. So I've given you a sense of the journey and the patient Jimmy now you think about that. Creating products around the area of infrastructure. How how do you begin into scale a process like that to build the pipes and the infrastructure to scale? I'd go back to two thousand thirteen literally would be. We'd been the size of a room like this podcastone and literally we would have a tubes and banks hung on the wall. It was literally are sort of brainstorming Warren. Of How do we take this process. This is from an academic open process close a manufacturing meaning Lockett to good manufacturing practices Standards Process Development Analytical Development Woodmen Vaqta scientists and technical operations personnel working around the clock so again very different way of practicing medicine right. This was like the wild west in some ways in the early days but we did it and we learned lottery not process we acquire our manufacturing facility. Because we're not in the business of just creating product chronic state. We WanNa Anna as she expanded globally. We need to bring down the cost of goods radically for these therapies. Because they are really expensive to make so unless you invested upstream in that then how you're going to be able to scale. Not She make these affordable and the same time you know reverend generate revenue for the company the processes so it's so different different to traditional medicine. So you have to be able to manufacture this therapy. You've got to be able to manage the logistics Patient to the provider Heider from the provider to the manufacturer back to the provider. Back to the patient what you call the vein vein logistics. So is there really any other way eight to do this. But to be a full stack or fully vertically integrated company. If you're going to commercialize these types of therapies. I I think the more and more you see where the world is moving to look at the personalized nature of what we doing whether these are current generation products or off the shelf products in the future that ecosystem being understood from the patient journey. The Cell Journey Sell Logistics to your point adverse event management energy thinking about the interface of tax attack for the future which is gonna be required a weather that being diagnostics whether that being management of patient patient selection or whether you're looking at blockchain China for example in terms of secure chain of identity. Because look if I'm taking your cells you want to guarantee I'm giving ourselves back right. So there's a whole security security apparatus in this and that people just don't consider when I got into it if we didn't have that pillar of manufacturing if we didn't have the research engine if we didn't have the ability let's see to learn from each patient that we manufactured what's working. Well Do. We need to add a bit of this reagents that we need to stimulate the cells in a certain way all of that repeat learning and that can only happen the full snack company in order to be able to really maximise and create great products. We decided to own that process ourselves. So can you imagine that if we see success in the clinic and we don't have the manufacturing to go in hand. I kind of feel less on. Ethical in terms of the the breakthrough speed with which sciences alliances evolving been right being able to manufacture the product would be such a shame building this new kind of technology. This new kind of medicine the talent the culture and the platform at farm everything new VIZ intially. That sounds really painful. It was not easy was actually developing products in a different way against the paradigm so so in all worlds of drug development and product development. You know there's a very well established cycle and you do things You know it's memorialized with the FDA this guidances agencies etc but try developing something that regulators of never done before

Cancer Engineer Leukemia Logistics Patient Cartier Cell Journey Sell Logistics Standards Process Development Ellen T. University Of Pennsylvania Fevers Dan Go Product Development Gus Persistent Madsen FDA ICU
Fighting cancer with CRISPR

Science Magazine Podcast

10:23 min | 6 months ago

Fighting cancer with CRISPR

"Now we have staff writer Jennifer cousin Frankel. She wrote a story this week on Crisper and cancer immunotherapy to big ideas says mushed together for the first time in human patients. Hi Jennifer Hi. Thanks for having me sure. I said something scary. It's not every day that we get to say a something is a first. There's always a lot of pushback whenever we put it into a story or if it comes up in a research paper but this is some type of I. This is the first time that that researchers have reported on taking immune cells in this case the T. cells which we kind of think of as the soldiers of the immune in system that fight off infection using crisper to modify them together and then putting them back inside a human body and seeing what happens. It's that hasn't been done before. It hasn't been described before their trials that are going on. That are testing this and this is why we never put I in a headline exactly far to do was dive into the techniques. We're GonNa talk about cancer immunotherapy and then we're also going to talk about crisper. We need to kind of understand both of those things to understand what happened in this paper. This is a specific kind of cancer. Immunotherapy right yes. That's right so cancer. Immunotherapy is essentially trying being to harness the immune system to fight cancer. And it's something that's been really hot in the cancer field for the last several years in fact won the Nobel prize is just the other year. What this study is making use of is one technique in cancer? Immunotherapy that uses the T. cells and it tries to to sort of help. The t cells recognize tumor cells and then destroy them some of the problems that have come up as people have experimented with that. Were things like it. It doesn't really get into solid tumors and some other things. This is still a really new field and people are still working very hard to improve. Its success it's been pretty successful in blood cancers leukemia in lymphomas and there are two Cardi cell therapy's that companies have developed in that have been approved there are some additional additional hurdles in solid tumors. And it has been more difficult to consistently get the therapy to work in solid tumors solid tumors or things. Like brain tumor pancreatic host humor. Like I think yeah any tumor. That's kind of a solid mass as opposed to in the blood. That's the cancer immunotherapy side of things. Let's talk about the crisper side of things. Can you just tell us what crisper is. And then maybe we can talk about how. It's been used their politically or not so far. So crisper is another really hot area in biology Jay. It's a technology that essentially cuts DNA and then the DNA can kind of recombine in different ways it can be used in different settings to add genes or DNA to remove them. It depends but it can give a lot of flexibility around modifying DNA A and it's used in all different settings not just in medicine but strongly medicine is one area where there's been a lot of interest in using crisper because it's a way of modifying lying. The genome in this case crisper is used to modify immune cell so they took immune cells out of a patient and then use this gene editing technique to make changes to them. They had these three patients and what they did was they took out blood cells and then they modified those cells in the lab. They had to add in a gene gene. That was going to target a protein that was on the surface of their cancer cells. The other thing that they did was they used crisper to edit the genome such that they were knocking out three other genes and the genes that they chose they chose because they I hope they would make the T. cells even more powerful. They hope they would help them. Hang around longer in the body more effective against the tumors than they reintroduce introduce those cells. They gave them back in. That whole process takes several weeks. It takes four to six weeks to from the time you take the blood out to the time you put the cells back in. They had to go through a number of layers to make sure that they were really doing everything safely and carefully. So what were they worried about when they reintroduced these cells into the body. One one question was just you know with these cells even survive right. He just kind of disappear which has been a problem. In general with some genetically modified t cells it can be hard good for them to kind of thrive in the body and these these were cells that had been modified in several different ways. Then of course another question is are they going to cause harm MHM if they do survive and one particular concern with crisper. Is that when you go in to do this. Editing you can have these off off target effects. Were you accidentally cause modifications to other DNA. That you weren't aiming for there was concern that that could happen then of course that's changing other. DNA in the T.. Cells who knows what effects that might have on the patients so those are the big two questions and then also you know they probably wanted to know if the people would get better. Everyone of course hoped that that it would help. These patients get better at the same time. The trial was not really designed for efficacy it was too small and it was also also so new and so they made certain choices in the very specific details of the treatment. They offered that improved safety. There were certain things they did did to try and make it less likely that the immune system of the patients would react in a sort of dangerous way to the cells but in doing so that could potentially elite reduced. How effective the treatment is you know the target that they picked on the cancer cells? They pick that specific target because there had been a number of trials targeting doing that with traditional therapy so they knew was probably a pretty safe target. But it may be isn't the best target unfortunately and as you might expect from. I'm talking about it. The patients did not recover from their cancer. Because of this therapy. What were some of the other results of the experiment that we can talk about now so I would say the results were that for the time for which they've been followed? The treatment appeared safe so far. Nothing scary happened nothing. There were no showstoppers. They saw some off target effects. But those off target effects didn't seem to cause any obvious harm to the musicians in the cells that had the off target effects. The percentage of cells with those effects seemed to kind of fade out over time about the target effects like the changes made to the T.. Cells of these patients. Were those persistent in the body. One thing that I think was quite heartening. Is that these. He sells really stuck around in a way. That other t cells going after this particular target haven't in other published studies and so they've they've lasted so far up to nine months and they're continuing to follow these patients and also when they took out the cells over months which they did did they would take blood from the patients and then look at the sells again it could get them back and study them in the lab and those sales were targeting cancer in the lab now like you say in the patients. The benefits were definitely limited. There were three people treated one of those people has since died and in the other to their disease has progressed and they are getting other treatments. MHM so the effects were limited. You know it can be hard to kind of know how to understand that on the one hand this is just three patients and so we were very very sick. And so if we're thinking about what's going to be an effective treatment you need to treat more people to really know and then again you're thinking about this. First Time in people have focused on safety safety from your story from boats. It really seemed like that people in this field were saying this is a step. This is getting us over a really big hurdle. Yes I think it's a step and I think it's kind of layering on the use of crisper onto this other area of cell therapy that have gotten so much interest interest in generated so much excitement cancer but also still have a lot of room to improve and it's a way of saying can we make better use is other technology. What's expected to happen next more of the same thing? Are they going to try to infer different targets. One of the exciting things about this field right now. Is there so much happening. And people have so many he different ideas for what they could try and there are a lot of different theories and we don't really know what's going to pan out and what's not and so there are a lot of different. The group's thinking about different targets different cancers other diseases of course to apply crisper to their companies. That are involved. They're just a lot of different ways. You could go with this but right now. There are other trials that are recruiting patients for crisper modified t cells else and some people. I talked to said you know. There are surely going to be many more trials opening in parts result of this study. What kind of of regulatory oversight was there for this is there a body that governs crisper studies? There's not a body that's specific to crisper but there is as a group called the recombinant DNA Advisory Committee which is a a panel that has traditionally vetted the safety and ethics of different gene therapy trials funded by the US government or other other funders and so this went through the review of that committee. which is colloquially known as the rack of the and also so went through you know a lot of review of the National Institutes of health a lot of review from the US Food and Drug Administration? You know as you can imagine anything new. Where you're you're genetically commodifying cells to a degree? You have four earn away. You haven't before writing them into people you have to be careful and of course you know. Everyone has hopes for this therapy in the years ahead. And because of that you have to be so careful when you're starting out. The hopes of a lot of people were pinned on gene therapies. His and yeah you know some early problems. Really put a damper on the field for a long time. Yes if something really terrible happens not only is that obviously terrible for that individual it has these ripple effects across the field and so I think the people running this trial. We're thinking of both of those things as they designed and pursued the study. Thank you so much Jennifer. Thank

Crisper Cancer Solid Tumors Jennifer Hi Cardi Cell Therapy Nobel Prize Jennifer Cousin Frankel Staff Writer Us Food And Drug Administratio Jennifer Dna Advisory Committee Us Government National Institutes Of Health
How Do Bengal Cats Work?

BrainStuff

04:08 min | 7 months ago

How Do Bengal Cats Work?

"About six million years ago to feline factions went their separate separate ways. A small bodied cat living in Europe came the common ancestor of both groups. One lineage eventually gave rise to Felix Casas. The modern in domestic cat kept in millions of households the other produced species known as and forgive my rusty Latin Prion alias Ben Glances or the wild leopard cat distributed across southern and eastern Asia it prowls forests farms and grasslands weighing about seven to fifteen pounds. That's about three to seven kilos on average few mistake the creature for an actual leopard yet. It's a skilled Predator all the same and just like leopards. Many of these we be sees are covered with Rosettes roundish spot clusters that surround lighter patches. A for in the twentieth century demand for exotic exotic looking pets created a hybrid cat market by crossing p Ben Glens is with the more familiar Felix. Casas a new breed rose in prominence. Athletic I and willful this so-called Bengal cat can be quite a handful and as we'll see it's no stranger to controversy. One of the cat lovers lovers who helped the bengals get its start was geneticist William Center wall in Nineteen seventy-one sent her wall then a professor at California's Loma Linda University began crossing using domestic cats with leopard cats. The latter are resistant to the Feline version of leukemia cancer. He was studying through his hybridize. Cats sent her wall all sought new insights into the hereditary processes associated with this disorder. He wasn't the first person to breed. Leopard cats with domestics reports show that other are hybrids were born as far back as nineteen thirty one and we can't discuss bengals origins without acknowledging the late. Jean mill a collaborator center walls. This conservationist made it aware cat with the Black Tomcat in nineteen sixty. Three bus began a decades long passion for bengals Mills Gorgeous Animals and and their descendants would soon become regulars at high profile cat shows that visibility popularized the breed as a whole another reader of note. Was Bill Angler her a zookeeper and longtime animal importer using a leopard cat named Shah bread. A number of half domestic half wild kittens in the early nineteen seventies. He's he might have also given these critters popular name. Popular Myth Says Bengal could be a play on the abbreviation. Be Angler. Of course it could. It's simply stemmed. From the species name glances the world may never know. Today you can find bengals a number of different colors and patterns a most people associate these animals with the Rosette markings detailed above but not all rosettes look like they can be pointed and vaguely Arrow shaped or circular with a doughnut like flare player. Other bengals have so called pawprint Rosettes as the name implies though splotches almost look like animal tracks and then you've got bengals swirling erling multi toned marble coats instead of the more traditional spots back in nineteen eighty-seven mill bread the first known kitten to rock this distinctive style. The coats base color can be quite variable to depending on the individual can look Brown golden charcoal grey silvery or even whitish. That's right folks. There are are white furred Bengal cats who look like miniature snow leopards out there underneath their showy coats bengals tend to have muscular physiques according to the cat. FANCIERS here's Association. The hind legs are taller than the shoulders. In general adult bengals way about eight to fifteen pounds or seven kilos a tiny bit more than their wild ancestors stars but these guys have a well earned reputation as energetic felines fond of long walks games of fetch bengals are on the move almost constantly way to prevent boredom keepers can stock up on toys or get their pet a feline playmate lake savannah cats another hybrid breed. Bengals have an affinity for water related aided activities from swimming and Kiddie pools to showering with their owners.

Bengals Felix Casas Ben Glances Bill Angler Shah Bread Europe Bengal P Ben Glens Leukemia Loma Linda University California Jean Mill Professor William Center Brown
9/11 first responders may have increased risk for cancer

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:25 sec | 7 months ago

9/11 first responders may have increased risk for cancer

"A new study shows that nine eleven first responders are at a greater risk of developing leukemia the lead author from the I con school of medicine at Mount Sinai says the study is the first to show an increase in the incidence of cancer which may take years to develop after exposure the study found that those exposed to the toxins found at ground zero have a forty one percent higher risk of developing the blood cancer compared to the general

Mount Sinai
CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:07 min | 7 months ago

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

"Today we're GONNA be talking to Cherie Virago professor of medicine and medical molecular genetics and also director of the stem cell program. I use school of Medicine. He Generals General's GonNa talk to us today about stem cell. Therapy and car T.. Therapy in particular which you may have heard in the news but before we get to that. Let's start with some basics first of all. Welcome to the program program thank you. Can you tell us in general what it means to be not only a professor of medicine but a professor of medical and molecular genetics so medical Michael Molecular Genetics. It's a very broad term It's it's really looking at the molecular basis of disease Not just inherited a disease but Many of the diseases have a molecular basis. Even if they're not directly inherited had he actually look get to the molecular basis. What kind of research technologies are you using? The biggest technology at the moment is Sequencing genes particularly in in terms of Chewers in my area sequencing can cell's genome to identify particular mutations. That could be targetable identifying mutations Sion's that in future could be Way We could design drugs perhaps decided Also there are ways of personalizing Medicine in a way Way We can identify Because not all cancer even the same kind of cancer is not all Homogeneous there's a lot of heterogeneity so if you can identify certain mutations in a person's at cancer cell you may be able to target that specifically perfect for that person's cancer as opposed to all the people with that kind of cancer. So how do you train to do this kind of work so in your career career how what did you do to get to this point. Well I guess there are various ways of getting there the way I got there. I trained actually in Australia Did all my hematology. Aw called you training in Australia. And then I did a PhD. That was more related to stem cell transplantation rather than molecular medicine at the time and then I moved to Ohio state where I stayed there for about six years on faculty and then the opportunity came to lead the transplant program. Ram At Indiana University. So I moved there in two thousand six. So we're talking about treating cancer. Is it all kinds of cancer or specific kinds of cancer. Turner accident well as a stem cell transplant. we're really focusing on hematological. Kansas blood cancers So leukemia multiple myeloma lymphoma. These are the ones that are amenable really to stem cell transplantation. You talk about what the differences are between those three short so It's really the cell of origin or the origin of the cancer so leukemia we're really talking about Cancers of blood stem cells the bone marrow in multiple myeloma. We're really talking about Cancer cells plasma cells which really part of the immune system in lymph falmouth with talking about cancer cells that are also part of the immune system that the less differentiated cells than the Coloma. So what what causes these. What makes someone developed one of those types of cancer? Well that's a really good question and we don't know all the the answers to that but It the it's silly as with other Kansas to I'll just blood cancers there are Hits in the genome of the the cans of the cells that turns them on to become cancerous essentially and so once they become cancerous. They just start growing multiplying without controls trolls. That the gist of it. Or Yeah. That's basically it they. They're able to multiply without control but they're also able to survive better They have a survival advantage compared to their normal counterparts talking about the history of treatment of those types of cancer. Like what do we do. And what are we. What are we got into now? And specifically of course what is stem cell therapy. Happy at the end. Yes so you know historically the we have been treating and we still the do treat These cancers with conventional cytotoxic agents these agents are essentially cellular toxins that cause DNA damage to the cells and as a result they The cells sells died and they because cancer cells tend to divide more frequently or more rapidly than normal cells and these conventional channel cytotoxic target the proliferating cells more than the Doman cells. So we're able to Mo- selectively kill cancer cells. But they are. They also affect normal cells as well as things have evolved We are now able to. We learn more about the genetics of the Kansas. His when now able to design drugs that particularly targets in pathways molecular pathways. That these cancer cells depend on so Treatment has become Less toxic to the to the patient in general so we're trying to target specifically just killing the cancer while not killing other other rapidly or any other kinda cells in the body. So what is then stem cell. Therapy like what. What's the difference between what skyping there and then going all the way to say? We're GONNA do a stem cell. Trance have so in some cases not all Kansas but some Kansas are also amenable to stem cell transplant therapy. And they're really too broadly. Speaking to approach is one where we use. The patient's own stem cells called tolerance stem cell transplantation. And where we use dona cells or allogeneic stem cell transplantation so with autologous transplantation plantation would really reverting back to the classic cytotoxic approach way we give very high doses of chemotherapy to Kill Oh as many cancer cells as possible. One of the side effects of this is that it will also cools a permanent damage to the bone marrow of people without stem cell support report. They would Essentially die of marrow failure so to collect stem cells. I there on stem cells assuming their stem cells not diseased. Then when you can give high dose. Chemotherapy give back stem cells and allow the marrow to recover so I have a couple questions there first of all. How do you get the stem cells? Out So stem cells live predominantly in the bone marrow But they do circulate the blood so you can either collect directly from the bone marrow but more commonly family today in the autologous approach we give growth factors which can move stem cells to circulate more in the blood and then we collect them. I'm by a process called a ferocious. Where basically they are collected a blood donor machine essentially that will collect them from the blood? How do you how do you how are you sure? You're not collecting cancer cells at the same time you do Some of these stem cell products will be contaminated but to some extent by cancer sells but it seems that most relapses after autologous transplantation occur not because of contamination. But because you really the the chemo a high dose chemotherapy that you've given has not killed the last cancer cell in the body. So how are you also assured that the stem cells are not. Can't where's the cancer come from. If it's not coming mm from stem cells as the simpsons or what about the sort of the the. He met a poetic stem cells. That give rise to the sherm tie. He met a point system. MM-HMM SO For example in multiple myeloma these inadequate ext themselves are not cancerous. Okay and in lymphomas Somali. They are not not cancerous. Can you just give us just a brief description of what the poetic system is so the Humana poetic system is essentially all blood forming cells and immune cells so the very primitive stem cells that give give rise to the humanitarian existent. They give rise to white cells red cells platelets as well as the components of the immune in systems such as B. Cells. T. Cells natural killer cells. We're just trying to figure out in my head and where it comes from. Because if if the are the white blood cells coming from the bone marrow in the stem cells though in development I it depends on the Canada Essentially for example if we take multiple well my Lama so the Within the immune system one cancer cell becomes Transform to become malignant and phones a clone in that clone of actually expands and has sub clones of its own and that's really the cancer but that's not arising from a in the actual stem cell of the very primitive stem cell that gives rise to all the blood forming cells in the Merrill.

Cancer T. Cells Kansas Multiple Myeloma Michael Molecular Genetics Australia School Of Medicine Professor Of Medicine Cherie Virago Ram At Indiana University Myeloma Lymphoma Director Ohio Professor Sion
Higher Incidence of Leukemia Found in 9/11 Responders

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Higher Incidence of Leukemia Found in 9/11 Responders

"We've known for a very long time first responders and others who spend time at ground zero after nine eleven have been coming down with a wide range of diseases linked to exposure to toxic das now there's evidence for the first time that there suffering from higher rates of leukemia Susan title bound as with the World Trade Center general respond data center we found that there was an elevated incidence rate of all cancers combined over the rates that are seen in the general population and then for specific cancers we saw an increased rate for prostate thyroid and leukemia the author of the study turned up this information says that the latency for leukemia variance and it can be quite long there are about seventy seven thousand respond hers and rolled in the World Trade Center program more than ten thousand have developed cancer including three hundred and sixty two with

6-year-old cancer survivor gets standing ovation from classmates, teachers

Steve and Ted

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

6-year-old cancer survivor gets standing ovation from classmates, teachers

"A warm welcome for a young cancer survivor a young boy in Ohio receives a standing ovation from classmates following his last chemotherapy treatment six year old John Oliver is a pain who goes by J. O. seen all smiles walking down a hallway returning to St Helen Catholic school in Newbury his family and to teachers surprising him with an assembly marking the end of a three year battle with leukemia despite side effects and not being able to do any physical activity J. O. as principal says he never fell behind and they are so happy to have him

Ohio John Oliver J. O. St Helen Catholic School Newbury Leukemia Principal Cancer
6-year-old cancer survivor gets standing ovation from classmates, teachers

Steve and Ted

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

6-year-old cancer survivor gets standing ovation from classmates, teachers

"A warm welcome for a young cancer survivor a young boy in Ohio receives a standing ovation from classmates following his last chemotherapy treatment six year old John Oliver is a pain who goes by J. O. seen all smiles walking down a hallway returning to St Helen Catholic school in Newbury his family and to teachers surprising him with an assembly marking the end of a three year battle with leukemia despite side effects and not being able to do any physical activity J. O. as principal says he never fell behind and they are so happy to have him

"leukemia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"leukemia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So all we did the transplant put in the central line catheter. That was a little bit were deal. It was started bleeding too much like filler die whatever I do. But they just trudged through it. And then you know after about. Out. Four or five months everything successful transplant land. Well, my brother. Stop taking the anti rejection medication and his body rejected. The transplant. So. So he know of the change direction that you were heading down that. Yeah, we're talking about that time. Yeah. We did. We we mentioned that I told him I think I wanna do this and something that was he was aware of how how do you think of your brother and your job now? So every time I go into work. You know, it's funny because the the unit that we did the transplant a lot of the whole. Employees who work there though. Call me Benjamin, I'll call them Benjamin back like him walk out of the hey, Benjamin Benjamin that's not Benjamin e man out. We have something going on or say to like, one of the female, nurses, and they're like, no, that's that's that's not, you know, people there that then you end up working with them eat you remember that while a so like Toby, gene Dulcie those who's actually the educator. She's on she's on our team for the leukemia. Lymphoma society, she's educator for that department. Okay. Shoes actually a patient on the same unit with member. Other jury members story we're talking about. He was having a hard time with the treatment throwing a lot. And she offered to take them down to buy a slice of human eat pizza. Okay. So so while I've got you here ICU nurse. Stories. I mean, do you just have stories for days? Are you the one that you had a party? Somebody says tell me I see you stories. Yeah. There is a. People are different breed of people where the kind of people it's like the bodies are our career rights. We we see a lot of things. Yeah. I've seen lots lots of interesting things, we we. We're not judgmental. Of course. And and really at the end of the day. It's like you're here with me for this amount of time in my job is to deliver you healthy out of this situation. Regardless of what you make whatever you came in with whatever you did to yourself or to your body. That's not my role my role right now is to take all of them all that I've acquired over these years and get you healthy and deliver you with a heart rate and blood pressure in the day. I love that therapist saying so people come to be with their their things that they are going through and the, but with mine, it's a lot harder at times to try to sort through the reality. They're afraid of being judged. You know, how much am I going to let this person know in the ICU? It's there, you know. What's one? Yeah. Here stories that don't quite match up. But correct. Correct. And then and then, you know, you'll get the you'll give them that live from really really really is. That would happen is or my this is the one that like. It kind of gets me. The question marks. We're gonna give you drugs. We're gonna give you medication that actually can interfere with some of the drugs that you can't tell me that. Because if I don't know I give him something I can actually kill you. And I want to my mind my job or my career is trying to save you my I'm not gonna judge you taking this. We need to tell me what you've taken beforehand because if you if you've taken something that I don't know. And I come I mean, one of them that I'm just going to throw out the taboo, one is the blue Bill and a lot of people. Yes. But if you're if you are on something like that. We need to know a head of time..

Benjamin Benjamin Lymphoma leukemia Toby gene Dulcie five months
"leukemia" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KTRH

"Leukemia's Levi's with us tonight on ground zero to talk about is the host of the nuclear hotseat. We're talking about the problems with the Wolsey fire that's burning at the moment. And how it started a facility that was considered a nuclear reactor was a nuclear reactor facility now owned by Boeing was originally owned by Rocketdyne question is how do you organize an independent investigation into this? Because from what I understand more people are concerned about climate change and putting my towards the studies, and and all this other stuff clearcutting and forest management. But what about the people who are concerned about inhaling this type of stuff? They had just gotten a huge boost in terms of visibility. The bad news is so many people are being exposed to God only knows what however what is done is. It has broken this site out from obscurity, there are people who have lived in the area for decades who didn't know about it because it was so well hidden now, it's suddenly headline news, certainly in the Los Angeles papers, and it's showing up in publications around the world, you mentioned the Kardashians. They have now been quoted in multiple sources talking about this very issue. So the cat's out of the bat out of the bag, and it's not going back in. That's the first thing. The second thing is that people need to pay attention to what after this have been saying. Because the last thing we ever want to be able to say is I told you so and we've been saying I told you so except now we've got people listening, so they can for social responsibility in Los Angeles has been spearheading a lot of these issues. And they need the support right now. They're the ones who sent out the press releases that all of a sudden cracks through the brick wall of the media. And they're the ones who have gotten the vast amount of information out. I did a special on nuclear hot seat this week which is at nuclear hot seat dot com. I invite people to listen because it's got a lot of injuries. But one of the people I spoke with is with a group called Fairwinds energy education on the east coast Arnie Gunderson, and he is behind the twitting to data group, and he has put together a system for people to be able to have the dust in their homes tested. If they are within twenty five miles of the savage Zana field. They can't do it yet. They have to wait until after the fire is over and on my program. He get some specific information as to what has to be done. The testing will be done for free to the first level. And then if a hot particle is found. There's a more involved system after that. But all of those of us who've been working to reveal the truth about nuclear are pulling together at the same time to try to reveal what's going on there and try and force action to take place. That's that's going to keep this in the public eye and get some results and the only way we can do that is with a lot of support one of the things I would like to mention this has been asked specifically of the mom, I mentioned earlier, Melissa bums said whose daughter has twice had leukemia. He's been very ill that he put up a petition up unchanged dot org. If you go to change dot org slash Santa Susanna. It will come up, and it's headline. No more cancer in kids, and it goes on for she's got over four hundred fifty thousand signatures. We're up against Boeing we need over a million. So I urge all of your listeners to sign and then get one other person that they notice. And for them to get one other person to sign that we've got to create noise, we've got to create a groundswell of energy and attention. We cannot let this one drop with all the things that are going on that can distract people. And heaven knows there are so many things out there that can pull our attention. We can't look away from this one because this is our genetic future. One of the things we've explored on nuclear hot seat is the fact that when they give the impact of radiation on the human body that is based on an ex ternal radiation dose to a male military body, meaning a Caucasian male of European or North American descent who is a hundred and fifty pounds. It has been found from data analysis after here Shema, which is the longest survival after exposure to nuclear radiation longest study that has been done. They discovered that women who were exposed to radiation or one and a half times more likely than the. Male model. The Dow reference man as he's called to develop cancer, children are even more vulnerable. A little boy who's exposed to count is exposed to radiation in childhood has a five times greater chance of developing some form of cancer in his lifetime. Then the model demand and a little girl is ten times more likely to develop cancer and little girls are the genetic future of our species and should be the ones who are most protected and this again is going with external doses. How it's being calculated an internal dose is far more dangerous because there's no distance between the radionuclide spewing out. It's it's whatever those atomic particles are and your internal organs. I'm just curious because I was commenting with a friend of mine the other day since these fires have begun tonight. We have the fires going on, of course in July, June, July. We had fires everywhere on the west coast. All of the world and the air quality here got really bad. And I never really felt. I mean, I have lung problems. I've had the problem since I had a a number of embolisms are number of clots get into my lungs awhile ago, and lately, though this situation here this fire here has been more irritating to my lungs. I feel like this burning sensations if I've been smoking a lot of cigarettes are and I went to pot party or something I had smoked lot of marijuana or something, and it just really is hurting an irritating. And I and I worry, you know, when I first read about this. I thought how far is radioactivity this radioactive ash coming because when we wake up here in Oregon, we wake up to the soot and the smog in and and the clouds, they burn off, you know, during the day when the sun comes up a little breeze comes in, but we have this stuff hovering. And I know when Fukushima happened there were worried that a lot of this so-called deluded radio-activity was going to go into the Pacific, and they were detecting it off the coast. So. So I'm curious about how far you'll the smoke is gone. And because I know when Chernobyl had a fire in there in the woods nurture noble people were getting spikes of radiation in England and other places, and they were curious as to whether or not Chernobyl's ash radioactive ash was spewing out over Europe. And I'm just curious how far of a reach this has. We don't know. And it's still going on. You know, we're we're not at the end of the story at we're somewhere in the middle of it. Hopefully, we're in the fire part of the middle of it as opposed to the early part of the middle. It is. And also just because it wafts out. And then it lands. It's not over because the next time a win come of its comes in the dust. It's spreads that much further and it spreads that much further. If it rains, we should only be so lucky to get rain here in southern California. If it rains it gets into the ground water, and then it comes up in the plant. It comes up in our food supply animals. Eat the food we eat the animals, it's there, and that when you eat it, or when you drink it it is internal contamination when you breathe it it's internal contamination, and it's gonna be hard to even detect. It can become a cancer can be. It can be leukemia. It could be a number of things that we're exposing ourselves to with this people who live in that area of danger impact, I was reading that they're saying that it would be wise to get gas masks. I don't even know if that's too late is that too to lady gas masters, should they get gas masks. I think a respirator if you're especially if you're in smokey area is not a bad idea. I happen to live only thirty miles away from the saddest Susannah field lamp, fortunately, I am upwind of it. But we've had shifts in wind where it's been very smoking in this area. I tend to stay indoors with my dog, and I've got my A filters cranked up. All the way, I also because of my research and because of the program another program I put together under wrapped awareness dot com. It's radiation awareness protection talk. I know things that I can do about supplementation and taking zeolite drops and other things to help protect myself. I will give you and your listeners one thing if they're going through any kind of a smokey or possibly radiological area. If you're driving through always keep your car on research for the circulation of the air. So you're not pulling an air from the outside. You are you are, you know, recirculating the air. And after this event is over. I would say change your air filter in your car, and you might want to advise your mechanic to get some kind of a radiation monitor justifying out if anything is showing up in the shop. It's just it's just terrifying. That you know, I I do not see one single mainstream source, and I'm talking about network news reporting happened, and why why are we going to hear it on the mainstream? I feel like the only radio show that's discussed this. I probably Amulya radio show. This discuss this because everybody else is talking about climate change talking about directed energy weapons. Which of course, I'll probably talk about later on in the show. What I'm saying is is that this is a huge disaster. This is a this is a huge story that should be on mainstream mentioned warn the people. And like, I said, it was hilarious. Because once I started talking about this somebody had referred me to a story that was done about Kim Kardashian the Kardashians. Angry that they have been exposed to that. You know, what can be done about it keep talking about it? Please CLYDE because this is potentially a nuclear disaster. I mean, you're right about Chernobyl when they had their forest fires. There was tremendous fear and panic over it. And I think the reason that we aren't hearing about it in mainstream media is the desire to not panic the people, it's the they're they're Missy don't worry your pretty little head about it routine. And they don't want us knowing the truth on so many levels is, you know, they don't want us knowing the truth. And this is a true. It's not, you know, something that could be dismissed as fantasy or delusion. Karen? This is a physical reality right here in front of us now, and it must be dealt with. And the means must be discovered to be dealt with it. And the people responsible must be held responsible for doing their job for getting the data for cleaning it up for letting us know, and we have to keep looking for things that we can do to support our health to protect our homes. Our families our children all of it because we can't rely on the government. We can't rely on officials who are out there. None of the bureaucracy is going to do anything to try and help us. So we've gotta figure it out and put it together on ourselves. And there is a very strong interconnect, anti-nuclear groups and radiation research.

cancer Leukemia Los Angeles Boeing Rocketdyne Levi Zana field Oregon Fairwinds Melissa bums Santa Susanna Europe marijuana California Kim Kardashian Shema Arnie Gunderson Pacific
"leukemia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:43 min | 1 year ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Leukemia's. Ground zero to talk about this. She's the host of the nuclear hotseat. We're talking about the problems with the Wolsey fire that's burning at the moment. And how it started a facility that was considered a nuclear reactor. It was a nuclear reactor facility now owned by Boeing was originally owned by Rocketdyne question is how do you organize an independent investigation into this? Because from what I understand more people are concerned about climate change and putting towards the studies, and and all this other stuff clearcutting and forest management. But what about the people who are concerned about inhaling this type of stuff? They have just gotten a huge boost in terms of visibility. The bad news is so many people are being exposed to Donald knows what so ever what it is done is it has broken this site out from obscurity, there are people who've lived in the area for decades who didn't know about it because it was so well hidden now if suddenly headline news, certainly in the Los Angeles papers, and it's showing up in publications around the world, you mentioned the Kardashians. They have now been quoted in multiple sources talking about this very issue. So the cat's out of the bat out of the bag, and it's not going back in. That's the first thing. The second thing is that people need to pay attention to what after this have been saying. Because the last thing we ever want to be able to say is I told you so and we've been saying I told you so except now we've got people listening. So is it for social responsibility in Los Angeles has been spearheading a lot of these issues. And they need the support right now. They are the ones who sent out the press releases that all of a sudden cracks through the brick wall of the media. And they're the ones who have gotten the vast amount of inflammation out. I did a special nuclear hot seat this week which is nuclear hot seat dot com. I invite people to listen because it's got a lot of interviews. But one of the people I spoke with is with a group called Fairwinds energy education on the east coast Arnie Gunderson, and he is behind the pudding too. He a data group, and he has put together a system for people to be able to have the dust in their homes test. If they are within twenty five miles of the sandwiches and a field left. They can't do it yet. They have to wait until after the fire is over and on my program. He gives some specific information as to what has to be done. The testing will be done for free to the first level. And then if a hot particle is found. There's a more involved system after that. But all of those of us who've been working to reveal the truth about nuclear are pulling together at the same time to try to reveal what's going on there and try and force action to take place. That's that's going to keep this in the public eye and get some results and the only way we can do that is with a lot of support one of the things I would like to mention this has been asked. Specifically, the mom I mentioned earlier Melissa bumps said whose daughter has twice had leukemia. She's been very ill that she put a petition up unchanged dot org. If you go to change dot org slash Santa Susanna. It will come up, and it's headline. No, more cancer in kids, and it goes on from there. She's got over four hundred fifty thousand signatures. We're up against Boeing we need over a million. So I urge all of your listeners to sign and then get one other person that they notice. For them to get one other person to sign that we've got to create noise, we've got to create a groundswell of energy and attention. We cannot let this one drop with all the things that are going on that can distract people. And heaven knows there are so many things out there that can pull our attention. We can't look away from this one because this is our genetic future. One of the things we've explored on nuclear hot seat is the fact that when they give the impact of radiation on the human body that is based on an external radiation dose to a male military body, meaning a Caucasian male of European or North American descent who is a hundred and fifty pounds. It has been found from data analysis after hero Shema, which is the longest survival after exposure to nuclear radiation longest study that has been done. They discovered that women who were exposed to radiation or one and a half times more likely than the. Male model the reference man as he's called to develop cancer, children are even more vulnerable. A little boy who's supposed to count is exposed to radiation in childhood has a five times greater chance of developing some form of cancer in his lifetime. Then the model of the mess and a little girl is ten times more likely to develop cancer and little girls are the genetic future of our species and should be the ones who are most protected and this again is going with extra doses. How it's being calculated an internal dose is far more dangerous because there's no distance between the radionuclide spewing out. It's it's whatever those atomic particles are and your internal organs. I'm just curious because I was commenting with a friend of mine the other day since these fires begun. We had the fires. Going on, of course in July, June, July. We had fires everywhere on the west coast all of the world and the air quality here got really bad. And I never really felt. I mean, I have lung problems. I've had the problem since I had a number of embolisms or number of clots get into my lungs awhile ago, and lately, though this situation here this fire here has been more irritating my lungs, I feel like this burning sensations. If I've been smoking a lot of cigarettes are I went to a party or something. I smoked a lot of marijuana or something, and it just really is hurting an irritating. And I and I worry, you know, when I first read about this. I thought how far is radio activity this radioactive ash coming because when we wake up here in Oregon, we wake up to the soot, and the smog and the clouds they burn off during the day when the sun comes up a little breeze comes in, but we have this stuff hovering. And I know when Fukushima happened there were worried that a lot of this so-called deluded radio-activity was going to go into the Pacific, and they were detecting it off the coast. So I'm curious about how far the smoke has gone. And because I know when Chernobyl had a fire in the woods nurture noble people were getting spikes radiation in England and other places, and they were curious as to whether or not Chernobyl's ash radioactive was spewing out over Europe. And I'm just curious how far of a reach this has we don't know. And it's still going on. You know, we're not at the end of the story at we're somewhere in. The middle of it. Hopefully, we're in the fire part of the middle of it as opposed to the early part of the middle. It is. And also just because it wafts out. And then it lands. It's not over because the next time a win come of it comes it is in the dust. It's spreads that much further and it spreads that much further. If it rains, we should only be so lucky to get rain here in southern California. If it rains it gets into the groundwater, and then it comes up in the plants. It comes up in our food supply animals. Eat the food we eat the animals, it's there, and that when you eat it, or when you drink it it is internal contamination when you breathe it it's internal contamination, and it's going to be hard to even detect. It can become a a cancer can be. It can be leukemia could be a number of things that we're exposing ourselves to this people who live in that area of danger impact, I was reading that they're saying that it would be wise to get gas masks. I don't even know if that's too late is that to lady gas masks or should they get gas masks? Yeah. I think a respirator if you're especially if you're in a smokey area is not a bad idea. I happen to live only thirty miles away from the Santa Susanna field. Lamp, fortunately, I'm upwind of it. But we've had shifts in wind where it's been very smoking in this area. I tend to stay indoors with my dog. And I've got my hep A filters cranked up. All the way, I also because of my research and because of the program another program I put together under wrapped awareness dot com. It's radiation awareness protection talk. I know things that I can do about supplementation and taking zeolite drops and other things to help protect myself. I will give you and your listeners one thing if they're going through any kind of a smokey or possibly radiological area. If you're driving through always keep your car on research for they circulation of the air. So you're not fooling an air from the outside. You are you are, you know, recirculating the air. And after this event is over. Over I would say change your air filter in your car, and you might want to advise your mechanic to get some kind of a radiation monitor justifying out if anything is showing up in the shop. This is just terrifying. That you know, I do not see one single mainstream source, and I'm talking about network news reporting happened. Why why why are we going to hear it on the mainstream? I feel like the only radio show that's discussed this. I probably am the only radio show this discuss this because everybody else is talking about climate change. They're talking about a directed energy weapons. Which of course, I'll probably talk about later on in the show. What I'm saying is is that this is a huge disaster. This is a huge story that should be on mainstream. It should warn the people. And like, I said, it was hilarious. Because once I started talking about this somebody had referred me to a story that was done about Kim Kardashian the Kardashians. Angry that they had been exposed to that. You know, what can be done about it? Keep talking about it. Please quiet because this is potentially nuclear disaster. I mean, you're right about Chernobyl when they had their forest fires. There was tremendous fear and panic over it. And I think the reason that we aren't hearing about it in mainstream media is the desire to not panic the people, it's the they're they're Missy don't worry your pretty little head about it routine. And they don't want us knowing the truth, and so many levels, as you know, they don't want us knowing the truth. And this is a true. It's not, you know, something that could be dismissed as fantasy or delusion. Karen? This is a physical reality right here in front of us now, and it must be dealt with. And the means must be discovered to be dealt with. And the people responsible must be held responsible for doing their job for getting the data for cleaning it up for letting us know, and we have to keep looking for things that we can do to support our health to protect our homes. Our families our children all of it because we can't rely on the government. We can't rely on officials who are out there. None of the bureaucracy is going to do anything to try and help us. So we've got to figure it out and put it together on ourselves. And there is a very strong interconnect, anti-nuclear groups and radiation research groups around the country around the world that are actively giving their inflammation. Again, if people can listen to my nuclear hop. Feet this week. It's episode three eighty six is.

cancer Leukemia Boeing Los Angeles Rocketdyne Donald Santa Susanna Santa Susanna field Oregon Fairwinds Europe California marijuana Melissa bumps Kim Kardashian Shema Arnie Gunderson Pacific
"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Standard for what the what the health effects of a particular chemical are and so they are used not just by federal regulators these at program offices that UPA but. Are also used by state regulators and they're very well respected internationally so so if if a report like this, were to come out finding finding you know major risks associated with formaldehyde at low levels of exposure most likely would lead. To or you know could? Very easily to stricter regulations down the road but even, beyond that there's a concern around class, action lawsuits. Cleanup lawsuits. If anybody's seen the movie Erin Brockovich. Is that that sort of thing where and and the leukemia finding is particularly controversial For that reason he is one of the most common cancers in the country, and so if, if if a report like this is on the. Books saying there's a, link to formaldehyde then industry could, be looking, at lawsuits from from anybody who gets leukemia and thinks that the from hide industry may have had something to do with it Johnson and Johnson just faced a class action lawsuit related to baby powder is that right I think that's accurate I'm not familiar. With that one That's though the seems to be the driving concern here among corporate, interests that down the line there they could face lawsuits they. Could face increase regulations that could? Affect their bottom line are there beyond the monetary concerns are there? Other potential just science concerns that these companies might have. Maybe. They doubt, some of the science in these findings absolutely I mean and and to be to be clear. Like the finding about leukemia is a scientifically, controversial one it's not just a politically controversial, reversal one but if I look like concert controversial one I think we're learning a lot more about how the sciences. Done as it's become more controversial under the Trump administration but just a little. Bit of background about how these risk assessments are done there are multiple types of studies that are. What we used to understand the, risks of the chemical the one type is epidemiological research. So that's research on. The effects of chemicals on human And so that sounds like the kind of thing that we would be most interested in because we are after all humans but. Of course there are ethical limits to how those studies. Can be done right so like we're not gonna go expose people to high levels of formaldehyde and just see what happened that wouldn't be ethical, so oftentimes that kind of research is coming from incidental exposure. You know workers who were accidentally? Exposed or a community that was accident accidentally exposed and so you? Can't control an experiment like that or a study like. That. In the, same way that you can that you can control exposures to like lab rats and so it. Could be telling to figure out okay well, so we're seeing this exposure and then we're, seeing this pattern of health effects but how do I know that the leukaemia that I'm seeing in this community was. Caused by by exposure to this chemical as opposed to something else that you. Know maybe within the water supply for the community or maybe there's a virus going around in this. Particular community so it can be. Hard to sort of detangle that sure the causal relationships Always become Exactly and then you've got so then to sort of account, for that you have these other streams. Of research so you have the kinds of kind of lab experiments that it was describing where you might be using lab rats or other animals to you can do a more, controlled experiments but, you know in, that case you're looking at Iraq instead of. A human and, you know scientists say that for the most part of set of long as long as if you see an effect, in one you're likely to see it and. The other but, you know there are different animal different and then and then you're also looking at sort of Petri, dish science would you were taking from the molecular level and sort of expanding it and extrapolating outward using using. Computer models and so the the work that these risk assessors, do you it's sort of try and try and navigate research and information is brought from these three different streams of research and figure out how it all..

leukemia Erin Brockovich UPA Johnson Iraq
"leukemia" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"I was diagnosed with with the chronic lymphocytic leukemia and i for eleven months i believe that and i lived in fear not fear like i'm going to die and pour me and all of that kind of thing just sort of a subconscious feeling about oh my god how did this happen and i had this experience with john of god who down and you did a whole show right as a farmer who does this for no money and and i'm going to go see for myself because john yes so let's let's finish the story though so i i had a friend from bulgaria her name is reina 'pisco via she's a medical doctor and in california and i is urgent and she flew down that she wanted me to go with her because she found out i had leukemia john of guy i had heard of john of god but i didn't know that much about them you know and i was on the fence about it because there's so many people who charlotte ten yeah but anyway she got down there and she called me and she said take a picture of all dressed in white when you go down their own you only dressed in white everything isn't what and take a picture from the front from the back from the side from the side and send it down we did that she emailed them down there she took the pictures to john of god she said would you do surgery she said he said to her i can't because he's not taking these herbs especially herbs that you take so she fed ex i'm god bless her and she went in to a fedex office from down in brazil near brasilia got these things fedex step to me on a on a tuesday the herbs i took the herbs and a special water and did all of the things that i was supposed to do and we took the pictures again and she said your surgery will be it was on my mother's ninety fifth birthday so that's why i remember so so much april twenty first and so i had the surgery and i i didn't feel anything i went to bed i drank the water i did everything that i was supposed to do i woke up the next morning and she called me from brazil surgery i don't know i just had the survey surge i was in maui different time zones i know i was a skeptical is the is anybody could be about this you know and some people because this is will i know how this sounds sound like it sounds crazy so anyway rain reina 'pisco v calls me from down in aba johnny she had the surgery i had the surgery now the surgery this is a guy who can do surgery two thousand people in a room at the same time this is not he he is not somebody who does the surgery okay he doesn't he doesn't remember any of it that he does you can watch them vote he goes he gets into this thing and he he picks up these instruments and you can actually see pictures of the entities that enter his body as he as he does this i know when you're going down there you'll see i'm going down you'll get a whole show on every time i've heard about him or talked about him or even written about him in the magazine it has been through somebody else's fis and i keep hearing these stories in direct experience a direct experience so i so i went to bed i didn't feel anything nothing changed i took the herbs she said you'll wake up the next at seven o'clock she told me what ten the surgery was at seven o'clock she said you'll get up at eight o'clock and then you'll drink some of the water the blessed water and you'll go right back to bed for twenty four hours let's get you the surgery part okay the surgery is just it's a remote surgery i mean it was twelve thousand miles from where i was so it's you know i don't i don't know what happened these are entities they don't have any form they're just the spirits that that enter his body it's been going on for forty years tell you a certain time to lay down a certain way to lay down just go to bed where white just where everything is white we'll drink the water take the herbs and and don't have sex and.

leukemia twenty four hours eleven months ninety fifth forty years
"leukemia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Perspective if you have a patient as lukaemia if you treat them with chemotherapy that raises the leukemia but it also raises their immune system and so it's very helpful to give back blood stem cells from a matched donor like a brother or sister and they end up amplifying tremendously to reconstitute the blood system so i can see what you're interested in studying these blood stem cells and this paper rather than looking at leukemia treatments or anything like that is actually the evolutionary perspective it's quite interesting when we first started studying blood development in my lab i knew about being a hematologist i knew that the blood cells are formed in the bones but when we started doing work and the other model organism that i studied the zebra fish we found that the kidney was where the blood cells were made and the blood stem cells were actually in the kidney and it was kind of strange to me to think that why isn't in it in the same place and so that's been the central question of this paper and the evolutionary implications of that and people are nine for a while that blood stem cells live in different places into creatures so fishes in the kidneys fabian of in the liver birds in mammals it's in the bones but it wasn't really clear why that would be the case but you went even trying to answer that question when he started out you initially studying the environments around the the blood stem cells in your body so what other cells and things was rounding them this sort of niche that right that's right so in these organs that have stem cells there are specific regions that are very important to support those themselves or to nurse those stem cells and these regions are known as the stem cell niche.

leukemia
"leukemia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Leukemia yeah nineteen a big joe henry having all kinds of fun thank you for joining.

joe henry
"leukemia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Yeah so because the low blood because faction he had the infection can be the leukemia i like crayons it's my lamont acidic leukemia looks like an infection when it comes on really really dr dr just loved actor would you have when you have leukemia you don't fight infections normally so minor infections can become rather nasty looking so you know and he's held is he he's fifty three okay so if it's a my logic leukemia would you would you hope for is my logic kimia not a l l or acute lymphocytic leukemia the myelogenous leukemia is are pretty treatable so so it's going to be unpleasant but there you can look forward to some real good response but there he needed bone now transplant i would be i'm the siblings so i would be the best probably candidate you're jumping way ahead yeah let's just see what he's got i whether transplants are appropriate and i forget where they get the donors from for most of thought thought they might be able to use it hologhan even like his own but i don't have done this in a long time but but so i just let's get down to the diagnosis i and each kind of leukemia kind a little different has sort of different treatment with different prognosis little different sort of course and so let's find out what this is i okay dr drew 'cause i knew you know he's gonna help me i think you're gonna be look i look forward to just stay posit look for good response the bone marrow is interesting i heard a red house essay read.

leukemia lamont
"leukemia" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"Commute news there is no family history or anything like that like nobody not of that i mean my grandma died of cancer which he was very old and it was stomach cancer and choose cuban and it was that like pork heavy greasy diet and i've heard thursday connection well he was like very ill so i guess theoretically there it is but i feel like everyone has some maria totally cancer there so he went into a chemo he i mean he just have to start a very aggressive treatment regimen after that it's interesting that you bring up sort of getting a second opinion and like doctors are people too because he was fascinating to see a doctor um go through that experience because you know there is a level of removal and he became very consumed with the disease and researching the disaster area and he could i mean he was reading that he still reads medical journals about out his specific mile uh leukemia and he knew of at the best treatment for that kind of leukemia was at a m d anderson in texas in houston i feel houston is like a leading cancer it is yes specifically without one at sort of the cutting edge so he went there he still goes there because he has to monitor it now but there was a point where it was we didn't know um because the truman wasn't working and uh man the way he explains it was start worse like he was like so my uh white blood cells are attacking views cells an you know i don't remember any other home uh white blood cells are stormtroopers yeah yeah exactly but it they came back at lake worked out sort of in the eleven thhour and he was able to get his platelet count backup.

cancer chemo leukemia texas truman houston
"leukemia" Discussed on We're No Doctors

We're No Doctors

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on We're No Doctors

"Katerina uh thank you cat this was i think a great email to end on yeah and good for you in getting help and i'm glad this is something you can live with i the second i saw leukemia in your email uh i'm not gonna lie my the first thought was very dark ashley you know don't know a lot about that leukemia cancer any a guts made a dentist's office is calling so i immediately just go to a dark place when i see the word cancer or see the word leukemia um but it's good to know this is something you can manage uh congratulations on very happy for you cuba's updated uh and thanks for the mouth all right uh i can either a couple of times i almost cried many male but i must strong white male of the worst thing to say no um um so stupid this has been over an hour i've talked for over an hour um i hope you found this a worthwhile episode guys uh thank you for listening we will be back again with busy i promise i'm also very curious oh i know why might dentists calling i didn't cover this but last week uh this was a horrible horrible thing i went to my dentist and um uh had hetero canal last year late in the year but the very back tooth and um i'd had a bunch of other dental work done so my dental insurance only covers a certain amount of money.

leukemia cuba
"leukemia" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"And the 20th century the bonds of that democracy what tested again when we come back the political upheavals of the 1960s and they're echos today stay with us support for this podcast in the following message come from subaru who was love promise is a dedication to make the world a better place here subaru retailer rocky decrease the fauna on how to saen subaru makes a positive impact a lot of corporations give money and support charities but the subaru love promise goes much deeper than that we had a bike building event uh uh last year the end we had our staff build these bikes for children that had leukemia in then we brought the children now to get their bikes the active actually taking your staff and going in delivering them and having a deal with the emotion pretty pretty special powerful staff to learn more about the subaru commitment to its customers and communities visit subaru dot com slash love dash promise we are now in the 1960s is thrown world is exploding violence flaring bull as low euro martin luther king junior is leading the civil rights struggle are deep partisan divisions in the country it's another moment of crisis where it seems like the nation as coming apart protest pickup lines meetings took her age ward demonstrators protest us involvement in vietnam war the complex plan is a secret organization which for one hundred years has been allowed to exist in this country america has given the negro people are bad check attack quick his comeback mark in but pippen frana.

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"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The boys be you know woke up a bureau living with his family and suddenly a settlement when what did to check out on the computer at this could be the kimia i of unita yeah i just sat him to get your computer check this out and i've no medical beck wife no idea and he was checking like lidl's pulse the backs and whatever legs and of course he didn't find anything because this is a fairy thank god is a very rare form of leukemia and especially for newborns but that was the situation so when did you realize it was the kimia how to data that him about yeah so forth in holland when something doesn't solve itself after two weeks your tall to go to the hospital so we went for a biopsy and then we got the result of the by abc's and that was when we were told that she was very very sick and what you just said that we had to prepare for the worst that she didn't have much chance of survival his leukemia has high survival rate went three two well but this form she had to my other we kimia my inuit leukemia because it's in your blood it's just the most dangerous form and your reaction your doctor noticed your reaction because it was different than the reactions had seen before how well in the in the original 21st herded i felt i didn't wanna hear it i felt like who are you having this opinion on my child i mean i carrots were for nine mall i know best the but my child who are you telling me this i just couldn't handle that was just too too much to in face of and i just wanna go out site with my husband and pretend that nothing was the matter i i i just walked out of that room with his can away i just need it the privacy of my intimate life did you and your husband react the same way well my husband is a scientist and he he's more he wants to know defects and he kiss last oldest questions but the at the same feeling of let's go out of deir an venkov or in the.

lidl leukemia holland abc scientist unita beck inuit two weeks
"leukemia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And then there's another family of children that lost everything in the fire it's really heartbreaking and one of the kids and cancer treatment and the home that they were sharing with their mother and her parents that she moved into was burnt to the ground this is the kid with leukemia so me i put them up the cinema fire victims' family and only a thousand thousand fifty cents fifty thousand fifty has been given so far and what people are so cheap but summit wrote something she said i lost everything to a fire years ago everything it's a loss of identity at first in long run i learnt the cherish people memories and experiences you will too sending levin well wishes your wait i thought about that do you have you thought about what would happen if your house burned down or your apartment he had to leave and through seconds and get away with just with your life have you actually thought about what you'd lose i don't mean the money or the goal of the bitcoin's or the let us say the assurance you know all the stuff that i am talking about your photographs for example i mean truthfully that's a big deal i of i'm a big photo guy and i have old style photos in addition to all the years of digital i wouldn't know what to do without him i gotta digitalize all of a fast about last year i digitilized though my super eightmillimetre family movies going back to what my father still live in new york i couldn't believe it i mean like the family story in fifty eight minutes this guy does the stuff for me what an amazing thing to watch my father walking around the store and there i was a young guy would my goofy friends at parties when my parents were young it's astounding to watch that stuff which ask yourself you know what would happen if you got burned out will the people are going through that right now shrinks take the streets to demand narcissistic trump's ouster that is not related to this but it is some one on 25 nutjob psychologists and other mental health psychos march long lower broadway in new york saturday to demand the president trump he thrown out of office based on a constitutional clause allowing presently ouster when the cabinet decided quote unable to discharge.

leukemia levin new york cabinet president fifty eight minutes
"leukemia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Need give me an hour give me an hour of positively give me an hour of good stuff i'd been involved with a number of charities over time i i wanna do something fawn something good something that makes a difference i i wanna do that because if i don't i swear by here's was going to light on fire so in wanting to go about this mission i've been involved with in those people i work with who are involved with leukemia lymphoma and they have their like the night um they have a light the night event coming up tomorrow and money raised goes to leukemia lymphoma leukemia lymphoma foam of the reasons are coast to me and number of for is for a couple reasons leukemia lapalme society gets as gets more per dollar to research gets more per dollar to the labs than most charities do and k in a waste their money on marketing they don't waste their money on decorations or on overhead paying everybody billions of dollars just to be the ceo my cousin who i met once didn't make it till didn't make it to six years old because of childhood leukemia had he'd been diagnosed with that today he'd have a better chance of survival so what they do matters would they do has been working what used to be a death sentence back in the 80s now is is more than a chance so michael worker challenge me can you raised two thousand dollars an hour okay no one i'm going to try going to try to raise two thousand dollars in an hour seems like a low number unless you don't have to thousand dollars but i i need it i need something i need something and he.

lymphoma ceo leukemia two thousand dollars thousand dollars six years
"leukemia" Discussed on Black Girl Nerds

Black Girl Nerds

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Black Girl Nerds

"I've seen bits and pieces of leukemia honors progressing plus saw a rough draft oh gene because this girl really get the falcons grade but of course you're characters the pilot as a full tank of enhanced debris has dogged with him because his companion on a rare light rain so what's unique item that you have to take the human you fly all it's funny because we have two french bulldogs had worked for an we should search were mr he cares we housing law people bandogs plan especially as a small on the fringes so we haven't dutch up because they're still run a year old home cases to ovarian zero posture unhappy that have their own instagram's immediately there is famous for them and the but the dog the store movie among drivers we and while the first courses are have parking migra had to give a small claimed his crazy stuff i should say find out more about that mrs now uh and so we did is harming the director i saw march fire todd martin how to do crashing he had a in the hangar hey upon for the future there okay and all kinds of into ashes troops gutter people come to town he sitting are actually copilot's the at it was crazy because he had to all of us have hit marshalls though i was pretty much it of the seat but he drew his and k running back and forth was thrown all over the place and talk had two at a certain time slovak phallic argument by ray ray either moves a snack leaving late usual don't get into debt hat ad uh he has via the exact spot because homes are deal was the crash hutu.

falcons instagram director todd martin ray ray
"leukemia" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WINS 1010

"On pit kim avenue in brooklyn 67 degrees building up to eighty three today mainly clear skies at the moment some bushwick presidents have sued hoping to clean up the environment in their neighborhood lawsuit is against the company that runs the garbage transfers station on porter avenue and bushwick jin chen turnout pay shea is president of the group clean up north brooklyn said they have met face to face with the company and i've had public forums with them to spell out their complaints let she claims the company still refuses to obey the rules and regulations that would keep the site cleaner family demanding better air for themselves and better air for olive asked local resident ssris arias is speaking through an interpreter said he signs health is at risk because besides toxins in the air residents say the site creates does excessive noise vibrations and attracts vermin carol d'auria ten ten wins in bushwick bpb capital the company that runs the scientists had no comment on the situation the us has cleared the first living drug for tough childhood leukemia we hear about this from correspondent john sold as the food and drug administration has approved the first treatment that would genetically engineer patients own blood cells to seek and destroy childhood leukemia the fda's action makes novartis pharmaceuticals car tcell treatment the first type of gene therapy to hit the us market and it's one in a wave of socalled living drugs being developed for blood cancers and maybe other tumors as well the novartis therapies for children and young adults with acute lim for blaskic leukemia despite some serious side effects a key test found a one time infusion put about eighty percent of hard to treat patients into remission johnson dole nece wins news time four fifty one.

brooklyn shea president us john leukemia fda leukemia bushwick bushwick bpb engineer novartis eighty percent 67 degrees
"leukemia" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Novel Targets

"This episode comes from the two thousand and sixteen annual meeting the American society of hematology, commonly known as ash we've called it controversies in hematology because each of the expert show here officer, very personal view. The not everyone is going to agree with leading them fomer specialist tells us what he really thinks about Carty. So I I'm not ready to go to my desert island with only a cartesian L agent to treat whatever patient, I might encounter and have the right targets being chosen for pioneering trial in acute myeloid leukemia. AM, oh, you're over sixty the survival rates. No more than about two percent at ten years. We have to do something better in ceelo, chronic lymphocytic. Leukemia will hear what it liberal expert for it was exciting at the me too. So it's sort of tastes great less filling version of brew. Linden. Now is it really better in his own little trial. It seems to be better. Finally, one of the prominent topics at fishes ash meeting was sickle cell disease, while we're excited about novel therapies, a lot of ad is actually controlling the disease, but what about cure? We'll hear more about the potential for gene editing and gene therapy later immature. This so despondent punch and Intech over the past two years. They sponsored fifteen episodes would grateful for their support and just to be clear if we do mention any products we made an independent Detroit decision to do. So our sponsors have no control of the topics. We cover who we interview of questions we asked. So let's start with a mentioned for the leukemia and lymphoma society at Ashby out to major new initiative called beat AML, this postering and adaptive clinical trial that will investigate multiple targets with multiple drugs from different companies. This approach has never been done before AML. Will it be a game changer? I spoke to one of lead investigators. I'm Brian Drucker director of the Oregon Health and science university night, Ken through toot in Portland, Oregon beat AML really is groundbreaking. We're going to be able to assign patients over sixty two treatment based on their genetic makeup of leukemia within seven days of diagnosis and our goals to try to have a treatment for every single patient who enrolls, and that's truly remarkable.

Leukemia AML American society of hematology Carty Oregon Health and science univ Intech officer Oregon Brian Drucker Linden Ashby cure Detroit Ken director Portland two percent seven days ten years two years