20 Burst results for "leland stanford"

"leland stanford" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:16 min | Last month

"leland stanford" Discussed on 790 KABC

"John Phillips Show Talk Radio 7 90 K. ABC. Don't forget If you want to email the show, you can always do sell it. Johnny don't like show at gmail dot com. Now we've been spending the last several months marinating in the juices of this recall election of Gavin Newsom. And we've heard a lot of people criticize the recall criticized direct democracy say it's undemocratic to try to remove someone from office before their term expires. However, there is a reason that the recall exists in the state of California if you are curious to know why the recall exists in the state of California. There is an excellent book that's really the prologue to direct democracy and progressive reform. Coming to the state of California. It's called American Disruptor, the scandalous life of Leland Stanford. It's written by a gentleman by the name of Roland did walk. If you want to understand the history of this recall process, go get the book right now. It's available at Amazon. Com. Roland is kind enough to join us this afternoon. Roland, Welcome to the program. Hey, John. Thank you. Now this has to be kind of like the final episode of Seinfeld for you because you spent so much time researching this and so much time going over what happened in California that led to progressive reforms. This has to be Deja vu for you. It keeps being days of over again, As the saying goes right. We keep repeating Americans could use a little bit of history to kind of not keep remaining the same mistakes or thinking. Everything is brand new. This has never happened before. When goodness gracious, we know that it has. Can you set the stage for us in terms of what you outlined in your book? What led the state of California to say we need a recall process on the books. So if there is corruption or malfeasance or a government that's not looking out for the people We have a way to take care of it. Essentially comes down to the same thing that keeps happening over and over again, I guess worldwide John is somebody has abused their power. There has been a perception that somebody has not only abused it. They've gained too much, and they're being arrogant about it that they're not being Accountable to the people that put them in that office and the perfect case in point, And I would argue the seminal case in point is the Leland Stanford who was, of course best known for being the founder of Stanford University. But more importantly, he was able to do that and make his great fortune because he was the person behind. That would became the Southern Pacific Railroad and created a monopoly here in California and throughout the West for the transportation network, which is absolutely critical to everything but then did not feel that he was accountable to the people. Regardless, the fact that the people paid for that railroad And he not only when he was governor of California, served as governor of California. He's still remained to CEO of the railroad correct at the exact same time, he was the head of the biggest Wealthiest, most powerful business organization in California and was the governor of the state of California and not only didn't see any conflict between the two but saw symbiosis between the two and exploited one. For the other, And this has nothing to do with party. This has nothing to do with the ideology. This has to do with accountability to the people to your point. And he also installed the attorney representing the railroad on the California Supreme Court, didn't he? He did that. He was highly influential in at least two appointments. The United States Supreme Court. Which became really an important part of the story as well. It was incredibly powerful and just kind of ran amok. There. Until people said Basta enough! We have to have some accountability. What do you think? Leland Stanford's main legacy is after researching this book and looking at it from the point of view of someone who is reading the newspaper in 2021 seeing what's going on in the state? How would you define his legacy? Well, of course, the popular legacy is going to be the creation of the Stanford University. And I would add to that very quickly that since Stanford University is really the birthplace of the incubator, the sustainer of Silicon Valley, the Internet this legacy about our mass communications system today. Which is very brand new 2025 years old is incredibly important. And his story that leads to that is vitally important. Not just for California not just for the United States, but for the world and the other part of this Equation that comes to mind again is somebody who achieves power becomes the governor of California and fuels as if he's entitled to that. And again, the people of California spoke up and said not so fast. What's interesting in politics is that so much of what spreads nationwide starts in California, It doesn't matter if you're talking about Reaganism that started here in the 19 sixties and then went national in the 19 eighties. Or you're talking about some of the legislation that you see today with the plastic bag ban. The plastic straw band starts in one Bay Area city goes statewide and then all the sudden You can't get a plastic straw in Denver. That really has been the case for in California since the very beginning, though, hasn't it? It has indeed, and Stanford's part of that as well because For example, when you have the gold rush, 18 48 begins in 18. 49, of course, really takes on some kind of meaning Here is a direct parallel to the gold rush that we're experiencing today with that Silicon Valley that I just mentioned mentioned, but Um, this begins with Stanford, who is able to brilliantly exploit the need to tie this.

John Amazon. Com Denver 2021 Stanford University Gavin Newsom Bay Area Johnny Leland Stanford John Phillips Roland California Supreme Court United States United States Supreme Court Seinfeld Silicon Valley Southern Pacific Railroad 19 sixties 2025 years two
"leland stanford" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"System or northern california Much it's not just southern california. That gets water from northern california. So to san joaquin valley some parts of the san joaquin valley. And i also like to remind people that you know. There's a the the reputation of los angeles as big bad los angeles you know. I'm not defending los angeles but took taking water hundred years ago. From the owens valley well san francisco. It's water from a couple of hundred miles away in hetch reservoir which is in a national park. I mean they you know the early one thousand nine hundred. San francisco was the big powerful influential urban area in california los angeles. Guoxin down right. Yeah and so right. That's right it was the late eighteen. Hundreds angeles was a pretty rough frontier town. You know small population gold. What nobody cared about beaches. Then they didn't have the gold so forget them and the railroad hadn't come in either. It's what really spurred the population growth in the late. Eighteen hundreds and finally in los angeles with the railroad but You know you know. San francisco likes the you know in. The past is kind of like to look down nose at los angeles but they get water from you know they get water long the stretches from from the sierra and You know even if you look at the sacramento valley where there's a lot of water you know. Mean the source of much water people. You know there are these years year gatien districts that have senior water rights Going back to the late eighteen hundreds. And they you know. They will transport water. You know more than one hundred miles within their within their systems within their canal systems. I mean they're canals that are as big as rivers so that dynamic of north versus south Still exists but it's it's it's far more complex than that will but tina. I really appreciate this. I still after reading a biography of leland stanford i'm convinced that the gold rush probably did more damage the california environment than anything else that we could be doing right now in the last hundred years And you've given a big nuanced answer in a good way of this water because there's a lot of sort of what i it is. A very sort of people are quick with water. that's at north versus out the shooting. California this or that so it was good to get some contracts pri- well you know when people find out that i write about water. You there is always get big They think of chinatown and they asked me. You know are running out of water and mighty standard reply is were running out of water to way. We use it in the nineteenth and twentieth century which was wastefully and thoughtfully off wesley and without regard to the environment. But we're not running out of water efficiently. There was just gonna say you've actually may be slightly more optimistic. We're gonna figure this out and science and technology is probably going to help us out of this but the most the most interesting aspect is people's behavior can change in. That matters a lot. Because i think half of our climate change is going to be about just changing behavior. Bright that makes the difference anyway. Really appreciate the time And Your expertise and experience. Thank you for having me. You've been listening to the chuck. Todd casper meet the press. Today's episode was produced by justice. Green and matt rivera john reece's our executive producer. Our theme music composed by spoke meeting between catch you compress daily. Msnbc every day at one meet the press. Reports is on demand on the big show every sunday morning. So thanks for listening. And until we upload again.

los angeles san joaquin valley northern california hetch reservoir Guoxin california owens valley San francisco sacramento valley leland stanford san francisco angeles tina wesley California Todd casper matt rivera john reece Green
"leland stanford" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on The Science Show

"Which brings me to the third question. I asked at the beginning of this science show. What has a dying teenager. In europe in eighteen eighty four got do with stanford university of silicon valley fame and much else but the teenager was leland stanford and he died of typhoid fever in florence. So in his memory is wealthy. Parents established the great university in eighteen. Eighty five and so many really famous scientists were there and still are like professional early population. Fame buttons peter raven was there and he's on the program a few weeks ago plus thirty two nobel prize winners. Seventeen of whom are still there. And professor peter neumann of was also at stanford way back and the campus was a real mental for this former w a scientist of the year. Peter yes i was there in the early seventy s and the other person they was john holdren who was at berkeley at the time but a lot of famous people came through that time and it was hugely important to me personally because i was able to get a job at oak university not long after that on the basis that ought to stanford with the famous people but one of the things that worried me was the lack of hope about the future unless we stop population growth and we stopped economic growth and it seemed to me difficult to say. I'm not going to have children. And i'm going to work to stop the economy. It didn't seem to fit with me. And i don't think it fitted with peter and john. Halden either john holdren by the way became the chief scientist under barack obama. Yes he did well. But there's a real choice to be made there that you could be public academic that garza at the and tries to find solutions. And i determined that. That's what i would do. We also had children and it's something to treasure that children can be part of the solution.

stanford university of silicon peter raven peter neumann leland stanford typhoid fever john holdren oak university florence europe stanford berkeley Halden Peter peter barack obama garza john
"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to innovation Hub and Sarah Miller. This is a story about a family. It's also a story of outrageous fortune, political self dealing and great tragedy. And I'm going to start with the tragedy because that's how the family is largely remembered. Today It happened in Italy, where a California couple was on vacation with their son. They had been trying to have a child for 18 years, and then finally they have Leland and he was, by all accounts, not only a really nice kid, but he was rather precocious in many different ways. A highly intelligent, remarkable child. Anybody would have loved him. Roland Walk is a historian who teaches at San Francisco State University. But while they were on a grand tour of Europe, he succumbed to typhoid at age 15. This was an enormous heartbreak is anybody whose experience or been around anybody who's experienced the death of a child? Can begin to understand is it's It was horrific for them. Jenny and her husband, who like his son was named Leland had everything money could buy. But the death of their 15 year old was devastating. The writer Mark Twain said that Leland Sr at once lost all interest in life. So the couple made a decision that reverberates to this day a decision to memorialize Leland by creating a school named after him, and they had this huge ranch 8000 acres in Palo Alto, California, and that's where they began the university. It is legally. Leland Stanford junior. University, Leland Stanford Jr had been slated to attend Harvard, but instead, his death began a Siri's of events that created a new powerhouse university. And an area around it. Silicon Valley that would change the modern world. Ironically walk, says Leland, Stanford senior who had actually made the piles of money that it would take to start this new university. Was, if anything, an anti intellectual, He was either expelled or he dropped out of three successive Secondary schools, so he didn't have what we would have today's the equivalency of a high school diploma. He was an absolute failure. There's no way that he was gonna even be able to be allowed to take a tour of the Stanford University campus today, but just because the elder Stanford seemed ill suited to start a university That didn't stop him. Being Underqualified had never stopped him. It hadn't stopped him from embarking on a scandalous political career or an exploitive business career. It hadn't stopped him from becoming a technological pioneer so powerful, he fundamentally change this country. This was the absolute not only high tech of the time, but the massively so you could think about is Google Apple Facebook all rolled into one. What Leland Stanford did through a bunch of shifty means, which we will get Teo. Is Nick the country together with railroads. At the time, it seemed impossible laying tracks through mountain ranges all the way out to the West that would have created a network country. But the technology seemed about his remote is the Internet. Stanford, though, got it done. The federal government was completely well, certainly the northern forces of the federal government completely behind financing a transcontinental railroad. Not only because the civil war was taking place, and they were afraid of losing the West to become a slave state that also they were concerned about their was a Mormon insurrection, and they worried about another separatist movement there. The story of Leland Stanford is not well known, but it says a lot about how much and in some ways how little America has changed. Roland Walk, is the author of the book American Disruptor, The scandalous Life of Leland Stanford, and he says Stanford would come to be worth more than the state he was helping to mold California. And he would do it in part by truly being a self made man and in part by stealing from Californians and from federal taxpayers. Stanford was from New York he'd lived in Wisconsin, but his life got really colorful when he arrived in San Francisco during the gold rush. Where things were a little different from how they are now think of a dystopian back in all, if you will. We're talking about a place. Where was 95% men who are here to make a quick buck and we're making quick bucks. The fortunes that were rolling into San Francisco from the Goldfields were enormous, so the spending of money on particularly gambling And some of the gambling was really horrific. For example, the original mission mission Dolores, here in San Francisco, was the site of where they would bring in grizzly bears and bulls and put him in a marina and let them fight to death. And they would all be cheering and throwing bets down. The streets were just completely filthy, that rats everywhere. Fires were taking place engulfing the entire little Pueblo, which became a huge boom town on a very regular basis. There were prison ships off the coast, where they use the abandoned ships of people coming around the horn and across the Pacific from China, for example. It wasn't the kind of place that you would want to bring your mother in law into this world steps. Stanford, A man who by this time had failed at a lot. His brothers were already out in California, and they decided Stanford should open a store catering to gold miners. Which is when things started to get sketchy and very, very lucrative. So he goes up there, and he opens up a little Stanford brother store where he starts selling cigars and liquor and and mining equipment and stuff like that. But Stanford had managed to become a lawyer when he was Wisconsin. So he went to the county supervisors. They're in that county, which would been plaster county at the time, and he said to them, You know what you need a justice of the peace. Why don't you appoint me justice of the peace? And they said, Okay, sure, You could be justice of the peace, So they're showing his first rials. Signs of being able to be not only an entrepreneur but conflating. Public office with his ability to make money ran his courtroom in Hiss Saloon, He opened up a saloon. Where better, Where better to run a courtroom really than in a saloon. You would have looked forward to that is a former reporter. I think that would have been a great story, but perhaps by today's standards, even by The standards of those days. That was a pretty remarkable and brazen thing to dio. But obviously he made a lot of money, and it taught him an important lesson. You know, putting these two things together. Having political power using that leveraging a little bit for my own private fortune seems to work pretty well. And that was a profound lesson for him. That lesson would become most helpful when a young engineer named Theodore Judah came a lot. Duda had pitched the venture capitalists of San Francisco, though they probably didn't call themselves that then on a great discovery he had made he had found a pass through the Sierra Nevada Mountains. A past that could complete the network of railroads linking the U. S. But for a while, no one seemed to care. So then he goes up to Sacramento, and he goes to a small group of businessman and he says, Hey, you know, here's this great plan, and they all say thanks, but no thanks. But in the back of the room There's this guy named Collis Huntington and call us Huntington to say, very wily trader who also came out right after the beginning of the gold rush and call us Huntington had a store right next to Stanford store. And he saw Stanford is a guy who made a really great front man. If they were going to get some government money, maybe Stanford could be going to some political office. So they said, Hey, you want to be my partner, Leland Stanford and a couple of the guys. Hopkins and Crocker. And come up to the office like tomorrow night and tell us about your plan. This way. Leland Stanford was introduced to the possibility of cashing in on this marvelous big high tech. Entrepreneurial enterprise of the Early part of 18 late 18 fifties. So you know, I've heard all my life as I think Many people have about robber barons like Vanderbilt and Carnegie. You say, Though Stanford might have been more successful than many of the people that we've heard of as having sort of built America, Um, you know, in the sort of second half of the 18 hundreds Why was he more successful? And and then? You know, why isn't he in that pantheon? Well, of course, we have to define success. And everybody has a completely different idea of success, right? But if we're going to measure business success, I sort of an Ah Normative, you know, standard way He had many more employees than any Carnegie's or any Rockefeller, said 12 15. Some estimate the 20,000 employees working under him..

Leland Stanford Stanford Leland Leland Stanford Jr California San Francisco Stanford store Roland Walk San Francisco State University Leland Sr Wisconsin Sarah Miller federal government America Europe Italy Google Palo Alto China Harvard
"leland stanford" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Whole seasons of committed for you to binge three available on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen All right, we're back so when you think about a motion picture camera in order to do what it does. It has to take a lot of photos in very quick succession that can be played back in very quick succession. Right in order to get the level of frame rate that actually looks like motion to our is So how how do we get there? Like what was there between the daguerreotype or the CAL type? Know these single exposure camera shots and. And the actual movie camera, yeah I can't help but use the metaphor of of guns and weapons of war when thinking about him, because certainly a daguerreotype would be kind of like an old time. He Cannon Right, uh-huh, who's a pain to load it to aim it to fire it? And then you'd have to go through the whole rigmarole of loading and again so you? You're you're dealing with with lengthy exposure times and some of the earliest cameras right? But but but as the, but for motion picture camera to to function as a motion picture camera essentially have to have a machine gun. Yeah, just just taking picture after picture after picture after picture and so one thing that immediately cursed me is that you've got some somehow deal with the change in the media on which it's recorded because the earliest photos were taken on on media that had to be specially prepared and loaded up one at A. A time. How how? How could you load a camera for rapid exposures of many images? And when we're talking rapid exposure, we're talking expected exposure times of a fraction of a second along way from those hour long exposures we were talking about and previous episodes for photography, and by eighteen seventy, the exposure time was down to one hundredth of a second, and ultimately won thousands of thousands of a second, which is fast enough for for motion pictures of. But how do you get all the like you? Obviously, you're not going to using like metal plates for that. Yeah well. So here's here's the thing of the earlier approaches to this problem, simply involved using multiple cameras. Thinking about the cannon, where you can't possibly create a single old time cannon! That's GONNA fire. Six cannonballs in the space of the few seconds. It's impossible. Get your six can get six cannons. You line them up, you have. You know a a in the ship right, and then you just fire them all off in secession. That's exactly the approach that was taken early on by photographers, such as Edward, my bitch. Oh, yeah, famous for the his running horse images from eighteen, seventy seven. He used a battery of twelve cameras to pull this off and I guess we'll explain more about that in a minute. Yes, now before we came in here Robert You were you were telling me some strange details about the life of Edward my bridge that I have never heard before. Yeah I was I was reading a little bit about him. In the history of photography by Beaumont newhall and. my bridge is a fascinating character. You know why he spells his name the way he does. Yes, so he wanted. He wanted his name to sound more archaic because he was born. Edward James Muggeridge and He wanted a fancier show name essentially, so it's Edward in his name is spelled like Ed Weird. Yes. And then and then my bridges spelled m. e., y. b. r. I G. E. Okay so earlier in his life, he was He was born eighteen thirty. He would die in nineteen. Oh four, but earlier in his life he was a bookseller, but then he sustains severe cranial injuries in a runaway stage coach crash in eighteen sixty. Okay, which is a like a brutal accident, actually killed one of the passengers injured just about everybody else. But anyway you know severe. Cranial injuries required a good year of treatment, and he was forever changed by possibly possibly the reason for some of his emotional in erotic behavior later in life, but during his recovery he took up photography. Okay, now in this photography is where he would, he would really make his name. Yeah, but as a there was just a note about a murder trial that took place. In the history of photography, so I had to look into it a little bit more in this is the the story basically in eighteen, seventy two, he married flora, Shell, Cross stone, but then he caught wind of a former lover that lived in the area, a major Harry Larkins and he got an in his head that that that Larkin's was the father of stone son of Florida, so my bridge went to Larkin's House confronted him at the front door and shot him dead on his doorstep. Oh. No Yeah, He or he shot him, and then he died later that day fatally shot him on on his doorstep. And so my bridge was accused of the murder and the defense ended up leaning on his previous brain injuries. Saying look you know. He was in this horrible accident and it it. It changed the way his his brain works, and and they brought in an expert testimony. The right in the people speak to say yeah. He was a totally different person before this took place. And they were going for an insanity plea, which I've read that my bridge apparently undercut this himself when when he was questioned, but any rate the judge ended up throwing out the insanity plea. And then acquitted the my bridge on grounds of justifiable homicide. Was a different time? Yeah, it was. Because there was no questioning based on what I was reading that he he killed this guy. He murdered this guy on on his doorstep. But. He was he was acquitted. and it was considered justifiable homicide. It was an important case. Apparently because it serves as an historic historic forensic neurology case in urology, neurology, neurology defense it would also by the way go on to become an opera. A Philip Glass would composed opera based on these events titled The photographer. But it's really tragic episode of. Flora petition for divorce head to do it twice and was finally granted. She died in eighteen, seventy five, and then my bridge had the sun placed in an orphanage in Florida ended up working his entire life as a ranch hand Gardner, and he himself died in nineteen, forty four in a pedestrian traffic accident. But but my bridge had established himself by this point. As of is a photographic pioneer, former governor of California Leland Stanford had commissioned him to photograph is resources. Work there was interrupted by the trial, but the resulting images were widely published for their detailed depictions of Horse locomotion, and this was the idea of using multiple cameras right up in succession to to capture images very rapidly back to back yet run. The horse pass this battery of cameras fire the cameras off, and then we can look and see are the horse's legs. Legs, all coming off the ground as it runs across the field. Apparently, this is a controversy in the eighteen seventies like people are are actually highly concerned to know whether the horses ever completely airborne, or always has at least one hoof on the ground right. Yeah, and so these images were Since we're a sensation They were widely published for their detailed. Depiction of Horse locomotion. And an eighteen eighty a my bridge invented what he called a zoo gyroscope or a zoo practice scope to project his pictures on the screen. So you know in all of this from capturing locomotion to projecting images. He was highly influential like He. He influenced a number of individuals who would go on to continue to.

Edward James Muggeridge apple Florida murder CAL Robert You Beaumont newhall Larkin Philip Glass Leland Stanford California m. e. Harry Larkins Flora Ed Weird Gardner
The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

Casefile True Crime

04:39 min | 1 year ago

The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

"The Californian city of Stanford laws in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County just under an hour drive from San Francisco covering any land area of two point. Eight Square Miles Stanford is adjacent to Palo Alto one of the principal cities of the affluent and progressive Silicon Valley which is served as an incubator for many prominent and influential technological enterprises. Over the years including Apple Google facebook and Tesla Stanford is home to the prestigious eight thousand Dak- Stanford University a private co educational and Non Denominational College and Research Institution. Many of the city's residents students faculty members who live on or Iran campus in a range of accommodations including Goma. Trees Co ops. Row Houses Fraternities sororities single family homes and condominiums established in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The university was founded by railroad magnate and California Senator Leland Stanford and his wife Jane. In memory of their only child Leyland junior he died of typhoid fever. At Age Fifteen. The land began as the stock farm with OAK dotted fields and soon developed into one of the largest university campuses in the United States despite sustaining heavy damage from two separate earthquakes in nineteen. I seek since and nine hundred ninety nine. The university has managed to maintain its original California mission architecture from the light. Eighteen hundreds characterized by embellished yellow sandstone long low and wide colonnades open arches and two red terra cotta tiled roofs at the heart of the campus is the main quadrangle the university's oldest structure stretching. Iva seventeen acres. The main quad is raised Vira Mile Long Palm Tree lined road and has an inherent data section. Both of which feature sprawling lawns courtyards and interconnected buildings housing. Various departments classrooms and administration offices regarded as a national center for Research Stanford Phages More Than One hundred and twenty research. Institutes exploring a range of topics from particle physics to International Studies Given it's proximity to silicon valley and it's impressive academic and athletic performance records. It is renowned as one of the top universities of the world. Many students go on to have a lustrous careers in their field of expertise with past alumni including noble laureates Pulitzer Prize winners and Presidential Medal of freedom recipients. One hundred and fifty thousand visit as drawn to the faint grants annually to explore it too many features including apiaries shops and gardens as well as a stadium. Golf course satellite dish and church liking trials around the campus outskirts off of use of the rolling countryside and attract by more than fifty thousand visitors a year in the early nineteen seventies. Just over eleven thousand students were enrolled at Stanford University and the Kanta coach in these men that had started in the mid nineteen sixties was still a major aspect of college lawf- students fighting for social and political change would often stage protests scenes and formed community action groups for issues such as racism. Women's liberation and gay rods. Leslie Marie Po love graduated from Stanford in nineteen seventy two with a bachelors degree in history by the beginning of the following year. The twenty one year old was working as a clerk at the north. Santa Clara Canny Low Library in Palo Alto. Leslie hoped to become a lawyer and recently been accepted into law school at the University of Pennsylvania though classes had yet to begin at three. Pm on Tuesday. February. Thirteen Leslie left work. For the day driving off in her seventy-two Orange Chevrolet Nova the coworkers presumed. She was heading directly to her time in the Los. Altos hills where she lived with her widowed mother Florence. But Leslie never arrived

Dak- Stanford University Leslie Marie Po Stanford Palo Alto Senator Leland Stanford Tesla Stanford Santa Clara County California Santa Clara Canny Low Library Goma Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Row Houses Fraternities Principal Typhoid Iran Apple United States Non Denominational College Leyland
Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

The Past and the Curious

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

"Edward Mobridge was born in eighteen thirty and kingston upon teams in England. His birth name was Edward Muggeridge but as he marched through the circumstances dances life he would change his name many times. Such a thing was pretty uncommon in the eighteen hundreds but he was pretty uncommon man. His hometown town was the historical site of coronations where the early British kings were crowned and ceremony and the earliest of. These monarchs were Saxons and perhaps inspired by that the young man would change his name to Mobridge and adopt the old spelling of his first name. Edward The vowel heavy spelling E. A. D. w. e. a. a- are D-. It looks like eat weird but sounds like Edward seeking adventure. He left for America at the age of twenty two telling his grandmother that if he didn't succeed and the lofty goals he had for his own life. He'd never retired. He arrived in New York with a bunch of extra bells and his name and little else he. He worked there for a bit but was thirsty for more. So he left for California soon after it was eighteen fifty-five during the gold rush when scores of people headed west to mind for the valuable metal. He sought his fortune through other means. Though he opened a bookstore in San Francisco the city was growing in the people had money need to spend by most accounts he was mild mannered and his business was pretty successful in the bustling city in eighteen. Sixty he made plans to head back to Europe for. We're a visit and to do some business. But he missed the boat so instead he booked passage on a Coniston goggin across the American continent to head head back east and from there he would sail to his native England. Kind of still go. aggies were the common covered wagon that you see all of the images of westward travel. It was was a fateful trip and the first time that a horse would fundamentally alter his life. These wagons were pulled by horses. The one carrying Mobridge was pulled by a team of six six mustangs but somewhere in Texas the horses pulling his wagon broke loose and started off leaving the wagon cascading on a high narrow trail above Iraqi fall. The driver couldn't get control and the WAGGON tumbled loaded with passengers and their belongings thinking quickly as the accident that was unfolding. Edward tried to cut an escape hole in the wagons cover but in the commotion he was thrown from the vehicle and hit his head on a rock. During the fall he recovered from the head injury in Arkansas. For three months though he had no recollection of the accident. One of the other passengers had to tell oh him what had happened. In addition to some memory problems he now saw everything in a disorienting. Double Vision Edward also displayed definite personality. Finality changes it was a brain injury. And as you might guess these can have a great impact on a person in his case. The injuries came with aggressive episodes. Grandiose thinking and general unusual behavior the people who had known him before noticed a distinct difference in his personality. After recuperating more New York he headed back to England where he stayed for several years when he returned to America in eighteen sixty seven. He considered himself photographer having learned a lot about the new art form and he had acquired some very nice equipment which he had brought with him. It was still a developing art. In fact the I photograph in history was made in France just four years before Edward was even born. By the time he was working eighteen sixties. The technology was still very limited mid and far from the powerful cameras that we carry in our pockets every day. Edwards equipment filled an entire horse cart in addition to the new career as a photographer he also sported an enormous beard and he called himself by a host of new names including Helius. This was not not the same old Edward. His photography made an impact on the world. He had a definite fascination with stopping time. Just a few years after a man named Matthew Brady Changed America by photographing not just the people of the civil war. But the battle scenes and carnage mobridge was documenting in beautiful detail. Some of America's because most amazing and mysterious natural sites. If you've never been to Yosemite Valley you still probably heard about it's staggering beauty. This led to it being being among the first of the land to be designated as national parks but before it welcomed hordes of tourists to gaze at its beauty weighbridge made some of the first and certainly some of the best photographs of the amazing land. Some of them are so amazing. They look like epic landscape paintings soon. Everyone wanted a piece of Edward. Helius Komo Abridge the same year. He came back to America. The Secretary of State William seward negotiated a deal to buy Alaska Lasca from the Russian Empire. But for years this was called seward's icebox or seward's folly because most people thought it was a costly mistake to buy the enormous swath of northern land in an effort to convince people of its value. The government hired Mobridge to join an expedition travel with his immense. It's photo equipment and a darkroom and photograph the Land Resources and native people of the territory. They are some of the most important documents we have of that time time period still today but it was back in California that his fame truly solidified and it was largely. Thanks to a man who would give his name to Stanford University his name was Leland Stanford and he had a problem he was a robber Baron and oh this was a problem for a lot of other people. This wasn't a problem as so called robber. Baron he like several other industrialised of the late eighteen. Hundreds was rich and powerful but he had gotten that way through some pretty shady and morally questionable ways used political influence and connections to get rich not to mention taking advantage of many less fortunate people he had been the governor head of the railroad a Horse Breeder and he owned what was at the time the largest winery in the world on his gigantic estate. He raised eight hundred racehorses. Feeding these horses alone wasn't expensive task in order to do so. He also operated a a sixty acre carrot farm just for food so you may ask yourself what does a guy like this. Have to worry about Mr Muggeridge. I I have a problem. That's not my name. Mr Mobridge have rows riot again. I have gone long again call me. He Leo's Leo's that's right heels as in the ancient Greek personification of the sun being okay. Okay Helius so I have this theory and it's more than a hunch but I just can't prove it and I may or may not have bet money on it so I I need an answer. So how can he LEO's help. Well he'll ios this concerned horses. You see I believe when a horse runs at some point in its stride dried all four of its speed are above the ground so at some point the horse has touching absolutely nothing yet still moving forward but it happened so quickly that I can't be certain. Do you understand yeah. He Leo's digs that. You want me to prove it with Pictures Helius. I'd like that very much which it's going to cost you. Some money got plenty. Don't worry. Coup crackle added now it was actually a pretty common disagreement of the time and Leland with his stable full of horses and pockets. Full of cash was in a unique position to solve it he just needed. Someone like mobridge invest best craziest and most creative photographer in the public eye to solve technical issues when a horse ran. was there ever a moment when all four of its feet were off of the ground many people believed it could not possibly be true. The first tries to capture the airborne image. Each were failures. It was impossible with the cameras of the day to catch the fast horse. At just the right time the beast was just a blur so they went back to the drawing board. The project was derailed by mobridge being the defendant in a murder case which is another story entirely but once that was over they got back to work. More bridge hung white sheets up along the race track. And whiten the track itself with chalk powder this would reflect any an all light which he knew would help. The camera. Camera capture a clear image of the fast horse next. He designed a camera with quick shutter speed. It may have been the first of its kind as most cameras needed a long Exposure to whatever was being photographed people would have to sit still early photographs. So that they didn't show up as a blur that would not work with a galloping horse.

Edward Mobridge Edward America Mobridge Edward Muggeridge LEO England Leland Stanford California New York William Seward Coronations Saxons Europe Arkansas Coniston Goggin E. A. D. Baron Texas San Francisco
"leland stanford" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on Bay Curious

"You're in this. This ship below deck. You can smell the sea. And the musk of the wood nearby men's way back and forth in their hammocks snoring softly amid the creeks of the hall. The Cook set you down here Bringham salt pork. It's the eighteen forties so it'll be at least another other seventy some years before. Incandescent lighting becomes commonplace but fire. Fire can be expensive smoky even dangerous angels out on this floating tinderbox especially if the cargo is flammable for light down here carew depend on glass poured in the shapes of cut gems in late into the deck. They glow above your head. refracting rays of sunlight onto the OAK cribs. These are prism lights. The light can go both ways the daylight comes down and if a fire breaks out below the prisons teams will glow with warning at the feet of the sailors above that prison. Technology used on ships is soon brought onto land so that the space is below. The sidewalk can be lit in eighteen. Forty five inventor thaddeus hyatt patents the vault cover in which a series of small glass pieces are placed in big cast iron panels. The panels are modular. So you can put many of them in a row over large Areas the glass pieces in high. It's early panels are circular and always flush with the sidewalk there flat in the ground so that the foot of a passer-by doesn't trip on them. Some are flat on the bottom but high. It also has refracting lenses where the glass extends down in triangular shapes these exposed rosed prisons toss and bend the light into dark subterranean corners. These panels of glass are called. Volt lighting involve lights are eventually made available in different variations circle and square glass different kinds of prisons in panels made out of concrete instead of cast iron. The vault lights become popular in cities. And they're used in many iconic and interesting architecture projects. Here's a fascinating one but it requires a little back story the city of Sacramento is between two mighty rivers the Sacramento in the American rivers. which for a long time made the city very prone to flooding in eighteen? Sixty to the city flooded and the newly elected California. -FORNIA Governor Leland Stanford was brought to his inauguration in a row boat to protect businesses against floods and avoid the rowboats votes that same year it was decided that certain parts of the city would be elevated up to fourteen feet but instead of lifting the buildings in some places they simply built over the first floor which means below the sidewalk. You can still l.. Pass between the abandoned storefronts of the city forgotten and these eerie streets are illuminated by vault lights which cast Sta Gentle purple glow into the dark neglected spaces. It said that people have seen ghosts down here an old woman in a black Victorian dress with a white ruffled collar and a small girl who was scared and won't let go of visit and then there's the iconic ways vault lighting has been used. Some of New York City's first. Subways used vault lights to illuminate the shining tiles. And then there's the other icon. Many of us never got the pleasure of visiting Penn Station. The original Penn Station in New York City was built in nineteen ten and and was opulent beyond belief it had this huge passenger concourse that led to all the train platforms. It had a magnificent tint arched glass canopy held together with an exposed steel structure. The ground of the concourse was almost entirely volt lights so said the sunlight pouring through that glass canopy would spell down to the lower levels but that station station was demolished in the nineteen sixties and replaced with the Penn station. We know today since then. It's been said Ed. One once entered the city like a God but now one scuttles in like a rat but what about San Francisco. What what do our lights light? Well most of them light sub sidewalk basements. You see a lot of buildings in San Francisco have basements assignments that extend out under the sidewalk. They can be used as extra storage or workspace and similar to a ship. It was less dangerous and expensive to use natural lighting reading than to have a flame under your building if you want you can see beneath the panels vault lights in the well-known City Lights Bookstore store in San Francisco's North Beach to find the underside of the vault lights. Go downstairs and walk over between the shelves of Cognitive Science and Asian Classics X. Look Up. And you'll see the colored glass dim as the feet of pedestrians crossover it. These are not prisons. Though they're flat on the bottom it's unclear. How many sub sidewalk basements there are in the city? I asked San Francisco. Public Works about it and they don't really have account but there's another mystery. I can solve our listener. Noted that a number of these glass prisons are purple and that was not intentional. So glasses made of silica which can be found in sand but often sand will have other elements in it to clarify and stabilize the glass. They add manganese dioxide it essentially makes the glass clear ish so we lease vault lights. I installed they were clear but the thing thing is when manganese is exposed to UV rays for long periods of time it oxidises interns purple or bluish. This process can take decades so when you see the purple glass it's old or they faked it and used colored glass to mimic the old class. And what is this week's question asker can make of all. This did seem like the ones that are purple are much more broken up and they've been weathered over time so that makes them very cool. Thank you so much for answering my question like I said I love your podcast from farm. Always listening to it so I look forward to hearing this one reporter Jessica paycheck. Today's Today's episode was sound designed and engineered by Rob Speight. If you are a die-hard Bay curious listener we made a little something for you. A Quiz inspired by all of our twenty nineteen episodes test yourself and see how much you retain from our shows last year find the quiz at bay curious dot org and we'll also link to it in our show. I'm Alan Price have a great week..

San Francisco Penn Station New York City City Lights Bookstore Sacramento Governor Leland Stanford thaddeus hyatt Alan Price carew Rob Speight reporter California. Cognitive Science Jessica paycheck Ed North Beach
"leland stanford" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KOMO

"My. is why the Stanford University mascot. cool take cool and politician Leland Stanford started buying land in the area in eighteen seventy six for a horse farm he and wife chain founded the university in eighteen ninety one. the memory of their son Leland junior died at age fifteen from typhoid fever one hundred twenty thousand dollars per capita income. was one of the richest neighborhoods in the world city headquarters for corporate giants like Hewlett Packard Xerox. trip to Palo alto is complete without a visit the road on sculpture garden featuring the largest collection outside of France one sure they're open a favorite pasta Robles pulled vines Zinfandel. the Shamir of moderate artichoke dip fresh Santa Cruz breeze as the natives often like to say in Palo alto the great. thank you so much I think I feel so much better yeah I grew up down there but I just learned so much all right back to the game little more serious stuff for you for the last couple of hours we've been talking about just how dangerous this damper team can be now they may be able to top twenty five but if you go back in the records earlier this week they are actually ranked earlier this season the Huskies would love to get a few lucky place tonight just like last week. I remember that play from last week they Dodge a big bullet against S. C. that could change the whole look of the game dogs get lucky against the Trojans last Saturday what a Huskies needing another big game on defense the Stanford team has some big guns on offense here's coach Pete I mean the tide in is a lot of stop him you know me got a bunch of also slashers in same stuff for me just give him a chance at six seventy schoolmate place. I think the running back Scarlett shifty he's strong Whitington can do some things and we started running back a move out there and yeah they do have big receivers but I'm sure coach Pete has a great plan I'm sure Jimmy lake the defensive coordinators ready to go as well should be a good one tonight down on the farm I do have a tweet here from a CD by the name of crazy old check she says forty to nothing Stanford I think you're gonna be wrong it's definitely not going to be that all Ralph says Huskies hammer the hapless cardinal thirty five to three Lisa says well for four of Stanford stakes thirty one to ten dogs spend says all Huskies Bigelow plowing on the farm Akhmed runs wild for a hundred fifty yards dogs when it forty two ten that's sounds could be reasonable big I know this is from Bobby big dog say goodnight Stanford fans this game is over in the first half Huskies role forty two to seventeen Karen says it's the Huskies second road game in six games just their second game of the season on the road can you say road kill twenty four twenty one Stanford and then dean Miller I did read this one and this and this could be close to he says thirty one to seventeen dogs I have an update here from Colorado this one in the fourth quarter with about ten minutes ago Colorado just kicked a field goal to take the lead on Arizona thirty to twenty eight we do all the final the top twenty five number eleven Texas over West Virginia forty two to thirty one Siva Florida out Florida just ended number ten Florida twenty four Auburn thirteen a Notre Dame wallet Bowling Green by a final the fifty two to nothing Ellis you over Utah state forty two to six Oklahoma forty five chances twenty all right that's going to do for como kicked off don't go anywhere are husky coverage continue next really swore to the tail gate show and the rest of the gang go dog..

Leland Stanford Huskies Stanford University Palo alto typhoid Hewlett Packard Xerox. Pete I Colorado Dodge France Robles S. C. Florida Scarlett Trojans Jimmy lake dean Miller Arizona Utah
America, Jeff Bezos Bill Gates And Fifty Years discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

10:19 min | 2 years ago

America, Jeff Bezos Bill Gates And Fifty Years discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"In the last fifty years the tech industry has reshaped America it's changed how we communicate our economy and our political landscape the captains of this industry mark Zuckerberg Jeff Bezos Bill Gates they've all become some of the richest people in history and it all happened in Silicon Valley a story of high tech a lot the ghosts were daring entrepreneurs found equally daring investors willing to roll the dice on risky new ventures realized by armies of technological whiz kids all remote from and free of the stultifying influence of the federal government that's the line Silicon Valley and its denizens have touted anyway historian Margaret mera says it's a self serving myth that belies silicon valley's humble beginnings as a remote Cold War research and development hub and the deep ties it fostered with the US government how Silicon Valley went from obscurity to global powerhouse is the subject of America's new book the code Silicon Valley and the remaking of America America's a professor of history at the university of Washington and she joins me now it's good to have you on the show it's terrific to be here thanks for having me so you have written a revisionist history of sorts why is that need it your what's the danger of thinking of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs as these loan calculators well I think tech is all around us tech is no longer off to the side it's were using its products every day and to realize how realizing how we got to now and realizing that it's a story not only of entrepreneurship but also of politics and culture is really important understanding where we go next off now that's interesting so and we're gonna get to that but let's go back to the beginning now yeah well I did Palo alto become the hub of all of this tak a and as you point out in the book it was just the sleepy railroad village in the nineteen fifties but you say two things made a big difference the mom and then the southern Pacific railroad tycoon Leland Stanford that's right Leland Stanford who of course is a man of the nineteenth century not the twentieth or twenty first but in in the eighteen eighty five he and his wife and out and found at the university and sixty years later that university becomes the hub of a growing electronics industry in a valley that before that had mostly been a place of fruit production and canneries it was the beginning of a complete transformation and the catalyst for that was not just the fact that Stanford was there and not just the fact that private industries and companies like Lockheed L. A. base Lougheed opened a major division up there but also because the federal government got into the research and development business in a big way for the first time in the nineteen fifties and then there are these two threads run side by side Stanford and and Cold War industry because you write that Stanford helped shift the center of tech away from and my tea in Boston which was historically the first type of technology and innovation so what was it about Stanford that made it so uniquely suited to being that lab of this burgeoning military industrial complex well Stanford did what no other university dead which was it really completely reorganized itself to meet the needs of the burgeoning Cold War and US military industrial complex at then this is a really important thing to understand you know one of the reasons I wrote this book is because I've spent two decades looking at history of tack and having people ask me here and around the world how you know where it's going to be the next Silicon Valley how do I build a silicon something and and often the other regions have looked at the bay area inside a hot if we have a university there then we're just going to you know at we can build a tech cluster adjacent to it not recognizing how distinct Stanford was it was a private university that had an immense degree of latitude to try to change the way it worked and the people who ran the university in the fifties and the sixties and notably it's dean of engineering and then provost a guy named Fred Terman decided to really reorganize the entire curriculum to beef up physics to create these really powerful research labs that were devoted to things like microwave and radar technology as well as small and advanced electronics no other place did that and Fred turn was the guy who lord Hewlett Packard out right yeah that the secret of of Silicon Valley is not just the tack it's the people right and Fred Terman is a really important character in the early parts of this book because he is not only situated at the this key role at Stanford but he is so instrumental and personally bringing out people and encouraging them to start companies there is another important distinction between Stanford and MIT say that Stanford encouraged people to work outside of academia for the for companies you know themselves the that and also that the companies didn't make their employees sign non competes so you have that that flow of labor yes so the non compete is a really important California hallmark of king of why California and my north California because the state of California other let unlike other states including the state of Washington where I where I am does allow people to job pop and doesn't penalize them you know isn't for non compete agreements are are not are not allowed under California state law but there's a I think that Stanford has this get create this model for collaboration with industry and and creating an opportunity as you said for art for both faculty and students to go back and forth between academia and industry and that was not done that that was something that no other university was doing it and other parts of Stanford looked on it with some horror hit has as higher education kind of selling out to an industry yet to give the most bad reputation and union act in the halls of academe another big part of this story is the post nineteen fifty seven the space race by Nick and Kennedy is putting man on the moon at that started or sparked this start up an explosion in Silicon Valley so how did that get more money flowing to individual entrepreneurs and and why were they Sir are often based here in the west yeah well this is a really great part of the store and it's really important to that head of show how the story of the valley is not just big government and it's not just entrepreneurship it's both and it's actually the wait not only the government spending money but how it float so look you come into the nineteen fifties and you have a lot of electronics a lot of air space a lot of military related activity going on up and down the west coast but when you think about both LA in Seattle you think about building big building airplanes building you know aerospace may not exclusively but that that's kind of the dominance that that the characteristic of the industry was you know building building big things the valley was already building small things it was a small place it was building smaller tronic some communications devices well after October nineteen fifty seven when of America's they the white house's hair is on fire metaphorically because the Soviets have been the first one to get a satellite into orbit there's this huge push for more spending on space the space race kicks off again goes into overdrive and with that starts flowing you know what do you need to build more powerful rockets to send a man to the moon you need very small very light very powerful electronics devices and that is exactly what the valley is building and as more startups settled in the west you have the rise of the venture capitalists and it's really interesting to read in your book about the dawn of that whole game didn't early venture capitalists guys actually drive around Palo alto looking for signs of of nerdy men working on something in her garage is that they could invested they they did it's I mean it's amazing the venture capitalists the beginning we're not fees you now rich swaggering they weren't someone many of them were people who had a great deal of their own money they were young smart guys many of them with business degrees who were managing other rich people's money for them and one of the stories I tell the book is one that was told to me by bill draper led to one of these legendary venture capitalists whose father was a VC whose son and other family members have become very prominent venture capitalists and bill draper talks about driving around with his then business partner pitch Johnson another person I interviewed for the book and how they would just go out in the palm orchards and look for these old sheds that used to be used for drying prunes that might have this sort of sign that was tacked up outside with some funny name that can ended in tron or some kind of made up electronic sounding name and they would show up and they would knock on the door and they say Hey what do you do and I'm a venture capitalist and the and the guy would say what's that it's like I'm someone who can invest in it I can give you some money I'm gonna best in you for for some upside in your company and and that the guys in the print shed would often say will come right on in let's look we'll show you what we're doing so quite as it is it's very is very quite as but it's a wonderful image to think about these these young men getting up early in the day and just driving around looking for deals and is another person VC I talked to for the book read dammit Dennis told me like in those early days there was there was just so much there was so much out opportunity out there and there was very little competition no one else was really tracking the stuff none of the big money guys certainly none of the east coast money men were paying any attention to these little companies the California electronics industry in the northern California electronics industry matures you start getting this generation of men who can come out of the work in these industries and I'm I'm saying man AG again and again deliberately okay this this was an all male all white a world at the time and there's still so white and so male I mean not that much has changed looking into this whole history how is that informed why there hasn't been much problems

America Jeff Bezos Bill Gates Fifty Years Sixty Years Two Decades
"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

"Uncomfortable somewhat eccentric. Man possibly had an injury from this stagecoach accident, which affected his personality. He dresses Jabaliin strings on cuffs of his pants and beat up old hats and, and, and dusty black jackets and Stanford who favors tuxedos even during workdays and top hats and shoes that are shines to brightness of mirrors. And everything is, is quite in his in its place in Stanford's world. This odd couple begin to spend time together and begin to socialize together and begin to talk late into the night and become friends, and they become one of the strangest collaborating pairs that you can imagine in, in the history of invention, and it's their friendship that leads to what I believe is the invention of motion pictures, which ensues a some years later when Stanford gives more bridge, another photography assignments. To photograph is horses, because he keeps the farm, which is his race horses, especially trotters at a place that we now know as Palo Alto the home of Leland Stanford University, the tragedy. However, tuck it in here because my bridge lives several lives inside and Edward notes, he has distanced himself from people by dressing, shabbily and staying by himself, he marries, a young woman, a woman who was twenty years younger than he is flora, he's fascinated obsessed with her. He stares at her. He takes photographs of her outside, however, he doesn't return affection that she can recognize she's a young woman, he sets up in a house, and he tries to give her all the money in the and the things that she wants, however, he doesn't give her what she finds adequate affection, and this leads to flora after the birth of their son falling in with another man, whose invented himself Larkins and this was another. Other profile of the nineteenth century inventing itself for me. Although Larkin's will wind up a villain here, he very much could have been at the right place at the right time to and become one of the one of the gilded age is celebrated ones, not one of their rascals Edward. Yes. Talking about a guy called Harry lark, and who was an Englishman with a polished education, who decided to leave his prosperous family behinds in London and come to the American west, which he does in about eighteen seventy or so. And he is a smart talking beautifully dressed, man, who seems to be adept at persuading people who, give him their money. And so he arrives in, in San Francisco, and, and despite his polished, outward appearance finds himself in jail for trying to con another fellow out of out of some of his his travel money. And once he springs himself from jail, he invents, this guy, Harry Larkins, rather, handsome, and articulate, gentlemen, invents himself as the critic becomes a writer on the theater for the Harrises, go, Tron ical, and he's a man about town in San Francisco, and he meets Edward mortgages young wife flora downs. And he's deuces flora Moi ridge, and they become lovers while Ed Weybridge is off on his photography assignments up and down the west coast. And mortgage comes home, and becomes quite suspicious of his wife and one thing leads to another and he discovers that his wife has had this lover Larkin's for more than a year, and he decides in a fit of pique and also in some of the sort of notion of western Justice that Larkins has to pay with his life. So he goes at nights at midnight to a house where he knows Larkins is, is spending, the nights knocks on the door demands to see Larkin's Larkin's presents himself, the door and Edward more everage pulls out his Smith and Wesson, revolver, and shoots dead. And at this point, why is a well known photographer. He's well known as a friend of Leland Stanford and Stanford. It seems comes to mortgages aid when the murder trial in sues, and Stanford helps to get a lawyer for mortgage, it appears to be and after a long and, and sensational trial, which fill the American newspapers for a month and a half in eighteen seventy three four mortgage is acquitted of this murder, which is peculiar because he admitted to it. And he's acquitted on the basis of something that was one called justifiable homicide at the time and the place in California in frontier, California, there was this notion that AMAN had a right to kill his sexual rival, and he could be acquitted, if he did that it was the husband's rights to defend the marriage bed to use the language of the day and mortgage is quitted of his murder. And released. And then he goes back to Mr. Stanford and Stanford welcomes him back with open arms and says, listen, we've got to finish this work on my horses. I've got these thoroughbred horses. And I really wanna know whether horses when they're galloping ever leave the ground. The inventor tycoon when we come back, the invention of motion pictures, and we'll try to get Addison in this picture to gilded age murder and the birth of moving pictures. The inventor and the tycoon by Edward ball. I'm John bachelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Taking you through the third shift. This is the John Batchelor show on cagey out eight ten. This is Dr Howard founder and formulator of balance of nature.

Leland Stanford Harry Larkins Edward ball Larkin Stanford murder Leland Stanford University John bachelor San Francisco Jabaliin Palo Alto Harry lark California Moi ridge Dr Howard Ed Weybridge flora downs London founder
"leland stanford" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:52 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Edward ball is the author of the inventor and the tycoon, a gilded age murder, and the birth motion pictures, and we will get the motion pictures because may bridge, you might have guessed is the man who has the genius idea of how to make his pictures move. He's a very enterprising photographer. I our we have Edward Edwards of profile of Leland Stanford who becomes part of the central Pacific, the great railroad magnates of the post civil war, period. The, the last bike is driven in eighteen sixty eight and they become wealthy beyond imagination in the latter part of the nineteenth century known as the today. Meanwhile, Edward my bridge has been home with his mother and his family residence until the war's over. And he comes back to ten in that period. He's been trying to invent things like washing machines, but there are a lot of inventors of that, like, good printing techniques. For putting color, and in tagliatelle printing. And he goes off to Paris at one point, and stumbles across photography, which was all the rage in Paris, photography was the new technology, their digital age any immediately takes to Edward it was as if he'd been looking for his whole life. Yes, it seems almost like an accident. That's why would would encounter this, this new technology and embrace it. He was nearly thirty seven or thirty eight years old when he decided he was going to set aside. Everything you've been doing professionally in book, selling, he say, he tried to become a small time inventor for a period of time at thirty seven he changes his career and decided to pick up a camera and become a photographer returns to California in eighteen sixty six. I believe, and with the help of a friend, whom he had met in New York, MRs sell Celik, the man he met when he got there and eighteen fifty. Yes. That's right. He sets himself up as a photographer for higher. And he's not good with people. He's, he's kind of a reclusive man. He's not socially at ease. And so he's not able to get customers in the most conventional way. That's stock did as portrait subjects that was a very lucrative part of early photography and still today, but my was runner bad as a portrait artist and he began to photograph the outdoors and it just happened that you'll sympathy valley in central California had become a destination for small numbers of adventure travelers. To, to enjoy the rapturous beauty of this is twenty five mile this seven mile long. Use me chasm in central California, and my takes some of the most majestic and arresting photographs of this valley, and they've become big selling art objects, they, they're, they're, they're awarded prizes. They he makes a lot of money from these photographs. And he suddenly has his himself a prosperous career as they've landscape photographer. So at this point, he is known in San Francisco, and in central California, as the man who you want to photograph your land, and your property, which is something he, he knows how to do quite well. And he meets this guy, Leland. Stanford who by this time Leland Stanford has has quite a bit of property. He's a one of the richest men in west of the Mississippi, you suppose this is sometime in eighteen seventy two after he had some dealings with Crocker one of the partners in the central Pacific. Eighteen seventy one actually and. So Stanford, who is the prosecutor just men west of the Mississippi. The president of the central Pacific railroad hires. Edward marv's to photograph is house. Just a normal kind of assignments for a photographer here. I have a beautiful piece of property photograph my house for me. Moy CHU is, as I said rather uncomfortable. Somebody eccentric man possibly had an injury from this stagecoach accident, which affected his personality. He dresses shabbily strings on cuffs of his pants and beat up old hats and, and, and dusty black jackets, and Stanford who favors tuxedos even during workdays and top hats and shoes are shined to brightness of mirrors. And everything is, is quite in his in its place in Stanford's world. This odd couple begin to spend time together and begin to socialize together and begin to talk late into the night and become friends, and they become one of the strangest collaborating pairs that you can imagine in, in the history of invention, and it's their friendship that leads to what I believe is the invention of motion pictures, which ensues of some years later when Stanford gives more another photography assignments to photograph is horses, because he keeps the farm, which is his race horses. Specially trotters at a place that we now know as Palo Alto the home of Leland. Stanford university. The tragedy. However, tuck it in here because my bridge live several lives inside and Edward notes, he has distanced himself from people by dressing, shabbily and staying by himself, he marries, a young woman a woman almost twenty years younger than he is flora, he's fascinated obsessed with her. He stares at her. He takes photographs of her outside, however, he doesn't return affection that she can recognize she's a young woman, he sets up in a house, and he tries to give her all the money, and the and the things that she wants, however, he doesn't give her what she finds adequate affection, and this leads to flora after the birth of their son falling in with another man, whose invented himself Larkins, and this was another profile of the nineteenth century inventing itself for me. Although Larkin's will wind up a villain here. He very much could have been at the right place at the right time to and become one of the one of the gilded ages. Sela. Braided ones, and not one of their rascals Edward. Yes. Talking about a guy called Harry Larkins, who was an Englishman with a polished education, who decided to be his prosperous family behind in London and come to the American west, which he does in about eighteen seventy or so. And he is a smart talking beautifully dressed, man, who seems to be adept at persuading people who, give him their money. And so he arrives in, in San Francisco and. And despite his polished, outward appearance, he finds himself in jail for trying to con another fellow out of out of some of his his travel money. And once he springs himself from jail, he invents this guy. Harry Larkins was rather, hand, some and articulate gentlemen, invents himself as the critic he becomes a writer on the inter- for the Cisco chronicle and he's of a man about town in San Francisco, and he meets Edward mortgages young wife flora downs, and he's deuces, flora, more ridge, and they become lovers. While Edwin Weybridge is off on his photography assignments up and down the west coast and mortgage come. Home and becomes quite suspicious of his wife and one thing leads to another and he discovers that his wife has had this lover Larkin's for more than a year, and he decides in a fit of pique and also in some of the sort of notion of western Justice that Larkins has to pay with his life. So he goes at nights at midnight to a house where he knows Larkins is, is spending, the nights knocks on the door demands to see Larkin's Larkin's presents himself, the door and Edward more average pulls out his Smith and Wesson revolver, and shoots. This men dead. And at this point, why is a well-known photographer. He's well known as a friend of leaving Stanford and Stanford, it seems comes to averages aid when the murder trial in sues, and Stanford helps to get a lawyer for mortgage, it appears to be and after a long and, and sensational trial, which fill the American newspapers for a month and a half in eighteen seventy three four mortgage is acquitted of this murder, which is peculiar because he admitted to it. He's acquitted on the basis of something that was once called justifiable homicide at the time and the place in California in frontier, California, there was this notion that AMAN had a right to kill his sexual rival, and he could be acquitted, if he did that it was a husband's rights to defend the marriage bed to use the language of the day and is quit of his murder. And released. And then he goes back to Mr. Stanford and Stanford welcomes him back with open arms and says, listen, we've got to finish this work on my horses. I've got these thoroughbred horses. And I really wanna know whether horses when they're galloping ever leave the ground. The inventor tycoon when we come back, the invention of motion pictures, and we'll try to get Addison in this picture to gilded age murder and the birth of moving pictures. The inventor in the tycoon by Edward ball. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. This is Dr Howard founder and formulator of balance of nature where changing America one life at a time. I've been vitamins, I had to take because post-cancer cancer post, cardiac situation, but the bows nature of I mean that being so condensed on natural. You know is amazing stuff. I haven't told this good in seven or eight years, I would not be able to do a third of anything, give pigging ballots matrix to have more energy. Yeah, it's a godsend really is experienced Valance of nature difference for yourself for a limited time, all new preferred customers will receive an additional.

Leland Stanford Edward Stanford California Harry Larkins John Batchelor Edward ball murder Larkin San Francisco Edward Edwards Edward marv Mississippi Leland New York Paris Moy CHU
"leland stanford" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Of course, it's really difficult to make estimates. Clearly, the California office was doing really well, in spite of the fact that there was something of a financial panic going on in San Francisco that year it didn't seem to impact Strauss by. At the end of eighteen fifty-five. He'd sent more than eighty thousand dollars home in gold. Yeah. One of the things that really made his business. It'll come over and over that, even when they are difficulties they still managed to pull through and even do pretty well, like people will always need dry goods. They always need clothes and linens and household basics. So it was a really smart business to be in the first place in eighteen fifty six continued expansion of the Strauss enterprise, in California, Levi, sister Fogler, who had changed her name to fanny, when she moved to the United States move to San Francisco. With her husband, David Stearns, and their children to assist with the growing responsibilities of the business, and his brother Louis also join them, it is possible though unconfirmed that his mother Rebecca made the journey as well. And for the first time since moving to the US leave, I actually had a home with an address, that was separate from his business, not living above it or within it indicating that there was this ongoing trend of prosperity. The firm also changed names that year. It went from j Strauss and brother to J, Strauss, brother and company maybe to Levi's contribution, but on all records in California. It was listed as Levi, Strauss. Levi sent more than double the amount to New York in eighteen fifty six that he had in eighteen fifty five that amounted to approximately two hundred thousand dollars. Eventually in the late eighteen sixties Levi changed the name of the California branch to Levi Strauss and company, right? He knows his family members contributions. Eighteen fifty six was also the year that Levi Strauss became involved, along with his brother in law in the committee of vigilance, which was vigilante group made up largely of merchants that form to combat the city's growing political corruption and related violence, while business and politics, largely stayed separate up to that point concerns over, how businesses could be impacted by the lawlessness of men. In power led to the committee of vigilance nominating, and eventually electing many of the city's business leaders into political office. So they've picked people that they knew from other merchants and put them in office because they thought that was safer. And while Strauss did not seem to have any political. Ambitions of his own. He did back the political efforts of the committee, those committees. There were several of them in several places at this time period. And in some places their activities were kind of controversial because there was like an extrajudicial violent capacity in this combat of corruption. So it's like there's a whole bigger story there, but his involvement was really about electing business to city positions. And there had actually been a similar committee in San Francisco. Several years prior to this. That was much more of lake of vigilante law force that thought that they would fill the gap between the crime that was going on. And the police that were obviously to their minds, not doing anything about it. So that existed in San Francisco as well although he was not part about time eighteen fifty seven, the Strauss, family experienced, a financial loss and September the Central America which had picked up passengers and freight in Panama. Including a large shipment of gold went down in a hurricane off the US coast in the Atlantic. More than four hundred people died at an estimated one point five million dollars of gold was lost, including seventy six thousand dollars that was on route to j Strauss, brother and company from Levi, Strauss and company. The wreckage of the Central America was found and much of the treasure recovered in nineteen Eighty-eight. Although there was a significant legal battle over who should get that gold. The thinking of the Central America, a financial panic. There was a lot of gold that New York banks had been expecting on that ship. So when it didn't show up that was it was a significant economic disruption. And yet as seems to be the pattern of his life, Levi, Strauss, whether this storm part of this is because his brothers were the ones shipping him goods. So that meant he didn't have to reassure a supplier of his good credit and be like, no, no, I know. I lost some money, but I will make it up to you. They're like, yeah, we'll just keep going. So the Strauss family, continued, businesses usual. And because other entrepreneurs didn't have the credit or the leverage to do the same thing. Levi's business flourished as other shutdown by the end of the year. He was shipping gold to New York once again, and he had expanded to have offices in the city that were actually separate from his warehouse. House. He was also taking shipments of raw materials from suppliers outside the family, which he then leveraged in deals that got him discounts on the goods that were made from those raw materials, as the country found itself in the grip of the civil war, San Francisco's citizens realize they could eventually be impacted by California had entered the union as the Free State as outlined in the compromise of eighteen fifty. But while most of the city was loyal to the union. There were some concerns about some government officials wanting to allied with the confederacy. After a pro union rally in the city on may eleventh eighteen sixty one at the junction of Montgomery market and posts streets, a resolution was put forth formed a union committee of thirty four this is a committee of respected men. He would uphold the ideals of union fill vacant government, posts, and keep an eye out for treason, Levi, Strauss is one of the men named as a member of this group and one of only three Jewish men included. They were very worried that there were people that were infiltrating, California, who were pro slavery, and that it was going to completely cause an upheaval of everything going on in the state, and particularly in a large city like San Francisco, so they really wanted to try to keep an eye out and prevent such a problem. And when the troops that were stationed at the Presidio were sent east to fight it really left. The people of San Francisco a little bit uneasy and they were fearful without protection, Navan tier group known as the home guard was found. Did that consisted of three thousand men and it sort of served as a makeshift, military force, the home guard and the union committee of thirty four actually disbanded though? When Leland Stanford was elected, California, governor, Stanford was a pro union Republican who was very well respected successful and powerful. So the concerns of some sort of pro confederacy uprising that led to the formation of those two groups for pretty diminished under his leadership Strauss, and his California business continued to do well through all of this, and the prosperity of California's merchants helped keep the country of float through the civil war Strauss had recognized the value of real estate fairly early on and had invested in a number of properties throughout the city, which he often sold as a profit after holding them for some time Levi, Strauss and company also moved into a new space that he purchased in eighteen. Sixty seven was a four story building on battery street, but clearly showed the company's success. The company was known for its excellent and speedy. Service and the ability of its employees to satisfy client needs with even the largest orders. There was a write up where they actually used the word empowered to describe the sales people and clerks at Levi, Strauss. As being able like they were empowered to meet the needs agree to deals with clients, which is sort of a weird word to be using in the eighteen sixties. But there it was. Unfortunately, the late eighteen sixties also came with family loss, as Levi's half sister. Mary died in eighteen sixty six and his mother Rebecca past three years later after Rebecca's death Levi traveled back to New York. And he stayed there for a month, presumably to help settle accounts and get her affairs in order. There's also an embezzlement scandal Levi, Strauss and company are in October. Eighteen sixty six when news broke that a bookkeeper had taken five hundred thousand dollars left the country, while the company, not wanting to scare away, business partners, said that there was no money missing. It also made a statement in an advertisement that the man in question, ES Goodman was no longer with the company. It was not authorized to conduct business on behalf of Levi, Strauss and company, this mix of messages seem to below over while Mr. Goodman, never saw any retribution of the fact that he had taken money from his employer. Quite a lot of money from his employer. Neither the company nor Levi, Strauss person. Finally seem to suffer any negative fallout from it either..

Levi Strauss Levi San Francisco California Strauss Strauss enterprise New York j Strauss United States America Rebecca ES Goodman Montgomery David Stearns embezzlement Leland Stanford Atlantic Louis confederacy
"leland stanford" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Of course, it's really difficult to make those estimates clearly, the California office was doing really well, in spite of the fact that there was something of a financial panic going on in San Francisco that year it didn't seem to impact Strauss by. By the end of eighteen fifty-five. He'd sent more than eighty thousand dollars home in gold. One of the things that really made his business. It'll come up over and over that, even when they are difficulties they still managed to pull through and even do pretty well, like people will always need dry goods. They always need clothes and linens and household basics. So it was a really smart business to be in the first place in eighteen fifty six sock continued expansion of the Strauss enterprise, in California, Levi, sister Fogler, who had changed her name to fanny, when she moved to the United States, moved to San Francisco with her husband, David Stearns, and their children to assist with the growing responsibilities of the business, and his brother Louis also join them, it is possible though, unconfirmed that his mother Rebecca made the journey as well. And for the first time since moving to the US leave, I actually had a home with an address, that was separate from his business, not living above it or within it indicating that there was this ongoing trend of prosperity. The firm also changed names that year it went from j Strauss and brother to j Strauss. Brother and company maybe to aknowledge Levi's contribution, but on all records in California. It was listed as Levi, Strauss Levi, sent more than double the amount to New York in eighteen fifty six that he had an eighteen fifty five that amounted to approximately two hundred thousand dollars eventually in the late eighteen sixties Levi, changed the name of the California, branch to Levi Strauss and company, rising, his family members contributions, eighteen fifty six was also the year that Levi Strauss became involved, along with his brother in law in the committee of vigilance, which was a vigilante group made up largely of merchants that form to combat the city's growing political corruption and related violence, while business and politics had largely stayed separate to that point concerns over, how businesses could be impacted by the lawlessness of men. In power led to the committee of vigilance. Nominating evenly electing many of the city's business leaders into political office? So they picked people that they knew from other merchants and put them in office because they thought that was safer. And while Strauss did not seem to have any political ambitions of his own. He did back the political efforts of the committee, those committees. There were several of them in several places at this time period and some places their activities were kind of controversial because there was like an extrajudicial violence capacity in this combat of corruption. So it's like there's a whole bigger story there, but his involvement was really about electing business to city positions. And there had actually been a similar committee in San Francisco several years prior to this. That was much more of like a vigilante law force that thought that they would fill the gap between the crime that was going on. And the police were obviously to their minds, not doing anything. Thing about it, so that existed in San Francisco as well although he was not part of that at the time and eighteen fifty seven, the Strauss, family experienced a financial loss in September the Central America, which had picked up passengers and freight in Panama, including a large shipment of gold went down in a hurricane off the US coast, and the Atlantic more than four hundred people died, and an estimated one point five million dollars of gold was lost, including seventy six thousand dollars that was on route to j Strauss, brother and company from Levi, Strauss and company. The wreckage of the Central America was found and much of the treasure recovered in nineteen Eighty-eight. Although there was a significant legal battle over who should get that gold, the thinking of the Central America off financial panic. There was a lot of gold that New York banks had been expecting on that ship. So when it didn't show up that was it was a significant economic disruption. And yet as seems to be the pattern of his life, Levi, Strauss, weathered, this storm part of this was because his brothers were the ones shipping him goods. So that meant he didn't have to reassure a supplier of his good credit and be like, no, no, I know. I lost some money, but I will make it up to you. They're like, yeah, we'll just keep going. So the Strauss family, continued, businesses usual. And because other entrepreneurs didn't have the credit or the leverage to do the same thing. Levi's business flourished as other shutdown by the end of the year. He wishing gold to New York once again, and he had expanded to have offices in the city that we're actually separate from his warehouse. House. He was also taking shipments of raw materials from suppliers outside the family, which he then leveraged in deals that got him discounts on the goods that were made from those raw materials, as the country found itself in the grip of the civil war, San Francisco's citizens realize they could eventually be impacted by it. California had entered the union as a Free State as outlined in the compromise of eighteen fifty. But while most of the city was loyal to the union. There were some concerns about some government officials wanting to ally with the confederacy. After a pro union rally in the city on may eleventh eighteen sixty one at the junction of Montgomery market and post streets, a resolution was put forth formed a union committee of thirty four this is a committee of respected men. He would uphold the ideals of union fill vacant government, posts, and keep an eye out for treason, Levi, Strauss is one of the men named as a member of this group and one of only three Jewish men included. They were very worried that there were people that were infiltrating, California, who were pro slavery, and that it was going to completely cause an upheaval of everything going on in the state, and particularly in a large city like San Francisco, so they really wanted to try to keep an eye out and prevent such a problem when the troops that were stationed at the Presidio were sent east to fight it really left. The people of San Francisco a little bit uneasy and they were fearful without protection, Navan tier group known as the home guard was found. Did that consisted of three thousand men and it sort of served as a makeshift, military force, the home guard and the union committee of thirty four actually disbanded though? When Leland Stanford was elected, California, governor, Stanford was a pro union Republican who is very well respected successful and powerful. So the concerns of some sort of pro confederacy uprising that led to the formation of those two groups were pretty diminished under his leadership Strauss. And his California business continue to do well through all of this, and the prosperity of California's merchants helped keep the country of float through the civil war Strauss had recognize the value of real estate fairly early on and had invested in a number of properties throughout the city, which often sold as a profit after holding them for some time Levi, Strauss and company also moved into a new space that he purchased eighteen. Sixty seven was a four story building on battery street, but clearly showed the company's success. The company was known for its excellent and speed. Service and the ability of its employees to satisfy client needs with even the largest orders. There was a write up where they actually used the word empowered to describe the sales people and clerks at Levi, Strauss. As being able, they were empowered to meet the needs agree to deals with clients, which is sort of a weird word to be using in the eighteen sixties. But there it was. Unfortunately, the late eighteen sixties also came with family loss, as Levi's half sister. Mary died in eighteen sixty six and his mother Rebecca past three years later after Rebecca's death Levi traveled back to New York. And he stayed there for a month, presumably to help settle accounts and get her affairs in order. There's also an embezzlement scandal at Levi, Strauss, and company in October of eighteen sixty six when news broke that a bookkeeper had taken five hundred thousand dollars left the country, while the company, not wanting to scare away, business partners, said that there was no money missing. It also made a statement in an advertisement that the man in question, ES Goodman was no longer with the company. It was not authorized to conduct business on behalf of Levi Strauss, and company, this mix of messages seemed to blow over while Mr. Goodman, never saw any retribution of the fact that he had taken money from his employer. Quite a lot of money from his employer. Neither the company nor Levi, Strauss purse. Finally seem.

Levi Strauss Strauss Levi San Francisco California Strauss Strauss enterprise j Strauss New York United States Rebecca Central America David Stearns ES Goodman Montgomery Louis embezzlement Leland Stanford confederacy Fogler
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And met up with the Union Pacific railroad line in Utah. The Chinese had some of the most difficult and dangerous jobs. But Quan says all that didn't get them much respect from their bosses. They were thought of as really just another tool, and so they didn't really record the names of those who died and didn't even bother to collect their bodies or search for them. They were found when spring thaw king after the railroad was done the Chinese worker. Contributions were sometimes recognize and sometimes not fifty years ago at the one hundred anniversary a Representative of the Chinese historical society of America was invited to speak. But then the representatives time was inexplicably cut from the schedule. Max Chang is one of the organizers of this year's event to add what I call it the great Salt Lake salt to the wound. John Volpe, the secretary of transportation gave a speech which basically said who but Americans could lay ten miles of track one day who but Americans could dig tunnels to the solid granite of the Sierras and Qantas. It wasn't rich American industrialists. Who did the hard work didn't see Charles Crocker? Leland Stanford Mark Hopkins down in the railroad hammering away setting black powder explosives. It was his Chinese labourers who did it and they were ignored. Not so at this year celebration, one of the speakers was the current secretary of transportation, Elaine Chao,.

Union Pacific railroad secretary Chinese historical society of Elaine Chao Salt Lake Leland Stanford John Volpe Charles Crocker Utah Max Chang Quan Mark Hopkins Representative Sierras fifty years one day
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He has a blog called weather west so Google whether west Daniel Swain, he really gets into the particulars of these big events. Also, if you go NWS for national weather service bay area NWS bay area. I'm sorry. Let me back that up NWS Monterey and abuse Monterey is where the national weather service office for the bay area is you will see the national weather service page for the bay area. There's a dropdown menu about halfway down the page. If you click on that it's updated every few minutes, and they will have something several times a day called area forecast discussion. That's what you want to click on its plain English describing what time things are going to happen where they're going to. Happen. Those kind of things also I'd recommend on Twitter. The following the national weather service. Bayer office on Twitter national weather service, Sacramento, national weather service, Reno national weather service, L A and also Daniel Swain on Twitter. In fact, Amanda stupi our engagement producers going to put up Swain's blog on our website. So it's they're available for you. Our listeners and available another call Marie join us you're on the air. Hi, I'm you discussed vacillating between damaging floods and damaging drought. And I was wondering if our Pippen is just too fragile for the real weather or whether has become more extreme Inc. Thank you for the call. It's it's a great question and a very complicated question as the climate continues to warm there have been scientific studies published that show these atmospheric rivers will get stronger because there's gonna be a warmer world means more water, vapor. But there are also questions about how the Jetstream moves. And when you have a melting ice in the polar regions, what that does digestion, it gets very complicated. We haven't seen an increase in overall rainfall over the last century since climate change began what we have seen is droughts being more severe forest fires being more severe. So some of this is still is still kind of up in the air. And remember we have always had a major flood events. I mean, some of the worst ones in California history is longtime residents will remember nineteen ninety seven ninety eight nine hundred eighty two eighty. Eighty three nineteen sixty four nineteen fifty five there are famous events, and we've tried to build flood works and levies and Weirs and dams all over the place, but sometimes mother nature just overwhelms us. And you know, there's even a scenario that scientists have looked at called an arc storm which is an atmospheric river a one in one thousand year event that could hit California, obviously, the chances are quite low in any year that would be ten days of rain, the central valley levies would break you'd have an inland. Sea for three hundred miles twenty feet deep. Hurricane force winds hundred twenty-five mile wins massive landslides loss of power water sewer for weeks or even months and some scientists call this the other big one we think about that in context of John earthquakes, but these Amazon river storms have the potential to do immense damage, and the only one we've ever seen in modern recorded California history was eighteen sixty two when the floods were. Were so bad in California that new governor Leland Stanford had to take a rowboat through the streets of Sacramento to his inaugural. Let me read a comment from actually a question from Ellen. Who says typically, how broader the atmosphere rivers is today's weather and so Cal connected to the same atmospheric river, carry the bay area storms, basically. Yes. And another listening writes driving into the city from the peninsula this morning. The bay look very high in choppy any chance it could overflow onto the highway. It depends on the timing of the tides and the winds I haven't heard predictions of major flooding. We have had flooding in the play in the past excuse me in places like L visa in south, San Jose. But right now, the main concern is on these smaller rivers. I'm sorry. Smaller creeks, mostly in the north bay, you know places like Santa Rosa Petaluma places like that, however back to one of the other questions as the climate continues to warm we'll see the overall bay level rise San Francisco Bay already risen eight inches in the last century doesn't sound like a lot. But when you have a high tide an incoming tide a big storm that can be enough to put it over.

Daniel Swain California Twitter San Francisco Bay Sacramento Monterey Google Leland Stanford San Jose Amanda stupi Santa Rosa Petaluma Hurricane Pippen Amazon river Marie Reno Bayer extreme Inc Ellen
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He has a blog called weather west so Google whether west Daniel Swain, he really gets into the particulars of these big events. Also, if you Google NWS for national weather service bay area NWS bay area. I'm sorry. Let me back that up NWS Monterey and WS Monterey is where the national weather service office for the bay area is you will see the national weather service page for the bay area. There's a dropdown menu about halfway down the page. If you click on that it's updated every few minutes, and they will have something several times a day called area forecast discussion. That's what you want to click on its plain English describing what time things are going to happen where they're going to have. Happen. Those kinds of things. Also, I'd recommend on Twitter. The following the national weather service. Bayer office on Twitter national weather service, Sacramento, national weather, service, Reno national weather service, L A and also Daniel Swain on Twitter and fact, Amanda stupi our engagement producers going to put up Swain's blog on our website. So it's they're available for you. Our listeners and available another call Marie join us you're on the air. Hi, you we discussed vacillating between damaging floods and damaging drought. And I was wondering if our Pippen is just too fragile for the real weather or whether he's become more extreme. And thank you for the call. It's it's a great question and a very complicated question as the climate continues to warm there have been scientific studies published that showed these atmospheric rivers will get stronger because there's gonna be a warmer world means more water vapor, but they're also questions about how the Jetstream moves. And when you have a melting ice in the polar regions, what that does the digestion, it gets very complicated. We haven't seen an increase in overall rainfall over the last century since climate change began what we have seen is droughts being more severe forest fires being more severe. So some of this is still is still kind of up in the air. And remember we have always had a major flood events. I mean, some of the worst ones in California history is longtime residents will remember nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight nine hundred eighty two eighty. Eighty three nineteen sixty four nineteen fifty five there are famous events, and we've tried to build flood works and levies and Weirs and dams all over the place, but sometimes mother nature just overwhelms us. And you know, there's even a scenario that scientists have looked at called an arc storm which is an atmospheric river a one in one thousand year event that could hit California, obviously, the chances are quite low in any year that would be ten days of rain, the central valley levies would break you'd have an inland. Sea for three hundred miles twenty feet deep. Hurricane force winds hundred twenty-five mile wins massive landslides loss of power water sewer for weeks or even months and some scientists call this the other big one we think about that in context of John earthquakes, but these atmosphere river storms have the potential to do immense damage, and the only one we've ever seen in modern recorded California history was eighteen sixty two when the floods were. Were so bad in California that new governor Leland Stanford had to take a rowboat through the streets of Sacramento to his inaugural. We read a comment from last actually a question from Ellen who says typically how broad or the atmospheric rivers is today's weather in. So Cal connected to the same atmosphere. River carry the bay area storms, basically. Yes. And another lesson writes driving into the city from the peninsula this morning. The bay look very high in choppy any chance it could overflow onto the highway. It depends on the timing of the tides and the winds I haven't heard predictions of major flooding. We have had flooding in the play in the past excuse me in places like L visa in south, San Jose. But right now, the main concern is on these smaller rivers. I'm sorry. Smaller creeks, mostly in the north bay, you know places like Santa Rosa Petaluma places like that, however back to one of the other questions as the climate continues to warm we'll see the overall bay level rise San Francisco Bay already risen eight inches in the last century doesn't sound like a lot. But when you have a high tide an incoming tide a big storm that can be enough to put it over.

Daniel Swain California Twitter San Francisco Bay Google Sacramento Monterey Pippen San Jose Hurricane Santa Rosa Petaluma Marie Reno Leland Stanford Amanda stupi Ellen Bayer Cal John
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California? Not the nineteen ninety six earthquake and fire that destroyed much of San Francisco or last false campfire, which devastated the town of paradise. It was a flood as in the great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial. Inauguration by rowboat as the city was ten feet underwater, it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of China. Knees miners drowned when the Yuba river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry count Barnes bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide wiped out nearly every house in ranch. No one knows how many thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch and economy to a farm in one when it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make a floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hold. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys, I'm like the big earthquake. Everyone expects but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance. These atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turn around don't drown with a perspective..

California San Francisco Debbie Duncan Leland Stanford Yuba river Barnes bridges camp Sierra foothills Sacramento China forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California, not the nine hundred ninety six earthquake and fire that destroyed much of San Francisco or last false campfire, which devastated a town of paradise. It was a flood as an a great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial inauguration by robot as the city was ten feet. Underwater it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of Chinese miners. Drowned when the Uber river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry counterparts bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide white dot nearly every house in rant. No one knows how many thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch in economy to a farm in one. When it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make a floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hope. Old. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys yet. Unlike the big earthquake, everyone expects, but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance about these atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turn around don't drown with a perspective. I'm Debbie Duncan, Debbie, Dunkin writes and reviews children's books from her home on the peninsula. And we invite you to share your thoughts on her commentary by going online to kqeDorg slash perspectives. Support for perspectives comes from leaf KEB racer. I'm an and Bernstein seeking Justice for.

California Debbie Duncan San Francisco Leland Stanford Uber river Sierra foothills Sacramento Bernstein Dunkin forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California? Not the one thousand nine hundred six earthquake and fire that destroyed much San Francisco or last falls campfire, which devastated a town of paradise. It was a flood as in the great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial. Inauguration by rowboat as the city was ten feet underwater, it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of Chinese miners. Drowned when the Yuba river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry count Barnes bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide white dot nearly every house in ranch. No one knows how many. Thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch an economy to a farm in one when it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hold. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys yet. Unlike the big earthquake, everyone expects, but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance about these atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turnaround, don't drown with a perspective. I'm Debbie Duncan, Debbie, Dunkin writes and reviews children's.

Debbie Duncan California San Francisco Leland Stanford Yuba river Barnes bridges camp Sierra foothills Sacramento Dunkin forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet