8 Burst results for "leila alcorn"

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Unladylike

"He all and welcome to unladylike. Kristen i'm caroline and y'all just heard. Today's guest raquel willis speaking at the brooklyn liberation march. Last june felts like the air was like electric like something new was happening here. We were entering a new era by day. Raquel communications director for the ms foundation for women but for the past five years she has been working twenty four seven on the front lines of the trans rights movement last summer as historic numbers of protesters flooded the streets and response to george floyd murder a group of multiracial gender expansive activists including raquel organized the brooklyn liberation march. They wanted to call attention to the fact. That police brutality. Disproportionately harms black. Trans people the march was quite possibly the largest protest for black trans lives ever the bigger estimates around twenty thousand folks which is shoes we thought. Okay we'll maybe we'll get you know a few hundred folks maybe a few thousand folks but you know when we were speaking at the brooklyn museum and we were kind of on the balcony level. The dress code was to wear white and it was a nod to asylum parade that the nwa c. p. had in the early Twentieth century focus on the victims of lynching and so that was kind of like our aesthetic nod and when you looked out from that balcony it did look a sea of white you know and people came in in their entire and it was. It was a powerful day. Can you describe standing up there and and talking to the crowd. What what did that feel like for you. It felt powerful but it. It also felt like i was really the vessel and it was one of those moments where fight not worried about how my voice founded you know. I think that's what trans woman that is a very common experience with like having all of these second guesses about. How do i found feminine enough. Do i sound like a woman. You know like those are real insecurities i carry around as transpire fan and to speak to tens of thousands of folks as my authentic self open as a trans woman. Not being worried about what it meant for anyone to read me. Trans not necessarily filling unsafe in that moment was a powerful experience. And now when i had had before that moment today on unladylike it's the making of a modern day movement leader i. We're following rebels path to the brooklyn museum balcony and the pivotal events that awakened her activism. Then we're digging deeper into transgender inclusion in feminism the weaponization of womanhood and the onslaught of anti trans laws that are sweeping the nation. Okay so back before you're out here. Leading a movement we actually all work together That is how raquel you mean. Carolina all met. I think it was around twenty fourteen. So we were all working for how stuff works in atlanta. Which is now. I heart podcasts. So how would you compare the raquel. We met back then to kill. Yeah wow just a little question to kick things off. Yeah rock hill. Twenty fourteen was a much different person. So i was definitely Coming to terms with what it meant to be open in my career as a transgender woman Interestingly enough when i started at then how stuff works. I wasn't how you know. I hadn't had any conversations with any of my colleagues at that point nine sworn to myself that if the need arose i would come out but i was still kind of navigating him what we consider be like style. So that means kind of you know people not saying you're tran. You're not saying you're trans there. But like you know you're kind of flying under the radar or in the closet as i think most people know it to be. I actually came out december of that year just a few days after the holidays The death of leila born yang transgender girls who seventeen years old. She died by suicide after being estranged from her family and community and sense conversion therapy. Lay there there was so much that went on in her life and she set her suicide letters published on tumbler after committing the act and i remember reading her letter and she just talked about how she didn't see a future for herself that she wished that society would be fixed that somebody needs to fix that in that really just kind of tore down my thoughts around staying south in my journalism and online media career. And so it's it's interesting. I posted a video on youtube. Got like four thousand views. Which at that time was like. Oh my god. Is this viral. Four trillion views early viral shouts little bags. So it's like it was it was resetting for me because it really put in perspective the importance of everyone and i didn't have a platform at that time right so it was really mean raquel as like the person who was going to work everyday and and trying to figure out herself in the world who had to decide it's going to take some risks and put some things on a on the line because they are trans you who are out here. Don't see a future for themselves. So at what point did you start to get interested in using your voice in activism and organizing everything kind of started to coalesce After learning about leila's leila alcorn death. The young girl the backdrop for those years leading up to it was kind of the emergence of the movement for black lives I had known about the death of or the really. The murder of a black trans woman named john nettles and twenty thirteen. So this social justice.

john nettles Raquel Kristen youtube atlanta leila george floyd Four trillion views Last june raquel four thousand views raquel willis Today early Twentieth century last summer one today seventeen years old december of that year hundred folks
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

14:57 min | 4 months ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"First state to ban gender. Affirming care to trans-youth earlier. This month arkansas tennessee and mississippi enacted new laws aimed at banning trans athletes from joining sports teams in tennessee. The legislation forces trans students to show legal documents revealing the sex. They were assigned at birth in order to participate in middle and high school. Sports and in south dakota republican governor christie gnome issued two executive orders monday banning trans women and girls from playing school sports as attacks against the trans community intensify so has their resistance with trans-youth leading the fight against violence and discrimination trans seventh grader. Chris wilkinson who plays football for north middle school and harrisburg south dakota. His last score refused to let him. It's team because he's trans. Wilco said football has saved. His life did not exist. I don't think i would be here. Respect the person next to you in the person behind you just let them live their life the way they want to and makes them feel accepted. Because that's all anyone ever wants. Today is international trans day visibility which this year was marked with a week of action urging people to be active in the fight against antitrust legislation violence and discrimination joining us. Now a rocco willis activists award winning writer former executive editor of out magazine and former national organizer for transgender law center. And chase strange. You the deputy director for transgender justice with the lgbt an hiv project. Raquel and chase cole road. A new piece in the nation titled visibility alone will not keep transgender youth safe. We welcome you both packed a democracy. Now chase strange. Let's begin with you. Can you review for us. The laws that are being voted on a cross country store with the latest arkansas. We are truly witnessing and escalation of attacks on trans people. Unlike anything i've ever seen in government this week the arkansas senate passed. hp fifteen seventy a sweeping bill that would strip young people of healthcare that we know they need to survive. It is going to the governor's desk. We only have four more days for him to veto. This bill and young people and their families across arkansas are already planning for the worst. People are considering fleeing their homes. Having to relocate to other states. Young people are in sheer panic. We have to understand. This is medically supported care approved by every major medical association. That people need to stay well to stay alive and we were on the verge of having that stripped away from hundreds of people across the state of arkansas and unfortunately there are similar bills pending currently in alabama and tennessee part of this wave of anti trans legislation that started at the beginning of twenty twenty one and has escalated throughout the state legislative sessions and chase to. What do you attribute this sudden wave of legislation and all various states across the country. I mean you know. This year is particularly egregious and sweeping. But this is something that is been the culmination of work from an anti trans anti lgbtq lobby for the past at least seven years and of course we can trace this history going back much much longer we can look at the moral panic of anita bryant of phyllis schlafly and even just looking in one hundred years in the past and the ways in which colonial powers used regulation and control over upset bodies to exert power. So there's a long history here. I think what we're seeing today in state. Legislatures is a particular effort to pivot from the anti trans restroom bills into a new form of regulation of trans young people and trans bodies and they have seen an opening because they built alliances even with some people who consider themselves liberals and progressives who have either remained relatively complacent or who have joined forces and the attacks on trans young people. So right now. We're seeing an escalation in super majority republican legislatures where we are not countering that escalation with the appropriate level of resistance given the magnitude of harm that is going to result to bring into the conversation. Rocco you tweeted the quote. The gop continues to terrorize communities on the margins. All across this country. This is why we must come together on these fights as a black trans woman from georgia. It's not lost on me of these fights against people of color and lgbt lgbtq. Folks are connected. Can you elaborate on that absolutely. Yeah you know. i'm from georgia. And when i think about my life all of my identities have played a role in in the way that i've navigated society and of course the way that i have been made a target and so when i think about the recent passage of voter voter restriction back in Georgia i think about the wave and woods. It's all about policing communities of color and and that is completely tied to this fight and this onslaught against trans people. It's about policing our bodies right. And so this is about us interrogating what power looks like and how it is wielded within our society it makes absolutely no sense for these people to be trying to control the lives of vulnerable communities. And when i think about trans children is so horrible how they are being stripped of their childhood and not even look out the humans that they are. I wanted to ask chase about one of the. Aclu's clients dry a year would black trans student athlete. Andre is a recent high school graduate. Who ran on our schools. Girls track team. Let's go to her in her own words. One of the issues Our community is facing. It hasn't been facing for while is misinformation in general who we are in our community stands for in our community is and wanting to combat that is education more more education within our school system. So that people don't say oh that's a man or woman miss gender education very important in having to understand what we as a community. What gets you will stand for chase. Can you tell us about intra. Yeah so i just want to start by saying under a year. Would and terry miller too young trans athletes from connecticut to young black women who have endured so many attacks simply for existing and participating in school sports alongside their peers. As they have every right to do andrea is young person who graduated from high school. She was a track athlete. She trained every day for four hours. Worked so hard loved the sport. And how is she rewarded for that. She is the centerpiece of attack campaign with pieces on fox. News targeting her a lawsuit brought by alliance defending freedom on behalf of sis gender athletes trying to block her from running in her senior year which ultimately all of their senior seasons were cancelled because of covid but the lawsuit continues even though she has quit the sport altogether due to the ongoing harassment that she experienced the lawsuit is continuing because they are trying to strip her and terry of their past titles and any win that they have achieved. They're trying to get it. You raised from records even records that are hanging in their individual high schools. They have been the subject of so much misinformation and assault and claims that they have displaced this gender athletes when all they were doing was running consistent with their rights under state and federal law winning sometimes they lost this gender athletes. And i think an important clarification point here is that there are claims that gender athletes are going to be somehow displaced in scholarships by transgender athletes. No trent out. Transgender woman are athlete from high school has ever achieved or received athletic scholarship to compete in flex at the collegiate level. Because there is so much discrimination. Terry and andrea never once got a recruitment call even though all of this gender athletes who are trying to block them from participating are currently on athletic scholarship in division one schools. We have a serious conversation to have about. How much discrimination trans people are facing and yet they're still escalating attacks if you can also elaborate on that raquel and talk about the peace. The two of you co authored for the nation visibility alone will not keep transgender youth safe. What will rock cal. Yeah i mean. I think a big part of the work that safe and i have been partnering on over this last week. As we've expanded trans day visibility into trance week of visibility and action is really getting people to be about that action. And so that means we can't just rest on some of the social strides that we've made whether it's in hollywood or on different screens and these different sector. Those things are powerful and great and we definitely need to see more of our stories in media in the way but we also need to be using that action. Such chains are material reality and protect our right and so this week has rarely been for us all about getting people mobilize so that they can contact makers let them know that trans people have a whole group. Folks who support us are behind us who love us and wanted to see us. Safe and protected when i think about Trans you i think about two trans youth who actually really inspired me because of the way that their lives ended just a few years ago so within months of each other leila alcorn young trans girl and blake rocking sending young trans boy die by suicide right and we know based on the things that they said and the people who knew them and of course a suicide letter leila had published online after she pads is that they felt like they were not being supported that there was no future for them out openly trans youth. And i'm afraid that if we don't get involved and be active we're gonna see that trend continue and chase. Give us a quick shake on her. How you see the biden administration of the actions. It's taken on behalf of the trans community in three first three months of the presidency. I think we've seen some important federal executive actions coming down from this administration. And i hope to see way. More aggressive and robust actions from this administration enforcing federal civil rights laws. I also you know as we think about what today represents i also want to hold the fact that the law alone isn't isn't gonna save us that we are ultimately going to have to energize and mobilize and build power for our. If i think of the two things to central things for me as a trans person that saved my life or sports and health care and those are things that are being stripped away from our young people and yes we already have the legal rights. It's all of these bills are illegal. They violate title nine. They violate the constitution. But we need mass mobilization resources to our translate organizations and support for our communities materially beyond what visibility can afford. And even beyond what the law can afford chase. You spoke to joanna brand the mother of a fifteen year old trends boy ahead of arkansas state. Senate vote earlier this month. This is joanna speaking about the importance of gender. Affirming care for her son dylan today. After two years of therapy doctors visits and almost eighteen months gender affirming hormone therapy and don is happy. Healthy confident and hopeful for his future is outside now. Mattress deals on the inside and his support to other. Lgbt kids tramps Trans girls our girls in trans boys. Our boys denying access to gender affirming. Healthcare is denying the right to be themselves. My son will be devastated if he is forced to stop his hormone treatment. All of the progress that he has made all the plans to be able to graduate from high school and go off to college presenting outwardly. In the full expression of how does the insider would come to a screeching halt. It would be heartbreaking. Not only for him but for all the other trans youth in arkansas. That depend on this care chase strange you. It looks like the governor is going to sign this legislation. is that right. I am hopeful that we can mobilize for. Vito and i think everyone should take action. We have a few days. Tell him tell him to veto it because it will send a message to trans young people and even if he does be to it. It's a simple majority override in the state legislature so we are preparing litigation because we want trans people to know that we will defend their ability to access us life. Saving care through any possible tool that we have in our toolbox and your final comments on this day of trans visibility racquel willis. Yes i mean. I think that we have to continue to have a nuance discussion about what visibility mean there are so many great strides that come from it but it also makes our community more of a target and the other thing i wanna say is that it's important for us along with being in contact with lawmakers to make sure. We're supporting the organizers and organizations who are on the front lines and lift every day so donate support their work. And we'll continue to move. Forward racquel willis leading transgender activists We will link to your and chase strangers. Peace in the nation headline visibility alone will not keep transgender youth safe chase stranger deputy director for transgender justice with the aclu next up state so excluding incarcerated people from saving covid nineteen. Vaccines will look at. How a new york judge has ruled this unfair and.

Chris wilkinson Terry Georgia Wilco leila Vito alabama south dakota two georgia Andre dylan Rocco monday This month christie gnome harrisburg Today new york two executive orders
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Going Through It

Going Through It

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Going Through It

"Before we get into this week's episode I WANNA. Let you know that it evolves themes around suicide in self harm. If you're worried about yourself or somebody that you love please please please reach out to the national suicide prevention hotline that number is one, eight, hundred, two, seven, three, eight, two, five, five South Carolina everything. This is going through it a show about women who found themselves in situations where they said no no thanks. I'll have nine and they made a decision to make a change in turn something around. I'm your host, Tracy, Clayton? They're all of these like successful algae. Hugh plus folks Thank it gets better. It gets amazing. All these different things and the truth is for a lot of people that doesn't get better. That's Racquel Willis. Today Racquel is a writer editor and transgender rights activist. She's done organizing work at the transgender law center and she was executive editor for out magazine. Big things big things happen. But at this point of her story, she was just trying to get a footing. So my relationship to Queer and Trans Activism prior to Leila Alcorn stuff. was kind of non existent I also had been in the closet. Gender identity working, and almost the middle of Georgia. My first job as a newspaper reporter picture of. The year is twenty fourteen. You cannot get rails happy out of your head and you also cannot stay off tumbler because tumbler was it. It was the place to be. It was so revolutionary because people there were using their own voices to talk about themselves learn about their own realities and there was a fourteen year old trans girl from. Lee alcorn that Raquel became aware of who did just that she used the platform to discuss and process her life. So Leela alcorn with a Yang Trans girl who really had learned so much about her identity she was active online as of millennials she became known in our community when she wrote a suicide letter that was set to publish on Tumbler after she had died by suicide Leila had battling both depression and parents that she felt were really unsupportive. It was kind of that bizarre instance of using technology to kind of say you know what you were. Going through and then to also have this translates youth telling the world that she was GonNa die because she couldn't a future for herself. When I sat with Racquel, she read the part of Leila's suicide note that resonated with her the most when I was fourteen I learned what transgender meant and I cried of happiness after ten years of confusion I finally understood who I was I'm mmediately told my mom and she reacted extremely negatively telling me that it was a phase that I would never truly be a girl that God doesn't make mistakes that I am wrong. If you're reading this parents, please don't tell us here kids even if you are Christian or are against transgender people don't ever say that to someone especially your kid. There was so much of Leila that Racquel on herself even reading this now I'm like, yeah, this was like me at the age came out of fourteen out gay I didn't have the language of transgender and I grew up in a very catholic environment. So the idea of like charts turning back on you and your parents choosing their faith of our farming you was was an imminent threat I. Always when we're cal I read Leila's note she felt so many fill in all at once I bar since it's here's just as I read more and more about her and I don't something just compelled me to do something different and not care about being. Silent anymore and I stagger these boxes on my like little rinky-dink coffee table and I put my laptop up they are and I recorded myself and I I made this short video where I'm dislike crying you know about this that feeling of helplessness like as a Black Trans Woman and the South I knew what that felt like Racquel hill posted a video to youtube not sure what kind of response she was going to get it got picked up by. BBC They saw it and they asked me to be on this radio show Racquel knew that this opportunity with the BBC could really open up the conversation about Black Trans Women that nobody at the time was having. She had just one little problem. I wasn't out at this now, second job that I was I was like, what's the point of being out? You know let me just like navigate as seamlessly as possible like I did in my last job but killed knew that in order to speak on Trans Women issues in the importance of their voices, she had to use her as I. I really only had like a day to kind of thinking through and I told my immediate boss was woman. Yeah was trans and that I was going to be talking about my experiences on BBC and then she talked to her boss who is like the the of like entire company. Who was a straight man? And I was Oh, how could this go but he also was like very supportive of and they were like you should do it by your voice is necessary inside did speaking on the BBC was a huge turning point racquel found her voice and now she was not afraid to use it. Soon she grew huge following on twitter and before you know it, she became somebody that folks looks who regarding issues facing the Trans Community I think the situations around Leela and subsequently being on the BBC just made me felt like I could be a mirror for other. Trans People. Now I sit down with Kale right as the pandemic it but it was also.

Leila Alcorn BBC Racquel Trans People Leela alcorn Racquel Willis South Carolina Lee alcorn Racquel hill racquel executive editor twitter Hugh reporter Kale Georgia Tracy youtube depression Clayton
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

"And then, of course, all of the murders that have been happening particularly in Dallas. and so. So it was important to go to those specific areas to see how to bolster the effort. Now I knew I didn't want to go in. Working for this National Organization saying that I had the answers I don't have the answer. y'All have even how the Black Trans Woman I don't have the answer I'm not from New Orleans. I'm not from Louisiana I'm from Georgia, a southern woman, but it's a completely different context and nobody knows better than the per people legal who are actually like resident there. But it was about US having these resources that we could at least build a space for folks that come together to delve and political education. What are these systems of oppression plaguing at 'cause I believe that I believe political education. Okay. But also what are the ways that people are figuring out how to survive and how can we share those ways with each other and then what are the products y'all work in currently the GIACOBBE supporting each other better I am and so out of that space, of course, like house of to love now. A, you know a couple of things went. So making half to love the success that it is right now. But part of it was some of those initial connections happening with like Mariah more and McCall. Milan Nicole, sairy right and also supporting Wendy Cooper another local advocate a new orleans. Legend in your alleged. Yes. Who Was Leading the cans can't stand campaign and so that space in a way. Broad I think more of the the girls and to her orbit. So it was. And also, just ahead, just the chance for for folks break bread with each other to love on each other if the hard conversation that you know when the girl need to have with somebody else you know. In that save space and then go out and do the work ones that weekend summit with over. And so I was so grateful to be able to found and build the initial framework for it with authorities equality. Fellowship. And then be able to really. Gifted and a sense to some of the other powerful black organizers who made the the later iterations, possible Maki Bradford, and Atlanta we away back and of course, Mariah more and Kayla Gore now. So so it lives on at. Teahouse. I think it. Would Their Trans Agenda that I was introduced to? In Creating chains I hear the voice that coming up and they were talking about how you know the work that she was doing world has really led to the you know the shift in culture. In regards to what they will focus on and so I think that's beautiful. I think that we all are doing that culture ticking. And you know I just wanted to highlight that. You started off before that you started off as a rioted and you are writer, but you know that was your. Your Your. Needs. Correct me if I'm wrong into movement work riding, right Well kind of it's a complicated story. So so yeah I, before I winced TLC I was working in the media industry but I was working on things that are completely unrelated in general science graduated from College I. I actually freelance for bed. It was kind of difficult to find because I was black on. Yeah. I had a college degree but I had no connection right now and so I freelance for bed. Move that is really important people people. All over people's air so much. Agree just having all these things we have to have connections with people. When we go out here and we try to make stuff happen if we don't have the connections, we don't have them and they're not going to happen that's part of. Like, you make the make connection. Thought you are looking into this and you have connections and you see Black Trans Women out. You're trying to do the work because I know as an executive director Joe is some things I'm like I happy selection to make this happen. You're asking me why I've been this. Why didn't do that and it's like, I didn't have a connection I I couldn't get the invite. I couldn't get the invites the this this dacians that'll will by only or to do the work that I know is important over year we didn't have the match and so it's really really important. That both the Mexicans are important and if you have them. Help US maker, yeah it's true. You know and I, and so I didn't have professional connections but I also was leaving an environment where. I was the only openly Black Trans Women on campus. I did not know another actions woman. Who with open about her identity? Rarely before. Before I moved to Atlanta. At twenty. Three twenty four. You know. So I also have community connection side and even. Even I didn't even look at the nonprofit world is option until I. Made It. So Atlanta and so. I worked at this small newspaper where I actually would like Staus for like a about a year and a half almost. was out as clear with night outage Tran. And was working on a very small how a conservative town I mean that's like. The our life pre trump. Palin. Hunting they in the back yard. Toss enough hammers to knock a nail into a wooden. Like, that the kind of like college and first job experience I had. and. So when I? Left that space 'cause. I just it felt like this. It also felt like something was getting closer and closer to me way I was going to be ousted like something was going to happen and I also just got really weird message does sometimes one-timer Guy Guy Fan I know your secret don't worry I won't tell anyone but it's like. Okay but why are you telling me how this Mesa you know like it's like that kind of weirdness style that was happening while the Movement for Black Lives was really starring popoff. And I, wrote. I roll the things that I wouldn't right but I had to write them as they didn't implicate me. Especially, the LGBTQ issues saw I mean I can't even say I was a feminist in that space without getting hate mail. So. Yes. That long story short. So that was my first job experience and then. I started working at how stuff works, which was a media company, but it was an Atlanta based than it wasn't. It wasn't really conservative, but the work that they were doing wasn't connected to any of the movement stuff that I was starting to to be more and more interested in and see myself and. and I just remembered there was. The death of Leila alcorn there with the death of another. Another Black Schramm I've black man black seth man at the hands of police don't even remember who because there was so many during that time period and I went to work the each of those days and it was just business as usual and I was like I cannot be in spaces where. This y'all get to operate of doesn't matter. And Yeah and then I started doing more work with. Community Tony Michelle. Williams was leading this entire program at snap cow and so I went in as an entire like while I had my day job out get off and then they'll be an internist APCOA and that kind of. Brought me more fully in some movement was that when our you where you doing when I'm actually An. Anti Right. The we mean. We met at Trans are fit car. Oh no actually maybe yeah. Actually. That was like twenty fifteen years. Yeah. Yeah. Actually. Yeah I it was you and Mickey be out had. We we had. We were. Present time, which was a bodybuilding competition for. Trans men that neo founded in I was part of the organised or organizing that particular year and we had We were doing a show and want the the models didn't show up and you making. Matt and Basically. That's how I met both the out. And I house staying yeah y'all okay. I'm remembering this now. Yeah. I was but I also was the organizer to. Endow. We were some babies that we our house. died in clashes. Like we. Do not. have. Battle. K. and I was like, oh It was like Oh..

Atlanta US New Orleans Mariah Movement for Black Lives GIACOBBE National Organization Dallas. Louisiana Milan Nicole Maki Bradford APCOA writer Wendy Cooper Matt Leila alcorn Palin Georgia
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"They already had a bunch of podcasts like they saw the potential podcasting early. And investment in it. I was not a podcast. I was a digital publisher are worked on the website on really kind of publishing content I, wrote maybe one or two things while I was there, but it was mostly like publishing content while I was there. There was the death by suicide of Leila Alcorn Yang Trans Girl who? Ended up publishing a ladder about. How she'd been at the future for herself transport them. And she added to be published on Tumbler after she. died not like one of those by the time you read this yeah kind of experiences that. Broke something in me. And also just reminded me of the death of Ilan. A Black Trans woman at the hands of a black sister, man and twenty thirteen. I believe if I'm I'm remembering the years correctly. and. I was just realizing that. Oh you know like I was seeing the pattern of violence. Yeah, from all ends right like the psychological violence, the social violence, the physical violence, the State Violence that Trans folks of color were experienced same. And when Lela died, that was kind of like the final thing and. I was teary-eyed. I publish this on Youtube Video. The site talking about how we need folks to be better, you know we need folks to move up and. Fight on behalf of Trans people because we can't do this alone and no child should feel like they can't find. How clear in our society, I was still style. You know so like I was still in this mode of will I'll stay on the clause a, but I wasn't as like. Stringent about it and this new job I was like well. If it comes to a point where it has to come out I will, we'll just let the chips fall where they may. Publish that video. It went. I guess viral. It was like four thousand views. Was You know barometer of Var Rally at that time was so much smaller than it is now like people jet like millions of miles of us, but so that was the thing and BBC picked it out. Okay, and they were like. We want to interview you for this global radio show. And I was like. I wasn't really like excited. I was scared. Because I knew. I was going to do it partly because. One of the things I said in the video was like I, couldn't be silent anymore so I knew I had to hold myself accountable so that, but I was frightened. I told my sister WHO's Al-Barid. She was like. That's exciting. So when are you gonNa tell your boss. And I was like. She was like yeah. Okay so I told my boss then she told her boss. And they were on board with their like you definitely have to do. It was not an issue that I was trans. We didn't even. Go into any more detail. They didn't ask any like wild. Question was what it was. So I did their interview and then from there I would just became more outspoken on social media I was starting to tap and more to community organizing. Not As journalists. Really. Literally joining the efforts because I felt like I needed we putting my energy and the movement. To keep us alive and I knew there were many folks fighting for. Black Trans folks in the south you know. or at least I did I wasn't connected to the larger network that I am now. And then I test this podcast to. The folks they are and. was like we need to be having a conversation about what's happening and the Movement for black lives. What's happening in terms of LGBTQ, issue? I would love to do a podcast on these things now granted I will say. Maybe, I didn't articulate the vision while enough, but one of the things that I was told by a black woman who was my supervisor was A. we've already got. A FEMINIST PODCAST! They're already talking about things. and I was like you have, and this is no shades them 'cause they did great were. And still do great work. They had a podcast that was hosted by two white women, and No shade, but they weren't. Going to be able to carry a conversation around race. and Algae Cube plus issues and and different things like that and the way that I. It was very disheartening to have. My black supervisor squash that a Nazi the importance of having those conversations. So that was one shot in the next Straw was the death of another black person. At. The hands of the police are member just light trending on sweater. Were a you know how it is for folks like we have this kind of mass mourning when that happened, yes. Than as we work enacting new ways via social media. And I just remember going to are. Surrounded. Most of people were there. There was that by black supervisor. Nobody was phased It was business as usual, and I'm over here I can't think about anything. Yeah, by are people being killed by police? Yeah. And I was like Oh, I gotta get Outta here yeah. I've gotta be a putting my energy and every part of my energy and to. What's happening on the ground? So I started applying to as secure plus organizations I didn't even. Envision I guess mostly black organizations being ready. To hire me as a trans woman, yeah, so the lgbtq plus kind of non profit industrial complex. Seems like the Fed I applied to. All types of places I won't name them, but I will say that. I was applying for like. Calm, positions, press, secretary, position, and types of. Storytelling positions. And I was just getting met with resistance. You know by these very white spaces. Yeah they're national LGBTQ plus organizations that turned me down and a so interesting now because. These are now the same who wanNA. Pick my brain on. Everything still won't pay me. From my label right, but they want to take my brain. And then I found Trans Law Center. TRANSGENDER law center. which was based on the West Coast and I came in the COBB's associate. And I moved from Atlanta. To Oakland California. My first time living outside of Georgia twenty five years old. And that was on, and so you know had of their formative experience. They are as well during that time. Thousand I spoke at the National Women's March continuing to be outspoken on social media I shifted from the Com- space, which I felt like I was being blocked from doing more. And to NASA national organizing spe okay. Sorry was a national organizer for the organization but I was still. Freelance writing, doing like George you know press and all types of things you know in in a sense you know though I was never acknowledged as this or compensated as this I was in some ways a spokesperson for the organization And it's so interesting because I feel like I'm at a point in my career now where I can make. Say these. Yes, like this is the Labor that I was doing the Black Trans. Woman s that you weren't fully acknowledged. Yes, they were benefiting from and this is in these various spaces, but you weren't acknowledging before this kind of era of rocketing. Talking about systems of oppression. So while I was a TLC I pitched. This project adds focused on the healing justice a Black Trans Women in the south and focused on how we can kind of alleviate some of the problems of these murderers and various community, so it was really based on political..

supervisor Black Trans Women Trans Law Center Leila Alcorn Yang publisher Youtube BBC NASA Lela National Women Oakland George Straw West Coast secretary California Atlanta Georgia
"leila alcorn" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

15:24 min | 1 year ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Device. Bitch magazine Buzzfeed and Huffington Post. I am so excited to meet rebel and to get this conversation started. So let's just jump right in. Let's do it. We are here with you. Know Media Racquel Willis. I'll lotion our hands as we just discussed the fear of Ash. Yes no one wants to be ashy and these street literally. Everyone at this table right now is rubbing lotion into their hands. I'm like I had enough that I'm like bring it up my forearms arms because I'm just my body's part just really feels like the blackest thing we've ever done on this show. I love black lady moment of all of us just like going with the low. Yeah itself care itself. Payer Sodas not about motion repel you and then episode is about you. I'm like there's so many things that I want to talk to you about. I like am wondering where to begin. I mean I think we start at the beginning. I mean you are a transgender rights activists your writer and I WanNa know. How did you get started with this? Work it actually is really weird to me to consider that my career right because I think the a lot of times activism has become something that people latch onto for visibility right or latch onto Avalaible for cloud or whatever you can think of right and I think there's there's something that rubs me the wrong way about thinking of my career's activism. I think in my career as a time and nonprofits as a time in media as an editor now at out magazine Executive Editor But it's weird to think of my activism as my career. I don't know I don't know what the line it's like tied to it right because I think that activism is so expansive like I think we get into this idea that it is something so limited it is just being on the streets into a bullhorn. You Know Martin With Stop. And all of that is beautiful and powerful and important and we've seen through history. How those kinds of direct actions have shifted Culture Right Society but activism is so many different things organizing can come in so many different forms my thing. Israeli people need to find what their passion is and Organiz within it right. So if you're a writer. Are you writing about things that can liberate other folks? You know if you are a teacher. Are you teaching things that can liberate other folks right? Are you using your curriculum with these lessons of social justice these lessons around elevating blackness and Brown and Queer and and different types of bodies and disability all of these different things? So you're trans. Yes yet and I mean is it okay by ask about the beginnings of you deciding to go on this journey. Yeah I mean I appreciate this question. I think that Like your gender isn't really the choice right or your identity isn't really the choice. The choice is whether you're gonNA live in it and for me. I mean I grew up in a very traditional southern family and the judge and went to college college enjoyed. I spent the first twenty five years of my life in Georgia. You know and so I really see my suther ness of a strong important part of my identity and I was raised Catholic right so there are so many layers I mean and then you talk about being a young black person born to pretty traditional parents who were middle class. I mean you know I I joke about being you know. The huxtables by some standards. Right my mom was a had a doctrine of an education and and you know advocated adults for thirty or so years. My Dad was a professional as well and later went back to get his masters. Then become a professor as well so I had that kind of background where I had privileges and I also had you know obviously those levels of repression. I mean being black right being a budding queer and Trans Person So it took me a while to get to that point where I was like. Oh No you know. There's something else going on over here. It's not just that you know. I'm a feminine would call me or that. I was gay right even though I knew I was attracted to men. No there was something fundamentally different about my experience in gender and when I got to college and found the language and found other people Who had similar experiences. It was on like it was time for me to like figure out where I fit on the gender spectrum figure out of I could even see a future right because there were a lot of decisions I had to make You know when I was in college and trying to come into my identity because I also did not have visions of a trans person who had a professional life right or who had a family and who was loving right had a partner and had these healthy experiences. We just. We're not seeing that. Yeah what age did you start expressing your gender identity? So it's funny you ask that because I felt like I was unintentionally expressing my foods ender throughout my entire life right like I think we get so hung up on what people wear. If someone's face is down which you know of course. It's so much more than that. I felt like mind. Gender was so tired and how I was expressing myself And that's why people would call me a feminine or call me slurs and I just can never hide it right like you know we hear about these folks who are like yeah I was. I was pushing it up and and really deepen than closet like no people knew something was going on with me. We didn't quite know what was different about My experience and I didn't know but I I felt like I was always kind of living my gender even when I wasn't trying to And I will say when I got to college. That's when I got the education around. What are the options medically right? What are things that I actually want to do for myself? physically right whether it be you know a hormonal journey or surgical journey. Yea I I. It's been beautiful to kind of witness Our expansion and understanding on gender and and our sexual identity. When you question asks one in a minute I wondering when you enter your career in journalism because I'm reading about you so that your father staff really was a catalyst for your transition but also your career and were you thinking of you know you mentioned earlier which is so powerful for me of like how you didn't imagine a possibility of like some like in the world and that impact like a not only my going to be journalists as I'm dealing with this transition but I'm going to cover issues that spread awareness about my experience so other people are informed and no. Yeah I mean I was committed. You know I came in to college experience knowing that I wanted to deepen my understanding of of storytelling and use the media Asa Tool to make things a little bit better for people who are like me who grew up isolated grow up in New York or Atlanta for that matter. I grew up in Augusta Georgia and and although there are a solid amount of folks they are. I mean that's the has the second largest population in the state there. It's still felt like a smaller southern experience so I didn't know other algae Q. Folks for the most part there are a few obviously like teachers that people speculated about but they were never going to say anything because they might lose their jobs and so when I graduated from college I did not find any job prospects in New York. I tried and I found myself working in a very small newspaper in an even smaller town in Georgia called Monroe Georgia and I was in the cloth You know so all that first job I was in the closet about being queer about being trans And you know I maybe. People had assumptions or whatever they never brought sumptious to me. My understanding was like no one really knew partly because you know there are so many ways in which you have to comport your salve to be at that point what we're calling being passable right so that people wouldn't try and clock you're Trans Ness But then also I just felt like people. There is a certain level of ignorance. That was blissful right even for me like people weren't as verse and Trans Identity and Trans folks and so it was a little bit easier to navigate in some regards but it was hurting me on the inside. It right as deeply as I wanted to. About Social Justice Issues. I even had an editor who he was my boss who you know would basically try and steer me to write less liberal right or less progressive and that hurt you know it was hard. I couldn't really be my full south in that meant that I was only telling part of my story but I could only tell parts of the stories that I was interested in as well. What help push you through that moment to live in the fullness of your truth both journalistically and personally a few things so a personal moment I was asked to cover the first drag show that they had in that county and I actually. I mean I knew the whole community like in that kind of I Guess Tri County Radius. And I really had to pretend like I didn't really know what was going on. Draft show asking. I'm like drag was fabulous and so I had to do that. And so I'm like interviewing these folks that I totally know girl because I mean you like. They didn't know that I had to do that. And and anyway I mean I think even when I was my career being fresh out of journalism school this whole idea of objectivity right and not inserting yourself into the story. That was a mask for me to not really be my full south and so still. That was one experience right. The kind of you know bringing off fraudulent And then I would say the large are calling came from what was happening in the movement. You know this was a time you know. When the murder of people like Trayvon Martin were happening? Mike Brown People were shutting down highways Atlanta and other places. This is very recent RECCO. It's yes it's still pretty recent right. It felt like a lifetime ago. I think to some people but particularly for black folks like that was yesterday You know just yesterday and so that was That was what I was was witnessing but again I mean also wasn't just yesterday because this was what twenty thirteen two thousand fourteen so even now I mean thinking about it I was what like six years ago Six or so years ago so I mean I I was seeing that and I was like how in the World Am. I wasting my energy trying to fit into another grabs for these people to keep my job and survive. It's bigger than that. It's bigger than me and the semblance of survival and so what also happened was I am at this point. I had I was a few months in a new job in Atlanta as a media publisher for A website called. How stuff works again. Not Related to any of the liberation work that I was really interested in. But it kept me afloat And I also Read about the death of Leila alcorn. Who was a young trans girl who died by suicide And this was two thousand fourteen and so she. It was interesting because with her case she had written suicide note and she had Scheduled to be published on Tumbler pads after her. Death happened and so it was so interesting. Because you know I think there a report reports about it and then the note came out right and so everyone could read what she had written and she basically said how she couldn't see a future for herself after Trans Person and so. I did a video on Youtube when I ran and I was like ugly crying about what had happened to Leela what was happening period because there was the death of. Alon nettles had happened about a year before that another while. She's a Black Trans woman. Who was murdered and so all of that was happening and I was like. I have to be present and fully in this moment so I don't look back years from now wondering why I wasn't using my energy for what I knew to be right. This is so powerful. We have to take a break but when we come back. I really want to ask you because your transition to living your expressing yourself fully has been so recent. I.

Culture Right Society Atlanta Georgia writer editor Trans Identity Buzzfeed New York Racquel Willis Huffington Post Avalaible Alon nettles Tri County Radius Executive Editor Augusta Georgia Leela professor partner murder
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"You go back, and you read the Buckley versus Vallejo decision in nineteen seventy six or read citizens United twenty ten and by the way, they're they're very readable decisions both of them and the citizens United in particularly wanna read Justice, John Paul Stevens descent. It's it'll it'll krill your hair or or whatever the expression is set it on fire. Whatever it's it's amazing. And in both cases, what they said was that the simple process of giving money to a politician, or to a political campaign is an expression of support, and as an expression of support, it is a form of speech. So they're not asserting that the speech. Only happens when you buy the. Ad on TV what they're asserting. Is that the simple process of of of giving money is an expression of support and therefore speech while they really covered their butts, your they did it's pretty it's pretty all inclusive. And that's why you know after the Buckley decision, seventy six seventy eight and the First National Bank first blinding decision. They were able to extend that to corporations because corporations are persons, and so therefore, the free speech rights under the constitution. And and then of course, they amplify both of those citizens United, and then that left us with a maximum. I I think it was, you know, something like two hundred politicians that you could own and anyone given year, and in the mccutcheon case, they blew that up, and they did away with all the the minimums or maximums or anything, you know. And now a billionaire known as many politicians as he or she wants, and you know, it just look Betsy DeVos or will Ross or Donald Trump or any of these guys, you know, AC, you know, wholly-owned. Billionaires who wholly-owned politicians have long time. But a great idea love the way, you're thinking, Michael, I it's just you know, I encourage you to go back and read those decisions, I think you'll find it fascinating. Thanks a lot for the call Chris and Saint Augustine Florida, Chris what's up? How's it going? Love your show. Thank you. What's up? I was I wanted to sorry. I wanted to talk to you. I in from Cincinnati originally, and it's about transgender rights political topic. What happened was in two thousand fourteen Leila Alcorn took her life on a highway in Ohio. And I started the project where I attempted the section of highway where she took her life, and since then we've created so much buzz incense Inada, and I say buzz Leila wanted society to be fixed. There's been a lot of conversion therapy and everything she wanted to fix transgender people to be accepted. She was a trans woman. Yes. Seventeen years old when she when she muster life to suicide and about two years ago documentary film came out of somebody emailed me randomly and said I want to make documentary about this and our screening tomorrow in Chicago to on host that at two PM. And I wanted to just put it out there. It's called Leila's highway. It's tomorrow it to at the center on hope that in Chicago. And I know, you know, folks, love you in Chicago. So I figured it would be great mention the center is that a is that a theater or a venue or what? It's the largest LGBT center in the mid west. So it's right voice down in Chicago. Okay. Great. And the movie again is called Leila's highway, and you can see the trailer. Leila highway dot org L E L H, and I would love to see people out of the screening. It's completely free were have mental health resources on hand. It's one of those kind of talkback sessions will have the discussion rate so its Leyla highway dot Oregon and there's two inches in the middle that right? L E L A. Yes. To ages. Yeah. Yeah. Leela? Okay. Chris turned into an avid stormy into more of an advocate as a gay man myself. It's turned me into you know, I didn't know love I've just from Cincinnati. And the reason I opted the highway is I saw signs of on the side of the road to remember her as you often see after a car accident. Sure. And it just kind of over after as and I thought something needs to be state mandated with her name forged in metal that she was the you know, that she accepted. So that's kind of the kind of the poignant thing about that her name fortune metal on the side of the highway. Just is a great thing. So good on you, Chris that little step of activism led to the movie. You just never know. You know, when you toss a of a pebble into the pond where the ripples are going to go. How far they're going to go what they're going to affect and what kind of consequence they're gonna produce. That's extremely expected. It never expect. Film that come about Elizabeth Littlejohn a great director. She's from Canada. And she contacted me and said, I wanna do this. And we're going to we're going to screen it tomorrow in Chicago at UPS tomorrow, two pm at the center in Chicago and halston Chris. Thank you. Yeah. Okay. Great. Thank you Bill in Clifton, New Jersey Bill. What's up? Hey, how you doing? I've never heard much or anybody talk about quantum computing. So I thought I would bring that up. Okay. It's an Morton thing. I don't know how much you know, about it. But it's what happened was our Matt a conventional man it's finished we've gotten to the point where we can calculate a number beyond four hundred digits and the only way to conquer that is through quantum of mathematics, and instead of on that which is based on adding Addy positive negative numbers is based on square root. So it's actually like three-dimensional tests and the kids we can't make it more than it. Adam we're working within the quantum space where a lot of special things happen like super position of having a a logistical ones. Zeros you have zero every tweet zero and one and all the possible. Right, and it can defeat defeat any kind of of blockchain or any kind of retire fee. When the other things about the quantum state is whatever quantum system is observed or measured it changes. Right. So so breaking in or or trying to look at any your data. We big fingerprints. Right. So so Bill has has has a successful and functioning quantum computer yet been built. Oh, many already up to the unit of measurement is pull the cube. It I know it biblical. But the the number cubits that the computer now, it's their special. They'd be supercooled. If I wanted to see if you just number of little tiny copper rings and the energy is in the middle of those tiny rings. And that's where the calculations are done. But it the scary part about it is it will tell you everything if you can build a bomb out of piece of cardboard, you tell you if you want to do certain kinds of communications, another part of quantum mechanics is that there's quantum entanglement. You can do communications without radio ways right in instantaneously faster than the speed of light. Ten thousand times this beautiful white which is. Say it could be used for really bad things and really good things used to if you wanted to cure any disease take a hundred eighteen elements every combination. Well, acuity compound from it, and the, you know, the answers.

Leila Alcorn Chris Chicago Cincinnati Bill Buckley John Paul Stevens First National Bank Betsy DeVos Vallejo Canada mccutcheon Oregon Ohio Michael Saint Augustine Florida Donald Trump Elizabeth Littlejohn
"leila alcorn" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"leila alcorn" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"And i heart radio station it'll be mostly cloudy overnight with only a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms that low of seventy three for your monday you can expect late afternoon showers and thunderstorms with a high of eighty six monday night showers and thunderstorms likely through the evening then mostly cloudy overnight with a low of seventy one then tuesday mostly sunny skies with a high near eighty five that's the forecast from seven hundred wwl w the radar shows a few showers moving across bracken county down in northern kentucky right now and a few popup showers and stray showers moving across clermont and brown counties here in ohio is well it is seventy three degrees right now news is a service of travelcenters of america you're gonna get a single screen pass as well as vip and day passes for the first ever cinde pendant film festival being held august twenty third through the twenty fifth single screen passes our ten dollars per screen block and will allow you the opportunity to see twelve short films besides independent films for across the country to local documentaries will also be featured at the festival leila's highway is about transgender teen leila alcorn from kings mills and hard face is about former boxer richard heart heart face mason who is now a trainer at the northside boxing gym and unfortunate incident in boone county leads to a death a two year old boy is dead after drowning in a backyard pool the boone county sheriff's office reports emmett lay was that a home in the three hundred block of rule court with family members when he slipped out the back door and climb the ladder to the pool his grandparents found him just minutes after he disappeared from the home there is no foul play suspected and the entire family is cooperating with the investigation melissa neeley newsradio seven hundred wwl w a book out this week is revealing new insights about the ryan widmer murder trial former inquirer reporter giannis his lease book submerged explorers a theory that sarah widmer had a rare medical condition that caused her to drown in the bathtub at her warren county home ryan widmer is serving a fifteen years to life sentence for killing his wife of four months in twenty eight two thousand eight news radio seven hundred wwl.

kentucky warren county murder melissa neeley emmett mason richard heart leila alcorn brown bracken county ryan widmer sarah widmer reporter boone county america ohio clermont seventy three degrees fifteen years twenty fifth