20 Burst results for "langston hughes"

"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

07:43 min | 8 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Name ezell blair junior david richmond franklin mccain joseph mcneil purchase items than down a whites only. Let's counter at a woolworth's store in greensboro north carolina. They refused to move their action. That day was simple but it took careful planning and it spurred more citizens across the country the four men all students at north carolina agricultural and technical state university what become known as the greensboro four. Four students would meet in their dorm rooms and so-called all sessions where they discuss the treatment of black people in the us and what they could do about it. But after blair now named gebreel. Kazan was denied service. When he tried to get food at a greyhound station. The crew was moved to action. They knew they needed to do more. And talk. less to be able to incite real change. So they decided to protest racial segregation by conducting at woolworth which was a large enough entity that any major disruption get national attention from black and non black people and if they got enough media attention they thought then they could get woolworth to desegregate. It's been said that. White store owner ralph don's encouraged and council the greensboro four into the woolworth bids but mccain zayn have denied. The student was john's idea. Anyway the concept of in was not new activist had engaged in this kind of protest for over a decade by this point in nineteen forty-three pauli. Murray a howard university law student who go on to become a lawyer and priest organized stool sittings in segregated cafeterias women in the citizens civil rights committee in saint. Louis missouri held lunch counter. Sit ins in the nineteen forties and in the nineteen fifties the congress on racial equality stage. Sit ins in baltimore to protest discrimination but even those students had already been happening all over the country. The greensboro woolworth's sit in sparked a massive movement on february first the greensboro four. Tried to order coffee at the woolworth's lunch counter but they were refused service. As was the store policy the staff asked the students to leave but the students did not budge when police got to the woolworth. They said they couldn't take any action. Because the students hadn't provoked anybody and even then local media was already all over the story so the four state at the lunch counter until the store closed early and then went back to campus to find more people to join their cause the next day nearly thirty students showed up at the woolworth's to protest segregation and the day after that more than sixty students showed up the student. Executive committee for justice sent a letter to the president of w woolworth asking the company to quote. Take a firm stand to eliminate discrimination in the following days. The protests grew students from bennett. College in deadly high school also joined the demonstrations as well as white students from nearby colleges members of the klu klux klan and white patrons heckled a student but by february fourth the senate had spread to another lunch counter at s h kress and co and on february fifth the protests had grown to over three hundred strong and was getting a ton of media coverage some students protesting at the woolworth and chris. Stores did get arrested. But the boycotts were hurting the store sales and soon people all over the country were organizing sit ins and other forms of non violent protests against racial segregation. The student nonviolent coordinating committee formed in april nineteen sixty at the encouragement of civil rights organizer ella baker and in july nineteen sixty. The woolworth and chris counters were integrated. F w woolworth employees charles best mattie long susie morrison and jamie robinson or the first african americans to eat at the woolworth's lunch counter. I'm eve steph coat and hopefully you know a little bit more about history today and you did yesterday. Hey y'all if you listen. Yesterday you know that i had a cold. I'm still recovering from that. Cold my is still horse. So thank you for bearing with me again. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Come back tomorrow for another tippett from history. Good afternoon would you like to try. Free of our double fudge brownie. Oh sure ooh. That's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and geico saving folks. Lots of money on their car insurance Macadamia nut i taste. We take one more sir. Yeah i thought so. Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Hey i'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because i'm not famous but i did start a men's grooming company called harry's the idea for harry's came out of a frustrating experience i had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over. Designed an out of touch. At harry's our approach is simple. here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class german blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering a one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer. Get a harry starter. Set with a five blade. Razor waited handle shave gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping just go to harrys dot com and enter four four four four at checkout. That's harrys dot com code. Four four four enjoy everyone. I'm eaves and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast where we unwrap a piece of history candy. Every day today was february first. Nineteen o two writer activist. Langston hughes was born in joplin. Missouri was an important figure in the harlem renaissance and he is considered a pioneer of modern black literature. Though it's long been believed that he was born in nineteen oh two. Recent archival discoveries do suggests that he may have been born a year earlier hughes lineage was full of prominent and politically active people. His maternal grandmother's first husband luis leary died in john. Brown's raid harpers ferry. His grandfather charles can relaxed. In was an abolitionist and one of the first black people to attend college. His great uncle. John mercer.

jamie robinson july nineteen sixty luis leary tomorrow april nineteen sixty Fifteen minutes hughes two dollars ezell blair yesterday fifteen percents february fourth gebreel harry's ella baker blair february fifth Four students greensboro Yesterday
"langston hughes" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

07:24 min | 8 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

"Was america to me. Let america be the dream. The dreamers dreamed let it be the great strong land of love were never kings connive nor tyrant scheme that any man be crushed by one above. It never was america to me. Oh let my land be a land where liberty is crowned with no false patriotic wreath. But opportunity is real and life is free. Equality is in the air we breathe. There's never been equality for me nor freedom in this homeland of the free. Say who are you. That mumbles in the dark. And who are you. The draws your veil across the stars. I am the poor white fooled and punished apart. I am the negro burying slavery scars. I am the red man driven from the land. I am the immigrant clutching the hope. I see and finding only the same old stupid plan of doggy dog of mighty crushed the week. I am the young man. Full of strength and hope tangled in the ancient endless chain of prophet power gain of grabbed the land of grabbed the of grabbed the ways of satisfying. Need the man of take the pay of owning everything for one's own greed. I am the farmer bondsman to the soil. I am the worker sold to the machine. I am the negro servant to you. All i am. The people humble hungry mean hungry yet today despite the dream beaten yet today. Oh pioneers. I am the man who never got ahead. The poorest worker bartered through the years yet. I'm the one who dreamt our basic dream in the old world while still surf of kings. Who dreamt a dream so strong so brave so true that even yet it's mighty daring sings in every brick and stone in every furrow turn. That's made america the land it has become. Oh i'm the man who sailed those early seas in search of what i meant to be my home for. I'm the one who left dark. Ireland shore an poland's plane in english gra- in england's grassy lee and torn from black africa strand. I came to build a home land of the free. The free who said the free not me surely not me the millions on relief today. The million shot down when we strike the millions. Who have nothing for our pay for all the dreams. We dreamed all the songs we sung. And all the hopes we've held and all the flags we've hung the millions who have nothing for our pay except the dream. That's almost dead today. Oh let america be america again the land that never has been yet and yet must be the land where every man is free the land. That's mine the poor man's indians negroes me who made america who sweat and blood whose faith and pain whose hand at the foundry whose plow in the rain must bring back our mighty dream again. Sure call me an ugly name. You choose the steel. Freedom does not stain from. Those who live like leeches. The people's lives. We must take back our land again america. Oh yes. I say a plane. America never was america to me. And yet i swear this oath america will be out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death the rate and rot of graft and stealth and lies we. The people must redeem the land the minds the plants the rivers the mountains and the endless plane all all the stretch of these great green states and make america again a poem by langston hughes nineteen. Thirty five good night everyone. We'll see you in the morning at helps. Those are my last words. god help us course. No idea what was going to happen. I mean we had an idea. I must be honest here but how quickly he was gonna start within seven days. The muslim travel ban and everything else came after that the absolute horror show. And now as you're listening to this exactly for years later and some of you are listening in the hours. Leading up to the inauguration of joe biden combo harris Hopefully there's some sense of Good things are maybe about to happen. Let's be realistic folks. We've all been here before and it's easy to say well. Nothing could be as bad as trump and we know from the past. That's not quite true. Either there are things in president ssim politicians who can certainly be as bad trump But we're all counting on the fact that that is not joe biden so Let's see what he has to say. Today let's hope for a peaceful. I think that's i think that's very much order His only danger president biden him vice president harris Are the soldiers police who have live ammunition just feet from them and they say they've been vetting to make sure that they're trying to weed out the announced two days ago they turn entering. We'd the white supremacist. Who they know are in the police forces in the national guard in the military in this country as they now know that many of them were the leaders and organizers of the insurrection and the terrorists acts of january six were on-duty police officers and active duty military and ex military next cops so So the real danger. I think today are not the our our friends out in the woods In michigan doing their militia training exercises are only.

harris trump Today two days ago joe biden england Thirty five black africa Ireland michigan today langston hughes nineteen millions years later seven days january six vice president indians million muslim
Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:27 min | 9 months ago

Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

"Today's storyteller was a playwright and activist. Who stories centered. African american working class families despite tragically short career. She became the first black woman to have a play produced on broadway half a century later her work remains one of the most celebrated snapshots of black struggles and black joy. Here's the story of lorraine hands berry lorraine hands berry was born on may nineteenth nineteen thirty on the south side of chicago. Her father carl. Augustus was a prominent figure. Within the city's black community having founded one of the first african american banks growing up lorraine and her three older siblings played host to a number of famous people including langston hughes. Wabc boys duke ellington and olympic gold. Medalist jesse owens. Despite their middle class status and cultural connections the hands berries were still subject to chicago's deeply ingrained. Housing segregation agreements known as restrictive covenants were widespread throughout the city. White property owners could collectively agree not to sell to african americans. This practice created a ghetto known as the black belt which ran through the south side when lorraine was eight years old. Her father secretly bought a home. In one of the so-called restricted heads in nineteen thirty seven when the family moved in a white mob attacked a brick was thrown through the window narrowly missing lorraine the local homeowners association filed an injunction for the hands berries to vacate lorraine her siblings were chased spat and beaten during their walks to and from school the supreme court of illinois doubled down on the legality of the restrictive covenant. And the hands. Berries were forced out of their home eventually the. Us supreme court overruled this ruling on a technicality. Thirty blocks subsequently opened up to black families across the south side while this ruling and the hands fight did not outlaw restrictive covenants. It did signal. The beginning of the end for the practice lorraine attended. Chicago's englewood high school where she became interested in theatre. She initially attended the university of wisconsin. Where she cut her teeth with the communist party but left after two years in one thousand nine hundred fifty lorraine moved to new york to be a writer by nineteen fifty one lorraine had found a home in harlem and began socializing with many of the great thinkers who had once visited her family back in chicago. She started writing for paul robeson freedom a progressive newspaper at a protest against racial discrimination at new york university lorraine met robert number off a jewish writer. They married at her family home in chicago. In nineteen fifty three in nineteen. Six robert co wrote the hit song. Cindy oh cindy it's prophets allowed lorraine to stop working to focus on writing. She began developing a play that she initially called. The crystal stair langston hughes poem mother to son she would later changed the name to a raisin in the sun. This too was from a langston hughes poem called harlem. What happens to a dream deferred. Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or faster like a sore and then run a raisin in the sun centers on a black working class family in chicago south side as they try to improve their financial situation. The patriarch of the family has died and a ten thousand dollar insurance payout is imminent they the money to buy a house in the cheaper all white neighborhood nearby to they use it to invest in a liquor store and education lorraine based many of the characters on the families who rented from her father and with whom she attended high school the cast safer one character was entirely black lorraine was in her twenties and the play itself dealt with racism life in chicago's black belt and the pain of assimilation into white culture topics that were considered risky for the predominantly white theater. Going crowd it took over a year to raise enough money to put the play up. When it debuted in nineteen fifty-nine a raisin in the sun was the first play written by a black woman to be produced on broadway and the first to be led by an african american director lorraine was twenty nine years old. The play was an almost instant. Hit the new york drama critics circle named it. The best play of the year just five months after its broadway debut arisen in the son of in london's west end in nineteen sixty one. A film starring much of the original cast was released and several of the actors received golden globe. Nominations perhaps the most important element of the play success was that entailing box stories. Lorraine also make theater accessible and previously unimaginable ways as the writer. James baldwin noted. I had never in my life seen so many black people in the theater and the reason was that never before in the entire history of the american theatre had so much of the truth of black people's lives and seen on the stage. Black people had ignored the theatre because the theatre had always ignored them lorraine would go on to finish in stage. Just one other. Play the sign in sidney bruce. Deans window about a jewish intellectual the play which explored themes of homosexuality and the bohemian lifestyle. Debuted to mixed reviews in nineteen sixty four. It ran for just over one hundred performances closing on january twelfth. Nineteen sixty five. That's same day. Lorraine hanbury died of pancreatic cancer. She was thirty four years old. After lorraine's death. Her ex husband robert had several of her plays produced posthumously to be young gifted and black became an autobiographical work. Drawing on lorraine's letters interviews and journal entries the title came from a nineteen sixty four speech of lorraine's when she spoke to the winners of a united negro fund writing competition. She said speech though. It be thrilling marvellous thing to be merely young and gifted in such times it is doubly so w dynamic to be young gifted and black

Lorraine Chicago Berry Lorraine Langston Hughes Local Homeowners Association Supreme Court Of Illinois Englewood High School Jesse Owens Robert Co Cindy Oh Cindy Duke Ellington Augustus Us Supreme Court Berry Carl Paul Robeson White Theater University Of Wisconsin Harlem
Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

Radio Boston

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

"Black nativity is celebrating fifty years in boston. This weekend written by langston hughes. It's a gospel song. Play that re imagines the story of the nativity by placing it in an early twentieth century. Black neighborhood so he's talking about the in like the hotel and the he has characters who talking behind the back of the management about how cruel they were to turn away a woman who was about to have her child. The boston show is the longest running production of black nativity. In the united states and edmund buried gaither says this year they were planning a season long celebration gaithersburg involved in every productions since one thousand nine hundred seventy and is now in charge is the director of the national center for afro american artists. We would be getting and congratulating each other. It's the context of the virus. Most of that has just disappeared and we have had to think about how to reinvent ourselves. Based on what's possible gaither says the celebration will instead be a virtual gala saturday night celebrating joy love and hope it will pay tribute to the productions legacy and chart the next fifty years we have over a long history faced a lot of difficulties and we are still here so we are our president evidence of survival so let us draw on the strength that has seen as through previous stresses to give us the hope in courage to get through this one and let black nativity be part of what sustains.

Black Nativity Boston Langston Hughes Gaither National Center For Afro Ameri Gaithersburg Edmund United States
"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Not let our own heart drink any of that poison. Instead. Drink to truth. Of the life force. If we would on Earth. And celebrate John Lewis's life. Let us then. Re commit. Our souls, our minds our heart, our bodies. Our strength. To the continuing journey to dismantle their own. You know, minutes Did you allow a space? For the new Earth and new heaven to emerge. Clothes with this poem from Langston Hughes, which Is a kind of a sign and symbol of What John Represents. What we too can represented our continuing journey. Langston Hughes. Hi. Dream a world where No. Human No other human will scorn. Where love Will bless the Earth. And peace. It's pass adorn. I dream a dream. Where? Oh, Will no sweet freedoms way. We're agreed no longer saps the soul. No average light. Our day. The world I dream where black and white and yellow and blue and green and red Drowned. Whatever your race, maybe We'll share The bounties of the Earth. And every Woman, man, boy and girl. It is free. Where.

Langston Hughes John Lewis red Drowned
"langston hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

"America again it was written by Langston Hughes in nineteen thirty five that's the and a look a listener and be sent to me today and said you know this really says something and so let's just play it one more time and I am happy to comply when I get listener requests I'm always happy to do it here it is let America be America again let it be the dream it used to be let it be the pioneer on the plane seeking a home where he himself is free America never was America the move could be the dream that dreamers dreamed let it be that great strong land of love were never kings connive north tyrants scheme that any man be crushed by one of it never was America to me let my land be a land where liberty is crowned with no false patriotic wreath but opportunity is real and life the quality is in the air we breathe who are you on laws your video across the store I am the one who's in the world Barings slavery because I am the bread man driven from the land a great collection the whole ice and finding only the same old of mine eleven fifty America the land that must be tool call me any ugly name you choose the steel of freedom does not stain from those who live like leeches.

Langston Hughes
"langston hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

"V. from San Mateo county said to me John as I write these notes for your show before this evening I don't know what precisely will speak about with your listeners but surely the expressions contained in the black poet Langston Hughes poem penned in nineteen thirty five I miss the Great Depression let America be America again relate to the concerns of many Americans on this day I I want you to know that I re read Langston Hughes poem and he recommended that I either use Alfre Woodard's abbreviated version of what is an important point so tonight we begin optimistically on a positive note because the demonstrators on the streets are saying just what Langston Hughes said when he wrote this poem way way back in the nineteen forties M. it's a very simple title I'm sorry nineteen thirty five is one Langston Hughes wrote this and it's called let America be America again let America be America again let it be the dream it used to be let it be.

San Mateo county John America Alfre Woodard Langston Hughes
"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Have no wish to be an area hospital where he later died Ms our H. two and a five year old female our system solidly since that this is this is ridicules black cool kids will die certainly the which will live long as always eating blood and gold letting kids die Langston Hughes right this is an outrageous act of violence and in our study this Indianapolis the few words can be said to truly help people of Indianapolis who have lost people to gun charge for the blade of a knife yet words are demanding the level of gun violence is unacceptable words to tell everyone else it will be alright even as the violence in the streets mounts and breaks records for men and women of the IBM PC are responsible for the safety of the citizens more from this city you are about to hear how the violence affects you it might take my life in my hands walking out of the stadium you are about to hear the attempts an explanation and what some of the leaders believe might be solution we already know from the neighborhood that's why we have asked continuously where's the outrage what seems to be a lack of outcry or rage rage I think the most effective way of addressing that is from we're about to hear the story that's just like for six to the story of violent crime in Indianapolis no it's not just one zip code you're affected by the crime in Indy no matter where you live in the metro or in Indiana green was called in Greenville and Avon they should be asking themselves why do I care about this here's the answer it's coming to a neighborhood near you.

Langston Hughes Indianapolis Greenville Avon Indiana
"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"This is for the kids who don't black kids will die certainly the which will live long as always eating blood and goals letting kids stuff Langston Hughes right this is an outrageous acts of violence and and are starting the address is Indianapolis few words can be said to truly help the people of Indianapolis who have lost people to gun charge or the blade of a knife yet words are to maintain the level of gun violence is unacceptable words to tell everyone else it will be alright even as the violence in the streets mounts and breaks records for many women of the I. anti are responsible for the safety of the citizens more from the city you are about to hear how the violence affects you it might take my life in my hands walking out of the stadium you are about to hear the attempts at explanation and what some of the leaders believe might be solution we already know from the neighborhood that's why we have asked tenuously where's the outrage what seems to be a lack of outcry or rage rage but I think the most effective way of addressing that is funny we're about to hear the story that's just like four six two the story of violent crime in Indianapolis no it's not just one zip code acted by the crime in Indy no matter where you live in.

Langston Hughes Indianapolis
The Harlem Globetrotters

The Past and the Curious

09:20 min | 1 year ago

The Harlem Globetrotters

"The Savoie ballroom was a jewel of jazz age. Chicago theatre opened in the nineteen twenties just before people in the United States were hit by the Great Depression which left many Americans poor and hungry throughout the difficult time. The Savoie was a place to find joy on the south side of Chicago. The building was regularly filled with residents from the largely African American neighborhood. Who gathered to dance to some of the biggest stars of the day count basie Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Were just a few of the people who banged out. Tunes as people jibed across the giant DANCEFLOOR. Dancefloor was so big that it actually doubled as a basketball court for the Savoy. Big Five in the late. Nineteen twenty s the five-man team hosted games to fill the slow nights in the ballroom. A young man in cab. Calloway would sometimes seeing during halftime but back then basketball wasn't very popular people cared about contests like horse racing and boxing baseball. Not The five on five game that depended on getting a ball through a hoop. It was a long way from the sport. We know much slower and much lower scoring than today. This team from Chicago would eventually work to change that. But they're Savoie audience could never have guessed how at some point. There was a dispute among the players of the Savoie five and they broke up. Three of them led by Tommy. Brooklyn's start a new team and rename themselves. The globetrotters it was an era of barnstorming. And when not at the Savoy they set out from Chicago to tour the Mid West region of America there were no organized leagues of teams and players in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. Instead semi professional teams would travel from town to town and earn money playing teams from whatever town they were in sometimes. Businesses might have a team of employees so a barnstorming team like the globetrotters might play against some guys who had spent the whole day assembling cars canning vegetables or even driving taxi caps. Other Times barnstorming might play a team made up of members of a religious group. The House of David. Those guys never shaved so they played basketball with beards down to their bellies. Making James Harden's beard look like a five o'clock shadow soon. A young Jewish immigrant named Abe Sapper. Steam entered the picture with the globetrotters. Abe was a terrible basketball player but his other skills were valuable. He knew a lot of people who did bookings and many of these towns and more importantly he had a car these five teammates and their manager. Abe would pile into his model t like sardines attend camp and hit those cold slick winter roads. It was the nineteen twenties and they understood that random people in random midwest towns might be surprised to find that all five members of the team coming to play their local guys were African Americans. There were very few professional sports comprised of African Americans at this point so they decided to alter their name to help people know what to expect at the time. The most notable and best all black basketball team was known as the Harlem rent which was short for the Harlem Renaissance in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. The New York neighborhood of Harlem was an epicenter of black culture and it was a time referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. People knew about these incredible artists and musicians. Who lived there along with the writers like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston so the globetrotters who were very much from Chicago? Ask themselves how do we make ourselves sound dignified worldly and clearly a team of African Americans the Harlem Globetrotters? Will it matter that? We're not from Harlem that we've never tried it around the globe new super nope cool. Let's pile into a small unheeded car and go beat some people in basketball and they did just that it was remarkable. How good they are. They beat nearly every team from Wisconsin. Illinois Iowa anywhere else they went then they pile back into the car and head on down the road to the next game throughout the nineteen thirties. The team built up quite a reputation. They might have been the best basketball team in the world. No one agrees on how the famous tricks came into the game. A popular explanation is that they'd slip into the fun and flashy dribbles and drives after they safely put plenty of points on the board against their opponent. This did several things one it entertain the audience. Once the actual threat of competition was gone. No one wants to watch a blowout so a fun. Show of tricks kept the locals entertained but also no one wants to watch their local fellas get trounced a group from the city coming in and wiping the home team can really anger a local audience and the Harlem globetrotters new. This trick plays would thrill any crowd and win them over. The focus slowly became not about the final score but about how much fun it was to watch these incredible athletes and their astonishing an often humorous approach to the game. I we win. And then we cloud Abe Saperstein once said now most people agree that the real clowning didn't start until a man named goose. Tatum joined the team. Goose was an incredible athlete. Who could put the basket ball through the hoop with ease? But he also had a keen eye for comedy he found inspiration and funny movies and carefully watched the acts of clowns and other entertainers his favorite gags would show up on the basketball court. Sometimes goose would tiptoe over and pretend to spy on the opposing team's huddle all while making sure the audience in on the joke other times he'd hand the refs at trick ball after a timeout upon dribbling the ball. The referee grow angry because the ball never bounced back up. It just plopped devoid of air on the ground. Sometimes goose would disappear from the court altogether while the game continued only to be found in the audience eating popcorn. He even had a bit where he would pretend to be knocked unconscious on the court. The refs in his teammates would try everything to wake him up. But no amount of shaking or poking prodding would open his eyes. It was only the smell of his own Stinky Shoe. That would get him back up on his feet again. Much to the disgust delight of the audience in Nineteen forty-eight Abe Sapper Stein was with a friend who just so happened to own a basketball team called the Minnesota Lakers. The Lakers were the best team in the brand new professional basketball league which would soon become known as the NBA. The League did not allow black players on any of their teams regardless of League affiliation and regardless of the color of the player skin each man believed his team was the best in the world. They'd never meet in a league as it was so the natural solution was to stage an exhibition game between the Lakers and the globetrotters. It didn't seem so to the men at the time but game between an all white. Nba team and an all. Black semi pro team would prove monumental. Eighteen thousand people came out to watch which was easily twice. As many people as most professional basketball games would attract the time. And despite the fact that the Lakers star center who stood six speed and ten inches tall was seven inches taller than anyone else. On the court. The globetrotters one on a last second shot. It was a powerful moment. The next season those Lakers would go on to win the National Championship. But when they played the Harlem globetrotters a second time for a second exhibition between the two teams. The globetrotters came out on top yet again. The following year the NBA ended segregation and three of those same Laker Whooping Harlem globetrotters Chuck Cooper Nat Clifton and hang designee. Became three of the I four African Americans to join the League and play professional basketball. This was nineteen fifty three years. After Jackie Robinson had broken the color barrier in baseball the globetrotters still continue their entertaining shows today. Keeping the spirit of barnstorming alive. They get a lot of credit for how they support communities and bring joy to so many and educate kids about health. But it's easy to forget about how important they were in integrating professional basketball. They now tour and play with just one team often known as the Washington generals according to most sources the globetrotters have beaten the generals over sixteen thousand times. How many times have they lost though? That question is harder to answer. But it's just a few. The most recent globetrotter loss was way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when both teams lost track of the score when clock expired. The generals were ahead. That was not supposed to happen. And people expected the GLOBETROTTERS TO WIN. And it's usually agreed that they will today. It's all about the show the fun and the love of basketball not the competition. This is what made that loss. So shocking reports from nine hundred. Seventy one SE. The stands were filled with silent shocked faces and even a few crying children. Luckily it's been smiles for all since then

Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Harlem Chicago Nineteen Twenties Minnesota Lakers Savoie Savoie Ballroom NBA Harlem Renaissance Chicago Theatre Abe Sapper Abe Saperstein ABE Ella Fitzgerald United States Baseball Abe Sapper Stein James Harden
"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Here's the thing saving money with. GEICO is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes. And who completely hack you. And then put his hands up and say no foul no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch switch and save on car insurance no need to fake. An ankle sprain. Because you're absolutely exhausted. So switching save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show from IHEART radio. I'm going to be sitting down with different from people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP APP apple podcasts. Or ever you get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the real meaning of beauty in this day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Everyone I'm eve and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast asked where we unwrap a piece of history. Candy every day today is February first. Twenty twenty the day was February first. Nineteen ninety-two writer and activist Langston. Dan Hughes was born in Joplin Missouri. Hughes was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance and he is considered a pioneer of modern black literature. Aw though it's long been believed that he was born in Nineteen. Oh two recent archival discoveries do suggest that he may have been born a year. Earlier Hughes Lineage was full of prominent and politically active people. His maternal grandmother's first husband Luis leary died in John. Brown's raid at harpers ferry grandfather. Charles Henry Langston was an abolitionist and one of the first black people to attend Oberlin College. His great uncle. The John Mercer Langston was the first Black Congressman from Virginia. The first president of Virginia State University and the First Dean of the law school at Harvard University versity and his grandmother frequently told him stories about their family history. His parents were James. Hughes and carry Langston Hughes was young. His father left the family and moved to Mexico and his parents divorced. His mother moved to different cities for work. As a result. Hugh's grandmother grandmother raised him in Lawrence Kansas though he lived with and visit his mother in some cities like Kansas City in Colorado Springs. Eventually he settled with his mother and stepfather and Lincoln Illinois. Then Cleveland Ohio by this time Hughes had already begun writing poetry. He went to High School School in Cleveland and there began delving into leftist literature in ideology took interest in the souls of black folk by W E B Two boys and studied the work of Paul. Laurence Dunbar Carl Sandberg Friedrich Nietzsche and other writers and he started publishing his poems Hughes wrote one of his most famous poems. The Negro speaks of rivers when he was a teenager on train to Mexico once he graduated high school. He spent a year in Mexico with his father father but he had a strained relationship with his father who considered black people inferior even though he was black and he urged Hughes to pursue a career. That was more practical than writing. But Hughes immersed himself more in his writing he moved to New York City attended Columbia. University took odd jobs. Jobs then dropped out of college. He traveled to Africa and Europe as a crewman and he lived in Paris for a while where he continued to write poems and fiction and learned more about Blues Jazz artists when he returned to the US he moved to Washington DC and took trips to Harlem where he met literary figures. It's like county colon and Jean toomer in nineteen twenty six alfred. A Knopf published his first book of poetry the weary blues in addition to poetry Hughes wrote novels short stories and plays in which he portrayed black American life in the nineteen twenties through nineteen sixties. His works include the simple tales which began as a regular column in the Chicago defender. A book of short stories called the ways of white folks and apply Cotton Lotto that ran on Broadway for more than a year. H- used it reading tours and he traveled throughout the Soviet Union and Asia. Riding a lot of fluffed his poetry he wrote prolifically and many people around the world supported his work but many others disliked his portrayals of everyday working class nice black people believing it was a disturbance to the race to display the less desirable aspects of black life and other critics thought. That Hughes didn't take a strong strong enough political stance in his work regardless Hughes became successful enough to live off of his writing and public lectures Hughes wrote up until his death in nineteen sixty seven. His ashes are beneath a floor. Medallion at the Sean Burke Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. I'm Eve Steph coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you haven't gotten your fill of history yet you can find us on twitter facebook and instagram at Ti D. H.. Fee podcast. You can also email us at this day at Heart Media Dot Com. Thank you again for listening and we'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio vis the iheartradio radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show. Oh from iheartradio. I'M GONNA be sitting down with different people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our the word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. or Get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the Real uh-huh meaning of beauty the richest most powerful place on earth of fiction. PODCAST TUMAN BAY on an epic scale. How does everything power everything we have to get away from? This place is our destiny now on the podcast network Luke. Maye old episodes of Tumor Bay Seasons One and two now for free on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

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"langston hughes" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KOMO

"Gun safety round table Friday at the Langston Hughes performing arts center it will be open to the public but you have to RSVP online and we have a link posted at komo news dot com just look for the hot links section the initiative king could soon have a new lawyer former state Supreme Court justice Richard Sanders has offered to take up to my men's case but it's up to a federal bankruptcy judge to decide of Sanders can represent time and more on that story from call most Carlene Johnson well I'm in calls the offer from Sanders a god send the ever held reports as Sanders who practices law in. into a coma and describes himself with the libertarian conditionally offered to help I'm in on giving Attorney General Bob Ferguson unfettered access to the bank accounts for both private and political activities Eiji Bob Ferguson accuses I'm out of moving donation money for his initiatives over to personal accounts his supporters should know that they were donors to Tim I am and who thought their joining to win a shift and that money went to his personal living expenses and two entirely different initiatives now I'm in moving quickly to comply with Sanders conditions apparently submitted materials this week including written permission for the AG together all information from five personal bank accounts and five other accounts related to his legal defense I mean you may recall filed for bankruptcy last year has been defending himself since the start of this year hearing in federal bankruptcy court set for October seventeenth Carling Johnson come on news here's what's coming up on the call more morning news renting a home online watch out for the latest scam I'm Brian Calvert with an elaborate charade that might foremost Ryan Harris with the plan to get rid of one livable RV's and the predators who rent them out. como triple a traffic we do that every ten minutes for you Kiera Jordan what we need to know well we're still working with this crash that is partially blocking the on ramp from a hundred and forty fifth to southbound I. five but what is happening.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm US poet laureate, Tracy case Smith, and this is the slowdown. What if the first poets whose work spoke to me was Emily Dickenson when I was in the fifth grade. I read her poem. I'm nobody who are you in a class textbook. The first stanza of that poem reads. I'm nobody who are you are you nobody to then there's a pair of us. Don't tell they'd banish us, you know, and I couldn't help it. I felt singled out spoken to understood that poem gave me cause to feel that anonymity or nobody nece was valuable by this reasoning. I wasn't just a ten year old who hadn't yet been anywhere or done. Anything? I was a person flying under the radar someone with the freedom to do or feel or think anything. At all without fear of being scrutinized or judged. This new perspective felt exciting to this day. I feel grateful for the affirmation of Dickinson's poem and for its reminder that sometimes my best self is the one I keep to myself. But as freeing as it is, I don't believe Dickinson's. Nobody nece is quite enough. At least not for me. I also sometimes crave the community of others who've you me, not just as somebody but somebody worth loving and listening to and looking out for. Maybe what I'm saying is if you don't know that you matter to someone than being left alone can sometimes feel like abandonment, or alienating or invisibility, and I'll take that a step farther. If you know that you don't matter to someone that the fact of your life doesn't automatically conjure up a sense of compassion and regard in others than being left alone can feel a lot like disregard, which is demoralizing, and in the worst cases lethal. That's why today's poem consider me by Harlem renaissance poet, Langston Hughes strikes me as so important written in the voice of a young black, man. And at a time when colored was still an acceptable term. The poem invites the reader to see it speaker. As a citizen of a community. That encompasses all of humanity. He stands asking you to pay attention saying, I'm here. I'm adder just like you. Consider me by Langston Hughes. Consider me a colored boy wants sixteen once five once three once nobody now me before me Papa mama grandpa, grandma. So on back to original paw. A capital letter there he being mystery consider me colored boy downtown at eight sometimes working late overtime paid sport away or save or give my sugar for the things. She needs my sugar. Consider her who works to has to one don't make enough for all the stuff. It takes to live. Forgive me. What I lack black caught in a crack that splits the world into from China, by way of Arkansas to Lennox avenue. Consider me on Friday, the eagle flies Saturday laughter. Abbar? Abed Sunday prayers syncope glory Monday comes to work at eight lay. Late maybe consider me descended. Also from the mystery. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"She set poems by Langston Hughes to her own music since then she's been working hard. She's produced several new human beings as well. As new albums the latest album, the capitalist blues is out now and Layla McCullough is with us from the south by southwest festival. Leyla. Thanks so much for talking with us nice to speak with you again. Thanks for making the time. How has the festival been for you, so far it's very interesting because I've heard about this festival for a long time. And and it's my first time actually being here. So I'm realizing why it has the reputation that it has it's kind of overwhelming. And it's like, wow, how do you break through? All of this noise. You know? But here I am. Well, speaking of breaking through all this noise. And one of the things about your music has always followed its own path. I mean, you've always kind of said what you wanted to say in the way that you wanted to say it, and you have kind of organized your life in such a way that you could do that. And I was reading an interview about this latest album. We're you said how have my previous records not been considered protests albums? Point taken which I feel like you're making a statement with the title capitalist blues, are you? Yeah. I think so I think that it's appropriate. It's been interesting even just being here at south by south west and witnessing the inequality that is so prevalent in our society just walking around the streets here, promoting my music. And yet the words that I'm singing still feel like they ring so true, especially in this sort of context where everyone is literally trying to get ahead and trying to move their careers forward. Trying to move their life forward in some way. And and then we're right next to this huge homeless population. I've been seeing like people nodding out on heroin on the street corners and thinking how did we all end up here at the same time in this moment. It just makes me feel like more sure of my songs. Does it feel a little disorienting in a way? Yeah. It's disorienting because I'm like, I don't want to believe that there is rampant inequality with and that it's difficult to see our way through this as a society. I don't want to believe that we're all so callous in some way, and that we're all just so self interested. I'm not absolving myself of that, you know, when I say that I feel that way about myself sometimes, and I'm like, this is so confusing. Because I'm using to be here. I have I have an incredible amount of freedom in privilege in certain ways. And yet. You know, I'm a black woman in the folk music world jazz world, just seeing all of the layers of my identity sort of juxtaposed.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Live you know if you do things the right way the naturally the rewards come to trinidad chrome okay now you have a tour you planning tour is when you get hit to the states or they didn't play go ahead there was an exhibition forcing the i ten school of exhibition merlo moments that's what i say run by langston hughes who is a very talented hip hop party and in combination no they were very caught by the same thing all right okay yeah here's was renaissance poet he was the topic fema famous of the harlem renaissance poet from the thirty forty yes lifezette news that's three lendings nine from that and let's really is the new just after the incidents but that's okay and what is he doing with the the in charge of your tour or he this was he's conception monuments and he's welcomed wine company on moines as well sites combining final and hip hop now that we had yeah and it really is because he's obviously crossing barriers and taking it different social aries now the loss was on june ten in charleston south carolina i wasn't there but my work was and we kunti kuti plight there my work was really well received so the place that we're looking at as gonna be lanta looking publicly nine the next tool three months and we're hoping to get mitre hip hop performance as well tied into that at the moment of comedy reveal that signed sealed delivered but we would definitely be having exhibition in atlanta.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"It's very weird she's got short curly here rectangular glasses she's not a doctor but she's wearing a lab coat she's not a nurse but she's got a prescription pad beside rana is a big cardboard sign that says the poet is in and if you are open to it she's ready to find a poem just for you take them in land in your chair here and just see as you get a bit settled what do you need a home for today need more time in the day or more days in the week you say a bit more about that ronald bloom is what mount sinai calls their poet in residence every so often she sets up a booth in the hospital inviting visitors patients nurses doctors to approach her for a poem i walk in and i say to myself they're sick people here wake up now they're vulnerable people here wake up see the whole thing kind of works like a doctor's appointment you take a seat across from rana g asks how you're feeling what's on your mind what you need right now and she either writes a poem or prescribes one for you from a big stack of paper her medicine chest we'll see if it fits and if it doesn't keep going this one's called still here by langston hughes i've been scared and battered my folks the wind done scattered snow has frizz me son has baked me looks like between them they done try to make me.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on Touré Show

Touré Show

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Touré Show

"A murderer or a army military dude like how you supposed to be like well there's this car today jamal lion gay billionaire popstar don stand it still i think that you know it's all about paying dues and i don't always have to audition for instance there was a cameo that reggie huddling asked me to do in marshall as langston hughes that was just that was just him asking me to do with their other movies that are coming up that you know i either created for myself or or were created with me and mind so it's it's it's kind of luck at a draw it's just but but i'm certainly in my mind i'm certainly not above auditioning i still auditioned for alien covenant let's talk about that how did you how did you get that i audition like everybody else i don't think they knew who i was really yeah i don't i mean they knew like once i got onset they knew who i was but i don't think that really scott my sitting at home watching empire being like ooh i love kooky city i'm curious because really scott is one of the great directors modern hollywood what is being directed fucked up with that egypt's and movie you really of the gate two bucks when when you are being directed by really scout what is that like what are his notes like when he comes over like okay that was great but he's so funny he's so funny and he so he's so funny and serious at the same time it's so exciting to watch him work because he's literally like a little kid and a candy store and he's so respectful you know what i'm saying of of people's time and people's talent it's so interesting because we worked on french hours like french lunch hours where we would work through our lunch and he because his whole thing is we work six thirty in the morning to six thirty in the evening every single day and his whole thing is people should be able to have dinner with their families and like whoa i've never ever been on a set like that in my life.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Around the Rim

"Allows me to think about something that one of my favorite poyton langston hughes shared he said that we should hold fast to our dreams for if drains died life is a brokenwing bird that cannot fly and college athletics is fortunate to have two eagles not just flying but soaring and for keeping watch and making sure that opportunities continued to come to those who work hard who are disciplined and who are prepared thank you so much commissioner and make williams and thank you athletic director tamika smith we're fortunate to have you among our ranks thanking '80s action yeah and now for a dynamic group of coaches fleece johar alan once again moderating a conversation with quitting heels myth syracuse cookies weeks washington of penn state you'll let mcphee mccue in from jacksonville university a n david 6 of hampton university wanted to start out by sharing this black history month has always been in one of my favorite months because it was an opportunity for me to learn a little bit about who i am where i come from and all of the power that people of color puts this and how we help to build mode shape frames america i'd like to start by sharing that one of my favorites has always been booker t washington who was an american educator author an orator he advised president and between eighteen ninety a 1915 booker t washington was a dominant leader in the african american community.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"World ordering power is to break from a kind of ideological sir have monolith a means not even just a consensus it's kind of a hill it's it's it's it's the it's it's the really it's the equivalent of kind of what we used to condemn as in of soviet ideology right it's a it's a kind of it's a kind of axiomatic there that i mean i consider it it's they're like flatter authors yeah i mean it's sort of like what do you mean the us wasn't the most beneficent savior in the world that that stopped a all of us were living under the the nazi yoke right exactly and and and also i mean it's it's such an incendiary topic to raise in this country when you go to almost any public event whether it's a a graduation at a at a high school her a middle school a sporting event someone is going to invoke the heroic nature of the world war to record of the united states it happens at it happens republicans democrats across the board everywhere it's like our societies drip and it and as i read your book i was her thinking it's such a great pushed back to this notion that being born in american means you are born into the greatest nation that's ever lived the country that saves the world i mean it really is like a nonstarter if you disagree with that in the mainstream of american discourse absolutely and it's one of the reasons why you know in in in this book and in some of my previous work i really go back to the black radical tradition and thinking about world war two in particular and i and i use this quote somewhere from from langston hughes where he talks about you know we we we hate hitler as much as anybody but we also want to defeat what he calls are native fascisms you know and and for african americans you know that notion that world war two was would require a double victory a victory against fascism abroad and also against racism at home you know became a very sort of a sort of a sharp critique right it was.

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"langston hughes" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Here & Now

"A jazz orchestra in a string quartet sit ready to play as a man steps up to the microphone carl stokes mayor of cleveland starts to read a poem by another noted cleveland her langston hughes i to sing america i am the darker brother they sent me the eden in the kitchen when company comes but i lay behind the control room glass was famed new york jazz producer bob thelia of the next to him was noted composer and arranger oliver nelson's they collaborated on a series of recordings like this each one featured prominent american cultural voices commenting on current issues over a jazz soundtrack take this hammer a geared to the cab you tell him our god tell him i'm god music historian lauren schoenberg says the albums were released on deals personal labone in and they definitely word headed for the top of the pop charts mob was at that time you had people were making enough money from the commercial stuff that felt that they could go out and record things that they loved the may not have been a huge pay day at the end the stokes recording was released under the title the mayor and the people on one side of the record he can be heard reciting a mixture of gospel lyrics and verse from poets like links than hughes ingil scott hereon picture man of nearly thirty who seems twice his own clothes torn endured the other side consisted of an impromptu question and answer session from an invited audience arranged by feel we'll see it's very easy saying the now just men and now we are we going to be able to tool you am i going to be lancia questions are you can say these question.

cleveland oliver nelson carl stokes new york producer bob thelia lauren schoenberg lancia