19 Burst results for "lamm"

"lamm" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

02:55 min | Last month

"lamm" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"The line and then flipping between the two on monday versus the friday. Yeah that's so true. I love gems term of cold. Burn out 'cause. Like i was in say that i don't feel that pandemic has burned me out. I feel like it's made. All of life has become burnout. Burnout is ever present in everywhere. All around us because like everything that we do even things that used to bring us joy like lamm across saying or like bullshitting twitter or whatever have been compressed into the same ritual of survival that go through every day with like no gaps or room for anything interesting to spring up from between them. You know and. I don't know what we can intentionally do to introduce. More spontaneity into our lives with so much of our behavior is restricted. And so much of what we can and can't do is governed by the spread of disease that we can a can only really control our individual behavior But i don't know maybe being aware of it is really the first step. Good segue for us before we get into picks. I am curious like with all of you all dell with this like we've hall admittedly dealt with burnout in some way shape or form. What's a piece of advice you would give to someone that's an and then it's come up a bit here but as if you were to leave everyone with a piece of advice dealing with burnout. What would you leave them before. We jump into picks. Don't be too afraid to quit your fucking job at your job. Just do it. Why ya. I quit the best job i ever had and it was the best decision that i ever made and i still miss it sometimes and it still hurts sometimes but light. The effects of burn out aren't just about ruining a job that you love. It's about ruining like a whole career. It's about ruining like it. It's about that. It takes away the joy for doing the work regardless whose pockets. You're lining by doing that work and like especially if you came to this career aptitude something else where like you worked really hard to break in and transition. You have to be so defensive of your love for the work because at the end of the day. That's all we really have. And every time you encounter burn out the joy comes back slower and a little less stronger than it was there before. And so i s advice would be like. Don't be afraid to do something dumb. And drastic t. lines planes right. I think i want to add my mom's nerves and she constantly constantly reminds me by you. Know we only have one body and we can you know we can work as part as we want. We can build a career we want. We can build all the riches that we want but.

lamm twitter dell
"lamm" Discussed on Radicalize Me

Radicalize Me

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Radicalize Me

"And i like i was just wearing this really flashy costume and just the awareness that i was no longer grounded is it's kind of like how people with Dissociation in ptsd. They describe really out of body experiences. But i wasn't looking at my body from the outside. I was in it but i wasn't attached to it right. It was really bizarre. And the way we described that is called co consciousness. so you just. The metaphor is is that the body is a car in one right now. I'm driving that car. Saw him in the front seat driving. We're talking no big deal but one room comes in either in the backseat will have some awareness that something is going on arm in. The passenger seat were fully aware of what's going on. But i'm no longer in control right with my other altars. I'm just in the trunk. Like lamm each. I have no idea what is happening. Wow yes so when it comes to I'm sure where i go. I as is like really fascinating To like the okay so like the vision thing for one is there when they can look and see like a change in the brain in your at like vision is actually improving with a personality shift. is there any avenue there to like learn more about like Visual impaired nece and like to correct absolutely it definitely opens up our understanding of like how the body works really There was an article that came out in twenty nine thousand nine hundred and it was from. It was translated from german. If i remember correctly and they said oh people with the idea could really lake bust the myth about what the brain is fully capable of doing because we only recently learned that one trauma happens. Our brain creates new neural pathways to somehow navigate. That damage right so it will. I think that are systems in general whether you're disordered or not we've created new neural pathways to deal with every day right. Yeah it's it's really interesting because i i I still have some of it. But i overcame a lot of Chronic pain issues with This this sort of psychological approach either. There's a few different ones. But i the one i started with was an app called curable and yeah you know because a lot of it does go back to like well. You know Whatever chronic thing this is can can be very much related to trauma into You know uncovering that stuff and and Phasing it down. i guess But yeah it just sounds similar in the way that it's like. Yeah the the brain does like crazy stuff like that. They're bringing controls. Yeah i'm i've had a lot of people say the movie inside out. Has helped them conceptualize what a lot of systems go through and it's not the same but like people with borderline personality disorder. Similar thing So a lot of systems used the metaphor of inside out to really conceptualize to people. That are singlets. Like yourself to just understand the enormity of just going to say. We're nist that we deal with like for me. It's totally normal. Like i don't understand singlets at all like you have one personality one identity. What is i mean. Super them. Whereas i have to think about five other people at all times so recently My family went through laws. My grandfather passed away from complications of a stroke on september eleventh and he was very very accepting of my system and actually referred to would always.

ptsd lamm
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"Segments primarily but also but not side of it whether you're buying if you're servicing or buying, you know, you're working for a large creditor or you're working or you know credit grantor like a Capital One or a Bank of America Michael fewer, you know collecting Healthcare debt from the regional hospital and Kentucky. What whatever it is that your workflow and how you do it. What your margin is ultimately is what you're being ugh assessed against when they're deriving at it when they're figuring out your your Enterprise Value and wage. Technology is a key driver for it. It's can ultimately lead to better profitability long-term and more clients sustainability. Michael has been a fascinating discussion a survey of the industry is survey of the ups and downs today that Empires collection agencies revenue cycle management customer relationship companies have faced are are facing I give you congratulations to you and Mark for building a wonderful business. Fifty transactions is outstanding plus you're expanding other segments that I think a lot of the bars are also expanding into so before we end the conversation here what final words of wisdom do you have for the these companies that right now are going through a tough tough transition in a very kind of unprecedented pandemic, but what would you how would you be counselling these folks Thursday? And and you know, what? What are your final thoughts? Yeah, Michael, first of all, thank you again for having me on the on your show. I would tell you that. Most probably the the key kind of leave behind is keep fighting. Keep keep doing what you're doing every single day, especially these companies out there that are dealing with enormous challenges from a work-at-home data security perspective. We're going to ultimately get through this and these industries are going to be even better off as a result of it. And I think there's going to be some amazing companies and Technologies and other solutions that come out of this pandemic that are going to drive the growth of this industry over the next five to ten years. So I am I'm beyond excited about where the industry's are headed. Well Michael Lam, thank you so much for your thoughts on the obstacles and opportunities that all of us are facing and and these tough times. We look forward to another phone conversation with you and Mark sometime in the future. Thank you. Thanks again..

Michael Lam Michael Capital One Kentucky and Technologies Bank of America Empires collection
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"Saying that we did have pre-existing relationships where we had met know off the buyer and seller in I'd say ninety percent of the of the deals that we closed pre-existent. Yeah where we actually knew the buyer extreme well, and we knew the cellar to now we were running auction processes for most if not all of these transactions. So did we know everybody on the other side of the page? Injection. No, but we did know them and there was a comfort factor. So, you know, you kind of work. Look I had to kind of move away from hey, let's get on an airplane and go sit down and hack this out to let's get on a zoom call and see what we can do. Is it ideal frankly know and I thought nothing replaces face-to-face interaction, but we we had to work with what our clients needs and expectations were too. So we've been talking about debt buyers and comedy Ebbs and flows of that world. There's a chart that I'd like to share with our viewers. Now that shows the trends in deployments as you can see here these bars represent the deployment volumes for Encore and puree. That's the blue and red and then the yellow here is square too, but what's interesting is you could see the second quarter results and deployments for these two publicly traded companies wage, right? You can see how how low that is. Relative to the I guess the past five years and but oddly enough. It's only it's the second lowest since 19 since 2013. So what's wrong surprises me is that in light of the high prices? You would think that the sellers would be selling more even though we did have that bump and we sought to add floss that in March and April you saw temporarily anyway volumes go up and then some of the fintech folks in particular were lowering their prices to get the bath room to sustain that and they did it actually to changing some of the terms so that the flows weren't just 12 months at one price. They would they would kind of renew it or review it every right choice so they were kind of being flexible. So you saw that happening but then starting May June the the prices they didn't shoot up, but they were they're pretty stable. They may have crept up a little bit off. Surprising that the total volumes would go down in a. Which it may not be the typical recession, but it's certainly is as a pause in business so long. Why do you think that the volumes in the last the second quarter were were down that much and and again if you compare it for the last, you know, seven years it was the lowest since 2013. What do you think the only the the only trend from what we're seeing that when you look at it over the past few months is we were in such a period of transition or a state of flux wage in every industry you could think of and the.

Encore
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"Yeah, no, I I would agree with you and letting money as a financing partner the due diligence about the people and the data the information they're giving you is critical and it's normal to expect a positive spin. I mean everyone's trying to make yep in their history look great, but then there is a boundary when that positive spin becomes misrepresentation. That's right. And and to me, you know, you have those experiences. I'm sure you've had yours that have been less than Stellar in for us. You just remember them you put away in your memory book and I I don't regret as an example working on that deal that I did you make operation. I think it was a great Learning lesson at the time. I wasn't saying that then but I was I was definitely feeling that way a year or two after that. I I'm glad I went through that. Well, yeah, that's another good point if you're not playing long-ball, even though you could get real excited winning, you know, the shortfall eventual that collapses if there isn't both strategic Synergy as well as personal that alignment, right? Yeah. I try to meet I don't know about you Michael. I but I know I'm in a weird world with the pandemic but I I try to meet everybody I transact with whether there are a referral meet face-to-face, you know zooms great but like meeting face-to-face and really breaking bread with somebody to understand really what their intentions are is is really important for me when we take on clients. So you mentioned pandemic so share with us, you know your thoughts on the impact of the pandemic both on but your m&a deals as well as the saying the depth of world. Yeah. I mean I when when the pandemic really hit in March, I I was concerned and I've been through two recessions and Market changes and volatility. But this is was a whole different ballgame. And for me, I I really took a step back because in March my goal I don't know about for you. But most if not, all of our deals were put on hold. I think there was one that didn't get put on hold but I think most of the ones we were working on.

partner Michael
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"I think a lot of times I think lack of trust between a buyer and seller and took their advisor leads to negative outcomes and in a transaction because if if somebody's willing to lie to you or may not tell you the full story. What would they do as a partner if they were if somebody was to buy your company and is advised that as an advisor. You want to see a successful outcome after the transaction page and uh, and if if you can't get to that level of candor. Is that a client or a business you want to sell to somebody else? Is a question I always asked myself. So give us some other examples that of deals that have failed obviously don't mention the names. But yeah in in in the I'll give you another example one that's kind of the end of the spectrum, you know, but few years ago we were working on a deal was actually an operation that had a big truck center in Jamaica and was a debt buyer and they were doing a lot of work in and out of stat purchasing and we actually had buyers that were on the way down to Jamaica to do the visit to do the site visits as as a part of our process is pretty customary and took the buyers got down there and so did way the doors were padlocked by the Federal Trade Commission because they were doing unscrupulous activities or See, you know deceptive practices down in their site down there. And so those little things don't leave your memory books when a deal dies because someone could be candid with you and say look we're we're going through an investigation right now and we should probably push the pause button on the sale of this operation and come back because of what's going on. They chose not to they kept it close to the vest and they didn't share it. So ultimately I will never forget that that dynamic because we worked so damn hard on that transaction for and that way was was was a bummer and it just was one of those situations where he wished it didn't happen. So I guess in that case the biggest driver of the failure was done lack of trust, right? Yeah. I mean I just it just was one of those situations where that person was embarrassed were those owners were embarrassed about the situation and they didn't want to didn't want to come clean about it. They were hoping to get something done before it blow up and thankfully for the buyers that had spent the time and effort nothing occurred. So I guess that's again another example of how relationships are critical to transactions. Cuz yes you ship that was not built on Thursday this when your lending money to people and financing groups, you know, you're interviewing and diligence seeing them just as much as their diligence to you to see what kind of partner they're going to be dead. You know, we I've had some unbelievable, you know people that are friends for life that we've sold businesses for that. I do anything down or just because they're good people and they you know, they they treated us well and and we did a great job for them too. And I value that that to me as much as it's great to get the Payday. The feeling that you added value is is so important every day for me, but don't feel like that or feel like that about a client Bots. Hard to get excited about them..

partner advisor Jamaica Federal Trade Commission
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"You know, there's a a major event at the end of it. So I guess in this helps you get over the lumpiness and we've lacked lived. You know what that's like, I mean it's feast or famine and so good bad good bad Market, whatever. It's in. We're always playing long-ball developing those relationships and starting out small and then leading to something big So I guess you know, was it your I guess learning along the way that that lumpiness can also be adverse, especially when you're getting started. I mean my God, you probably lived it to like like me not every deal closes as much as you'd like like it to you don't have that control as an intermediary. You can only do so much. So keeping that pipeline filled and being not emotional about it is another key theme for me. I I don't I don't want to be rattled. I want to make sure I can't control everything but and I can only do so much but what I can control is my pipe off and how many deals and opportunities were bringing out to to the street for private Equity or lenders to to think about our strategic buyers to consider dead. So when you started see is I guess your focus probably initially was the pipeline was at it and building my when when you look at me Chuck versus my partner Mark, I'm definitely more of the outside guy Michael. So I'm the guy you see speaking at trade shows going to the conferences off in interfacing a lot and not that I don't do the execution. I do that as well because I love that part of it, too. I look at myself more as a hybrid because I cannot only wage talk the talk. I can actually do the work as well and that obviously helps whatever industry segment. I'm in you know, I can talk through and explain kind of the song doubts of a transaction from start to finish. So we're talking about deals successes and failures and you guys have had a tremendous record but along the way what were some of the challenges that you had faith in getting this new business going just you know, like everything when you're a new company and you're starting out people are wondering after you spend all this time somewhere else. Why'd you leave? Why'd you start a company or you really what you say you are and like anything. I had a nice following a very good Network off clients. So did Mark and people that we had worked with in the past and we leveraged that, you know, we you know for the first couple of deals we did we did everything we could to really show how involved we were right that we weren't simply handing off a client to a junior person that we were involved. Start to finish and that I think is really what led to us being referred in and getting testimonials and people speaking very highly of us in the marketplace because we did what we said we were going to do right out of the gate when we when we started working with clients..

Mark partner Michael
"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"Options. So how the heck how the heck does one go from international relations two accounts receivables management. I mean, nobody know. Why you going home. I'm with I'm with you. It's it's one of those things where I I don't know maybe I had it in my blood or what but I when I when I was younger my family had run a debt collection law firm and one of the areas that they focused in on was Commercial receivables Management, you know, dealing with equipment leasing companies and as a you know, as was thirteen fourteen years old, I would go into the office and hear all about receivables management and people or businesses not paying their bills and it was intriguing to me at the time when I was I was just a kid. I was just I it was the whole world around debt collection was something I had not had much experience in being young. I was but just learning about it at that at that point in my life was a was a key driver for how I eventually got into what I'm doing now. So who's taught you how to collect? I mean thirteen years old, you know, you grew up. So my uncle yeah, my my uncle who was a bankruptcy attorney and still is at one point. I just was you know, he said look, I want you to go sit with this individual in the office and I just thought there for hours learning and processing paper on how how you go about collecting on those Payment Processing machines that sit and rest of the people didn't pay for and it was just one of these things where you just got the knack for it and I just that's how I and then I started getting on the phone and collecting trash collecting those accounts as well. Have a knack for it. But at thirteen and fourteen, I mean nobody at least most kids that age don't develop that real hard Edge that many collectors are known for I mean Thursday you have such a nice demeanor. I cannot imagine Michael Lam on the phone demanding a payment. It just is like it was yeah it was for me as I started learning it and and my Dunning name at the time I didn't use my name was Michael Stevenson. And and for me, I I really enjoyed the back and forth around it and explaining to the business owner at that time why he owed the receipt why he owed the payment. It wasn't about being tough or hard. It was just more about logically explaining why we were on the phone and why we were wanting to talk with him. I just always got a lot of in, Georgia. Out of that because it felt like I was at least doing a service to them to try to help them clean up the situation that they were in and it was just something I I recently began to really get more into overtime and it was my it was my summer job..

Michael Lam Commercial receivables Managem Michael Stevenson Georgia attorney Dunning business owner
#171  Snowy Shaw

DJ Force X in Conversation

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

#171 Snowy Shaw

"When we got it. I won't read it until your dead, but then she wrote. Read, it's in engine y'all like eight hours or something like that and she's like, wow now I understand you better. Through. It strikes underneath I mean you're been this lonely guy never find a place in life you know and always keep search for to find that. Sense of belonging or in a piece or whatever it is and. Struggling for equality I, want to reach top I mean. I realized that I have those kind of bucket list things going on like, wow, I. WanNa live in New York you know what I did. It's like now I'm an old guy. Now I mean, maybe it was. Twenty or something like that. I mean that's a miss. My Chase Fantasy Spiderman is from New York Mine. War Kiss us. It's just a fantasy and and. Just like Lamm said, you'd chase is better than the catch.

New York Lamm
"lamm" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Soon as I say let me know he stops shoot it over to just look at for segment to go back to kick in our dorm the hell it is yeah well we don't have the ability to cage our kids when we go to work let me not caged anymore and I was just crate training great prices right we're going to call it crazy because it's really a cage but it makes me feel better they call it a night being a parent is to test the job I've heard of I create my new doctor it's rewarding I live just just well good because each like the crazy move this is what you could do a deal they they we can do this all day long but we won't Robert Lamm from Chicago is on the way we want to talk to him but seven hit on nine of seven thousand Hey bring your kids proselytes cream of the top I was so used to argue with Dave on the other things that go seven ninety no it's eight forty okay see you argue with me and you argue with Dave what's the common denominator there you were to from the west will construction traffic said newsradio eight forty WHAS traffic police sorting out a record third and Broadway gonna find a broken down within sixty five right before two sixty five no major problems on seventy one looking good from store to the junction everything else moving along at a pretty.

Chicago Dave Robert Lamm
"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

"It's a different way to access a problem all system. So did you ever get that experience where someone says? Hey but hey. I thought you were supposed to teach me to draw but now you're exposing how bad I am at planning. I usually I usually try not to expose anybody and point the finger and say look now you see how bad you are at Xyz that but some people sometimes find it surprising how helpful it is and that they think. Oh Yeah it's most they get attracted through the through the visuals and they're like yeah. Oh Wow now I see this problem in a different light and I couldn't see it like that before. That's really great when people discover that were podcast of course so this is an audio a medium but yes. I'd love for us to try and get you to teach us some some. Give some good tips on how we can draw sketch some some better through the medium of of sound okay. Well one important thing to not forget whatever you do but especially when you sketch is key breathing a lot of people especially when they find sketching very hard they hold their breath and they get really stiff and really nervous so take it easy. I'm also I have just in terms of the former clarity. You know some things that you can do for your sketches if in doubt slowdown Make your mark slower because we often refer to get to sketching as a very fast technique but sketching is not fast because we move our hand incredibly incredibly foster cross the paper sketching fast because we are economical with our strokes we draw we simplify things. I when we sketch icons we simplify the icons two basic shapes so that we don't need to make that many stroke so we are faster and then also when we get more More experienced we try to simplify systems and concepts to just the core of what we need to explain. And therefore we don't have to draw that many elements because we are reducing the complexity or the level of complexity that we show in something that we want to explain by reducing it to the core ideas So you can always benefit from slowing your hands down. Because then you'll strokes will get clearer. Your handwriting will get clear. You don't have to write and draw things again. Usually our ideas our overtake the speed of our hand and then things get messy. Also one thing. Why sketches get messy and unreadable is The the biggest enemy of good form is pressure. Usually time pressure. You can also when you when you speak for example and you don't have much time you start speaking really quickly and then it becomes difficult to understand what you're saying all or when the stakes are high. When you're standing on a stage other people are watching an ours. Come in and just pressure is the natural enemy of good form in any discipline. So what you need to do. Is you practice the form and practically strokes and the clear shapes that you're drawing so when you are under pressure either by your own ideas streaming in by having important stakeholders in a meeting by being under time pressure that you have the good form in your hand because you practiced it so much that you can deal with the stress without impacting. Your good form like you do with public speaking like you do with athletics or Don's performances or whatever so that is one tip it's practice. Wow that was like a ted talk. I definitely have to rent a brief. I recognize the breathing thing. I do remember sometimes especially if you're doing a long straight line for example a new kind of you realize halfway through now. I haven't I haven't taken a stall of this line but I really wanted to be straight. Well one thing one tip for straight lines if you if you have one key lines one tip is especially when you work on a just on a piece of paper. Usually we have more control over our hand movement when we actually pull towards our sense of gravity so when we start away from US and pull towards our belly button so if you need to make a very long straight line Then it's better to draw towards yourself then pushing away or drawing sideways. That can be a tip when you draw on a piece of paper because you can always rotate the piece of paper so that the stroke will point towards you. Perfect practical tip. Yeah thank you so much. This has been so enlightening and so wonderful. Thanks for joining us. It's.

US Don athletics ted
"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

"Do you have a backup? Backup element to the sketch. Yes also also what I need to say is when I talk about. Sketches for me sketches. Not only the visual part but also the labeling and annotations so a sketch is always visuals and words and adding words to sketches is an integral part and super important because the visual elements in a sketch are good for a lot of the to explain a lot of things But for some things words are stronger and more precise what I found out over the years when I looked at my own sketches and when do use -tations and what do they use words for and how do images and words really play together because I love languages. Well what visuals are really strong at. Is They great at Showing relationships because we evaluate relationships in our life in our environment all the time through our eyes. You know how fast this bottle away from me. Can I grab it? How quickly is this car passing by? Can across the road before it so we we evaluate all these relationships through the visual information so we are really good at it when we want to show a relationship like a time relationship when we put two events on the piece of paper further away from each other and to closer together we automatically read the distance the physical distance as time distance as the longest stretch and the shortest stretch without even having to think about it. This is not only true for time relationships but also for hierarchical relationships or conceptual relationships functional relationships so visuals are great for four showing relationships because we read them naturally but then when you come to a precision and data and naming then language is unbeatable. Because if you put if you put them time line and then really evaluating by the length of centimeters if this is now three days or four days is really hard so if you want to be precise and want to make things actionable than it's great to Edwards to it. That's an example. I'll just think about how I love standing in front of the White Board and and and drawing things and thinking through ideas and concepts in workshop environmental team environments and I'm just stripping now when you're explaining this that I'll use words of course to describe maybe sketching something time-line example. There may be a draw. I'll be drawing the line and that's one day to three days. That are maybe finish up that works in the in the room but what we find what I find is very often. People will take photographs with a small phones at the end of meetings to record that moment. Maybe I should maybe spend a few minutes adding some labels at the end. And that's what I that's what I meant by making it more robust because the people who are in the room they will remember it or maybe they will only remember it for two days and then they will have forgotten because our memory just fades away. Mine Fades away quicker than others so yeah making it more robust if it needs to enjoy over time or over different context then if in doubt Ed labels that's always good because even for yourself if I look at some of my sketches that I did half a year ago For someone's like what was I thinking and if you add labels you just help yourself and you help others annotations. You could even argue that. It's a responsibility when you're doing these things that you need to add labels for declaratory because otherwise contributing to confusion possibly. Yes and you need to be the judge of what is adequate. And what is the use of this thing? How long does it live? And if in doubt make it more explicit and and add labels or add additional visuals. Whatever you need to make it more robust so I have this theory. Now that I'm thinking of when I'm listening to you speak because you're speaking so eloquently about problem solving in a way that applies to everything. I'm thinking that you not only have practitioners. Your courses and workshops. You have leadership as well. They are also interested in learning this these things and they listened to you. Explain this and this makes me think that sometimes you X. has a hard time being listened to by leadership whereas you are working with visuals but in a way that they can understand. I noticed this thing sometimes when I actually do client work so sometimes I get hired by clients to help them visualize complex situation so that they can either express something in a clear away or understand things in a different way. I sometimes notice that they hire me for visualizing somethin- but actually it very quickly turns into more for consulting thing because in order to visualize something I have to ask very precise and often the difficult questions of so what all the elements. And how do they really hang together? And what is this relationship really like? How does that work? And this usually put the finger fairly quickly on some very strategic high level questions That just need to be answered in some way shape or form to be able to visualize it. So that's also why I love The challenge of visualizing something as a way for exploration and a different way to uncover requirements because very quickly Because you you can waffle. It's much harder to waffle with visuals. that you very quickly get to the important questions because there's no way around that so they think they've got a problem visualizing a particular thing whereas whereas actually many times the problem is they haven't come far enough in the thought process around the particular thing in order to be able to communicate it. Yes all that something in the system is broken..

White Board Edwards Ed
"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

"In one hundred ninety three countries around the world from Finland to Panama guest ever lot alum is a designer visual thinking expert and trainer. She's been holding sketching workshops for many years. And you might. Well have seen some excellent sketch notes. Which ever lot has been published in her book form on top of that. You could well of even seen her illustrations in content everywhere by Sarah Walker Butcher and the user journey by Donna little in our conversation with Oughta we learn about sketching visual thinking and we get a lot of practical advice on how to work with the visuals. Not only to communicate ideas but to uncover and work on problems. When.

Sarah Walker Butcher Finland Panama Donna
"lamm" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Yesterday alcohol use mark Lamm came out strong against Democrats in the Arizona senator who are pushing legislation S. B. sixteen twenty five which would require assault weapons throughout the state to be registered or surrendered the bill also allows owners to render the firearm inoperable instead of surrender now this is the red hot issue we do have a second amendment a rally coming up this Saturday I thought that this would be the time for us to reach out to mark lamb sure of mark when he is innocent the ring of a good server circus the sheriff lamb recently you came out in opposition to red flag laws and a bill that would restrict gun ownership currently offered in the Arizona legislature could you please explain for us what the red flag logs are what the problem you have with that and what's wrong with this proposed bill it's simple James it's it's unconstitutional you know we have a second amendment that this is very plain and simple says shall not be infringed you know and I know a lot of these there are a lot of people that want to chip away at that may be one a back door the red flag laws are dangerous laws and their ways the back door and for those people don't understand red flag laws basically they're worried about the people with mental health issues and what they want to do it and create an Avenue to take those guns from those mental health people or did the problem with the red flag is is that it doesn't require a conviction of anything basically it's somebody saying Hey I think this guy might be have some mental health issues we should take his guns away it's like the minority report going after somebody before they actually commit the crime we have lost a sense of personal responsibility in this country and you can't legislate your way out of it red flag log the way an attempt to legislate their way out of a mental health issue and so the red flag log I'm not form I don't support at all they're very day interest and they they are a back door into doing away with the second amendment and then S. B. sixteen twenty five going after our rifles and I don't like the term assault rifles either rifles and they deem them as assault rifle consider the public they think it sounds worse these all our military style rifles they're very capable rifles and they're great rifles and right frankly rifles are not the issue if you want to go after something that hurts people why don't go up to do you I stuff or heroin or things like that because we lose far more people those are the issue that I deal with the my communities I know that's a long answer James but let it boil down to comes back to I love freedom I love the constitution and I love that the second amendment and people need to understand the second amendment is there to protect all of the other amendments or else the government's gonna run roughshod over us just what do you say to those people though who are saying you know would reason why we need to have a red flag law is because we need to try to stop a situation like that what happened at parkland high school we we had somebody with disturbed we at these guns in the wind and he killed his his his classmates a what about the people who everybody knows after the fact that you know this person is perfectly capable of doing it if you know that he has a weapon why wouldn't we want something in place so that the authorities could go in and get that weapon before he does something bad with it you know I think we're impugning guns on something like that when the issue is really mental health if if you have somebody that if we if she's dead set on hurting people she has access to a vehicle or at night we've seen it all throughout the world the gun is not what hurts people the people hurt people and we've got to stop in Cunene inanimate objects of for being the culprit in these mass shootings or in these mass killing when reality what we have the mental health issues we I'm very active on the on the national level as far as being part of the all share of groups that we need to gather we did we address mental health issues we need to start looking at ways that we treat mental health as opposed to going after guns is the way to treat mental health it's just I think when you really start to break it down the people they can understand that you have two issues you have a mental health issue it's not about the guns it's about it's about somebody wanting to hurt people or having mental health issues to where they feel like they want to hurt somebody and trust me if you take away guns they'll find another mechanism to hurt people god is not the answer in our founding fathers understood it and we there are people that are I have bad intentions towards the constitution and they want to chip away at it and they want to chip away at the second amendment and I was sure refused to allow that I for both of the constitution for the people in my county that would protect it and back for all do it is a drink at the conservatives are because we have banal county sheriff mark lamb and us sure if I was out in your neck of the woods last week in and that you are there it's my understanding that you just got back from Washington DC though and your meeting but others share of what is the hot topic among those shares I imagine is what we just discussed you know what their without one of one of the hot topics but obviously I think a lot of people have heard in the country we were able to listen to Attorney General Barr came in and spoke to us it was great you talked about the support that this our president president trump and this administration house for law enforcement and frankly for protecting our communities and America I've been around the president several times and his love for America and freedom and his desire to protect that is what you walk away with every time you're around and you know people dislike doll it and it's sad because the guy re really truly does love America what we heard was we have a an administration who understands the rule of law and they want to enforce that rule of law so they're coming after sanctuary cities as they should it is anytime you harbor summary somebody illegally you're committing a crime you're potentially committing a crime if I was looking for somebody and I had somebody harboring that fugitive they would likely get charged with harboring yet we've allowed cities and government officials to use it as a political tool and harbor people that are committing crimes or sheer you legally which is a crime and then we see in time after time where that person goes on to commit an act of violence against an American citizen I think we are discriminated against American citizens or communities are where they endorse or push for sanctuary cities it's discriminatory towards the American citizens and above and beyond that some of the other issues we are seeing in this I hope that your listeners listen to this I talked to several sheriffs and we sat in and we share from New York talked about issues I share for Virginia New Mexico all around this country we are seeing an attack on the sheriffs and their authority because they know that the share of the last line of defense for freedom and we protect our community from government over reach and this is happening folks it's happening all across this country and it's it's been a slow drip and if we're not careful it's gonna happen everywhere and so that's why I've been so strong against sanctuary cities supporting the constitution the second amendment because they're trying to or rolled at the things that protect our our citizens which are the sheriff local law enforcement now the county sheriff mark lamb and if you are not familiar with what he is talking about this is the perfect opportunity for you to do two things number one other freedom expo this is some of what is discussed especially in the Saturday symposium of the whole constitutional role for the share of is very very important and people if you know that you would understand what the share of mark Lamm is saying it would also kind of concern you because if our sheriffs are being targeted then you have to know that the people who are doing the targeting they understand the constitutional role of the sheriff as well so that to freedom expo is going to be on a March or March the sixth of March at seven go to K. F. Y. I. dot com to make sure you get your tickets this Saturday we are going to have the second I should say I'm going to be part of the second amendment to rally it is going to be on the capitol lawn downtown Phoenix said that some two number with Washington Street it's going to be going on from ten AM to two PM and I'm telling you with the news out there right now about S. B. sixteen twenty five and these red flag laws our second amendment rights are being in in French they're being pressured and you know and I don't give a hot darn if you're a Democrat or if you're a Republican if you're chipping away at our constitutional rights you're going to get called out as you need to be going to second amendment a rally AZ dot com if you are interested in checking this out if you need some more information and get all the details and sign up but the second amendment rally this is the the website again is second amendment rally AZ dot com I am one of the speakers is going to be there this Saturday because I'm telling you as sheriff lamb said our second amendment right I think is the most important one because are you between the first and second with the second one goes they all go well do you results are come again for the New Hampshire primary and guess what guess what another one has bit the dust tell you at six twenty twelve minutes after the hour let's check traffic will leave power Hey James G. eastbound sixty still a lot of cars priest over to Country Club Dr very slow also the one a one southbound moving slow chaparral over to Broadway Travis still kind of busy on the one on one heading home west found your back in Scott's still hate road you're heading towards a Phoenix your song is from hate over to cave creek road we got a wreck on the tenets east bound university Dr that's off to the right that's a crash involving a big rig so our big rig wrecked there near university of fifty one north bound traffic still very busy Thomas all the way down the highland nineteen panel westbound nineteenth Avenue that's where your traffic starts get bunch did continues out eighty Third Avenue and slowing also on the seventeen heading north nineteenth Avenue all the way out the Glendale or traffic coming.

mark Lamm senator assault Arizona
"lamm" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Lamm to the program hi Robert great really great you guys really love Christmas this is you've three other Christmas albums so what what makes this one different really the most different thing is how many original songs there are as it turns out in addition to how Chicago has sort of more into you know really kind of a more moderate bent over the last few years especially with also absorbed a few guys who are very good song writers in addition to being great musicians so when we got this project to do from rhino records so I don't think they were expecting so many a new song but as it turned out they like the songs quite a bit it's amazing you still have so much to say you know you would think at some point you would go you know what I've said everything I have to say but the fact that you still have more in you what is it that you tap into that every time you write a song you're like I'm I'm there again well for me I can't speak to the other guys with me every time I write a new piece of music it I learn something from it you know another attack I'm always entering into sort of do area and I never know what's going to happen and I think that's that's what keeps it exciting that's what keeps music interesting you know venturing into the unknown to some degree you guys are so busy meet you record while you toward don't you would do to tour than stopping record how you do it actually we do it while we're touring we we have figured out a way and the last name our a trumpet player and really kind of the list at least for this current album he's he acted as producer but between him and some conversations we had with our order your friend Phil Ramone we put together recording digital recording studio that can travel with us so so essentially we pull into a city we also have what we need lot of times we'll just set up for a sound check at the venue and go for a ground track it to get a great contract and we should start building and and we do all our of overdose actually I do on the bus with the equipment plugged in we drank some of the equipment into her one of the one of the you know the meeting rooms or someone sweet somewhere in hotel for a day or two and do do is watch what we can do and just take keep keep building and along the way speaking with Robert land he is from the legendary rock band Chicago I'm you include your take on what the world needs now by Burt Bacharach and hal David very famous what is that song so timeless what is it about that song that really spoke to the thought yep this is it this is gone on the record what kind of a long story I'll keep it short hi I recently read purchase a memoir and and in doing so I I've been a long time perfect expand as a composer so I realized at that point that number one there was a lot of what he's been doing his entire career that I related to as a composer number two lyrics to what the world needs now is love or so pertinent to not sure when that was written which I'm sure was probably during the whole Vietnam War stuff was going on I just see that they have to be Rick's speak to what's going on in the world this very moment and in particular during the holiday season we really just want people to reach out and and and the child to help people the band has been through a number of changes since the untimely passing of Terry castle tell us about your current line up Robert which can be heard on this new album well it is this line up is amazing I would say that if it's actually my favorite line of accepting of course with the original line of Chicago but what's going on with this one is that we we switch to a couple of guys around who played in the band for quite a long time of course you can go be locked into myself as the founding members in a key hello who's been our guitarist for thirty years now but last couple of years we added a very good bass player who happens to be a good singer happens to be a wonderful musician and composer and more importantly we found this incredible a lead singer who happens to be from Canada Neil to now and he has breathe new life into the great Chicago ballots in in live performance and as it turns out he's also a great composer so we've for the last couple of business line at prison traveling and performing and and all I can tell you is that Chicago it feels like it feels like a big band will be playing but it feels like a band that that has the respect of not only appears in our original audiences but we seem to be bringing in fresh ideas as well and that's amazing considering that this is your fifty third consecutive year of touring in twenty twenty coming up that's incredible Cooper I was speaking with Robert land the latest album Chicago Christmas is available right now so Billboard recently released their top list of pop artists of all time and you guys came in at number ten overall but you were the top American band on the list is this so get you excited you just like you know what I'm happy to be making music or to making these lists have some do you think to yourself well we've really accomplished something will all of those things but more I think the biggest feeling is one of surprise you know what our plan was to just keep playing your plan was to just you know be Chicago you know continue to develop as musicians you know write our music you know the with the audience you know the we have the audiences all over the world in the we try to we try to diss them all occasionally and that was really that was really our goal but to be in the company of those other great artists and when it was number ten and number nine or number twenty doesn't doesn't matter a whole lot but it's very surprising to be number ten joining us is rock and roll hall of Famer Robert Lamm of course a founding member of the rock band Chicago I don't notice a Brooklyn accent but when you were growing up in Brooklyn did you ever think the songs that you would some day right would have such staying power in a being used in movies and TV shows like dad pull in South Park even sex in the city well you know when I was growing up in Brooklyn I was and by the way my of my ancestors are from upstate New York so I don't have the booklet I don't have the good pets well hello my my father to expect but at any rate I think that we starting out I was really just a learning to love rock and and always be there was the music that I grew up with and it really wasn't until I was in Chicago when I was studying music and beginning to play in little rock bands that I thought well maybe maybe I I could also write songs besides play them so as it turns out I'm really bored of a composer than I am a player hello I'm happy to clean this band when let them with the Brooklyn theme because I think it's so I grew up in Brooklyn also I'm originally from I was born in Coney Island I grew up in C. gate so to to go back to Brooklyn and see what it's become I'm still every time I go to anywhere like Williamsburg in those places I'm like what happened here it's amazing well you know I I agree with you some of it is surprisingly different on some of it hasn't changed at all the neighborhood why probably spend the most time was so the region is certainly parts of bay ridge changed forever with the building of the Verrazano bridge but where I went to school you know our I went to Berkeley tank and excuse me that's all the fans is Nancy boys went right the subway to go to school that's right yeah no Brooklyn as many space of many things and will change over the course of decades so but is still broken it still feels that way still feels like one of my favorite movies and apparently not a lot of people I I think it should be a classic but it was only released on HBO and it was buy another booking guy Larry David and Chicago is kind of a central part of this whole movie and there's one line in the movie I don't think I could say on the air but it's out of one woman's history with the band over the years I think you know what I'm talking about Robert yes I do so how did that come about where you Larry David is doing a movie with you yeah Larry that was clear history by the ones in the movie yes well we'll Chicago was on the road Larry is good friends with begins house who has had a hand Chicago's grandest here very cold our real manager Peter should really who asked us how do we feel about working in a kind of a kind of an improvised comedic film Larry and we just thought you know we're out on the road anyway we have a couple days off let's just see how it goes and I have to say it was just hilarious I can't think of the actor's name who played the the Russian the Russian the holy leave Shriver yeah yeah yeah yeah so yeah so everybody everybody was very talented you could tell that it was a lot of affection between the actors and Larry and just being with Larry you have Larry look at you and and you know us with your mind that you could we could react to work just repeat or just make up your own line I was just one we found out that we are done after I thought your great a very authentic so now that you have a Christmas album coming out actually fourth Christmas album so do you have to do you tour right after the album do you tour anyway I mean a lot of acts don't tour for as long as you've been like what's kept you returning to the road for so many years something I initially little while ago is that you know we have a very fiercely loyal fans on various various stages and wherever we go well they will come to our country and sometimes during the summer and prettier during the colder months sometimes will go up to Canada and go across Canada or will go to Japan or will Corey Europe so too large utility insists that keep coming back and just want to hear this music and you know we certainly have enough of it and moved it to to to alter the repertoire from time to time and keep things interesting and surprising Robert land thank you so much for talking to us Chicago Christmas albums available right now thank you so much Robert Robert could speak with you we'll be back with more of W. O. R. tonight right after this let.

Lamm Robert Chicago
"lamm" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on KTOK

"Is Robert Lamm and I'm Joe McCormick and today we've got a very special episode three all out there we are doing a partnership with National Geographic yeah so they've got a new show coming out called one strange rock and it is produced by Darren Aronofsky it's all about the science of planet earth in the sort of intricate interconnected processes both geological and biological the keep the earth stable as a sanctuary for life as we know it and so because of our partnership with National Geographic for this episode we got an opportunity to talk to one of the astronauts on the show doctor Jeff Hoffman who flew five space shuttle missions including a Hubble Space Telescope repair mission this is a great interview we're just delighted to share it with everybody yeah doctor Hoffman is very knowledgeable from multiple vantage points about the thing that we're gonna be focusing on today which is the radiation risk from space and how earth protects us and he's knowledgeable in a couple of different domains because he's done high energy astrophysics and now knows all about the radiation environment of our solar system in the universe at large but he also has a direct experience of what it's like to be an astronaut in space to sort of go beyond our protective barriers and that kind of perspective is kind of hard to come by because I would say one thing it's really easy to lose sight of in your day to day life when you're reading about politics or playing with your dog or making some dinner is that your body is made of molecules and in order for molecules in your body to do what they do they have to remain what they are in most of the time the internal chemistry of our bodies is pretty stable right but we have to recognize that the chemical stability of our bodies is an enormous and unique privilege provided to us by virtue of the fact that we live on planet earth yeah and this we get into a truth that we touch on a quite a bit on the show and that is that earth is just the right planet yeah for life as we know it kind of and surprising of course being creatures that involved on planet earth that planet earth is just the right plan it for us but despite realizing the kind of anthropic obviousness of that fact it is still a kind of strange and comforting feeling what wait a minute is a comforting or is it discomforting the fact that most of the universe is going to be so hostile to us so unbelievably hostile so incredibly violent that it's just impossible to even consider and I'm not even talking about the vaporizing heat of stars of the Cold airless void of deep space I'm talking about the fact that the universe is an acid bath of killer radiation including ionizing radiation which often takes the form of these high energy charged particles the blast through animal bodies damaging in changing the molecules within them as they go along and even changing the DNA of ourselves altering the blueprints for cell replication and bringing about tissue damage sterility in cancer and so that body integrity in chemical stability we so take for granted to keep living is only possible because of the planet we inhabit which shields us from being blasted by the sun nearby and by the galaxy at large yeah it's it's interesting to think about this that we we are creatures of the shallows yeah so life as we know it essentially thrives in a tide pool protected from the full onslaught of winded way from you know if you've ever been to a to to a number of beach environments you seen those areas right where we were that the waves are crashing but there have been but there's this pool this this area of calm water that is protected from all of that yeah and that's where a lot of life can thrive that otherwise would not be a be able to bear the hostilities beyond the rocks exactly and it actually reminds me of this a quote by John Steinbeck and and he's not directly talking about we're talking about here but the the comparison is is just beautiful he he wrote the knowledge that all things are one thing and one thing is all things plankton a shimmering phosphorescence on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe all bound together by the elastic string of time it is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again yeah earth is protected not from wind in ways but from the full blast of solar in cosmic radiation instead of rocky sea walls were protected by a robust atmosphere and most importantly the magnetic sphere yeah the interesting other side to the fact of the we've got this kind of connected consciousness that we're aware of like there is no real division between the earth and the heavens they're just different places the only real division this distance and so all the universe really is connected and does have a common origin in the Big Bang but at the same time that connectedness we use the word connected in such a happy way it's like nice to be connected to things but you could also think about that is extreme vulnerability like you are right next door to everything in the universe that would cross shin annihilate you and what we've got standing in the way of those those crushing annihilating forces beyond our power to control is essentially a big magnetic field and a thin layer of gas around the rocky surface of the planet that's right so basically we have going on here is your earth solid inner core in liquid outer core they play a crucial role in protecting life as we know it from the least deadly radiation differences in temperature and composition in the two core regions drive a powerful Dynamo in needing earth project protective electromagnetic field yeah and remember this is the one of the the the key factors we have to consider in proposed interplanetary space travel and establishing stations on other worlds the only planets in our solar system with some form of magnetic sphere in place or mercury earth Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune right so then of course you've also on the surface of the earth got the atmosphere to count on because that means that there's more stuff the radiation has to get through to get to you and so the atmosphere will block some kinds of incoming radiation but the other big protector is the magnetosphere that keeps these particles directed away from the earth some of course still get through right and also the man is fear serves to protect the atmosphere as well yes because if you don't have a magnet as fear your atmosphere over time can be stripped away which is one of the things that they can probably happen to Mars long ago right so it's a protective barrier against the elements are battlements and the only humans who have walked to these battlements our astronauts such as doctor Jeff Hoffman now most astronauts never even go beyond that the shield that protects us right we know that astronauts in space are exposed to extra locals of radiation and that's one reason you want to limit your time in space you like you can go live in the I SS for ever they want to bring you back eventually because the more time you spend up there the more you're exposed to this dangerous radiation that could harm you in the long run but even up in the I SS you're still you're still benefiting from a large part of the earth's protective shield right yes it gets a lot worse if you want to go to the moon right on Mars or colonize another planet yeah because then you are going beyond or as protection so I guess we want to go now to our conversation with doctor Jeff Hoffman to talk about the radiation risks posed by the universe and what astronauts have done and can do to protect themselves but first I guess we should give you just a little bit of background on doctor Hoffman yeah so his original research interest were in high energy astrophysics specifically cosmic gamma radiation and X. ray astronomy in his doctoral work at Harvard entail balloon borne low energy gamma ray telescopes and design and and the testing of this technology from nineteen seventy two to nineteen seventy five during post doctoral work at Leicester university who worked on several X. ray astronomy rocket payloads any works in the center for space research at the Massachusetts institute of technology from nineteen seventy five to nineteen seventy eight as project scientist in charge of the orbiting H. E. A. O. one eighty four hard X. ray and gamma ray experiment which launched in August nineteen seventy seven but in in seventy eight he was selected to become an astronaut and he went on a total of five different shuttle flights so in eighty five he went up on on it and discovery nineteen ninety on Columbia ninety two on Atlantis ninety three on endeavor and then in nineteen ninety six on Columbia all told one thousand two hundred eleven hours in space twenty one point five million miles that's a lot of miles yeah frequent flyer yeah so he he he is a not only pedigreed scientist a pedigreed astronaut five shuttle flights that's impressive that's five more the vast majority of human beings all right we're gonna take a quick break and when we come back we will be heading straight into our interview with Dr Jeff Hoffman right now when you come in and switch to T. mobile you get the amazing iPhone eleven pro on us iPhone tennis traded aren't these mountains majestic joke are you even looking I'm posting these amazing pics I took with my iPhone Levin pro it has three cameras whoa those picks are amazing and you have service to T. mobile their new single goes farther than ever before then you can look.

Robert Lamm Joe McCormick one thousand two hundred eleve
"lamm" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

Inappropriate Earl

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

"Raker attacked by the dogs, which was no, no, I could see you as the main doctor lowest child's, I believe she was in American actress, you know, they usually like to go for the international flair exotic enough in the beyond with you. I know you're from Decatur Alabama. I'm not sure if in the past present or future, JAMES BOND would have any reason to visit the state of Alabama situation like Lamm Nason movie. And I am overseas. My down there can overseas. I mean anything's possible. Alba is the new JAMES BOND. I mean, if you were to tell me that someday in the future, there would be a black JAMES BOND. It'd be like a you're crazy, but now because times of change and certainly actors of color are getting more prominent roles plaque James Bond's completely possible. Jay, I wanted to be the next Pretty Woman. Well, yeah. But I could see that. I mean, you know, the hillbilly. You know, country bumpkin from Alabama who you know, I could see that. I JAMES BOND. I would have trouble casting UN. But I would cast you in. Out in the universe. Like, I could see you in a superhero movie where you're like the the damsel in distress the bad guy. There aren't many bad. Female bad guys that makes any sense, which I always love like it goes back to I like different cat woman ninety but it's not like I like different. I like female bad guy. You know, I like a JAMES BOND would I think would be interesting. I mean, I don't know if he would order MARTINI. Shaken not stored probably just. Yeah. Gimme a Colt forty five in a can how. But I like like you talk about we were watching Anthony jazz. Special in you, write very similar style jokes bait and switch like I like. Robocop is a great. Kind of goes back to casting where the two main bag guys Ronny Cox and Kirkwood Smith had never played bad guys before and they both lobby lettuce read from these parts. And I think the directors and casting people you guys are like fathers from the seventy like movies and sixties where your guys and farmers. No one's gonna believe you guys. And if you look at the two main bag is from RoboCop, they are I con ick like killed it because it was so different. And I think they both even as veterans, you know, Kurt what SMID later became the dad and that seventies. So you wouldn't picture the dad from that? Seventies has a great villain. But oh, he was amazing in RoboCop and even the bad guy, Alan Rickman, and the diehard was it classically trained actor. Yes. He was Hans van Gruber. He was never a bad guy that even like we recently watched the Ted Bundy movie, which is a great example, Zac Efron who was Disney actor who's now playing a serial killer one of the most famous serial killers of all time. But it does like there's a line. And and it's true because they really said it in the Ted Bundy case, they were like, you know, serial killers aren't monsters that come out and the night, time and half Fengs and scary beards. They can be regular people. You know? And I think that that's with casting. I think. For an actor. It all comes from. What's inside of you, like what comes out of your mouth, and how your brain can portray the character versus what you look like sometimes because I think you can alter how people see.

JAMES BOND Alabama Seventies Ted Bundy Decatur Lamm Nason Hans van Gruber Ronny Cox Alan Rickman Jay Kurt Anthony jazz Alba Zac Efron Kirkwood Smith Disney
"lamm" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"You know, I just found in my personal experiment, thus far that state is much more. A rewarding than than ground beef. And so I figured that out pretty quickly like Lamm sometimes I had to lamb chops the other day. I don't want people just sitting. I'm just eating grasp than me. Yeah. I have found that the the sake me is somehow awarded, you know, like gray murderers. Have you found that too? Yeah. I I agree. A hundred percent. I mean, there's there's I mean dif- different people have different tastes for different things. But I think the you can't really compete with a rib eye well cooked rib eye. I mean. Holy. It's so good. So good. Yeah. And I'm you know, L waiting for Joe role. The call me up on his cast. I'll I'll get on L all job. This is the minor leagues to the job. So he'll be calling you pretty soon. I think Joe watching smelt, but he he might be because he we got him on the carnivore diet. So me, and my brother got him on the carnivore diet, something I was going to ask. Is. So so is there anything that we can do? And maybe it's not something that you do. But is there anything that people can do that just enjoy to have something a little different because most of the foods that were talking about they are savory? They are filling. You know? It's it's wonderful to have some eggs and some butter or some meat and some tallow like, it's it's ridiculous. How good it is. I mean, there's not really many things that are better than this. But are we able to mix in something sweet somehow able to get a different flavor because most of the things we're talking about are kind of a call him buttery their buttery. They're salty. He can we can we mix something else up. You know, get something a little different on the palate. Maybe in the way of like a protein, shake or or what are some of your suggestions? So, you know, it's interesting sin. I've seen this. You probably know about I've seen this monk for extract a lot in a lot of supplements. Now, I have to look more likely come how nearly makes it sweet one thing. I will mention to people is that glycemic is a sweet amino acid lysine tastes like sugar. So if people want sweet in their tea or.

Lamm Joe hundred percent
Race too close to call heading into Wednesday in Pennsylvania special election tonight — live results and updates

The Bryan Crabtree Show

02:36 min | 3 years ago

Race too close to call heading into Wednesday in Pennsylvania special election tonight — live results and updates

"What you look at the iran deal high tickets terrible i guess he was okay i wanted to eat a great kid or do something and he felt a little bit differently let's go over to kevin cirilli in canons berg pennsylvania where the administration faces a special election that is being viewed as a bellwether for trump's prospects in the midterms kevin what's the latest there the results are too close to call here the pennsylvania's eighteenth congressional election a special election mullah's democrat challenger connor lambeau into this race until every vote is counted now they're counting absentee ballots and it's unknown whether or not going to get a vote results tonight looking very unlikely we heard from the counter lamm's campaign right behind me stick around they wanted to see what was going to happen to watch this play out vick owns saying publicly that he wanted to stay in this political observers in washington or suggesting that this could be a bellwether for the midterm race this was a district that candidate donald trump carried by more than twenty percentage points so the fact that it's this close democrats very confident they're hoping that will be sort of a way terms yeah we'll be eagerly awaiting those results kevin in the meantime though let's talk about tillerson's dismissal what's the difference between tillerson and his replacement when it comes to us foreign policy and what do we expect to actually change here i apologize attorney loud in here inside of the connor election night party specifically surprise in terms of the timing of secretary tillerson's announcement but president trump and secretary tillerson for quite some time the source close to director peyot pointed out those secretary tillerson difference experiencing secretary tillerson report is brought with him a level of experience in the private sector as a former congressman on the house intelligence committee as well as someone very closely aligns with the cia with the intelligence community is bringing down perspective to the same around the world now should know that secretary tillerson ever touch criticism for not doing all diplomatic posts around the world and the democratic party is ball's in the.

Peyot Director Secretary Donald Trump Canons Berg Pennsylvania Kevin Cirilli Iran Democratic Party CIA Congressman President Trump Attorney Tillerson Washington Vick Lamm