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Your Pelvic Floor "Power Source": The Hidden Key to Ignite Your Core, Empower Your Body, Release Stress, and Realign Your Life.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

Your Pelvic Floor "Power Source": The Hidden Key to Ignite Your Core, Empower Your Body, Release Stress, and Realign Your Life.

"On this episode of the Ben. Greenfield for this podcast. The key is to really become more in tune with what our bodies are telling us. I always think of pain is like a way to reframe. It's communication it's body asking for awareness attention and communication. How are we to have really powerful strength from the inside out unless we can learn how to let go and then we can contract and so much more powerful strength comes? They cannot even squeeze their pelvic floor. They can't really even feel they're so us. It's incredible how disconnected people are help performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more my name is Ben Greenfield. Welcome to the show. Well Howdy Howdy Ho. I had the immense pleasure today to be able to interview a woman. Shocker I know like ninety percent of my guests on the show seemed to be dude. I don't know why that is Tom. Purpose it just seems like a lot of the guys I interview are dudes. It's kind of sausage fest around here But not today my guest today is Lauren Roxborough and she roxburgh Roxburgh. I don't know but anyways we talked about this new book that she wrote called the power source. And if you have issues with pelvic floor alignment Maybe constipation or prolapse or bowel issues. Or so ask tightness or abdominal activation. Or you feel like your key. Goals could use a little upgrade. The shows for you. You're dig it Speaking of constipation drink some coffee. Those keep your colon and your bowel squeaky clean those cups of coffee. Specially if you use them enema style All joking aside Coffee is great. I put it in both ends quite frequently. However I am extremely picky on the taste of my coffee and also whether it's USDA organic whether it's free of Mold micro-toxins Yeast and pesticides whether is absolutely delicious. Or not. And I probably drink. If you count the fact that I'm drinking out of a big old twenty ounce coffee Mug I probably have the actual equivalent of two four cups of coffee a day and most of that is in the morning but I do not drink cheap. Toxic Brown sludge. I drink the Creme de la Creme of coffee organic specialty grade free of toxins and really damn delicious. The smoothest and richest coffee. You're ever going to get your hands on so my team at kion and I and we're all die. Hard copy levers over there everybody's trying stuff out re drink. Certified Organic Specialty Grade Coffee that we make specifically for kion and we have available for all of you to the Kion Coffee Kion Coffee. I promise you will not be disappointed in this stuff. Not only that but I'm to give you a twenty percent discount on it. So here's how you get this coffee. You go to get kion. Dot Com get K. I. O. N. DOT COM and use Code B G F. Two Zero is going to save twenty percent so called. Bg F two zero at GET KION DOT com. It's not the darned finest coffee you've ever had in your life. Send it back. We'll give you a refund. Everything everything at Kion guaranteed so check that out in addition to that something else that makes your morning much. Healthier is Greens alkaline and my friends at our gamified. Green juice have cracked the code on. Not only how to make an amazing green juice formula with Ashwell. Gonda Marinda Collella Macho Green. Tea tumorous SPIRA. Lena meant a whole lot. More in this healthy superfood blend. But the fact is that normally you'd pay top dollar for the stuff at juicery we're talking like twelve north of fifteen dollars for just slightly over a dollar and fifty cents a serving. You can have the same thing in your own home. None of the shopping driving chopping juicing blending and this stuff is amazing for your immune system as well so I actually just had some in my smoothie this morning ice little bone brothels Stevia through a little bit coconut milk in there Some Baru nuts. It was absolutely mind blowing. Amazing organic is giving you twenty percent off you. Just go to organic with an eye or gamified dot com slash Ben Organic Dot com slash Ben. You don't need a code organic with an iron gamified dot com slash Ben Delegate twenty percent off so now that you're stocked up on your coffee on your green juice. Let's go talk to Lauren. R I folks. I recently read a book that I thought was really good in that delves into something. I haven't had a chance to explore in quite some time on the podcasts. It was probably way back when I interviewed bio mechanistic. Katie Bowman up in Seattle about The bio mechanics of not just The entire body but specifically to pelvic floor and kind of take qigong exercises. And you know we had a great discussion but really didn't get into a thorough treaties of the pelvic floor and The fact that that is such an issue for so many people still root of so many people's issues. Obviously when you look at functional medicine the gut is the root of all issues when you look at holistic dentistry. They'll say the mouth as the root of all issues but a lot of a lot of bio meccas and Myself included Think that the pelvic floor is at least pretty damn high up on the totem pole as far as something that you should be addressing and taking care of but it's like mysterious area that massage therapist don't like to touch or go near and that we often see anatomical posters of on the wall while we scratch our heads and try to figure out which ligament is connecting to which pelvic bone and so what. I decided to do was get the author of this brand new book on my show so the book is called the power source in the power sources. Of course your pelvic floor the power source the hidden key to ignite your core empower your body release stress in relying your life now before we jump in I I WanNa let you guys know. I've mentioned this briefly in the past on podcast but I raced ironman triathlon. For like ten years I did a ton of chronic repetitive endurance activities. Without addressing my pelvic floor my deep core attention to the tightness of my elise muscles etc and as a result of that I had to deal with over the past four years or so everything from extreme so as tightness in the need to learn how to release all of that and a bunch of hip flexor and glue issues related to that I have had to deal with prolapse issues. I've had to deal with chest breathing issues a host of problems that I probably would never had countered and I not Or had I read this book at some point a lot earlier in my life? So the author is Lauren. Roxburgh Roxborough Roxburgh. Lorne is actually. It's a Scottish name. It's rocks bre like Edinburgh my husband's qe Scottish box. But that's right amazing art cool. I'll quit talking like fat bastard and get back to The intro so so the book it's in the Pelvic floor the deep core the upper core and even some things you might not think are related to that like the heart. The shoulders the head the neck the jaw and so Mrs Roxburgh is going to basically walk us through that. And even how things like nutrition in vitamins and minerals. And even your mind. Your mantra is your visualizations result. Or or if I can talk today corresponds to the pelvic floor. I didn't have my coffee this morning. I corresponds decent. That's multicellular Alec. I I four went my morning cup of coffee in had Cook County which I like And I mix it with Chagas. So it's an amazing immune system tonic and you get kind of this. Dopaminergic release Use this stuff called Mike. Akao they're like rock cow. Nibs shells that you steeped in hot water and I put you know. Put like Ginger and Cayenne cinnamon and sea salt in there. And then I pour that over the The forcing matic Chagas is almost like immune and dopamine tonic. But it still doesn't spend the dials in your head like a nice coffee so so I'm stupid this morning but we're GonNa do this anyways. I'm stupid but I've got lots of good dopamine and my system in my my immune system boosted so the pelvic floor Lauren You know I it's important but in this is obviously going to be a question that will rabbit hole a little bit? In terms of its importance I would say likely describe for people who might not understand. What exactly the pelvic floor is and then why it has such an impact on the rest of our body because you get into like how it impacts everything from a flat tummy digestion. Which is kind of intuitive. But then you also talk about things like jaw and head tightness skin beauty etc. So can you can you? Can you do an explanation for us? Yeah I mean I think really what it comes down to for me. There's not really been a great sort of you know certification or schooling around this so I sort of had to figure it out on my own spending twenty years being a pilates instructor and then a body worker and working with some of the top athletes on the planet and realizing that. Wow this is such an area. That's barely talked about or even touch like you mentioned so I guess for me I started. I started actually doing the hands on body work and going into that area and realizing how connected it was to every other area in our body. So for me the pelvic floor basically what it is. It's a Hammock of muscles right connects. Our pubic bone are tailbone in our sits phone. So I like to call it the PELVIC CORE. It's the base of the core the core. Whatever you WANNA call it. Essentially it's an area that becomes very locked down and tight and clutched because of too much like sub-conscious stress stress energy that gets blocked in our base which you know many people in the holistic world or in the spiritual world would call at the root shock. Okay so that's that's the route that's what is the fourth chucker. The root shocker. Actually it's the first one at the base. It's the one we WANNA address. I mean depends on who you talk to because some people say we have shockers in our feet so I'm like or in our hands but in the traditional like shawcross system. That's out there right now that you can read about the the route. Chaka's the first one. It's the one that we wanna address from the beginning because it really does affect all the other ones. It's the foundation so if it's not you know having good clean energy and having the ability to contract and expand and create space and he'll than it will lock down and becomes scarred up and then that energy will just get stuck in the tissues and it also will block the Chee. It will block the ability to you. Know cleanse the system in a healthy way as well so it's both digestive function from like a Almost like a rectal Kalanick's standpoint but then it's also sexual function in terms of like prostate orgasm libido erections blood flow etc. So it's it's kind of two different energy systems. That would be affected. If your pelvic floor is kind of either out of alignment or not care for one hundred percent and also it can even affect our guts right our ability to digest food and even absorb nutrients because when it's stuck in clutch. It will then compress the organs as well and it's directly connected to the diaphragm muscle. Which is you know that dome-shaped muscle that separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity. And when those two are pulling together because of you know a contracted energy or collapsed energy in stuck energy than the organs are getting smushed as well. So then your body isn't going to be able to squeeze everything out of the food that we eat and even the emotional energy that we're trying to move through our guts to feel our gut instincts. And so when the pelvic floor is tight it pulls the diaphragm down and you know this can go both ways. It essentially goes up into tightness in the shoulders in the tightness in the jaw. And there's a factual line mean you guys know. Fascism fascist connective tissue. That WRAPS AROUND OUR ENTIRE BODY. Like a full body wetsuit. It's Kinda like Saran wrap But it's also this matrix this kind of living tapestry that sends energy through us the nerves. Line the FASCIA. So to the lymph nodes and sodas the CI the lifeforce so when the fascist is compressed and these areas it becomes thick and dense It loses blood flow circulation. Obviously lifeforce in Chee and then it creates that collapsing contracted energy. And so that's why. The JAW is directly connected of Dennis Wacho Their TM J. patients to pelvic floor therapists when they are realizing like it's actually coming from a totally different place in the body. So but those those structures within the body the pelvic floor the diaphragm the the shoulders and the jaw and the cranium are directly connected and create such an impact on your overall health and vitality and also just energy okay so so one one thing. I wanted to touch on that I thought was fascinating. Was I recently interviewed? David Rabin Who doesn't work with the maps foundation and we talked about genetic trauma. And you actually touch on this in your book. You actually cite a study at McGill University or they showed that the children of women who are pregnant during a massive ice storm in Quebec showed some pretty distinctive DNA patterns based on their mother's exposure to stress. He talked about like the Dutch winter hunger. And then now we're seeing especially with the emergence of plant medicine being used for for for trauma released particularly Genetic trauma that people are almost like reliving and releasing traumatic experiences that they may not have had but that their mothers or fathers or their ancestors may have had. Now that actually is directly related to the pelvic floor in this weird way. Can you explain? Well Yeah because whenever? We have trauma whether it's trauma lives in our tissues so if we have trauma that stored in our bodies or our minds than we have the ability to change it with our awareness so I think that's what this is all about. I mean epigenetics is the way of becoming empowered to know that we are not a victim of our genetics but that they do influence us and make us more predisposed for certain issues ailments tensions or even diseases so I believe that whole EPI genetic philosophy won't actually know the philosophy is the science is is going to have a huge impact on the evolution of humanity right now and how we can actually become less of a victim of our circumstances and environments and actually become more empowered to without awareness in consciousness to shift. It okay so so. We're all adults here. So let me be more specific. Let's say like your. Let's say your grandmother was raped or had some kind of trauma. Or perhaps your mother could you? Then say that. Let's say like a male has prostate issues or constipation or prolapse or a hip tightness or pelvic floor issues. That they can't seem to figure out. Could that theoretically an and let me know if any research has been done on this to be related to EPA GENETIC TRAUMA? I mean Gosh. Of course it could and I think that it's good to look at those possibilities and but also it's it's sometimes it can be a little bit. What's the word like to go down the rabbit hole too far? You know what I mean like. I think the key is to really become more in tune with what our bodies are telling us to like. There is an issue like that means that something is asking for attention and pain to me. I always think of pain as like a way to reframe. It's communication. It's our body asking for awareness attention communication but I mean as far as if if we can say that something that happened to one of our you know like you said grandmother grandfather that kind of trauma that happened that could definitely be living in ourselves in our DNA. But I don't think I I don't WanNa be saying that we are going to be a victim to that. Do you know what I'm saying? So I think it's important to honor it and know that stress is GonNa make make us more susceptible it's GonNa make us more inflamed. It's GONNA lower our immune system all those things but I think it's more important to even focus on the fact that yes we we have a certain DNA in certain genetics. But we are not those genetics necessarily and those things only turn on when you know that immune system lowers vibration lower. So I think that's where this whole thing with the pelvic floor for me and all the power centers really is about awakening this deep awareness in consciousness inside the body understanding your nervous system understanding how your physiology works and learning how to position a new mindset around. What are our body's telling us like getting into the sensation again feeling again. Having pleasure like we are meant to have be sensory systems in the sensory experiences not beautiful partner healing part of life. Okay yeah that makes sense and I plan on going there too deeply because you and I are kind of more bio mechanistic. We are Yogi Shaman. You Know Plant Medicine Plant Medicine. What what do you call them? People who who sit in on on medicine sessions not therapists. Where we're not psychiatrists psychologists but anyways Facilitators we're not facilitators. At least you are but anyways Yeah yet another grasping for words so that being said I would love to get back into some of the bio mechanics of the nerve function issues and some of these five power centers that you talk about but before we do you you were starting to go down the route of this tightness in the pelvic floor almost like clutching of the pelvic floor very similar to how we might clutch or Titan Jar our jaws subconsciously throughout the day. Yes now you talk in the book about the state of hyper tenacity and some of the issues that creates. Can you describe a little bit kind of what happens when we when we clutch? Tighten that pelvic floor. Yeah so what happens is you know. I mean the kind of what the common theme is these days is. Everyone's talking about you know. We'RE LIVING IN FIGHTER FLIGHT. We're living in the doing you know the Yang the pushing through making it happen control kind of energy. That's the masculine. And that were most of us are living in in sort of probably in too much right into extreme and so what's happened is our bodies have really just everything has tightened up so we haven't had the ability where sitting too much. We're not getting up to do. Our movement medicine were not freeing up emotional energy and so our systems are locking down. And they're creating this compression in this clutching and then you know like I was saying earlier. The breathing is so important for pelvic floor to and so people are not breathing. Deep like they should They're not moving their bodies. And all the different ranges of motion twisting birding. You know all of those different things side. Bending that's supposed to help the body unwind and rebalance on a daily basis. And so what happens? Is this stuck. Energy starts happening in our pelvic floor especially because we're sitting on our ass all day so all that energy is sort of pooling down there and then we're also just pretending like that part of our body doesn't exist no one talks about pooping or sex very much unless it's porn so it's this very extreme sort of it's either all or nothing and so there is no in between and I think what our world is calling for an asking for is more of that Yin Energy more dot com you the Feminine Energy and all of us is rising or we want it to be because that is the balance right we want to have the the Yang. They want to have both doing in the bean. And we WANNA be able to be in more flow instead of so much force and pushing through. And so. That's where the pelvic floor is the physical connection to that energy to awakening not energy. And knowing because you can I mean you know people have been talking about cables forever. Cables is only the Swedes Right. It's only the control. It's only clutching and bearing down and what's missing and not in a man. Did you know described that? And of course men do pelvic floors actually i. I get asked that a lot of men have Appel. The I'm like I know you and you're on your pelvis and I'm like yes But Anyway so. Essentially the idea of learning how to expand the pelvic floor create the space will actually create. When you do that. You're east-central Anthony Right. So then we have more ability to have more strength when we can. You know east-central Along and then concentrically contract. You're going to be able to always use the BICEP as the example. Like if you're gonNA fully contract and how the most strength even get out of your bicep curl then you need to fully extend and expand and links in to get the full strength. So that's my whole message is like how are we going to have real strength like really powerful strength from the inside out unless we can learn how to let go fully surrender expand and Elongate an open and then we can contract and so much more powerful strength comes if that makes sense it? Kinda reminds me of what What Paul Czecho- another podcast gas to have had on talks about specifically with men? He talked me about this issue. 'cause he kind of biomechanical mechanical analysis on me This is probably stemming from both my bodybuilding days as well as my parents telling me to kind of like suck your stomach in tighten your APP stand up tall stand up straight and I think men and women of course will develop this issue as well sometimes depending how they were raised what they were taught but men can be very conscious about just kind of letting their tummy hang out and releasing some that pelvic tightness intention that might somehow detract from their six pack or the other v-shape in their waste. And you know for me for the longest time that created an issue like I mention you know I went through some pretty serious by mechanical issues related to my pelvis my so ass and a big light bulb moment for me occurred when I was taught how to inhale diaphragm adequately and at the same time. Relaxed the entire pelvic floor which is of course what you do or should be doing during a bowel movement. And then during the X. Hail Lightly Titan and allow for some tenacity in the pelvic floor and just learn how to loosen and tighten the pelvic floor in correspondence to the breath and that actually helped me a lot particularly during during bowel movements and also that same practice as as you've already alluded to related to the importance of the root Chakra and sex seems to really enhance sexual function. Erectile function orgasm quality. As well when you learn to breathe into your pelvic floor and control some of that function with your breath but a big part of it for me came down to the realization that I didn't have to hold my tummy and all the time I know right. It's so true I went through the same thing up with all the years you know doing pilates teaching plaudits and then I went to school for Structural Immigration. Which is another former feen and my teacher was like you got let your belly go like you're just holding that thing in so tight and that it's amazing how that really did open up. My hamstrings gave me so much. More flexibility. In my hips my hamstring mobility was like. I mean I must have doubled from letting go that. I mean because that was directly connected to the pelvic floor like you were saying so. It's yeah I mean it's pretty massive. I love you brought up the sex thing because I have worked with a lot of male athletes in my career and many of them have said. They have seen huge. I've actually gotten text messages from the wives or girlfriends. They're like Oh my God what have you done? Because he is so much better in bed because what it does is actually the awareness that connection when you get to know this part of your body and you start to kind of understand it a little more. It takes you out of your head and into your body when you're in those moments of intimacy and pleasure you're not over thinking too much in your cerebral line actually feeling in your more of your emotional body right so you have this ability to feel kind of slow down but another thing they. They've all mentioned was that they have a much better time. Kind of controlling win orgasms. Come they last a lot longer. They have more stamina and they even have the ability to go multiple times as well when they have this sort of awareness. So it's not always just such a tightening. It's really sort of allowing more of that. Sensuality and more pleasure as well. Yeah there's there's a book called The multi orgasmic mail. Which I read I. It's it's really good as far as walking through how to do with your breath. But it's Kinda funny because a lot of this can be related to sexual pressure societally. Meaning that you know. I think from an evolutionary standpoint a male with strong ads or visible so ass or kind of like tight core. In in this this this this might be considered kind of crude or uncouth but but would be you know possibly regarded as better capable of not only being biomechanically functional but maybe being able to like thrust better during sacks or be a better sexual partner or something like that an and you know we associate you know even instagram photos. That trail going down the groin. When guys are standing over the tight stomach is being associated with you know kind of like this Alpha male dominant sexual status. When in fact it's creating as you get into the book. That extreme state of hyper tenacity in the pelvic floor which creates to all these other issues. And what I like in the book is how you get into each of these different power centers that we can focus on. Not just the pelvic floor but the The other for the deep core the upper core the heart and shoulders and the head neck and jaw to actually kind of reverse a lot of those issues. And so what I would love love to get into our these five primary power centers that you've identified because I really like how you how you've chunked to these into specific sections and then how we can how we kind of Mayes each them so again. A question that I think we'll probably rabbit hole a little bit as we discuss. But can you get into what the five primary power centers are Y- of course? So the reason why I came up with this theory or theme was working on multiple people for so long I started seeing these patterns so I started seeing these areas where I like to call it like where the stress was being contained. You know like this energy was being held in sort of thicker and denser and creating less range of motion and flexibility in less neuro muscular connection. So that was what I just saw. It was like a plaque build enough. I like to talk about Sasha connective tissue this residue that builds up in certain areas faster. That's blocked or congested are brittle or thick just has lost auction in blood. I think of it almost like plaque inside this sound. Like you need to floss. Your teeth you need to exploit your skin is the same thing you need to move that tissue around in order to hydrate it in order to bring circulation blood flow movement Edgy. Ci Whatever it is so what I was seen as these areas. Were all getting congested. And so I realized that the pelvic floor was the first one we had to get to. The pelvic floor is connected to the feet. By the way you have not medial line right that starts from the inner arch of your feet and goes all the way up through your inner lake through your inner thigh. And then up into your pelvis pelvic floor is and if I could jump in just just real quick and comment on that one of the things that was very useful for me. As I began to address my own pelvic floor issues Was a keeping a golf ball underneath my standing desk and doing media work on the inside of my foot like releasing the medial foot and then also using a roller and I had to actually get a roller that was able to come off the floor. I got to remember the name of it. But it's like one of those those rollers that's on a stand and so you're actually able to to throw your leg over the roller and get into the addict or because anybody who's tried to foam roll the addict or knows that it's a very difficult place to to like leverage your body over and actually get a good good kind of roll on and I think it's called a high trainer. I want to say I'll I'll hunt it down and put a link in the show. The high rollers the high roller a link to it in the show notes but such. It's a foam roller. That's on stands. And so it's because it's off the ground you can really target your upper inner addict with it. So that in the golf ball were really useful for me. Sorry to interrupt you. But but when you talk about the foot and the ad actors being comic wear the pelvic floor is going to be affected from the ground up. Those two sections really helped me. Yeah absolutely and the other thing I used to the rebounder because the when you gently bounce on the rebounder. It's a phenomenal way to actually. That was doing research in Germany. Now that they're they actually have seen tone regenerate from using the rebounder in a gentle way even like for especially for women that have had prolapse or a lot of damage from posts or you know inability to basically incontinence so funny. How a lot of the things that you're talking about. I kind of intuitively stumbled upon so so I have a rebounder and I people make fun of me sometimes especially like some of my friends who are athletes who you think bouncing up and down to the rebound or to get fit. I'm not I'm doing it for the for the limbaugh and for some of the pelvic floor issues that you've just described but I my rebounders in I saw this term actually from my friend Luke Story In what I call the Zenden of my house where we've got a sauna and a hyperbaric chamber and this thing called a bio charger and what I actually do. Is I stand in front of the bio charger. Which is it's it's like a Ri- frequency P. M. F. Generator. That has a little bit of ozone stand in front of that and I just just at some point during the day for fifteen minutes. I'll put on an audiobook or podcast and go and bounce up and down on the trampoline doing different breath holds and alternating right foot left foot. But I just do it during by charter session. 'cause I'm all about stacking modalities? I'm not wasting my whole day. I love it with body care but yeah I'm I'm literally on rebounder for fifteen minutes every day for about the past year and a half. Oh you're speaking my language so this is what I have every client get like you said. Asana a rebounder my rolling tools and then they have like their own in-home Spa Slash Jim. It's incredible so it's a great. It's a great way anyway. The rebounders phenomenal for regenerating tone in the pelvic floor. And also if you think about it when you're going down with the G force your you know your opening UK the organs right so that really helps free up some of that stagnant blocked energy or that plaque like I called it a few minutes ago and it's opening up the diaphragm just and also you don't really even have to think about it because it's just happening you know like it's not like you have to force it to happen. You just get on there and balance and like you said the lymph thing obviously is super important as well. I mean in the environment we live in the world we live in. We've got to be more mindful of flushing our lymph to and that's just. I believe to help clear blocked energy as well. It's like shaking things out like that idea of kind of flushing it out through the shake in the bounce. So that really helps free up those Power centers that get congested for sure. Were Hiller I wanNA interrupted I show to tell you about cafe. Pecs CAPEX is supplement and it was originally designed to help you digest. Fats especially useful if you're Keita Genyk. If you didn't like a high fat low carb Diet and you're winding up with like little bits of oil or fat in your stool. That ain't normal folks. You also should not feel like you got to decommission a bathroom right after. You've had like a cup of butter coffee or you know a bunch of coconut milk in your smoothie. A big part of this can be your bio production your fat digesting enzyme production and so this Capex was designed to digest all the fats that you might have in a meal. That's like a higher fat lower carb meal. 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So all you gotTa do is use Code Ben. Twenty twenty on viewers website so Ben Twenty twenty as in two thousand and twenty twenty five percent off and he goes to Viorica clothing dot com slash Ben. Now it's spelled funny the U. R. I. V. Ori Clothing Dot Com forward slash Ben. That'll get you twenty five percent off. If you use Code Ben. Twenty twenty are right back to today. Show yeah and related to the pelvic floor this first power center that you're talking about in the book you have what you call movement medicine for each of these different power centers each of these five power centers and for the movement medicine. Part of the pelvic floor you actually utilize in addition to recommending things like the rebounder or work attention of feet etc. The use of a squishy ball and I had not done much with a squishy ball until I visited my friend Tracy dues down in San Diego. Who's got a wellness facility down there. And she showed me. She took me through an hour long session with this squishy ball and I had no clue how much tension you could release with. Just like a wimpy little ball so get get into the squishy ball and how that works. And why you recommend it particularly for the pelvic floor section of the book. Yeah well I think again you know. I was working with people hands on going. Gosh you know this is such a shame that only people that I put my hands on can have access to this information. So I'm like I got to figure this out so I went on my own journey and became my own Guinea pig and tried it with my clients and realized that using this ball was going to give people first of all that neuromuscular connection you know the idea of we. We get touched in an area at wakes up basically so by using the sphere to sit on it and then move your body around in different areas. So you're free How things are attached so a lot of the issues that are happening. You know in our body from biomechanical standpoint are from rotations. Right to work. In the body things are being pulled in certain directions. And then the connective tissue glues into that position locks us in compresses the joint. So what happens when you use a sphere is it allows you to get into where the muscles attach the joints so it's freeing up those areas that you can't get to with any other kind of rolling tool you can use different size balls. I mean personally. I like a firmer ball for the pelvic floor. When you do the pelvic floor section in the book or in my video courses online I use it to sit on it and then we unwind it through doing certain stretches or breath work to really awaken that connection and then also we do like we take a little bit of route to roll the belly the guts because as you know I mean again the pelvic floor the so as in the the guts are like a really hard area to roll to do it yourself so I was like. I've got a design a tool. That's GonNa get into the connective tissue and unwind things without using your traditional roller. So this this fear because it's squishy kind of forms. Your body in a goes into the area to clear out the COBWEBS free up like I said where the muscles attached to the joints and frees up some of these deeper areas that you can get to when you get hands on bodywork but if you WanNa do it yourself at home and you WanNa do it on a daily basis like you would brush your teeth or you know. Flaw sorts fully eight. Which is what I recommend. Then it's you know five or ten minutes on that body sphere or a squishy ball. You're gonNA feel like a new person because you're getting into those deeper areas in. The energy is flowing better new more connection and you have the ability to strengthen those muscles more efficiently and to feel yourself a little more to in the in the past. I had tried to do some pelvic and actually does work for the so aspen for pelvis. the very kind of firm vibrating balls. That like the hyper ice hyper spherical. Yes that vibrate. And they're super form. And those are amazing for pelvic or or or a A So s release or kind of working I also went to work them along the Iliad Cross and also the gluten eating gluten minimus. You can you can kind of get into that tissue with those but then when you when you kind of get down around the perennial areas in the pelvic floor. Not only does that firmness. Kinda of you increased risk for causing some damage. But it's very difficult to get them to mold around some of those organs though softer tissues and the squishy balls. Just work fantastically for that. And they're like a few bucks on on Amazon like miniature squishy Yoga balls yet. I mean I designed my own because I wanted to. I'm really picky with the material that I wanted to be a more ECO friendly material and also They're made in Italy actually but they're also it's more of like a we call it hook a hook. You WanNa Hook it into your connective tissue. So it has a little more of a stickiness to it. Some of the balls you can more easily slide off of this. One particularly has a little more of a hook into the connective tissue. So I prefer that one. Is Your Ball on Amazon done? It is Yeah Amazon and I'm pretty much anywhere. You can buy physical therapy products. What's it called? It's called the body sphere. The body sphere. Okay all hunted down and put a link for folks the Bodies Fair Ball. Okay so we use that. And you've got some great illustrations in the book. And and what I will do by the way for all of you listening in I mean only to the book and the show notes for everything we discuss over at Ben Greenfield finished dot com slash power source that's been grievance dot com slash power source. So so you walk people through how to use that book or use that ball and then you get into some of these other parts of the power center. Because it doesn't just stop with your pelvic floor. Obviously as you've just noted you gotta start there but then where do you move from there? So the next one where of course I saw. I've seen so much kind. Of course stuck nece is obviously the guts the belly It's amazing how many gut issues are coming up in our younger generation. And that has a lot to do with as you know the vagus nerve lives in our guts and it's really because we're always in sort of even if it's lower level stress vote. Were always like we're getting that email. We're getting cut off in the car. There's always just that sense of feeling. Mike something is I gotTa keep going. What's next what's next? So it's like this. There's a lot of these stomach issues. Got Issues coming up in the in. I mean in all of our not just the younger generation but in everyone it seems like a lot of people have digestive issues constipation You know pain in their stomach and and it's a lot also people are overeating and their stress eating. And they're not even eating because they're hungry are just eating because they're stress in there. You know I. I find a lot of people in our my clients and people that have done my online programs. They reduce their sugar cravings by working with their connective tissues especially though getting into their guts in their in their stomach area and of course that has a lot to do with lower back as well and like having that hooch belly is has you know has a lot to do with the tension and build up that that occurs in the in the stomach area too. So by working the connective tissue around and then also doing the brass work and visualizing kind of understanding how your body works better again. You become more empowered and become more in tune and then you can actually learn like how to relax your system and so doing the belly rolling phenomenal though because it does it actually addresses that Vegas nerve. Which is you know. Connecting to the brain com puts you into the more calm state of the nervous system the parasite it's a great tool. If you're feeling really overwhelmed or stressed it also helps you breathe deeper in more efficiently and it just helps you get more in tune with your gut instinct and also just a more of a better sensation. If you really are hungry does not make sense like if you're always so stressed and holding your stomach fulltime don't even you can't even feel if you're hungry like numb. Yep exactly and in this stuff all comes full circle obviously if you pulling pelvic floor tension in sucking your abs in all the time it does influence feelings of hunger appetite release digestive enzymes etc and one thing to note for people. Is that when when laurens talking about the deep core? That's really that entire part. That's located around your belly button area and the the most important muscle there is the so ass Which is kind of a hip flexor? But it's so interesting if you actually look at the so asset attach is right behind the Oregon's right in front of your spine if you can visualize that and it runs under your diaphragm and it goes into your hips or through your hips and your groin. And so if the so asses tight this is something that can affect your organ function and your pelvic function farther down. And as I'm sure we'll get into as we move up to the higher power centers Lauren. The what's going on with the shoulders and the head the neck in the jaw and that was another one like I mentioned. That was a big lightbulb moment. For me when I realized how tight myself was and how much that was affecting probably three things hip flexor tightness that was causing. Low back pain deactivation of gluts. That was affecting my power and my push off when I was running or squatting lunging and then a bowel function and when I learned about this idea of releasing the so us it was amazing in one thing that I do two or three times a week like I mentioned is all use that vibrating round. Hyper ice foam roller or Chris. Fear Roller to start on the outside of the hips work. My way all the way around kind of like tracing the entire path of the so ass stopping right around the belly button placing my whole body weight over that for a minute and then tracing back around and I'll do about three to five times on the right side and three to five times on the left side and by doing that just a few times a week. It's a total game changer. For my soul ass and then the the other one. I want to ask you about this one. Because it's a new device and they've been advertising on a bunch of policy they sent me one and I'm interested to hear your thoughts on this because prior to this device coming out I would just use kind of like if I if I wasn't using that roller kettle bell handle to just dig into the cell ass. But there's this new device called the so right and I. It's like this plastic shape device. That's designed for some release. Have you seen this? How do you spell it P. O? R? It I'm trying to remember. I know I feel like I get deemed about these things so much. I think I have. Is it? Like two little pointy things up like rubbery what it is. Yeah I mean I think you know. All of these tools are phenomena. I think you just have to be careful like you said because you're getting we're getting into these areas that if you don't know what you're doing like it can be you know. I mean you just want to be careful is what I want to say. That's why like the the squishy ball because for people just to start if they've never even done anything like this before to start getting in there and and then get to know it a little more and start understanding a little more. Maybe learning looking at you know a graphic of of the organs and understanding that Gaza. So as is like you said it's behind the organs so there's only certain areas where you can actually get to it in expose it. You can't get the whole thing you know so I feel like those tools can be helpful if you know what you're doing and maybe it's good to just go and how a session of a hands on body session and physical therapy session and have someone really introduced you to that part of your body and then do the stuff at home on your own but I think you know especially when you're dealing with these softer areas in our body and more of the viscera than it is important to be a little more educated and aware instead of just like jamming things into your stomach. It is important me and I think you're right like starting with the software and squish your options until you're really intimately familiar with with how it feels to trigger yoursel ass. It is important as around some of your organs. I don't WanNA irresponsibly recommend people start shoving a kettle bell handle into their cell ass but typically get just so people know you're lying face down on your belly typically when you're doing so ass work unless a massage therapist is working manually on you and a big big part of it and I think you mentioned this in the book is that you want to kind of an correct me if I'm wrong. Breathe into whatever device that you're using to release the cell ass. I think that's a big part of it. Is Your House kind of pause over the cell? Ask Fine the tight spot than take a deep belly breath into that area and hold it and then release and that's a really good job with so ass release. Yeah and also doing a little with hands on to you can do it with any of the tools but doing the contract first and then the relax is a really powerful tool because that also sends a message to the nervous system to start realizing. Okay I feel this and now I feel safe to let go and let whatever you're putting in there go in deeper so it's important to again to go into that. Like I. Even do that with the pelvic floor when I do hands on with people like I asked them to contract it so that they can neuro monthly connect. You what it is or where is it? And then some people like literally. They cannot even squeeze their pelvic floor. They can't really even feel they're so us. It's incredible how disconnected people are and so the beginning is that I mean we have to. We have to like be able to visualize be able to see it. Then connect to it. Then breathe into it. Then start understanding a little more than maybe feel it when we're doing a workout or going for a walk or taking a class or a dance class or lifting weights or whatever it is doing whatever sport you start realizing. Oh my gosh. I can't believe how much more how much I use my pelvic floor when I'm wanting when I'm doing squats or how much use public floor or my so as when I'm doing any kind of activity whether it's a racer you know. I think it's really important to just you gotta turn it on first before you start jamming things in there. I think that's an and you know. That's part of the Feminine Energy. That's me I mean that's totally my whole thing is like we really need to slow down. Connect really find the awareness. I because that's where the power is and that's what I talk lot about is like that's why I called it the power source because these more fine tuning nuances is really where the foundational power comes from. And especially with wanting to all of us want to reach our highest potential especially. I'm sure you and your audience like how are we going to do that? It's not going to be just forcing more. It's really about going the other way because we're so extreme that way now. We need to harness the energy in the other way. Does that make sense to create more of that balance? Who makes perfect sense? Don't go don't go straight to the kettle bell okay. So so the next Like the Third Power Center so we got we got the pelvic floor. We've got that deep core which includes of course which we just discussed and then what's the third way before we got the third? I happen to say because you have you ever heard the so as be called the muscle of the soul. No because it's our deepest muscle so it's yeah it's a it's a thing in ancient towels tradition and it's basically because dot part of our body is so directly connected to like sort of our reptilian days like in evolution so that does have some of that. Epi GENETIC DNA so it's really important for people if they want to understand themselves more to get into that so as because it's such a foundational. I think of it as the Such pillars of our bodies right. It's whole it's connecting. Our Body are upper body to our lower body too. So I love that. You're so into. This is a lot of people. Don't even know what it is. So it's brilliant that you're shedding light on that it's so massively important for overall functionality you are so so us to then we move up to the upper core now this area to me is I mean. Gosh they're also amazing to me but the the upper core because it's where it's directly connected to our lungs right so I've found that a lot of people store emotional energy in the diaphragm. This is we call it the personal power center in personal power Shocker in the Yoga tradition and I'm not sure why the emotional energy get stuck there. It's probably because maybe we're not stepping people would say that we're not stepping onto our True Path right so we're not stepping into our true power or maybe trying to control people's too much or holding energy it and so the diaphragm obviously is the muscle. That's responsible for taking an auction and also flushing. Co Two out of our body and most people don't realize they can take in about two gallons of auction into their lungs. They're not using that much they're using us. Humans are using about twenty to thirty percent of that capacity. And that's going to slow all of our systems down including our metabolism and obviously our ability to deal with stress so to me the diaphragm. The diaphragm is incredibly important. As well connecting to the pelvic floor when we learn how to breathe more expansively more three dimensional than we actually as we breathe in our diaphragm pushes. Down into our organs. Organs dropped down into our public floor in our pelvic floor opens expands. And that's just a natural thing that happens in our system subconsciously but when we bring awareness to it and become conscious of weakening make it even more enhanced so as we exile. Everything is going to contract. Naturally squeezing up the organs will push up into the diaphragm and the diaphragm will push up into the lungs and squeeze and wring out the co two. So it's really important that we breathe sufficiently in order to live our best life in our bodies be the best that they can possibly be breath. Is Everything right? Especially when we're in a time of stress we need to be able to ground ourselves and take a few deep breaths. It changes everything. It changes your energy. It changes our state and also just. It's our tool as human beings. What do you think to to push back a little bit on that? What do while I do agree. That breathing is almost like massage for your deep core and especially for things like bowel movements or saks. Like we discussed is incredibly powerful at moving energy through those organs but then there are folks like a Patrick McCowan for example the author of the book the Oxygen Advantage and several others in kind of the breath work sector of late. Who have identified this problem of over breathing focusing too much on these deep breaths and essentially breathing off carbon dioxide. And so a lot of these folks are now recommending things like the control pause technique where you do a full exhale Not Not a forced sale but Relaxed exhale and then see how long you can last on that xcel with typically forty to sixty seconds being a really good score and then training yourself how to breathe almost very lightly and silently through your nose like they claim that this over issue is actually causing people to blow off co two. Have you come across much of that? Yeah I mean I think what they're doing is they're kind of stretching the capacity of how far you can take the body and then when you're in your normal state it's like what we would. I was an athlete. And we trained in the altitude and then we come down to you know to compete not in the altitude and it's amazing how your body just is way more efficient. So I think it's it's really kind of idea so it's like it's not really that we're supposed to be like deep breathing all day long like that's the tool that we have when stress arises in that tower system releases it. I think all of those ways of pushing the capacity of a human and making them go beyond their boundaries. And you know kind of pushing not do you know what I'm saying like stretching not nervous system or that resilience. I think that's what they're talking about and I think that's phenomenal and I think it's super important and I think you're right the nose breathing because it's a natural filter is phenomenal way I do teach sometimes the sail through the mouth just to connect to the deep core I find that can be helpful but as as far as like walking around in our daily day or sleeping at night. Inhaling excellent through the nose is really amazing way to obviously stay clean and also our systems just worked better that way to my take on this. Is that those guys are onto something and that carbon dioxide retention is actually something that is significantly helpful due to the fact. Because if you're doing a good job oxygenating and taking those deep die from addict brass if you're exhaling a little bit more lightly or a longer period of time. Oxygen will more readily dissociate into things like muscle tissue or heart tissue if carbon dioxide levels are elevated. And because of that. I think you can have the best of both worlds because you can do deep dive for matic belly breathing through your nose and then you can exhale through your nose or through slightly pursed lips and this is just a basic breathing habit. You'd use all day focusing on exhaling for a slightly longer and more relaxed period of time. Then you inhale and that would be just like your basic breath work pattern during the day rather than focusing on okay getting deep. Oh doing like darth vader thing during the death. Because we're a lot of people make the mistake. They're forcing it and that's the that's the same thing it's like the idea of just letting always used visual of like taking you know you have a full bathtub and you're taking the plug out and then you're going to let the water. Just go down the down the drain and essentially. That is exactly what you're saying. It's like taking your time letting gently come out. I think that's brilliant. I definitely agree with that. And then there's a time and place to perhaps pull out let's say during a pre-cold soak or workout pull out like the Wim. Hof Breath work where you're really doing a lot. More deep focused breathing. Or you know if you're GONNA go do like a whole a tropic breath work session or something like that. That's where you get into more the more rigorous breathing where actually breeding off a lot of co two. And so there's a time and a place for that but as far as your basic breath work pattern during the day what I've settled on those deep nasal inhales through the belly and then nasal or purse lips relaxed long excel and that seems to work really well the other thing. I would say really quick along these lines is you know when you're doing these rolling techniques so the book or whoever you can see stuff. I do online. Is You know when you if you're let's say you're rolling your ribs out You WanNA actually liked free. Visualize the ribs and visualized breathing in expanding the intercostal stretching the ribcage opening lungs in the front and the back body three-dimensional and then. That's that's just more of sort of using your breath to give you that traction so that's like another way so like you're saying with the Wim Hof like there are times when it's good because you're basically stretching. The tissues connective tissues to open up expanding clear that density thickness compression and like contractions. So in those instances what you're doing is you're creating the capacity that's there for you and available for you when you need it or when you wanna use it for you know like even having sex or doing some sort of athletic thing or something. So you have that there that capacity of expansion resilience and you know that sort of stretchy e centric space and that. That's super important so when you're doing the rolling you want to really be aware and not watch like watching. Tv YOU WANNA be thinking about yourself breathing into it expanding it and then of course. The breath work while you're doing going to also purify your system as well but I think again it just to people tune into that neuromuscular connection and then create that smoothness in the connective tissue in the webbing makes perfect sense. What's the Fourth Power Center? Oh so now. We're making our way after being in the personal power center now are making our way up to the heart to the heart shoulders You know the front back body here in the upper body. I feel like this is the area where most people can say. Oh Yeah I have tension in my shoulders like who doesn't have the way to the world on their shoulders. I've not met one person on the planet that doesn't have some sort of a not in their shoulders. Best athletes on the have like some sort of you know. Scar tissue knots in their shoulders. So I think it's just the way we're designed and gravity part of it but also it's an area where we tend to you know our shoulder start to go to our ears in and everything becomes compressed and so then we obviously are sitting too much as people have been saying sitting. Is the new smoking over Is obviously going to also compress the diaphragm and lungs as well. So it's a really important area energetically keeping your heart open and clear but also structurally to have front to back balance. So you're not having those shoulders rolling forward that you're actually because the shoulders rolling forward will pull on the connective tissue in. Then that connective tissue will build up the knots to try to hold you up in gravity and what I like are some of the moves and this is one that I do where you really kind of like opening up the shoulders and realigning what tends to be as you just alluded to hunched over. During a day of sitting computer work phone work et CETERA. And you've got a lot in there but but the two that I found to be key for me are a chest release. Would you can do again. One of the squishy balls literally just laying face down into an exactly what we just describe for the so ass except for doing it on the right side of the chest and then the left side of the chest and the other one that I really liked it super simple. Is You just get on a foam? Roller rolled all the way up to the shoulders. And then flip those arms up like a superman pose above the head and what I do when I do. That is just pushed my elbows in the back of my hands into the floor behind me as hard as I can and it just opens up the entire chess which is amazing if I've been working on my computer for long period of time or I've been hunched over sitting on an airplane for a long time and if I don't have a foam roller and I can't get down on the floor like let Sam waiting for a plane to depart at the airport. I can just go back against. The Wall flipped the arms up. And what I like to do is put the can visualize this back of the elbows back of the hands against the wall. So you're almost like doing a superman pose against the back of the wall and then you just slide the hands up and down. We'll try to maintain contact with the backs of your hands. The back of your elbows in the back your shoulder against the wall and that I'll get like popping in my shoulders. I'll get this amazing release in the chest and so yeah. I mean if you do that and at the same time. Kind of keep the pelvis in alignment. It's a total game changer. From a partial standpoint designed tool for that for all the all my clients that were traveling so much in planes and all of that it's actually called the infinity role and you put it right between two tennis balls together. You know. It's like a little kind of almost like a little. They call it the Pena. You put it right there between your shoulder blades. You could be at the airport wherever you are up against the wall and you do that exact move or you can do like where you take the arms in the snow angel arms and then you can do like this is our arms and then you start mobilizing that tissue around the upper back that sort of you know when you see an older like man or woman walking down the street and they're super hunched over and they're they have Qassiss there. That's actually connective tissue. That's become thick and dense and it's actually glued that person into that -sition so it truly is preventable. Yes people might be more genetically predisposed for that posture. But it doesn't have to happen because actually from gravity it's that Gravitational Force. It's pushing us down. That's making us figure out a way to hold ourselves up in gravity so the human body is amazing that way but then if we don't have awareness and we can't you know release some of those pasta things that we've done all day long. I mean the body is so mazing. It's a miracle like it will unwind. All you need is like five minutes to undo the day you can sit at your computer all day hunched over as long as you do a few things to undo that shit you are good like you'll sleep better wake up better you'll be you'll you won't lose that insurance and a half in height that most humans do these days at least in our culture and by the way one of the thing. I want to throw in before we get into the fifth power center the Fifth and Final Power Center and then I've got a few kind of fun closing questions for as well in in that is that I don't think setting is the new smoking. I think sitting is an amazing way to activate your sympathetic nervous system and like my preferred posture other sitting on the floor preferably or sitting in a chair for things like eating praying. Meditating I like sometimes even run into a couple of clients who have been like. I'm now meditating standing position to up regulate my fat enzymes on my glucose burning. Say No. There's a time and a place parasol pathetically activated so it's not that sitting is the new smoking. It's that sitting as a preferred position for eight hours. A day is not about mechanically favorable position. But I think if you WANNA be para sympathy the sympathetically driven than sitting or some form of sitting is one of the best position to be. Yeah but like in a comfortable position with good you know good mechanics said you know the ability to be so hunched over. I think that's really good. Call even if you're GONNA stand all day into your twenty thousand steps a day myopically focusing on your your or your fitbit or whatever at least sit to eat people. So don't don't worry you don't have to stand all the time standing creates other issues in the feet to that's like becomes terrible and the golf ball that is underneath literally right now. What we're talking to both my feet. They get rolled the whole time and podcasting. Okay so then you have the final power center. Which if I recall properly is is the head right. We call it the head head neck jaw essentially again here. We are talking about the cranial sake. Roles connection and within the cranial sacral connection. Is You know our nervous system inside the spinal cord and whatever's happening up top is going to be connected to the base and so the head to me obviously like so many of us are living in that sort of cerebral like overthinking mind over processing over wearing all of those things so I think a lot of times. I've even said this before. Like people are like like taught walking talking heads and they literally have lost their connection to their body. And it's a really important part because you know our emotions live in our body and we want to connect to those things in our thoughts are on our mind so we want to integrate the two and so I love to be able to help people understand how connected the jaw and the pelvic floor. So the very sort of physical connection of this over processing tension energy sub-conscious clutching bearing down locking the JAW head. Forward is also going to obviously compress in contract all the other areas so whatever is going on in one is going to affect the other like a domino effect who knows which way it comes from but a lot of times people are sitting in their at their computer with not necessarily good posture. Their heads or forward in so with the weight of the head forward than the base of the skull the neck muscles there were the neck attached to the base of the skull. Those muscles are tissues. Start to get really thick and dense in unlock you into that kind of Chin jutting forward really unattractive posture you know what I'm talking about and then what hold your head up in that position is your jaw. So you're like Oh what what else is GonNa hold me up so you kinda clutch your teeth and bear down on your locking jaw and then a lot of people would say that you know the tension or tightness or holding is also us holding swallowing our emotions. Not Saying we want us not saying what we WANNA say so that can obviously cause a lot of neck issues tension in the neck and a lot of people that over the years of my practice. I've seen so many people who have neck issues in so many of the neck issues have become has come from the shoulder tension or the jaw tension. So it's usually also weakened neck muscles so as heads forward than the front of the net muscles start to weaken the back of the muscles start to shorten and tighten into that Chin jutting forward with the head kind of up really like I said unattractive. And so you're getting all of these muscular structural imbalances happening. So that's why I feel. It's super important to talk about the job because when we can get our head back on our spine in a more aligned way which again only takes a few minutes of day every day at the end of the day clearing out that plaque Flaw senior Fasha or just becoming aware of that. Four reponse -ture it can have a massive impact on your overall health. I mean your overall vitality again bringing in that nervous system energy from moving that cerebral spinal fluid. I mean every time we breathe. That's our body pumps that cerebral spinal fluid from you know up to our brain to basically feed our brain nutrients and then also flush brain of toxins so if your head is all wonky forward and it weighs about twenty to thirty thirty five pounds like your energy is in your in. Your fluids are not going to be working very well. So that's why I always recommend doing inversions. You know doing your own self body work on your neck. Whether it's on the roller or the Matt or just stretching reading or doing physical therapy kind of stretches to create that space and keep the alignment lane on your long roller long way as phenomenal. And what what I like in the in the book is because again like I love to do multiple things at once. And so you've got exercises where you can be sitting on one of these softballs again. A little bit of a pelvic floor release but then at the same time you have some photos and images of how to do a job release how you sit there while you sit there. How did you year polls like polling on the top of your ears as close to your head as possible and almost doing your massage. How to do a temple rallies release on the side of your head. I think a lot of people think that they have to go. See a cranial sacred therapist. Not that I'm against that because you can get amazing work done with the cranial therapists but there's a lot you can do yourself and there's so many times when we're just like sitting whatever again like on an airplane as it's taxing or perhaps while we are closing our eyes and meditating or while we're doing some of this ball work on the pelvic floor that you can use both hands and do some amazing jar. Release your released. Temporale is released a lot of people. Just don't I guess I guess we should say just like play with their head enough right like there's a lot of cool stuff you can do. And there's so much limped around the ears is a bunch of lymph ducts there as well so that can help. That's why if you ever feel like you're getting sick to give herself a little massage around the scalp and around the ears. It's phenomenal way to boost the immune system to yeah. I mean taking away. They call the fashion of the skull. The Galileo neurotic because of all the nerves. That's why we all look any scalp massage so doing that on daily basis. That's in ancient diabetic. Thing that you give yourself scout massage or face massage also clearing energy. It's also going to anti-age US help us out more glowing skin. I mean it's all connected. So yeah we gotta work on the head to and the jaw even if it's with our own hands so as the five power centers. I'm GonNa see if I can recite from memory. We got the pelvic floor. The deep core the upper core the The head neck shoulders. I'm missing one. Which had his. 'cause I said Pelvic floor deep core heart head neck shoulders and so you totally hot it. Yeah Pelvic floor. Deep core upper core hard shoulders and then head Neck Java got I was okay. Cool so we. We didn't have time to get into some of the things that you talk about in the book like different minerals and vitamins and herbs and protocols that you like to combine with pelvic floor therapy but I'm GonNa ask you a few kind of like lightning round ish questions regarding that in a couple of other things because I know we're running a little bit tight on time. But the first is sage. You talk about sage in the book. And what. Why is that one of the first kind of herbs that you discuss to utilize in something like pelvic floor therapy? Well I think it's also just another thing Another tool or resource that we have a ritual weekend. Kind of indulge ourselves in for clearing our energy so sage has been known to purify and cleanse energy in our space and so it also is great too. You can save your own body. You can save your own space. You WanNa if you do your body you WanNa do it outside. But it's really it's really believed to essentially enhance our intuition and clear out. Any of I mean if you believe in energy that's really what this is about. It's about using nature something from nature to clear negative energy in your space around you because we do pick that stuff up in our in our energy field in our quantum field so it can be a very powerful thing. And I like sage for the pelvic floor because or the route. Because it's such an area of you know the pelvic floor is the area of primal instinct. Survival instincts. Feeling like you're not gonna pay your rent or someone sick in your life like that energy. Clutches embarrassed down there. So or if you're picking up someone else's energy so using sage to clear. The energy is a really powerful tool in order to enhance that awareness and then just have more of a deeper connection to. I think the base of our core. That's why I mean. Sage you can use for any of them but I do believe that I chose that one because I think it's great to smudge every day anyway because you wanna clear especially that part of our body after original book. I added because I always keep policy sticks in my sauna. I grab some sage and so now I of alternate between sage and Paul Santa Like I. I can't even go in my son without putting some kind of some kind of woo sent in there. So it's it's also so. Thank you for the recommendation on. Say if I'm meditating in there like it. Better than the Polisario next question is pelvic floor specialist or pelvic floor therapists. If if someone was going to go and actually have a therapist or I know some of these therapists like you know. Jam In their fingers into your rectum. And you know working around all the perennial areas and you know kind of getting in their deep into some of the areas of tension. Some people have or training them improper breath work etc. Is there a way to know that you're going to somebody safe? If you'RE GONNA go see a pelvic floor specialist to actually do some hands on work with you. Yeah I mean. I you know what I've studied Gration roughing Ida Ross work All of those people that have been through the training it's rigorous training. It's a two year program and there is A network that we can give you. I can send you the link for it but it's a network where we can find someone that's trained in that modality You know all over the world and so that is part of her philosophy. She was developed. This work in the nineteen sixties. And you know. She basically taught everyone about pelvic floor. I me when I was in training to learn this. I was like. Are you kidding me? Like we're GONNA have to put our hand and there's ten people in the class and we ended each. Put Our hand in each other's pelvic floor men and women and it was so intimidating at first and then after I got off the table and I felt the results. Unlike everybody needs to know about this. It's so massive so. I would highly recommend someone in the world of structural integration because they are trained in it From the energetic but also physical bio mechanical standpoint and then also you could find a physical therapist. They are starting to do programs now where people are trained in this work. I mean it is a newer modality in the physical therapy world as well so but there are people obviously great to go to recommendation and check out the website where you can find a true structural integrative practitioner and yeah. That's what I recommend to to go for it okay. So yeah in the past. Because I've been to pelvic floor specialist before I went with someone who is actually physical therapists and that that seemed to me because physical therapists pretty rigorous education and they they were really well versed in bio mechanics and trusted them versus. You know going like a yoga teacher or something like that which you know. I don't know not that. Yoga teachers are bad. But go with somebody who has been well well-versed bio mechanics and if if you do have a A link to any other directories or practitioners. You recommend if you know it to me. I'll put a link in the show notes for people over at Ben Greenfield finished dot com slash power source what's been Greenville Dot com slash power source. There are a ton of other things that we didn't even scratched the surface on. That are in your book like how do mantras and visualizations in correspondence with your pelvic floor. Work a whole bunch of moves that I think people should get the book to go through in books like this. I keep in places where I stretch. I've got like you know becoming a supple leopard this book a couple of Yoga Books and resistance stretching book and I. I don't I don't shelf them. I actually keep them in the same place. I keep all my foam rollers and my son and everything. So you guys if you get the book any book like this like any kind of therapy book. Don't just read it and shelf it. Keep it top of mind because it was really great is anytime you're going to do. Like I always spend fifteen minutes every morning. Doing some kind of self care and so. I've got all these different books to choose from that I can return to over and over against. That's my recommendation for. Y'All if you get this book just keep it where you stretch. Keep it where you do therapy. So when it's top of mind like that you know you can use this stuff. Just like you keep cookbooks in your kitchen. You keep books like this wherever you're GONNA do body worked so that the other things if you have a personal trainer or a body worker or somebody like that when you buy the book just like grab an extra one and give it to them so they can start to incorporate some of this stuff in your training program. That's another thing I love to do is for my massage therapist or anyone. I'm working with WHO? Who is a therapist? I try to keep them edgy. I'll send them the links to podcasts. And the books and so you can kind of educate the people that you're working with and it comes back around you and then they spread that around a bunch of other people as well so it's a great way to get some good. Karma go so it links to all this stuff over at Ben Greenfield finished dot com slash power source lauren. If people wanted to come to a session with you you're you're in La Right. Yeah actually. I don't really see clients anymore because I have my whole online platform so and then I teach at retreats and I teach workshops and stuff like that. So yeah you know how it is it just gets so busy you can only do so many things but I have a ton of resources online as well and I do have a Free Power Center visualization. I sent you the link all not too people wanna sort of get in tune with these areas by having. It's like a meditation but it's also kind of a visualization in talking about the anatomy in. What's happening in those areas? So it's a great way to learn about your body in those areas and deepen your awareness so and then we also have You know have my online studio. We have a seven-day free trial for anyone. That wants to try it myself. You know in a video because I believe you know. Obviously that always happens with these recipes in the books. It's like they wanna see it in video as well so it's a really powerful way in there's tons of different modalities rebounding. There's foam rolling. There's Matt Work. There's breath work. There's body rolling on all the different tools that I've created with in partnership with open teepee. So Yeah that's a great great place to start and then also we have right now just created a new program to boost the immune system called immunity movement medicine. So that's a free courses. Well our love a link to all that over at fitness dot com slash power source. And you guys have questions feel free to jump into the comment section of their ass lauren. Ri- your questions and remember to take care of your public for people because when you're young and it's all it's all a toned and it hasn't had a chance to develop. Piper or nerve dysfunction. You might feel great but don't neglect to take care of it. While you have the chance. It's worth the investment read. Read the book so all right will thank you so much lauren. For coming on the show thank you and forever. And until next time I'm Ben Greenfield along with Lauren rex about signing from Ben Greenfield tennis dot Com have amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes. The resources pretty much everything that I mentioned or at Ben Greenfield fitness dot COM. Along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful. Ben Recommends Page which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for. Hormones sleep digestion fat loss performance. Plenty more please. Also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this in every episode helped to make this podcast happened generate income. That Nabil's me to keep bringing you this content every single week so when you listen in be sure to use the links and the show notes use the Promo Code generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

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The Pill - Everything You Need To Know About The Dangers Of The Pill, How To Get Off It Safely & Safer, More Natural Birth Control Alternatives.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

The Pill - Everything You Need To Know About The Dangers Of The Pill, How To Get Off It Safely & Safer, More Natural Birth Control Alternatives.

"This episode of the Ben Greenfield for this podcast. How does this impact on how we built community something? That's absolutely essential for health and longevity city since then I've had skin issues. Neurological issues and doctors will say no that should only affect your reproductive system except that every system in the body is impacted. Good bye hormones that we have in fact been doing harm by perpetuating this inherent bias that just having female on your chart needs that your symptoms attends are not real help performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking lacking and much more my name is Ben Greenfield. Welcome to the show. Ah Mon Mike Test One two one two one two three. Hey look there. It is at works thanks. A wonders offers of technology. I'm here again and I've a really good show for you today about the pill this one's going to be doozy. I think you'll dig it. I didn't want to mention a couple of things. First of all Boundless Book Launch Parties are happening in January across New York City and La. So if you want a good excuse to go to the big apple or go to whatever they call Los Angeles January Sixteenth Big Book Launch Party in New York City and then January twenty ninth thirtieth and thirty first all time for you to come hang out with all the cool cats in La so you can get access is to the book at Boundless Book Dot Com and the calendar of events for all of the Book Launch Party is at Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash calendar. I also have a request. Anybody knows anybody at Ted Ex. Let me know Japan of the comments section and leave a comment on the show because I gave a Ted talk in Quarterlane quarterlane several months ago and it turns out that the powers that be at Fedex have banned mytalk from being allowed on the website due to the fact act. That folks may try some of the highly edgy and explicit bio hacks that I talk about in that particular tech's talk and it could be potentially dangerous dangerous in harm the health and safety of Tech's viewers. I think that's ridiculous personally and I would love to get this talk published on the attacks website and not banned from the website free speech anyways so if anybody knows anybody at Ted ex Let me know I do. You think that that the talk would be beneficial for a lot of folks to see and love to get it up on the website. So there's my ask for you. This podcast is brought to you by kion by the way kion flex so kion flexes are brand new joint supports up you want at kion and it is a blend of several different unique compounds that we spent a long time at kion researching and looking into when it comes comes the stuff that's actually clinically proven to assist with management of Soreness Management of inflammation. And we've found three different plant extracts. The tumor of sack rides are way. Different thinker cumin. Another one called Hera talkie which comes from an Ir vetik fruit that as these amazing joint health benefits and then a blend of really unique approach geologic enzymes including this cool silkworm extract stuff that just banned. Soreness helps you bounce back after a hard workout and feel like you're ready to go at it again. You pop three of these in the evening right before you go to bed and joint on that slow you down so this is. This is one of our brand new supplements at Kion. A you get a ten percent discount on it's called flex so few exercise you have joint issues. This one is right up your alley. You GotTA GET KION DOT COM get K. I. O. N. DOT COM and the ten percent. Discount that you can use over there is B G F one zero and then on this podcast is finally brought to you by Juve so juve are these infrared and bread light panels. That have been shown. You know the this idea of photo bio modulation relation has been shown to do things like assist with Collagen elastic production. The Skin reduce pain reduce inflammation increase testosterone production in some studies on that that Juve is rolling out with their just mind blowing as far as both free and total testosterone production. And they've got little portable units you can take with the on the go in- Tuck away and your hotel room and shine those in your balls or you can. You can do the full light panels. I use those a lot of biohacking facilities full light panels and they just work Juve is one of the best ones because of the power they produce. You need a very short treatment. Time like ten to twenty minutes versus our in front of some on these other devices so you get a discount on juive and you get a free month's supply of our Kion Amino 's when you get a juve it's very simple you go to juve dot com slash Ben J O v Dot com slash. Ben To get your Geelong. They are a ton of you. You have been asking me about. Oral contraceptives and birth control. And especially the pill. Which I've mentioned a few times in previous podcast episodes assode is something that I'm not the hugest fan of but of course I'm not a physician? Who is an expert in hormonal contraceptives? I do however know and have talked about in this in the past that women on the pill are more likely to be prescribed an antidepressant. Hi Depressant and there is an increased risk based on research for things like auto immune disease heart conditions a thyroid issues adrenal. Oh issues Even breast cervical cancer. And then there's some of the summit just annoying issues like vaginal dryness and hair loss and lower libido sometimes fatigue or brain fog increased susceptibility to infection. And this. This is an issue that I think a lot of women women deal with so I decided I finally after getting a lot of requests from y'all to to interview this person on the show I said to finally hunter down and get her on. She has actually written a book called beyond the pill. which you might be familiar with if you're not you need to read it because it it highlights a lot of these issues but I wanted to get into some of the nitty gritty of this on the show as well so her name is Dr Joe? Lean Gene Brighton. And she's a functional medicine naturopathic doctor. She specializes in women's hormones and also specializes in managing a lot of the long term side effects that are associated with hormonal contraceptives and also alternatives to those. So I she's a real wealth of knowledge and I I really appreciate her. Take on all of this stuff. Everything that we talk about. Today you can find at Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash beyond the pill. All that's been greenfield finished dot com slash beyond the pill which again is also the name of Dr Jolyon Brightens Book and I just realized that the name of One of my kind of more popular books is beyond training. So we've we've got to books with similar titles which means we're totally holy on the same wavelength Dr Brighton. Yeah and I have to say in this intro. When you're like I had to hunt her down being hunted by Ben Greenfield? I think that should the added to lake top ten fears. People should have. Yes yes no the weapon more with the virtual assistant totally but I was just thinking like yeah. I know I've seen you work out if you tried to hunt me in real life I'm pray I don't know we will go there. It is turning into like Zombie Apocalypse. Type of type of scenario Yeah now when whenever. I read a book that I'm really interested interesting or I just hear over and over and over again that I need to interview someone I literally do have this. This lady who I work with in the Philippines. She's one of virtual assistance and she's just like a Ninja a Mike. I need you to find this person. Also senator a study. I'm like find the lead author for this paper. I need to get them on and within like five days. She's like here's their skype. Here's their phone number. Here's their email. And here's the date you're going to interview them. And I'm like holy cow so yeah professional professional soccer services they come in handy. That's amazing that's amazing so all right so anyways you wrote this book you wrote this book beyond the Pill Hill and I I think are a really good place for us to start would be how the pill is working exactly because that'd be a good way to also explain you you know at the the different phases of the cycle and how how the pill is impacting does and you know my audience loves science. LOVES THE NITTY GRITTY. And we. We certainly have time to get into this. So can you Get into how the pill works exactly absolutely you know I was a ten year pill user myself really grateful for birth control. I'm a first generation college student. You didn't and I can look back to this tool that utilized and yet it wasn't until I actually got into Knox by the medical school than I understood how birth control worked or even how how my menstrual cycle worked now when it comes to the health specifically think the most important thing for people to understand is it works at your brain level. Tom Now there are so many stories. Basically the go around about birth control not. Oh it's just impacting your ovaries while. Let's back it up. How do the ovaries no to oscillate will the brain signals to the ovaries so essentially when you take the pill? It's a high enough dose of hormones. Instead you will digest state your liver will try to process it. And then it's going to impact the brain by shutting down brain ovarian communication now. Really important understand. Is that not all of the pill is going to be absorbed in the small intestine. It actually will make its way into the large intestine which we can get into. Why that's a problem Further down the line. But you have to understand that when people say will taking a low dose hormonal birth control well comparatively speaking to the first iteration of birth control. It is lower dose. However it's still a high enough dose that your system tries to essentially detox had out but there's enough hormones to tell the brain shutdown communication to the ovary so we don't fire off follicle stimulating hormone F. S. H. and we don't fly off Luton ising hormone la so we don't get follicles writing so we don't mature an egg ovulation and because L. H. doesn't spike? We don't ovulate. This is all fantastic. If you don't want to have a baby but when we wake the reality that birth control works at the brain level. We can start to understand. Why wouldn't have complained of mood? Alterations essentially neurological symptoms since the introduction of hormonal. Birth Control Okay so so basically when you're shutting down F. S. H. L. H.. Can you compare and contrast that to what should normally be happening to f. l. h. during normal menstrual cycle totally so even while we're on our period so day one is the first day that you have flow and even while we're on our period we are getting eggs ready and van is by way of follicle stimulating hormone telling the ovaries let's mature in AAC. So we're going to mature some eggs and we're GONNA pick a winner and we're going to ovulate now during the normal menstrual cycle. That is without any hormonal interruption. We will see the efficacy rises and estrogen rises in the first half was called the folicular face. Then we're going to spike estrogen. And then we're going to spike lute nizing hormone Oh estrogen goes high it tells the brain released loot nizing hormone loot nizing hormone tells the ovaries releasing egg now. This is the best part of the menstrual cycle in that. Once we ovulate with left behind his structure called the Corpus loom that structure Secretes progesterone. Now what you find in birth control. Every single form of hormonal birth control is processed in Progestin does not have the same benefits of progesterone. And in fact we've never had a long-term terms study to tell us what happens to women's body. Let alone her brain when she is essentially putting on birth control after starting her period and stays on it for decades at a time time because progesterone stimulates the Gaba receptors in our brain which helps us still chilled out in con- It also helps with fluid retention so women on Birth Control Experience Waking sometimes. There's a whole lot of reasons that can be but one is water retention because they don't have natural progesterone they have progressed in which isn't going to have that diuretic diabetic effect and when our projections. Right we feel chilled out and calm and in love with life. Were not finding ourselves crying all the time feeling really irritable. Oh having depression and most notably when progesterone is low we experiencing Zion. which is why some experts believe being on hormonal birth? Control can lead to things. -IETY is it a myth that Progestin does used in these on. Birth Control. Pills is made from pregnant mayor horse urine. So that was that's Premarin and that's actually in the back of the day they were trying to make bio identical hormones and come up with all these hormones for postmenopausal women and that is made from horse urine. That's when we had those stories are stories. Excuse me studies that showed horrific outcomes with hormone replacement syrupy and especially when we give estrogen. It's not challenged by progesterone or you know and this is most specifically four bio identical hormone. Replacement isn't therapy. That's where we can get in really big trouble. Because estrogen left unchecked can stimulate tissues to grow and those shoes can sometimes be cancer tissue so the breast and the uterus as you were talking about with hormonal birth control you know that synthetic estrogen and Progestin is associated with increased risk of certain cancer so like breast cancer liver cancer brain cancer on the flip side it does decrease ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer as well. Okay is it now. What about this progestin? Would it actually shut down or down. Regulate the body's own ability to make pressroom absolutely so we see this with with the hormonal. IUD's so once upon a time women were told by their doctors that Progestin delivered via Ni- Ud was localized realized in state in the uterus. I actually was just lecturing in Vegas and had to say you know. The uterus is not like Vegas what happens there doesn't always stay there and what we found out is not the questions do ghosts in systemic. And what's really important is. Did this get started this idea that state localized. We actually didn't know the metabolites. We need to be measuring in the blood. So you place Progestin you measure Progestin. You're not seeing it except that we forgot that the body will actually metabolize lays these hormones and will different organisms that live in our body. We actually have no idea how what the the microbiome is doing with these hormones but when when it comes to these days we do see that some women stop menstruating and stop ovulating so with if a woman stops ovulating. It's because it's impacting her body at the brain level Okay so the other thing I wanted to ask you about just just a little bit of a rabbit hole here on progesterone is and asked this actually a little bit selfishly because my wife actually started taking under the supervision of a physician progesterone and and saw unnoticeable increase in like evening energy libido sex drive and there's definitely something that's occurring with use of gesture but I'm curious if you as a practitioner actually endorsed the use of progesterone especially in women who are approaching like a paramedic pause or even post menopause totally. You know there isn't in time in the place for the use of hormonal replacement therapy and so might take is always if you need gesture on. Why like if we think you need progesterone question? Why is that are you? Not Ali leading regularly like we see with polycystic Ovarian Syndrome or is he entering the menopause. Or you're not actually You know so impairment oppose. It's kind kind of like A. It's like a kid trying to drive a stick shift for the first time where it's like. Oh we're Jerkin we're going we're stopping we're going we're stopping and the bodies like getting ready to call it quits and enter learned menopause. which is when we stop oscillating so in those times we won't have adequate progesterone so you always have to ask why and so if you're a twenty five year when you don't have enough progesterone we wanna work on the root cause that doesn't mean we wouldn't also lab bridge bilour identical progesterone and you're absolutely right? It has profound found impacts on women's health and as I already explained at the brain level it can help with anxieties so it can help dissipate anxiety in addition into that. When you're taking oral progesterone it can help you get better sleep so insomnia or you know tossing and turning all night those symptoms of low progesterone and so taking an oral? Oh progesterone can certainly help with that. And it's so much of research and let me say there's very little research and women's health comparatively speaking to our male counterparts but but so much has been focused on estrogen that we've negated the fact that women need progesterone in terms of brain health so progesterone is involved in creating reading them island sheets so for people who don't know what that is. I like to call it. Basically the the outer orange covering ugly extension cords. We've all seen not who. Why do we have those coatings so that we can have electricity conducted efficiently so we need the same thing in our nervous system? We also know that progesterone is involved in neuro plasticity cities so this is really important to understand that if you're on protest in that's not gonNA give you the same Beth benefits neuro. plasticity is absolutely essential for us to be able to learn new. Do things in the adoptive Wilson Oh that progesterone is important in our bone health as well and so well so much of medicine in science will talk about estrogen. progesterone is absolutely essential and addition so as testosterone. It's we don't want it too much of it with the right amount. It goes beyond just libido it's also for our brain health are bone health and modulate the immune system to help keep inflammation and check. The other interesting thing is I read this brief book. DOC was a couple of months ago I was called. adrenaline dominance by Dr Platt Michael Platt and he talked about the use of progesterone in like kids kids and you know in males who have adrenal fatigue issues and kids with ADHD and add. He was almost like treating progesterone is kind of like a a coverall treatment for whole host of issues. That's that's something that you've also seen utilize utilizing your practices progesterone for for males room for children. So I don't currently treat children so I haven't used any hormone replacement therapy with them with men. There are men who absolutely do benefit from having progesterone and we know from the female perspective perspective that the one of the best ways to optimize our hormones is the Ashley of our environment signal to our body that the environment is very safe so so you know we we will out of the holidays. For example are we have a really stressful event navy. Were not sleeping much. Were eating more junk food. Were consuming more alcohol Kahal. It'll be were restricting our calories. No there's certainly a case to be made for caloric restriction in longevity and intermittent fasting fasting. However if you're someone who is already totally stressed out in every way possible your environment signaling that to you then caloric restriction? Shen might be one more way that you signal that the environment is not safe now. If you're Bonnie perceives the environment is not safe it you know I think so. Many of us think like. Oh Oh yeah. We're modern humans in a modern world. We're actually a very old organizations trying to catch up to the fact that like cell phone in our hand but you in on our body doesn't know if there is a lion chasing us these stress signals or because you know there's a lion at Predator kind chasing US waiting to eat us. Yeah and in all of that. What would your body do? If it believes the environments not safe it would shut down with reproductive health reproductive viability city is very very expensive and in addition. Your body's really smart it knows that the environments not safe. Maybe because there's enough food then you can't actually grow a viable organism and you won't be able to feed it once you birth it. In addition to that you're Bonnie knows that babies make a lot of noise and it wouldn't be the best idea of there's a Predator around if you're running all the time from these Potential predators so in all of that if we are and so what does this do in impacts this stress response to so that fight flight or freeze response or what's known as the sympathetic nervous system which is a big player in. That is our adrenal glands. So if the ADRENAL glands are working hot and heavy then absolutely bringing in progesterone can help support that because the brain signaling is going to shift to say let's make Cortisol instead of making these reproductive hormones. Yeah that's interesting so that that could be an alternative birth control. Method would be for women to engage in frequent long periods of intermittent fasting fasting to down regulate for Tilleke right. But the problem with that is that then our brain or bones are Har- all of our other systems would start to be impacted the negative way and I think this is you know this. I was joking by the way but there are people who will will say that there are also. Oh you know people who will say. Oh well if I don't want to get pregnant. I want non hormonal birth control. Like I will just do. X Y Z. Like some extreme thing to to try to shut down your cycle but we have to understand the joke but it's a very interesting point to raise that every single system in our body has receptors for these hormones hormones so that means your natural hormones. They impact every single system in your body. Those synthetic hormones in hormonal birth control. Do the same. They're meant went to dock on these receptors. And when you use hormonal birth control your flooding your system oftentimes with more than what you would make physiologically and it's is not even what you make physiologically when you look at progesterone and Progestin the structural level. They are not identical at all they're not identical. And so so this is where the conversation. It's really interesting when doctors begin to dismiss women symptoms when Women Sang. I started hormonal birth control. And ever since then I I've had IBS lake symptoms. Ever since. Then I'd had skin issues. I've neurological issues and doctors will say no nationally affect your reproductive system except that every every system in the body is impacted by hormones. Yeah I want to get into that a little bit more some some of the biological impact of the pill some of the more concerning effects. But you know about back to that fasting piece I actually I work with a lot of active. Females out of active lean females. And I I really discouraged intermittent fast that lasts longer than about about twelve hours especially not population because of this That that a protein molecule. KISS UPTON I don't know if you're familiar without one but it it helps stimulate Kanat atropine releasing hormone and you tend to see a really big down your regulation in a kiss Baptist production and so the hypothalamus doesn't release G. and R. H.. which which is basically the signal to release the? HFS As you're talking about so essentially you. You can down regulate fertility especially women who are trying to do the same type of intermittent intermittent fasting protocol. That initially was championed by guys. Like you know the the guy that wrote the warrior Diet Book Martin Burnham. I think it is a lot of a lot of these other folks who are endorsing hot and heavy intermittent fasting periods. I see over and over and over again. Women get eft up by long. Intermittent fasting versus getting cellular Tafkaji through like Exercise Sauna. A little bit cold but not long periods of time without eating like I encourage Ridge a lot of the women I work with to cut it short about twelve hour fast and then just like occasionally like a couple times a year do fasting mimicking diet and maybe maybe one or two times a month do like a like a dinner time. Dinnertime fast and I just find in the in the women who do that. They tend to be a lot more stabilized hormonally and you bring a really interesting point in that. The majority research on intermittent fasting and even the Ketogenic Diet had done on men middle. I mean we're we are. We are prescribing a lot of pharmaceuticals to women that. We've never tested women. The trials have all been done in men and so oftentimes women will try to keep up with the male counterparts counterparts. And they can't. I mean women are very sensitive to cooler intake and caloric deficit and rightly so when we go back from the the perspective of biological evolutionary perspective. We can understand that like we just state a human life like we are the creators of the future of the human species. So of course we're going to be different and you in not something people will say. Are you saying women are weaker or the lesser. No actually I think that our differences between males and females are such perfect complements to one another. And you know what's interesting about intermittent fasting and I. I do agree. Twelve hours isn't hard to do like you. Shut down the kitchen at seven and you don't eat again until seven. It's great for your gut health. I mean it's great for so many things we could have a whole episode on. Just that if you're going to be successful with something like the fasting mimicking diet or doing some intermittent fasting the timing your menstrual cycle. Michael that you'll most likely have the best success and failure best is going to be around ovulation when your testosterone is rising. So if you go to extreme you you could shut down ovulation but at the same time. That's a time where I mean. I'm not advocating anybody not sleep and not you but that's where you can get away a little bit more. So as testosterone rises. We find that we have more energy we can. This is where women can get away with like six hours of sleep and not feel terrible intermittent fasting is generally more successful at that time whereas once you get into the phase in specifically like the week before your period. There's shifts in insulin insulin that happened in insulin sensitivity. That is your body's like there might be a baby here. Let's eat more food and so women will see that they need more sleep. They might have a decline in in energy and they're having cravings they're more Hungary and this is something that as a talk about in beyond the Pale. You know if you are creating if you're like I just WANNA eat bread and sugar like your body's really saying can you grab some sweet potatoes in some yacht guy gets Vegetables in on which is great for supporting your microbiome abiomed. And that's going to help with estrogen elimination. But it's also what your body is needing in that time and so often I appreciate that you who are very cautious in not prescribing. A one-size-fits-all for men women and everyone in not. I think there's also some things that women can understand this very nuanced about cycle in. Die If you're if you're like oh I'm GONNA start my period in three days and trying to start intermittent fasting lasting in. I'm a failure. And he started that negative self-talk. No you're a cyclical creature and you need to honor that cycle and also just honor how you feel. Yeah and it's actually really good point that you make about about women and studies because I think it was up until the mid seventies where the FDA actually banned women then from participating in human clinical trials and originally was like just pregnant women because they didn't want to do harm to pregnant women but the law. It was weird law like it apply to women who were not sexually active or use contraception or who were homosexual. And it actually wound up inhibiting a lot of the research from applying to women and still. I think it's like eight out of ten. Studies are heavily focused on men and it might be a little bit higher than that in animal. Studies in in in in part of that too is based on the researchers themselves being primarily male. I think it's like thirty. Percent of scientific researchers right now. Worldwide are females else. We've got like a seventy percent skewing towards male researchers and then also the number of subjects is higher than that that are male versus female and so yeah it it really is interesting when you look at a lot of studies and you just read an abstract or or a headline. At first glance it can pay to dig in and actually look at the sex differences or whether that was even taken into consideration for drug development or even a supplement development. So actually. He's a pretty important issue that you bring up and it actually wasn't until the nineties that the FDA DA said we actually need to start studying women when it comes to all this we need to bring women in an in A. I know that some women are going to hear this and they're gonNA get really upset and I totally we hear that and at the same time coming from a research background. We have to understand that studying women is really expensive and really inconvenient so when when it comes to studying women we have to have them tracking their menstrual cycle. There's you know those the being a cyclical creature over a you know essentially twenty six. Maybe thirty a two day period that can definitely impact outcomes. And you're right about the animal models. They mostly like to study male animal models. And it's the same thing it's more complicated. Researchers they want it to be super clean. There can't be any other variables that could be impacting. The outcomes and yet we have to question in that because if that's the way your conducting the research and you're essentially maybe you're just Males or your taking your Cherry picking the population you're putting him through a bottleneck in the study to get statistical significance. And then you're saying okay and this applies to the general population. Everyone and then we have people starting to put up their hands saying saying but this actually doesn't work for me and I'm actually having a different experience. Researchers well understand that when we introduce things to the general population. We're we're going to see differences. Researchers are very much like there's going to be gray and not everybody's GonNa have the same outcome when it comes to pharmaceuticals medical interventions and yet. There's a disconnect act when we get into clinical practice where doctors will say. Let you know. They're like no it's blacker way there's a study or there is non when women were complaining women complaint of mood symptoms since the introduction of hormonal birth control. It wasn't until twenty sixteen that we saw a very large study over a million women who were tracked that they showed. Yeah if you start birth control your twenty three percent more likely to not only be diagnosed with depression but to also receive receive a prescription to treat it that is say your depression was so much impacting your life that they felt the Dr Phil. Pharmaceutical intervention was needed. And it's been interesting spiraling out of the studies to find that in as much as we vilified the synthetic estrogen. It was the synthetic progestin has been so problematic. Nick and the researchers have gone on to show increased suicidal idealization. That is women are more likely to take their own lives especially in our adolescents and in just in two thousand nineteen we have studied. Come out showing that. What if you've ever used hormonal birth control as an adolescence you may be forever forever at a higher increase risk of developing depression? There's something I know right leak and that was me. That's most of us. We started before brain was done developing. I said before age twenty five. There's a researcher Dr Jalen prior who has been questioning this for a very long time and doing research and saying you know adolescents. Very vulnerable when it comes to a stop establishing at brain ovarian communication consistent ovulation. That's really a decade process us and yet were coming in with synthetic hormones in disrupting that and when women complain of symptoms. Were saying there's not a good enough study to validate what you're saying. We have to understand that we were lacking studies and the lack of evidence does not imply safety. Yeah yeah and that's a perfect perfect segue into some of these issues with the pill you got into the depression issue one. This might seem kind of like a silly issue. But I've brought it up on the show in the past and people always ask about it. I'd like to hear from you whether this myth or fact but this idea that your ability or or or a women's choice of a male partner is affected by the pill because she actually tends to choose a partner that is more. I believe genetically similar to her based on sent when on the pill thus resulting in Two two genes matching up that result in a less it's genetically robust offspring that might be more susceptible to infection or or immune issues or something like that almost like the choosing a partner partner that is too similar to the woman and then also another more recent one was about a women's inability to be able to properly empathize or identify defy facial expressions which might also affect may choice when on the pillow versus. Not on it are either of those situations actually accurate a hundred percent. So let's let's break this down. I actually talk about this in beyond the pill And I have had so many patients. Tell me these stories and after reading on the pill we've had so many messages coming in of women saying yes while it was on hormonal birth control. This is what happened to my marriage when I came off. This is what happens. So let's break this down so first thing we have to remember is we're animals and as animals we have a senses in one of those are sensitive it smell and new people have heard of like fair moans and being attracted to a partner. So what's going on there. Well we have this complex called the MAC complex. It's it's on our cells and it is involved in our immune system as women off of hormonal birth control we will detect that and we will select for a male counterpart counterpart that is as giant genetically dissimilar to us as possible. And that. Is You know in theory so that we basically get as much jerk. Georgina variety as possible. So basically you don't marry her brother so when you're on birth control you're more likely to be attracted to someone genetically. Hey that's like your cousin which is weird so every time. I say to people like you like I know right so they done studies on this multiple times looking at okay. There's this NFC complex women are detecting Archie The genetics of their male counterpart Interestingly Singley on the flipside in exotic dancers. They've done studies that. If you're auditing you're more likely to be tipped more. You'll make more money if you're on hormonal birth control. You'll make less money. This is about men now being attracted to women that it changes while. You're whether you're not. You're on hormonal birth control control and these are the things that like you know as soon as I start talking about. This is when people are like. Oh so what would you. You WANNA see teen pregnancies. You WanNa see women. Not Having control controlled their bodies. No I would never say that but we need to have an informed consent. You know in taking this medication in understanding. What's taking place now? They did this other study. That was really interesting team in that they had women come in and they were the computer screen in front of them. Said manipulates faces to be more attractive and so women even sat down. They're not on hormonal birth control. They start manipulating faces for every man they made them more masculine Anybody who seemed Disney's beauty and the beast in Gaston sings his little song about how he so masculine. That's exactly exactly cleaver features. We're talking about so that strong jaw that chess but on the face looking out for Alpha archetype so one is this being in from the evolutionary perspective. The defender of the tribe. The person that if you made it with them they could protect you and they can protect your offspring. They I put women on Hormonal Birth Control. They bring him back several months later. The Women Begin to manipulate all the men's faces to be more feminine. They searched reduce the draw structure. So fascinating. So we're on hormonal birth control. Would we actually prior to prioritizing in mate selection well as it turns out Konya may be right. She is a gold digger in that we prioritize. How much does our main make like our potential mate? How how much money does he make? And so you know how smart is he that translates to modern day societies Alpha male. Like who can protect you however women who come off of hormonal birth earth. So you're on it. You select your mate you come off of it now how attractive they are becomes much more important to you and you're much more likely to initiate. She ate divorce now to your point of the facial recognition. How women actually don't pick up on the subtle social cues in the same way you you know that steady came out and researchers are? Were you know they were like well. We probably would have noticed it if women you know if this was like really that big of an issue and I just laughed and I actually said to my husband. I'm like yeah like Y'all notice when we get a haircut like subtle. I don't know that you would have really noticed it. And when we go back to your an animal these subtle facial recognition these subtle social cues can be the difference of life and death and not not to be like oh so extreme not but truly as women you know. It's it is something that we are more likely to be. Impacted acted by violence against US right. It's it's harder to defend ourselves in the No. I'm walking the line here. I don't want to offend anybody. But at the same time we have to start asking the question. If we're not picking up on the subtle social cues and some researchers have been asking this question. How does this impact how we mother has this impact on how we built community something? That's absolutely essential for health and longevity and in addition to that if we are seeing these changes happen. How might that impact us like in in the workplace in you know the just so many questions in how birth control is altering women and how that's actually altering society as a whole? Oh so we can't ignore this and what I think is really just a head scratcher is like why are we only now starting to ask these questions why is it. It's only now we're like well. Why my birth control be doing to women on all these different levels? When we've had introduced it was introduced in society? He really in the nineteen sixties. Started out. You had to be married if you wanted to get access to it but yet here we are now in twenty twenty a whole new decade. And there's so how many questions that have been left. Unanswered is actually Dr Elizabeth Kissling in Scientific American back in Twenty nineteen who stated that the use of hormonal birth. Control the way that we've been using. It is one of the longest and largest uncontrolled trials we've ever had. It's a huge experiment and we haven't answered nearly is many questions we need to and part of that is because there's there's this backlash stigma of like you. Can't you cannot question a woman's right to have access to hormonal birth control. That's not what we're doing we're questioning. What impact does this have on women so that they know what to look out for to stay safe and they know if they opt in to this involuntary drug what impacts it might have on their life long term? By the way I use antlers antler's in all of my decorating. That's that's that's guest on his male east quote handlers. It's an all my decorating. It was said I love that. You're quoting the scene all the Disney's sneeze and that's that's that's definitely sign of manhood whether or not use antlers in your decorating. Hey I won't interrupt today show because we have a VIP tax club. I send send out about once a week. These insider deals insider discounts cooled downloads. Extra insider stuff over using the word. `insider will hero use a different from word. VIP because the Tech Club is actually called my VIP tax club. It's very easy to get into you. Just text the word fitness to four one one twenty four seven I think it only works in the USA and Canada. You can try. Just try it and see what happens. See if your phone blows up or you get some crazy charge from your carrier. If so don't play me text. The word fitness to four one one twenty four seven and that will instantly get you into my vip techs ex-club This podcast is also brought to you by Vr. The Oris a clothing company and man. They make these amazing fashionable all pieces of workout gear. They just started to launch a line for women as well. It's a little bit of a colder period of months during the time that you're listening to this episode and they have their new Pontoh Pant for men which is amazingly comfortable their performance jogger for women their new one. 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Traveling has a detox vacation effect. ACT GET Super Hot low enough low. Elf does everything that I need for it to do in the one that I have is called sanctuary sauna because I can fit four people people in there so I can chew with my home and my sauna or I can clear everybody out and I can just do yoga I can take weights in there. I can do breath work in there. I I lay flat my back in there and do a whole atropine routine Sky's the limit. Sauna will pretty much upgrade. Just about anything that you do and if you get in there after workout I'll even build red blood cells very similar to to blood-doping aretha use but without the actual needles so Saunas if if you're not yet on a Sauna bandwagon they change your life and these clear lights are really amazing. So the clear lights on the one that I use you can find their complete line line and they all come with a lifetime warranty if you go to heal with heat dot com if you mentioned Code Ben Greenfield when you go to heal with heat dot com when you call the folks that clear light up on the phone You will get a five hundred dollar off discount. I guess you would call it on the regular price of any sauna you get free shipping of your sauna which is huge because these things are heavy and a gift with purchase very simple to assemble. Once they arrive at your house and again that's he'll with heat dot com use use Code Ben Greenfield delegates. Five hundred dollars off free shipping and a cool gift with your clear light sauna purchase. So what about outs the effect of the pill because we do have a lot of exercise enthusiasts who listen in on athletic performance. Do you know of any studies. The have looked at The pill in relation to exercise. Oh yeah this is fascinating. So women have been given hormonal birth control. So their mail coaches I would say like. Oh your menstrual cycle. It's GonNa get in the way of things with Pajama Birth Control. And that's GonNa make you a better athlete Acceptance Hormonal Birth Control in shutting. Down Your your ovaries shut down testosterone production by as much as fifty percent it. Then alters your liver at the genetic level to express higher amounts of sex hormone binding Globulin even now that liver is not betray you. It's like this is way too many wounds in our system. We've got a gobble up some of these hormones to keep our bodies safe except it's GonNa grab onto the test Austrian as well. Testosterone is essential for muscle mass energy production for bone health. So in in that way alone it can actually inhibit. Women's Athletic Performance and recent studies have come out showing that women on hormonal birth control athletes specifically they fatigue not faster while on birth control their muscle gains are less. Endurance goes down so now researchers are saying. Don't put your athletes on birth control. Troll actually leveraged their menstrual cycle you can work with their menstrual cycle to make tremendous athletic gains. And you know who did this the US soccer team the US US women's soccer team decided to do what like people like me have been shouting about for years. which is work with that? Women's menstrual cycle to waited. Make an exercise plan. That's conducive to our her body's doing they just one is crushed. It and I think that's phenomenal. And one of their their coaches and all of this. He actually created a whole APP around this. So that you can plan your date of your side goal and start working your routine around that and so just just briefly if we know that in the liquid phase so you're on your period your testosterone estrogen or rising. Your energy is going to go up. You're going to stimulate muscle mass. This is when women the you know the about a week after their period. They're like who I can lift so much like I can. I can run a marathon like there's so much more I can do. Whereas when we got into that phase and specifically leading up to our period that a great recovery time? That's a great time to recover your body work on you know stretching and when I've worked with And not not just stretching but just being really mindful of you. Don't do stop moving. Yeah you would just say like oh well I'M GONNA get my period too soon. I'm just going to stop opt moving. No no no but when I've worked with patients in this way and I'm like okay once you dial boxes Sweden than I want you to go hard this week. They make tremendous gains in their fitness skulls and in addition to being on hormonal birth. Control their women who've complained of waking now as I said earlier on this can be not water retention. So if you start control you gain weight you stop it you lose weight right away likely was water retention hormonal. Birth control is inflammatory. They've done studies ladies thing measurer. C Reactive Protein Marker of inflammation. They put a woman on birth control. And sometimes that. CRP shoots up about three times the amount so that's also gonNA causeway ause way issues as well but when we factor in long-term hormonal birth control use. We've got the down regulation testosterone. We've also got issues. In terms of thyroid I read hormone. That can lead to US gaining way. What is one of the hallmark symptoms of hypothyroidism unexplained weight gain? In all of that. We've got you know the inflammatory apiece as well but we also have to account for you know how hormonal birth control is depleting nutrients so there's lots of mutual this is one of the deep biggest drug mugging nutrient drug. Muggers there is We've got studies that go back to the seventy showing magnesium ZINC SELENIUM B-VITAMINS B twelve fully B. Two b. six and Co co Q.. Ten Vitamin C and Vitamin E.. Would are we going to impact the entire body mitochondrial function McConnell else. And so we have to start looking at pieces. Well and so when they've done the studies on waking and women you know they they're they are like on average it's not that significant except when you get into how that was done. They basically were like this woman gained fifty pounds. This woman lost twenty pounds. This woman gained seventy pounds. This woman lost ten pounds. Add it all up and take the average up not you know not that big of a deal now. What about the woman who gained fifty pounds? Or what about our body type like I'm like I'm five. Maybe on a good day if I put on ten pounds. It's big impact on my body compared to another woman. Who would bean six foot tall? So these are the kinds of things that are very individualized that we have to start talking more about and for me having looked at some of the exercise besides physiology data. It's interesting because you another very popular drug right now is meant foreman which is being used off label as kind of like an anti-aging and drug knowledge to reduce classy mcvay ability but to possibly have some other effects on down regularly 'em actively in increasing autophagy etcetera. When you look at the exercise literature you you know not only do you see a drop in the ability to be able to to proliferate new satellite cells post exercise you see a drop in the ability to be able to build muscle but then the other thing is about a four four to five percent reduction in via to Max or maximum oxygen utilization during exercise which is almost exactly the reduction that studies have found the pill causes in athletes that for the average exercise enthusiast? Might not be that big of a deal but when you talk about like a cyclist or swimmer Aurora going from. Let's say to Max of sixty five down to you. Know whatever five percent of that would be. So let's say they're going down to you. Know whatever sixty one from sixty eighty five. That is the difference between first and tenth place in many cases and then the other thing is that it can also down regulate your ability to be able to utilize allies glucose during exercise. Actually up regulation and fatty acid utilization during exercise in women who are on the pill. And you'd think that'd be a good thing right do you think. Oh It's turned me into a fat-burning machine but the problem is it's not doing that by increasing officiency. It's doing that by suppressing your ability to be able to burn glucose hosts for those intense bouts of exercise or those intense sports. And so you're basically dig less deep. You know related to what you're alluding to about increased or decreased time time to exhaustion on the pill or decreased force production capacity. That's because you simply can't engage in glycolysis quite as readily because your blood glucose levels are lower so it it kind of screws exercise performance from both in endurance and also a power and strength standpoint. So in my opinion what. You've just alluded due to this idea of adjusting exercise and even timing of competition based on the natural cycling. I I think that's a field that I'm really interested in seeing develop over the next few years and I know there are there are some really good Folks who are doing this like Dr Stacey Simms she had the book came out a few years ago called Roar which really gets into how to time your exercise and you know whether you do yoga versus weight training based on your cycle and then I don't now if you know. At least she has a book called flow that that also gets into this a little bit like how your movement exercise based around your natural cycle cool Yeah I think those are all great resources and then at the same time I think we should also listen to our body in tune into that because sometimes James I will say that women. I wanted to be really clear because I'll have women say nearly have a competition but I'm GONNA be on my periods so I think that a I'm gonNA fail at this moment to come in last and like okay. Firstly your mindset is everything and secondly sometimes women like sometimes women are on their period and you know or leading up to their period in the light. I doc I feel like I could like go. Harder is not wrong. No on your body and listen to that and know that there may be things that you WANNA shift so in a few hat. Ah We can't all plan all these like I'm an international speaker. People will ask me so you know what are the best times is hosting the elation Right around that post hosts ovulation. Your lips are going to be plumped like people WANNA listen to your more attractive. Your your brain is firing in a way that your linguistic capacity goes up young. Got People will say to me. Oh so do schedule everything around your cycle. No life doesn't work that way okay. The world's not set up that way. But if you know these things you can actually I start to alter your behavior. If you're like yeah usually get really tired around this time that I have a competition okay. Navy needs to be getting in bad like eight. PM Nine PM you. Maybe you need to bring on like you know you're more supplements in terms of your supplement. Regimen made you need on you know to make sure that your diet is dialed in in a different way and so you can work a lot with your intuition as well and understand that you live like the world is not going to revolve around your cycle that you I can understand these things to get the experience the performance. You know whatever it is going for you can make that happen by just shifting these simple practices assist. And I think I do think we're gonNA see this Research absolutely explode. I mean it's I mean with what the US soccer team was able to do. I think we're definitely GONNA see that. A lot of trainers and athletes are gonNA take note. We also know that there was recently that athletes who who came out About how her Nike trainer destroyed her body and how they kept cutting calories and all the things they were doing were like the opposite of what a woman's body needs in she went from being like the best of the best to like. I can't even compete anymore. And she's been very vocal about this in so I think we're GONNA see a lot of a lot the athletic world but just a lot of the world waking up to reality of like we have been trying to take the cyclical creatures these another cyclical to just over a twenty for our period. But we've been trying to basically fit this. You Know Square peg into a round hole and there's a better way and we can actually instead of treating in our hormones. As if they're these terrible things that are a burden we can leverage the superpowers that they're really designed to get us and that is why I think we're seeing millennials lineas and younger generations rejecting hormonal birth control at a higher rate than what we've ever seen. I think one they've seen the women that have gone before them. They don't I don't WanNa have those same experiences but two they also recognize they WANNA know their body and they recognize that there is strengthen their hormones things that they can leverage bridge and we finally have gotten away from place where older generations they and I you know I say older like as advanced generations. You the very much. Have this story where you know being a woman met. You couldn't get a job. You were too emotional. And so they never wanted to talk about the fact that our hormones do influence our mood food we have to recognize everybody's hormones influence their move if men's testosterone get too low. They're going to be crying all the time. They're not going to be motivated. They're not going to get out of bed Blake. They're going to be a mess and so understanding that everyone's hormones are influenced by their nude and if women are having symptoms because of hormones. That's a symptom. Your body saying we need a little help here as a teaching the pill you come in you can course correct and you can actually leverage that so that you get dot strength fat performance a gun. Whatever the goal is you can work with your body and work with your hormones to achieve it now if somebody's listening in let's say a woman who's listening listening in or or maybe a guy's listening anyone he wants to approach his significant other about getting off the pill? Can you just stop cold Turkey. You know in if not the wine on Okay so when it comes to hormonal birth control. It's an all or nothing situation so with devices it makes a little more sense right removed. The implants removed removed. The new ring. Don't replace that. Patch it when it comes to the pill. Sometimes women are like well. I'M GONNA go ahead and weaned myself off. That's a really bad idea. And here's why one is. You won't be protected against getting pregnant so it's only affected if you take the dose the way it's designed and so understand that the you know the ninety nine percent effective at preventing pregnancy that the pill gets is if you are perfect user if your typical users about ninety one percent which is to say hey that nine out of one hundred women using Mona Birth control the pill specifically will get pregnant in a year using it. Now when you come off it is a cold Turkey you just need to stop. Oh you don't WanNa win off because the other thing is that if you're cutting your pill in half or quartering it and he sees her tiny so it's hard to do. Your brain isn't getting enough the hormones to be shut down so it's going to be like okay. LemMe tell the ovaries to fire off. WAIT NO WE'RE NOT GONNA fire off. I've had women right knee and they're like getting hot flashes now and I'm having having acne. I'm having all these symptoms and it's like because you're messing around with your your your chemistry in a big way like you were messing with before and understand that hormonal birth control when you come off of it. It's a huge hormonal shift and we often forget baptise doctors like just come off. Everything will be fine until it's not and most often it's not so it's an all or nothing situation as they talk about me on the pill if you've started hormonal birth control for symptom management which is almost sixty percent of women. These these days are actually using it. For painful periods heavy periods acne regular periods. Understand that. When you come off those symptoms are GonNa come back so so whatever symptoms you use to treat the pill with or any form of hormone Hormonal birth control. Those are going to come back post pill unless you've done something like changing your diet. Get your Changing lifestyle practices to really work on the route of those issues. Now if you had those symptoms should give yourself a good three months to prep so often women will hear if some of these things in there like I just need to get off right now few endometriosis. If you had cystic acne prep your body for a good three months. You know as you were talking about with Metformin you often. Women get prescribed hormonal birth control if their policies to go burying Syndrome women P. C. O. S.. They're also GONNA get that forman that's GonNa that's GonNa take a big impact on your mind microbiome so the pill is incompletely digested in the small intestine. It actually will make its way into the large intestine and research. Studies have compared to antibiotics in terms of what it does to the microbiome. But how many people do we know that. Take antibiotics every day for decades on end. That just doesn't happen so things like that that we're going to have to work on support in a never want to see a woman. Jump off birth control. If you get cystic acne right away or your periods sir. Carol because of endometriosis you're GONNA you're gonNA feel like a failure. You'RE GONNA go right back on it so prep your body a good three months if you started hormonal birth control And you started audited just. Because you didn't want to get pregnant and there was nothing else going on. It doesn't mean you're in the clear what do come off. It doesn't mean you won't have symptoms in fact I've never seen a patient who doesn't have symptoms uh-huh coming off of hormonal birth control unless they do the work to really support their body in that transition. I outlined all of that in my book I give you a meal plan I am not dogmatic. I knew my training. I started in chemistry one into nutritional biochemistry. There is no one-size-fits-all what's true for you. That's what we need Utah. Onder stand so you'll get very nutrient dense diet lifestyle practices. I give you quizzes so you can dial in your supplement protocol and figure out you. It's all I. It's very much me. Being scientists in that I want people to build their user manual to their body. I want them to test. What is true for them and understand? That'll probably change over time now. So if you if you've had no cintas no issues you start hormone birth control for pregnancy prevention. You can end it at your your next end of your pill pack. If you you know you have a device you need to have a doctor remove it and if you've had the depth Rivera shot which is the synthetic progestin injection action that takes about ninety days to wear off so to speak. So you're GONNA have to ride that one out. It doesn't mean you can't be doing things in the meantime you absolutely can see. You can totally be supporting your body in making that transition as you're coming off event and so in all of that it's also important for women to understand that just when you stop doesn't mean that you what needed further take care of your body and so on average you need to spend a good three to six months supporting your body as you come off of it especially it if you're a period of fourteen and three cycles later your doctor put you on birth control. Now you're forty four your brain. Ovarian communication was never really solidified. It was never really established. And this is what I think is part of Post Birth Control Syndrome when women say to me feels like I'm going through puberty again and I'm like man. Puberty might be the unnecessary process for all of us to go through as much as like none of us liked it in the unnecessary process to go through so everything that I just talked about those symptoms coming in August. That's part of Post Birth Control Center which on average is going to pop up about four to six months after stopping hormonal birth control and the tricky thing is is not it can count on later her. which if your doctor isn't really tuned into that and you go into them eight months later twelve months later? They're going to be like no well. If you if this was because the birth control then you he would have had symptoms immediately. Accept that a lot of women you know they take a week break on the placebo. So why would they have immediate symptoms like they're cycling with birth control to get that drug induced withdrawal bleed not a period. It's a medication induced withdrawal bling it. I think that's really important language for us to clarify on there. Yeah and and I know that you have a whole protocol like you just alluded to laid out for Post Birth Control Syndrome but it but it's coming out from a variety of angles like addressing the leaky gut issues with with. I think some of the nutrients you talk about like slippery elm bark and marshmallow. I'm a huge huge fan of alvar extract and colostrum and a lot of these things as I can help heal the gut. And then you've got like a detoxification protocol healing some of the metabolic amount of damage replenishing nutrients with you know very nutrient dense diet right. I think you're even Correct me if I'm wrong. A fan of of organ meats or or capsulated Oregon supplements or things like that is very nutrient dense sources. But it's kind of like a whole all system that you need to be able to manage that post birth control syndrome. Yeah no I am a fan of organ meats your you'd be hard pressed to find anything anything more nutrient dense in our foods. Nature's multivitamin absolutely. I mean I all the time with patients I will prescribe beef heart and they're always like l.. That's gross and like the very first time I was GONNA eat beef heart. I'm like a certain my my small human who is now he just turned seven. Knee is hardcore me elite. He's like anything. He's been eating bone marrow since he was like an infant and You know his mom is look toy squeamish about this but he tell people take twenty five percent percent beef heart. Good your boots or get grass fed beef are I wanNA grind up twenty five percent beef heart and then I want you to get ground beef. Put together Mega Burger time and again. Everyone's like that is the Best Burger I've ever had. It is and it is like if you think about it. You know these organs are what our body prioritizes so when people are like why is my skin wise my act the last thing to heal while because your heart is more important your liver's more important. Your lungs are more important. Your body will prioritize these systems and those organs are going to get the most nutrients that are going to be taking care of that. Heart muscle works so hard. Why wouldn't it be rich and mighty contract co Q.? Tan and you'll be vitamins and nutrients. You need to run your energy and to do what you need to do. So I am a fan of organ meats and you know when it comes to basically re rehabilitating your body audie after birth control you are going to need the focus on every single system and I take you screw it in a way. That's not overwhelming in a way. That's like okay like I. I take a quiz. I choose my own adventure. I know how to get dialed into these things and for women who are listening to also understand that I wrote this book. It's called beyond the Pelle because they wanted to give women solutions to their hormonal issues beyond just passing them the pill as I said you know it's fifty percent of women that's our most recent survey that's come out. Fifty percent of women are using hormonal birth control because of symptoms. This is the go to doctors. You have acne. Let's give you the pill you have headaches. Let's give you the pill you don't WanNa you know you don't want to deal with heavy periods. Let's give you the pill we need to ask why and we need to do better for women. And if they choose to use hormonal birth control control that's one hundred percent their right to and they deserve to be supported in that and a big missing piece in this whole conversation around. Birth control has been what what what can happen. What should you identify? When should you get your doctor? What can you do to take care of your body while you're on it because it's not an all or nothing conversation and women absolutely deserves the right to choose? As much as they deserve the right to have access to the education they need and to know what are the signs and symptoms of a heart attack women. It's different than then. What are the signs and symptoms of stroke? We've all heard. Birth control can lead to a stroke. But how many women actually even know. What a stroke is the thing that I think? I didn't really expect when I put this book out. Was You know how many women's lives would be saved from this. This is unlike this is just a crazy thing that over over the last year. We've had women writing US saying you know if it wasn't for reading your book I wouldn't have advocated for myself in the Er. I could've died. We've had women with pulmonary. Embolism women. Who are having a stroke? Their doctor was like you just have a headache. Take some you know. Take some might all Endow takes an ivy profits and yet they the advocate for themselves by being able to identify these things and were able to save their own life. I mean I had these parents writing their daughter daughter went to the ER She was dismissed sent home. Her Mom had read my book. A that sounds like a stroke. Go back she sent her daughter back. Her daughter went back. DOC and sure enough. She was having a stroke and she had been dismissed. And what I'm saying right now about dismissing women this way more common than we even recognized there are studies income out showing women are more likely to die of a heart attack than men. Were more likely to be told. Your symptoms are in your head. You're overly emotional. Go home and then we die and that is medical gender bias for which medical schools are changing their curriculum. They're changing how they teach future physicians because they recognize that we have in fact been doing doing harm by perpetuating this inherent bias that just by having female on your chart means that your symptoms are not real now. Are you a fan of as an alternative to the pill any type of cycle tracking methods. Yes so there are. There's a whole table in my book. Chapter Thirteen is dedicated to non hormonal birth control options. Because I'm I'm my mom was a teen pregnancy so unlike step one. If you're Komo birth control is have a backup method if you are sexually active with a male partner and so in non we know the number one contraceptive that women love. It works for them. It has the highest efficacy rate. That means it works and women love it. Is the car pro. Ud you've Heavy painful periods No it's most definitely. I'm not gonNA work for you. And in addition to that you have a medical intervention even including medical devices. We want to track our symptoms and we want to get some baseline as line labs so that we can make sure that this is working for us on the individual level not as because it worked for her sister or friend. Does it work for Yale. So there's the Copper Opera Udine we also have barriers. Are you worried about copper toxicity. It'll with the copper in some women so we'll actually measure this will also measure zinc as well with my patients and so when you look the studies. What's really interesting when you see the conclusions? They'll send me the copper doesn't go stomach yet if you have a copper storage disease as you shouldn't use this method to me. The researchers are seeing something like it just hasn't been disclosed yet hasn't come out so yes again. Uterus is Vegas agass what happens. There doesn't always stay there And so if women are being told if you have a copper storage disease you shouldn't use a copper. Ud to me as a doctor. I I WANNA scream. I WANNA screen. What what is it? What are their baselines? She gets a copper. You'd want to screen again. We also screen fired as well. 'cause I've seen thyroid be affected. I I don't have any research studies to say like yes copper. Ud directly impacts the fiery. If you think about it your thyroid does need some of these nutrients that can be displaced by copper hopper. This is an area where we need studies so yes we WANNA look at those baseline labs and then we wanna we wanna have her tracking sent them so ideal for any reproductive reductive. Medical intervention is track your symptoms at least entire menstrual cycle. Three is even better and why status like with Copper Udine is not maybe you go on it. Everything's fine and six months later. You're like wait. What are these costs? What are these like really heavy periods? Like what is going on here. And so and gas lighting Israel in medicine Your doctor will tell you that you miss remember your period but if you haven't written down impossible to make you second guess yourself could you your personal data in in front of you. That's why the baseline labs are also important as well the question. We're always trying to answer is what's true for you. What works for you? I may be able to say this research. Study says that this wouldn't happen except that it did happen to you so okay well. How do we help you? Because you're the person sitting in front of me WHO's asking for my help. So we talked about the barrier methods so with cervical cap diaphragms. Much harder to get a hold of and condoms. Nobody likes the female female condom and I understand that male condoms can fail if they're not put on correctly. This is why I definitely advocate that women know how to place a condom appropriately as well and I understand that if you get started without a condom. Yeah there is there. Is There Candy Semi Semen released. That can be problematic What's important in the condom? Discussion is often. Women are given hormonal birth control. When they're all going off to college so here have some birth control? Study are don't get pregnant finance and no one really talks about the barrier methods that need to be in place. When you're on hormonal birth control there have been studies showing yard increased risk of contracting acting? HP and even possibly HIV. We need more information on this for sure. But a barrier method in non monogamous relationship is super important. Horton now for women who are like. I don't want any devices. I WanNa work with my natural cycle. Well that's funny. Because there's there's actually. An APP called natural cycles. There's also daisy and daisy is a fertility monitor natural cycles is the first FDA approved contraceptive device and. This is where the the fence tech industry is on the rise and is so awesome to see. So what does this all based on actually based on fertility awareness method. And what's interesting. His name is not a the concept of developing the pill is actually based on the findings the foundation of fertility awareness method which is tracking taking your signs in your symptoms. I mean way back in the day they were like we. We think there's something to this circle mucus but by the way like we need a better term than new kiss. I'm Jackie Kiss But you know in that there is a window when we can get pregnant. I remember there's a moment so sitting in class the medical school and my teacher says there's only one day out of the month of women can get pregnant here. I am on the pill and like this moments don't don't I'm like wait. I didn't suppressing my hormones every day under this fear based concept that I option getting pregnant so easy and get prime any day of the month. I mean ask women who are struggling with fertility and they're like if I knew how hard it was to get pregnant in Illinois if I would have ever used birth control For as long as I did so we can only get pregnant one day on the mound. Sperm is tricky. It hangs around Aitken live five or six days a jury. Your uterus will actually cultivate it and be like hey good little sperm like do let's take the best in the best of you like keep you alive and that is evolution's Lucien way of making sure that you are more successful in procreating so in the eighties release their sperm there waiting waiting an interestingly the it gets to decide it's not the strong swimmer in like l. the sperm penetrates the eggs. The eggs. Like you're cool you come on. Let's make a baby together so this is really where knowing your own body. I actually advocate that everybody asserts understandability awareness method. Because it's one of the best ways to understand understand your body and as they talk about in the on the pill getting together with a fertility awareness experts someone who coaches. His teachers can help you. So much get dialed in and when you understand so as I go through my book there's the low down your hormones. You can understand how your hormones work higher mental cycle works then we get into the period problems chapter after when you understanding. You're tracking your symptoms. Why your hormones are doing when your symptoms are coming on? There are so many women who were written me that are like only God may actually is because it has has also rising like all these years using accutane antibiotics only stuff like I needed to make these shifts. Like how easy was that so it can be great for understanding in your body working with your symptoms and at the same time he when we look at the research with perfect use. It's on rival with hormonal contraceptives. And that's because when so there's some people who are like oh so I can't have sacks during my fertile window okay one. There's a lot more than vaginal penetration that you can do. So so it's not that boring you can get creative and also you can use a barrier method. In this time I talked about leasing. I think it's only fair. To present their research and talkable that was the draw method when dunk correctly. You know. Italy has a four percent failure rate. I don't advocate it. Tell my patients to use it as a primary method acid because I don't like any method where a woman's not in control like she can't be in control of what happens in because without some sometimes those male hormones ramone's they get the best of your brain they override your judgment. And why that's you don't WanNA whoop situation. And when it comes to birth control in a sphere individualize What risk of getting pregnant willing to take? What risk of possible symptoms? Are you willing to take. What is your genetic predisposition like factor? Five Leiden you have a mutation and teach afar I really say you know you WanNa you WanNa think twice about using Ramona birth control. I won't migrations who have factor five mutation which is the clothing mutation. I'm like no dice. You cannot using hormonal birth. Control your stroke risk is way too high. Your heart vascular is way too high. Hi She's yeah. And we screen all of these things and know that and be able to offer that individualized birth control option. And you know I think in the the future as we go forward we're definitely GONNA see iterations because women globally are putting their ends up being like I want something better and why the heck do you're not have something better yet science. Yeah have you ever heard. By the way of the the is a newer ones called the Yuba. It's like a urinary measurement. I think it's tracking for starting L. H. or progesterone or estrogen on what it is. But it's relatively new. Someone just told me about. Oh I haven't seen that one But what else says said he's not women who are like all test my l. age and then on and then I'll have protected sex And yet you have to understand that like what happens is that testosterone is GonNa Spike in your cycle roughly around Dayton was gonNA do libido goes up suddenly. You're like my partner. Looks really good right now. And if you're having unprotected sex and you're like oh well then I'll abstain when my L. H.. Spikes it's too late. That sperm is already there. You're increasing your chances of pregnancy. So the symptoms thermal method of Measuring Your Measuring Your Body Basil Body temperature. So your eyes pop open for seeing the morning you papa thermometer under are you can paper chart taking taking charge of your fertility rate book for that and you can use the apps like daisy or natural cycles. There's also other apps where you can manually plug it in. That will help you understand when your temperature spikes which is synonymous with ovulation. That's going to be your sign Amami Malaysian But also looking for fertile cervical mucus. So there's actually a comedian Amy Schumer. Who should great skit where she talked about? Like you know. It looks like someone blew snot in her underwear aisle. And that's a that is exactly what it's like that raw egg white consistency and yeah. I can't tell you how many women that I've had call my office after getting off a birth control a call. They're freaking out there like there. Was this weird gooby discharge. I think I have an infection. I talked to them through it. And I'm like -gratulations you to stop deleted their. You're getting ready to oscillate in there. I've never seen this in my life. Yeah that's a sign nine of ovulation. That's also why there should be no shame Ever about the need of lubrication for sexual intercourse because ask little creatures Richard. There are times where we have more location and there are times where we do not so understanding all those symptoms you can even go further and understand cervical position position but I I think that can be helpful is very interesting to get to know your own cervical changes but it's not totally necessary in pregnancy prevention getting that at temperatures spike into your libido your energy your mood and then that cervical mucus is really essential. Look I mean I think a big part of it for me comes down to the fact that the pill is incredibly convenient but you know in very simple terms. Convenience always comes at a cost and in this case the cost is a a lot of biological damage from pointed out to stroke cardiovascular risk auto immune issues leaky gut nutrient abnormalities. A lot of these things that just are not not readily apparent or made readily apparent for women. And that. That's why I wanted to interview was because I think just so many women and and their partners are unaware of these issues and I know that it's I mean. Honestly it reminds me of the whole cell phone five G. conversations going on right now now. The phone is frigging convenient. Wi Fi bluetooth are so convenient. But it's not as though there's zero biological costs to the use of them and you you just in the same way you have to introduce smart utilization of technology. I think you have to utilize smart introduction of birth control methods that are more or natural than the pill and reflect a lot of what you provide in the book and some of the pointers that you gave out in this show. So I mean it's just it's it's the Human Inherent Tendency tendency towards laziness and convenience and when that's paired with advertising and pharmaceutical interest it just creates this shit shit storm scenario. Where a lot of women are hurting themselves? Yeah and when we're told that it's completely safe and if we're having symptoms that's just you you're just broken. I mean I mean it really fuels the fire in all of that and I think that's really such a big part of my message is not the pill isn't bad the you know the all of these ways of preventing pregnancy aren't necessarily band but might be bad for you like that's what we need. Is that individualized discussion and then informed consent and if women are going to go on hormonal birth control. That's where you need to be on a prenatal or multivitamin needs to be making sure that you're tending to your microbiome acre bio eating a variety of fiber considering probiotics probiotic. Rich food. Coming in. You need to track your metabolic health. If you're on a pharmaceutical that can lead to insulin resistance and inflammation US keep tabs on that. I don't care if you're twenty two. Your cholesterol may go up. High blood pressure may come on and we have to the educating women in this and having them also understand how their body works to begin with and that quite frankly it's downright dangerous to put women on birth control. Oh for symptom management without ever asking why she has them symptoms in the first place. Yeah well we've kind of scratched the surface of what's in your your book beyond the Pill and I think that anybody who wants to take a deeper dive should read the book and I've been taking a lot of notes all also linked to any other books. I mentioned in some of the studies and all the notes that I've taken during this conversation because I I always writing things down as we're talking and then I put them together in show notes for you guys all along with the transcript. So that's all going to be at Ben Greenville fitness dot com slash beyond the pill. The transcriptions always come out usually about a week after after the audio is released. But that's always available for you to review some of this information as well or use keyword search terms to go through the transcripts and is really encourage you to reach out to a loved one. If you know that they're on the pill in you know sometimes it doesn't work so much coming from you personally but if you just have them listen or read the book look that's my Mo lot of the time with my wife like. I don't want to shove health information at her soldiers have or read something and I think that everybody should should at least pay attention to what you're saying. Julian read the book and follow. What you're doing so thanks for coming on the show on Sharon all this stuff with us? Thanks so much for having me was such a pleasure to chat that with you. Awesome folks the show notes again are at Ben Bridge will finish dot com slash beyond the pill. And I'm Ben along with Dr Joelene Lean Brighton signing out from Ben Greenfield finished dot com. have an amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show. So you can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben Greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the a highly helpful. Ben Recommends Page which is a list of pretty much. Everything that I've ever recommended for. Hormones sleep digestion. Fat Loss Awesome Performance and plenty more. Please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this and every episode help up to make this podcast happen to generate income that enables me to keep bringing you this content every single week so when you listen and and be sure to use the links and the show notes use the Promo Code generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week week.

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Gretchen Rubin Interview On How To Declutter Your Home & Your Life For Outer Order, Inner Calm & Happiness.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:03:41 hr | 1 year ago

Gretchen Rubin Interview On How To Declutter Your Home & Your Life For Outer Order, Inner Calm & Happiness.

"And so when I gave up the fantasy of thinking that I was going to, you know, do XYZ then I have more time to read which is what I really actually like to do. And I never have enough time to read. So I would rather use that time reading or you know, you got a lot of things you wanna do outdoors. So like the thing that's like for whatever reason just isn't a good fit and have more time in energy things that you do wanted. Master's degree in physiology bio mechanics and human nutrition, I've spent the past two decades competing in some of the most masochistic events on the planet from seal fit Kiko, Spar negoti and the world's toughest mudder to thirteen ironman triathlons. Brutal bow hunts adventure races. Spearfishing plant foraging, free, diving bodybuilding and beyond. I combine this intense time in the trenches with a blend of ancestral, wisdom and modern science searched the globe for the world's top experts and performance that loss recovery hormones, brain beauty and Braun to deliver. You this podcast everything you need to know to live in adventurous, joyful and fulfilling life. My name is Ben greenfield enjoy the ride. Well, Hello got my friend Gretchen Rubin on the show day. She's gonna tell how to clean up all our crap actually got a lot out of this one. After I read her book. I get inspired. My wife was like what happened to you? I cleaned out my desk cleaned out. My office cleaned out my bathroom drawers, I straightened up my bedside collection of all the blue light blocking glasses and CBD oil, and and the books and M F devices straightened up, everything it was crazy. She thought it was broken not broken. I'm just listened to Gretchen Rubin. You're gonna learn what I learned in today's show, which is brought to you by kion kion has all these amazing supplement bundles. It's my company why formulate supplements and functional foods for you have a coffee. We have a bar. Everything is research backed real world tested soup or clean. And I have a lot of fun just hunting down amazing ingredients and turning them into formulations that you can get a Kia. For muscle gained for fat loss for recovery unit. We even have our kion daily life bundle which gives you a menas. Wonderful for carb cravings building muscle. Burning fat are clean energy bar with county ABS and coconut almond organic. Honey, all this wonderful goodness in it are pure coffee, which we tested against over forty other coffee brands that exist completely mold free beats the pants of any other healthy coffee out there high in antioxidants, and that I mentioned doesn't taste too shabby. And then our kiam lean which is the most potent fat loss formula of ever developed without any excess jittery nece or central nervous system stimulation all of this is in the key on daily life bundle. Just one of the many amazing bundles that we have deeply discounted for you at kion. So to get in on the goodness. And getting a dish ten percent off. You just go to get kion dot com. That's get K I O N dot com and use code g f. 1-0? That's as you ten percent off sitewide at get kion dot com. This podcast is also brought you by do Juve is the powerful form of photo bio modulation that a us. It's red light therapy mixed with near him for therapy. But rather than a week sauce light therapy device that you can get a cheaper device that you gotta stand in front of for like an hour to actually get the benefits. This is quick quick out. Ten to twenty minutes gives you all of the reductions in pain and inflammation, the increased storm production the enhanced skin collagen, synthesis a faster muscle recovery. You get all of this just ten to twenty minute dose. I have at my desk. Flip on one of my morning Cup of coffee. Boom done red light therapy. There you have it. And they have a go Juve go that you can take with you on the go and use for the exact same thing. But it super Smalls like the size of maybe a couple of cellphones slip it in your bag, and you can take photo by a modulating with you anywhere. So Juve has a ton of fun panels. You can custom design anything you want. And they're all very powerful medical grade power. I feel like I'm over using the word power. Now, you get the idea you go to Jews dot com forward slash Ben. That's J O Vivey dot com forward slash Ben that light checkout all the different devices. And then if you use code, Ben at checkout at Jews dot com slash Ben. You'll get a nice little bonus gift along with any of your photo bio modulating orders, so enjoy your Juvan, and let's get onto the show. Hey, folks, it's Ben greenfield. And if you're anything like me than you tend to especially in our information age internet of things culture like to find out about cool, new toys and interesting new books and amazing new clothing that's full of self quantified, tools, and and copper based antibacterial fabric, and you start to collect all these amazing things to improve your health and your fitness or to make your life better or to make life easier. And before you know, it your house is just full of bunch of random crap. Or maybe I'm just describing myself. But either way I recently read a book called outer order inner calm. Outer order intercom decluttering organized to make more room for happiness. And while I was. Reading it. I was like folding over every other page and circling all these things that were so intuitive and practical that I'd never actually thought of for for cleaning up. My house cleaning up my bathroom cupboard in my closet, and my sock drawer, and my gym and basically making life fricking easier. Because when you're when you're environment is clean, your head tends to be cleaned. And you get more done increases productivity, and it just feels good. So I decided to get the author of this brand new book. Her name is Gretchen Rubin on the show today to delve into some of these practical tips, and hopefully give you some takeaways for cleaning up your life a little bit more to make you more productive more healthy in the make what you do have more more meaningful. Hopefully, so Gretchen somebody you may have heard of before she's a really popular podcast that you can download anywhere and a link to it in the show notes. If you go to Ben greenfield, fitness dot. Com slash de clutter. That's been greenfield fitness dot com slash de clutter on her podcast is called happier. And on that podcast. She talks about habits, she talks about happiness. And if you want to tune into that again, just go find it wherever fine fine podcasts are found, but she's also written book, she has a bunch of blockbuster New York Times bestsellers like better than before and the happiness project and happier at home. And now this brand new book outer order inner calm, so Gretchen welcome to the show. I'm so happy to be talking to. Yeah, I'm curious. What inspired you to write this book? You just like loaded up with a with a pile of crap in your in your closet and your bedroom in your office like me or. That part of it for sure, but you know, ever since I started writing about happiness when the happiness project came out and talking to people about what makes them happier and kind of habits that contribute to their happiness and their creativity in their, you know, feeling productivity and energy. I've always been surprised by this kind of disproportionate connection between outer order and inner call for most people some people do not feel that they don't they just don't I call them clutter blinds. 'cause they like literally just don't see it. It doesn't matter to them. But for most people to kind of astonishing degree getting control over the stuff of our lives makes us feel more in control of our life, generally. And I really feel this myself if I clean out a closet like I feel great disproportionately great, and I feel energized. And like now, I can tackle that difficult project. A friend told me I finally that my fridge and now I know I can switch careers, and they knew exactly how that so. I. Been interested in this for really long time at finally it was like, you know, what I really wanna read a book about it. And really like go deep it did this very kind of narrow, but very kind of profound aspect of happiness and productivity has actually studied this like actually looked into what goes on in the in the brain with brainwaves or brain blood flow or anything like that. When it when it comes to out of order and intercom they have here's the problem. And this is kind of like an issue that I think is related to a lot of things related out or order and also to kind of happiness and have it's generally a lot of time. What people are trying to figure out is what is best. So you'll see like research where they're like are people more creative when they're in a neat laboratory or a messy laboratory, which is best. But or like when it comes to clear clutter. What is the best way to clutter when it's a habit. Are you better off doing something taxing first thing in the morning or later in the day? What's best? But the problem with that approach is that. People are different something. Simple morning people night. People for me. It's a great idea to get up early. And do something that's difficult. I thing because I'm a morning person. But they're night people who that's that's a low point for them. They're going to be much better to tackle something demanding later in the day when they're more energetic and creative and productive and some people like to work in chaos like for some people that is actually now would I argue is that even people who have like to have a lot of stuff around or who love abundance like or who liked to have like unexpected checks position. So they have a lot of stuff out on their desk at the same time, even they benefit from getting rid of things. They don't use don't need and don't don't love. They don't want a bunch of junk. They don't wanna bunch of trash. They don't wanna bunch of cords. They don't even know what that court is for files on the floor. I don't even know who those belong to. That's just in your way. But the idea that everybody's going to end up with like an empty desk with like one pencil on it. It's like some people like to work like that. But some people don't, and so I think that a lot of the research has been. A little bit misguided in that it's like, well, what's the best thing is the best thing to work unclear? Well, maybe not for you. So each of us has to sippers because again, you can do all the research and everything, but what I think most people really care about what I care about is. Well, what about me what what do I do? And it's like, I don't really care what a bunch of undergraduates Stanford or doing when they're have a match book and a lump of clay in a candle and thumb tack. It's like whatever how about me. And I know for me I do much better when everything's cleared away. Well, I'm want to jump right into the practical aspects of this. And the first thing is con- deciding what goes, and what stays Dan have like like a filter or a list of questions or a criteria that one could use as the going through each room of the house to begin to tackle all the clutter. Well, there's you're exactly right. And in your exactly right to start with that. Because one of my what lessons is don't get organized. Because a lot of times if you get rid of everything that you want to get rid of you don't need organize anything because you just like one thing to put on a cell. So you don't need some kind of elaborate filing system or some kind of weird storage Gizmo. You don't have anything left. So always start by getting rid of things. There's kind of two questions that I would ask the first is Marie Kanda was famous for asking does something spark joy and for many people. That's a hugely helpful question. But I for me that's a pretty high bar, and I did that everything. The house sparks joy felt a little emotionally taxing. So we'll just very cool. Dress shirts, don't necessarily spark joy. Yeah. It's so I does this energize me because there's a pair of scissors where I'm like, it's not that it's spur joy. It's not like it's not like like a really high like some scissors are so well designed they're like this is beautiful tool. This really speaks choice summer. Just like, you know, it's handy to have a Paris's IRS in this in my in my family room. So like I've had this pair since like fourth grade, and it it does the job just fine. So it energizes me in that. It's a tool. That's right at hand. What I needed even though is just like it's kind of like this old junkie pair of scissors. But it still works. It's energizing or another question that I like to ask is you say to yourself when you're looking at something do I need it. Do I use it or do? I love it. Because sometimes we have things that we love we don't really need her use. Like, I have some things where I'm like, I I have this. My daughter was makes fun of fees. Relentless clutter clear, and we have a miniature tin Disney Princess lunchbox. And she's like, why do we have this thing? And I'm like for some reason this thing just pleases me. I don't even store anything because I'm like, what am I gonna put my Disney Princess miniature book, but I just love it. And I'm like, you know, what I I don't wanna have my life. So edited down that I don't have any room for something that I just love. But I love it. So I'm keeping it. I don't need it. I don't use it most things using your needing. And again, there's like the drescher where you're like, you know, what every once in a while. I'm gonna need address shirt. And it's going to be very satisfied me. Like, I need a dress shirt. And I have exactly the right thing. I'm just going to go to my closet and get it. I don't use it that often. I don't love it. But from time to time, I need it. And so I wanna have it. Because when it same thing with something like thermal underwear, maybe you don't use it for three or four years because it's cold enough. And then the your comes when you're like now, I need Thurmond handy someday you. Have to be honest with yourself about what Sunday is Sunday is going to be below twenty degrees in New York City, highly likely, are you going to have an urgent need for a ten year old rice cooker less likely, you know, so that's where it starts getting into these tough decisions because because really this process of of getting out of order involves decision making and that can be hard. So so that's a question. I think often is helper. So just backup. You said. Do I need it. The three big questions are doing need it. Do. I love it. And do I use it? Yeah. Things that you don't really need them. And you don't really love them. But you use them. So. Another thing to say to yourself is have I thought about getting rid of this thing? Three times. Because the endowment effect. We tend to hang onto our possessions more really than we should we the endowment affects means that. Once we own something, we kind of value it more that we just saw it out in the world like a mug once known that mug, and it's your mug. It's like it's more important than just like a mug that's walking down the street. But if three times, I don't know if I really need this thing. I don't know if I really wanna wear this thing again, you probably should have given it away awhile back so three if it's occurred you three times that's a very good sign too that it's time to get rid of it. Okay. So somebody's listening. They're going to declutter when you're talking to people about this. Have you found that it works best to just like identify a day or a week or weekend? Just go through a nuke everything. Or is there a better system? Well, see there again. Right. It's what's best. I don't think there is one best way because some people are like sprinters, and they like intensity, and they're like I am going to do the entire basement in one day and they get up at. Nine AM, and they work until midnight. And they're so excited, and it's like a big thing, and it's all in and they want big results. And they they wanted just like, you know, go bigger, go home, and that is great. But then some people don't like to do that some people get overwhelmed when they think about tackling too much people don't have the time to do that. Like, they don't have a day where they can just like spend the whole day cleaning out the garage. And so sometimes people like to do just like one shelf at a time or maybe even just like whenever I have ten minutes just going to do like this drawer. I'm just going to do what I can. And one of the things that's interesting as we often will overestimate what we can do in a short amount of time like one day one afternoon, but we underestimate what we can do if we do short periods of work consistently over long period of time. If you spent twenty minutes, clearing out your house over the courses, six months, you would make very considerable gains. And so a lot of what I talk about things like, well, you do big things, but you can. Also, do small things whatever works for you. Because I do think that just because of realistically what people. Have an affinity for and what they had the opportunity to do. Very different. Okay. Got. Yeah. I tend to to have certain for me, it's usually a Saturday or Sunday where all have two or three hours of time and be able to go through an organize something. I I like to make it fun. I don't know about you. But whenever I have something I dread or don't want to do like all find a podcast. I've really been wanting to listen to or a chunk of an audio book that I that I really wanna go through or and don't laugh because I'm a fitness guy. Sometimes if I know it's going to be like garage project, all put on ankle weights and awaited vest, and actually turn it into an actual workout to clean things out and get my heart rate up, and if you really want wanna bio hack, this you can wear one of those fancy elevation training masks, limit your oxygen flow and just get an amazing workout maybe even pass out while you're cleaning camping gear in the garage. So so that's that's how I tend to do it. But but I. Also wanted to ask you because this is a big thing. These days this concept of minimalism, right? There's a whole podcast about it. There's a whole movement on minimalism is this the same thing as minimalism just like cleaning up all your all your clutter. You know? I don't I mean, I think there's different definitions of minimalism. So I don't want to overstate or put words into other people like what they would describe it. But I think at least to me and in the popular bandaged nation minimalism really means taking down to the studs. Like really getting rid of a lot a lot of stuff. And really, you know, having only really what you need. And you know, I think that's great for some people. But to me, there's simplicity lovers and their abundance lovers. So simplicity levers are are people who love minimalism, and they want their shells. And they want empty surfaces. And you know, they want one vase with one rose, but in it, and you know, and and silence, and you know, kind of low choices and everything. Is very simple. And that is great for some people. But some people love abundance. They love profusion. They like collections. They like things they like choices. They like abundance. They like, you know. And and I think like, you know, my parents so my when I go visit my parents, they have many more things on the counter on on on the, you know, on a coffee table, whatever beautiful things carefully chosen things valued things more than I would want because I'm a minimal I'm oh SimpliSafe ever myself. So I like a lot of like bear. But it's not like I'm writing they're wrong or or I'm wrong in their right? It's just we have different preferences. And I think again it's about getting to where you want to be. And I don't think but minimalism sort of implies there's a place we should all try to go. I'm like, I don't think everybody's trying to head to the same place. And I don't think there's anything wrong with somebody who wants to have a bunch of if you wanna have a giant porcelain collection. Great. I love it that some people wanted to great giant porcelain collection. I don't wanna giant porcelain collection. But that doesn't mean that I'm better or that my way is better. Okay. Got no, no what about the whole like mental aspect because in many cases, you have these things, and we kind of alluded to this a few moments ago. Those things that you feel like you, you might someday us or you might go on this adventure, or you might eventually tackle all of these, you know, guitar books or pick up this instrument and learn it, and you don't want to necessarily get rid of it because you're kind of like mentally checking out of that thing that you think you might do some day of how do you mentally let go or should you that is a very important thing. And it's a huge stumbling block with clutter clearing, and that's the fantasy self. So the fantasy self is the one that's going to go hiking. The Andes the one that's gonna learn to speak Portuguese. That's gonna learn to play the guitar. You wanna be arrests on person cocktail party where I'm gonna use linen napkins. That was my thing was like like, I am. I kidding come on. I don't have the life, and I never will have. Life where I have the slightest idea what to do at linen cocktail napkins. So you have to be so part of what's painful, but clearing is it does mean facing up to what is true for you. And saying, you know, what I'm really not gonna I'm not gonna learn to play guitar. I'm not gonna teach myself to play guitar. So I can get rid of those books. Get rid of tar can get rid of the music stand. 'cause I, but the thing that happens is when you do that. When you go to finish yourself, you re up this in immense amount of mental energy because this thing that's been dragging. You down kind of making you feel maybe regretful may be guilty for spending money on things that have never been properly used all that goes away. And so you you have more room in your head, and you also have more room in your shelves. Because now, you cleared out these things, and so it's enormously helpful to face up to it. But it can be hard because there's the fantasy self as yourself. But then there's us. Stealth which is like, oh, I used to have a job where I wore these suits. And these seats were really important to me at one time. And maybe I spend a lot of money on these. But I'm no longer the person who wears these suits or the most painful kind of fantasy self past self is like I used to be able to wear these clothes and now they don't fit anymore. But if I get rid of them, I say that I will never be that body again that is very very painful for people. To let go of Dodd idea or even people who will buy things thinking this doesn't fit now. But if I buy it and spend all this money, then I will then I will force myself to lose weight and fit into these clothes, you know. And this just just just doesn't work. What about a like a place that you would put this stuff as like, you know, like a waiting space like one room or one drawer were you say, I'm not using this right now might was kind of on my bucket list year ago. I don't know use it like is that okay to have like a a drawer or a location somewhere where you just kind of tossed this stuff to let it wait. Well, one thing you can do is you're gonna have a box that you put the date on and you put everything in the box and then after a year if you have an open the box throw the box with looking at it. So you can do that with things like Gataric lesson books or you could do it with things like chords where you're like do I use this cord like what is this word for put in the box? And if you never 'cause if the day comes when you're like, gosh what I really feel like doing today is teaching myself how to play guitar you'll know exactly where the books put them in that box. But and you just get rid of the box after year, but you need to. But I mean, but again, it's like don't fool yourself because you're just moving clutter around your house. If you're perpetuating the fantasy now part of one of the things that you can always ask yourself is have done this in the past where you're like. Well, have you yourself instrument in the past if you had done it once then it seems aren't we're lucky that you might do it again if you've never done it. It's sort of like, why why do you think that this is something that would ever happen, or you know, you've had this the, you know, you're like, oh, it really wanna get into needlepointing. So I like got myself this. Thing and I've never really done it some people, and this is something that some people are more prone to than others. They love to buy the stuff. I had a roommate like this where she'd go out and she by everything for roller blading, the the pads the the shirt the vest, the I'm totally like be like. Never did it, you know, but yoga the yoga mat yoga close the block never did the yoga so like look around and be like is this the kind of person. I am do I tend to like, you know, like, do I go out and get a lot of equipment. And then it never really gets used first of all that can help you buy things in the first place, which is the best way to clear clutter never to buy it. But then it can also you can say to yourself. These are these are related to a fantasy. And I see that these it's not like if I keep it for five years eventually start doing yoga, you know. Because we do sometimes why things to as almost a to show respect for the idea of something we want in our lives. It can almost kind of like bother. You though, can like if you if you have I mean, you feel guilty because like I bought a bunch of stuff to two years ago. I really wanted to get an escape skiing, and you know, mount Spokane thirty minutes from my house. It's got these great skate skiing trails and tracks. And I took my wife down to the fitness fanatic store down the street, and we got fitted. We got the boots. We get the skis. We got the polls. We all the gear and we went like twice, and it was it was okay. But you know, it was kind of a chore, and we were trying to fit it in with everything else. And it was a good workout. But it was kinda hard and we had to figure if we were going to do that or do the downhill skiing or snowboarding instead. And so I have all this expensive skate ski women every single time. I walk into the garage. And I look at that like. I have this paying of guilt. Like, I have this really cool skates. He's what I'm not skate skiing. What's wrong with me? One hundred percent. And that's one of the reasons that outer order contributes dinner calm when you say to yourself. Okay. Now, I'm gonna let these things go. And by the way, someone else is gonna get enormous pleasure out of them. So having them. This garage is practically the same thing as like burning them in a bonfire you they're going to waste because they're not being so you can let those things go, and then you'll have more room in your garage, like more room in your head because you won't have the sense of of guilt and dread. And I should but I haven't and all the money. And also, here's the other thing that happens when you get rid of all the things that you feel like you should do that. You don't actually do that means that you have more time and space and energy for the things that you actually want to do. And so when I gave up the fantasy of thinking that I was going to, you know, do XYZ then I have more time to read which is what I really actually liked to do. And I never have enough time to read. So I would rather use that time reading or you know, you've got a lot of things you wanna do outdoors. So Licko the thing that's like for. Whatever reason just isn't a good fit. And I have more time and energy things that you do wanted it. How do you donate like do you actually donated or you toss this stuff out? Well, I when I can't for sure and the greatest thing that has happened since it started, we're s- book as thrift shop moved in like they have a pop store like a block and a half from my apartment, I live in New York City. And it's like it's right there literally I walked by. I walked by the window the other day and a pair of my daughter was in the window. I'm like, I recognize shoes we gave those so that can backfire my wife has given away like my airmen triathlon t shirts and also you like I've actually seen this happen actually to me in Moscow, Idaho. I saw dude walking down the street with an and he was obviously not like a fitness guy. But he was like wearing an iron man traffic on t shirt that I swear was mighty shirt, and it bugged me. Yeah. Yeah. So I have to say, I think that's extremely rare. I don't think that's happening. Most people you don't you don't usually encounter your things like seeing someone else like with possessions that you thought you might use or healthier using them. I guess that's just like another mental ego block that I need to get over. So I think it's very unlikely. But I think when you can give things away it's good to or recycle them if you can certainly. But here's the sad thing though. And I think this is something that we all just have to accept the people say to me, I don't want. I don't wanna get rid of that. Because it's just going to the landfill. You created that donation to the landfill? When you bought it is the moment of landfill. We out escape that. I mean, unless something is literally like turn to ash or something like that. Like, it's there, you know, that plastic yellow water pitcher that you bought it's like, it doesn't matter. If it's in your cupboard for ten years or one the landfill is the destination for it at some point, you know, down down. Long decades. And so, and so I think that that's why it's really good to be very mindful of what you bring into your house because if you're not really going to use it or wanted or love it. It's best just to like one thing. One thing is stored at the store, you can say you can save yourself. It's at the store, and if I needed I can get it from the store just going to store it. They're stored at the store store you mean like when you're shopping. Yeah. You're like I like this yellow somebody buys it though. What if they run out your will other? There will never be a time when you cannot buy yellow pitcher. No now want. I mean what what is. So that you you feel like this is a one time opportunity. That's handmade. It's very unusual that you will feel that. Decide you need it. You can't go get it. That's related. I wanna ask you actually like shopping whether online or offline do you have any systems that you use to in your shopping, and you see something that you know, that you might use? It's kind kinda cool or you get distracted by something. When you're at the store, like let's say, I don't know like the you're out there to buy peanut butter. And then you see almond butter in walnut butter, and you add them all to your car because they all look good or you're you're on Amazon and you're shopping for let's say oh gosh. I don't know. Maybe maybe a kindle, and when you're shopping for the kindle UC, a couple other accessories, you could throw in along with it and maybe use maybe wouldn't how do you approach either online shopping offline shopping when it comes to resisting the accumulation of more clutter? Right. That's a super important question. So one thing is what one distinction just like we were talking before people are different. They're under buyers and over buyers, I myself having. Be an under buyer and under buyers actually have a lot of trouble buying. So we have to like we have to have ways to help ourselves by what we need because we will under buyers. I thought I was the only under buyer in the world because everybody talks about overbuying, but it's the thing under buyers unite so we have a different set of problems. But but our problems tend to be cheaper except that we do have to pay full price for things often because we've waited too long over buyers. So if you feel like you just buy too much, so there's a bunch of different things you can do one for online. If you're if you're shopping online, cancel all of your accounts, all your stored information and wish up guest this will have to enter in all your shipping billion formation every time and that is enough of a nuisance. It's not that big a nuisance, but it's enough of a nuisance that is really gonna cut down impulse buying. 'cause it's going to be. I don't have time right now like, you know, blah, blah, blah. So that's one thing you can do you can also unsubscribe to all newsletters with deals and stuff like that. Because. The vast majority of people do not need those deals are use that website on. I think it's unrolled dot ME. A lot of. Makes his tribe. Yeah. Yeah. Also one thing if you go to a store, and they ask you if you're buying something Personnaz you for your Email address. If you say, I don't give out my Email address. They never they always accept that. So I always do that. So they don't leave. I don't wanna even be unsubscribe ING. I don't want them on that something that works. If you're buying in real life. Another thing that you do if you're in real life, some things to do or don't take a cart or basket. Where's yourself to hold your things in your arms because it's fine to like toss the three things of of nut butter into your cart? But if you're carrying a thing of three things of nut butters, and you know, two things of yogurt around the store, you're gonna be like, this is a big pain. I think I will put the nut butters down. And then if I find that I'm thinking, oh my gosh. If only I had tried that almond butter how rich my life would be they need back for it. Right because you can stored in the store, so forcing yourself to use your arms another thing. You can do this is this is good. Like, if you're in a big bucks or two if you see something, and you're like, wow. That that seems like something. I would really want keep shopping leaving on the shelf. Keep shopping go around. And then by the time, you're done in your kind of approaching the cash register say to yourself, then you can say like do I wanna go back and get it a lot of times. Gosh. Now, I'm done. I'm like right here at the cash register I just wanna pay and go 'cause it's like is it worth the effort? You know, what you're trying to do is break the impulse because the impulse is where I see it. I wanted to get it. It's so easy. Like, I just put it in the car. I don't even remember I get home. I'm like, I forgot I even bought that thing. So you wanna break that impulse? By forcing yourself to go out of your way to go back and get it. And remember the don't like try to stop for as as quickly as possible. The longer. You are in a store the more likely you are to buy more things. Don't touch things the more you touch the more you buy don't eat things. Like, don't take too. Don't touch it. Yeah. The more you touch, and they know that they know that there's a fascinating book by pocket Underhill called why we buy and this, of course, is of enormous interest in. Subject of much study by retailer. So they they've got all kinds of impulse purchase by the cash. Register 'cause you're standing there board. They've got they really have figured out there trying to get you to do it. So you really want to think about how to manage the experience of that you shop from a list is a great one. But part of it is just sort of acknowledging that that it's something that you have let's say if you're a person who you go into a sporting goods store, and you're always just like man, that's stuff. So good like, I just can't walk out. You know, people feel that way about target sporting? All the time. Like if I walked through and again kick this horse to death. But I'm like, fitness guy. Right. So if I walk in and I see like, oh, the new little ball that you drop on the ground that bounces in a different direction to increase your reaction time or these new handgrips that make it easier to dead lift the weight off the ground like I can walk through. And just feel like there's there's ten new things I need to get. You could do is you could make a note of it. And then and then think about it or you could make note of it. And look it up online and see like what are people saying? This is really good or they're saying this is kind of a gimmicky thing again a break that impulse. And also just even saying yourself as you're going in like, this is a really tempting place for me. I'm probably going to see a lot of things I've never seen before that I'm really gonna want. So just be on guard. And remember, I'm here to get blah, blah, blah. I'm not here to, you know, add fifteen different things and the things against stored at the store if that if those grips are are something that you really want. And you find yourself thinking gosh that would really be enhancing Atta have that thing. Then you can go back get it. And it's interesting because one thing that people often advises using cash because for most people it seems that giving cash is painful like you feel that cash leaving your hand. I'm definitely that way. Some people however, actually find that it's easier to use a credit card because of the accounting. It's like, you know, you can't just sort of like fog out you see where your money's gone. And so. No yourself one thing. A lot of people. Do this is really smart. They'll have like a partner where if it's above a certain amount. If it's if it's a certain amount of money, they have to check with somebody like, you know, is it. Okay. If I buy this. I heard about a couple where they took turns each month being kind of the the family financial officer. So if you bought something over thirty dollars to check with the other person's if you're like, we really need a new electric kettle. It's like, okay. Let me ask the chief financial officer to really is this really good use of our money that check. But on the other. Can you have to think about yourself? I know somebody who never didn't make big purchases, but she just frittered fritter away all her money on small purchases. So she has her brother if it was over one hundred dollars, she could just by herself. Because that was she was very key was careful about those purchases. But if it was under a hundred dollars, she had text her brother because that's where she was spending her money the twenties thirties, you know, the fifteen dollars. Here like, and that's John. And it was just junk it was to stuff that. He was like, oh, it's no big deal. It's sort of I could use this cool. It's kind of funny out paper like, you know, to write like handy little notes on. It's like you've already got five things where you can write handy little notes how how fast these things up like. Yeah. It's only fifteen dollars. But you do not need that. And you'll regret it. And it'll just be something to have to manage for her. She figured it was a little things. So you could also have a deal where nothing in the sporting like if it's not on a list, you've got to you got to clear it. Let's make it so much easier. Like I travel ton, and I'm a big fan of eating healthy when I travel and a lot of times, I'll have the Uber. Stop off at whole foods on my way, to whatever hotel that I'm going to and I have a very simplest. It's the same thing every single time. I get avocados. I get a few cans of sardines. I get a little bit of that stevia flavored dark chocolate. I get some Pellegrino. I get some coconut yogurt. I get some little seaweed wraps to be willing to make myself like these little wraps with the avocado and the sardines, and I get some like some of the the healthy sugar free gum to keep my appetite satiated while I'm at a conference or at talk, and it's just so simple. And I have it as a note on my iphone store. No on my iphone. So any city in the world. I just drop in. Well, maybe not in the world on Hong Kong. There's no whole foods there. But most places in the US at least I can just drop in get the. List boom done, and I'm not getting distracted by the brand new spiraling SuperFood, crunchy granola bag that that could grab on my way out and it just worked so. Yeah. On a huge huge fan of those lists on the low car person or and yeah, I really do have to you have to have a plan. There. There's tons of that for you. But you have to know where to get it. And you have to have it at hand because it's not always it's not always in the minibar and those mini bars or those mini fridges or only so big. You can just it so much into them and that system works now a question back to back to the house in back to the clutter in the house in the book, you use the term clutter magnet. I never thought of it in that context before. But can you get into a what a clutter magnet is? And why that's important. So in most people's houses, certainly mine, there are certain areas that just stuff is just constantly accumulating. It's like the, you know, the death star where everything is just being pulled in. And and it just gets worse and worse so for for us. It's this certain area of our kitchen counter where stuff just gets put and then kind of never dealt with. And then more stuff goes on top of it. And then more stuff goes on top of it, and it kind of mounts up, and what happens is that. If you know if you recognize that something has a tendency to be clutter magnet. You can really go out of your way. Like every day say, I'm gonna get it. They're gonna get it down to nothing because then stuff doesn't accumulate there. Because people Messier. Areas tend to get Messier, and as people see that, oh, this is a place where I can just don't my junk like when I was growing up as our dining room table. If we had clear dining table. It was like people were coming over for dinner that night because it was just a constant mess. And that's the straining to see that an also often important things will get lost. Like, you can't you don't know what you have an important tax a statement that came in and it somewhere under their thought you look for. But it's not there because it got stuck to something. Or you know, I it just it it's draining. And so if you so like, we know it's the kitchen counter, it's the top of the jurors our entry way it's this one little table in in my husband, my bedroom. That's where the stuff is. So I make a special. To get it down. And and it's just it's so dispiriting I went to a friend's house 'cause I'm always trying to beg my friends to help me. Hell let me help them clear clutter 'cause like I get such a contact high from it. And if it's not your stuff, it's so much like there's so much less emotional pain and so much dislike joy to it. So over there, and I'm walking through he's like a very nice one bedroom apartment on the Upper West side. If you know what that kind of thing is and I'm like walking through his bedroom. And I'm like, your the top of your chest of drawers is like a festering sore on my soul. I can't he it's such a mess. Like, it's right in your bedroom. It's just like this mount of junk, there's like everything from dirty Kleenex is to to change to like like, you know, your coat check from a restaurant. You went to to some really important looking invoices. Like, you know, like ceramic duck. It's like, okay, what is going on here? It took like ten. Ten minutes twenty minutes, and he got it down to this shining bare wood with like once one attractive ceramic thing to put his change it. He's like if the days like, I just walked by on just so happy 'cause it's just it's just as there was just more and more stuff. It's like well. Of course, I'm just gonna dump stuff here then clear, and then it's easier so much easier to keep it clear because you're like, I don't need that coach. Let me put it in the Trat white change here. Let me put it might change. You know? Oh, here's this really important Bank statement. Why did I put my desk drawer? So that when I pay my bills, it's right here. I mean, it's just gets easier to maintain it once you once you have established that the clutter you once you take it back to to clear, and it's much easier for those clutter magnets to stay clear Dutch. Okay. So by the way, you making me feel guilty about my ceramic duck collection mcduck, if it's like it's like why ceramic dot here is this like randomly. He's like, I don't know where to put this around. Like, you could put it there. If you wanna keep it there. But. I've ever actually seen. What man wanted to have in his bedroom? Never actually seen a ceramic duck. What about kids how about training kids to actually declutter their their rooms or declare their spaces? Do you ever worked with kids or do you have kids or suggestions for for helping kids keep their stuff clean because my kids room, and my wife, and I are working through this right now. It's kind of a disaster zone. Trying to train them how having an orderly workspace an orderly room helps give you more order in life. You know, I actually I'm taking them through Jordan Peterson's twelve rules for life right now and trying to help them. Learn the win chaos is good. And when chaos is not so good and in in the room cast, typically, not good. But do you have any any tips or practical ideas to to help kids take care of clutter in their spaces? Yeah. We talk about this have a podcast called happier with that. I do with my sister who's very messy, by the way, Elizabeth craft. And we were just talking about this on the happier podcast. Well, part of it is how old are your children held are your children the ten year old twin boys? Okay, ten. Okay. So minor thirteen and nineteen. And so part of it is the kid. You know, like, I think parents often like, I am the, you know, I am the Potter who shaping the pot. Well, some parts, you know, you got you kind of get what you get. And you don't get upset. My thirteen year old is like an orderly soul. She's been like seed like nothing makes her happier than to go in and rearrange her little things on top of desk. And she's relentless I had her come up here at one time and help me clean my office. And I thought I was good. We got rid of three bags of stuff because she's just that kind of person. And it's not because of me and how I trained her. It's how she is. My sister, Elizabeth has been messy since the day. She was born. I was there when she was born, and it's always been the same. She's she's gotten better, but she's clutter blinds really care. You know, it's like busy just doesn't bother her. So it's hard to close a cabinet door because she just doesn't bother. So the part of it is just the nature of the child. And so you just you have to just accept that. You're not gonna totally shape a person also children, if they it's very easy for children to accumulate a lot of stuff a lot of toys just because of earth as and holidays, and they get stuff. And if it's enough stuff, it's really hard to manage. We feel. This is a dull if you're if you're grown woman, and you just have too many clothes, and it just doesn't fit you see people who are just completely overwhelmed and they're constantly like trying to. But it's like there's just too much. It's too much to manage. So I think the first thing back to this idea that we were talking about at the beginning. Don't get organized get rid of it. Help your children really really really reduced. How much they have really worked with them to be honest about do they actually play with puzzles? Do they actually play board games? How many decks of cards? Do they need? How many stuffed animals do they actually play with? You know, if you're constantly getting this thing, and that thing how many of them do you actually want, you know, some children, again, it's some children love huge collection, and they're playing with each one, and they're arranging them, and they're like, you know, doing Donald or they're doing, you know, what my sister did she would play hospital and like have a plague breakout among her all's, and she would be the the Florence Nightingale. That was like a big a big thing. She did she's using all the dolls right because she's got a hospital full of babies, so she used them all, but then others don't and so really helped him get rid of the things because then it's so much easier for them to manage. It's hard for children to do that on their own. Even Marie condo says the problem with children is that for them. Everything's perks joy. So you really have to help them understand like, what are you actually using? And sometimes you can do things like, well, what are you gonna put? We'll take these stuff down. We'll put them away put them in a box. And then you can kind of see if they ever miss them and stuff, and then maybe you can kind of spirit. You know, help them reduce also as adults maybe you don't experience, but some adult it's like something that their child once loved, but no longer loves is enormous sentimental value. So like, no my child doesn't play with this. Disney Princess tin lunchbox anymore. But to me, it's dear because it was once something that she loved that's a different kind of problem. That's my problem feeling attached to a child's toy. That's not the child being attached the child's toy. So you have to approach that differently. But I think sometimes parents are like, oh, but all these Fisher Price things are so the bar the house the school like, oh, they're all wonderful. It's like even if your kid is like I don't play with Fisher Price anymore. So you have to really get clear on who's hanging onto what and help and help them reduce so that they can more easily manage what they have. No, you're also a fan. You talked about this a couple times in the book of making your bed. And of course, there's that. Tiddly famous. I believe it's a Ted talk by a general. I forget his name now. But he talks about the importance of making your bed. I don't make my bed personally because whenever I make it. My wife always has to remake it because I don't fluffed the pillows the right way. I don't took the sheets exactly as she would like. And so I just kind of quit making the bed because it I know it's going to get remade. Anyways. I just I don't do it. Like, there's nothing like learn how you know deliberate deliberate incompetent at the same time. I'm not complaining that somebody else makes the bed better than I do. So I don't need to. But when it comes to making your bed. Why is that important when it comes to to clutter? Can't you have a messy bed, and and an orderly home against the I don't I don't think that like you have to make that. I think I have people who are like grandpa had to make my battery day. Now, I'm a grownup. I don't make my bed, and I look at that unmade bed. And I just think I can do at one. I'm like, that's great. If that's what may. Pshew happy. Then don't make your bed for many people when they compare how they feel with a made better on my bed. They just really prefer the made bet it just does make them feel better. There's something about establishing that bit of order on their on their environment. That just makes them feel better than the whole room looks much better. Then you're much more able to find things like if you can't find your wallet. Or you can't find your shoe a lot of times it's because there's like bed close on it. And also when you come back in at night, it looks much more orderly. And so it's a more restful experience. Because you think it just it just kind of looks looks nice. I'm in the bed is interesting because there's certain possessions that we own that feel more tied to us. I think in some kind of mystical way like your bed is much closer to you than like dining room chair. It feels like for many people like a reflection of themselves. And so if they're bet is in good order than they might feel like they themselves are in better order because it feels like it's kind of a reflection of them. And so there's something about it. Now, it's interesting to imagine. If your wife was like, you know what? You're right. I don't I I'm just gonna I'm I'm just going to let this go. I wonder if you would make the bed yourself in your own way because you just prefer walking into a room at the end of the day and having the bed made hard enough. Maybe maybe would maybe you don't face it. My husband, and I have a thing where whoever gets up second mix the bed. So. Later, you get to you don't have to make the bed and so. That works for me. But if I, but if he gets up early, then I'm the woman exit. That's kind of a nice way to divide it up because it's sort of like either way you kind of have a little bit of a benefit. It's kind of funny because I wake up I, but I have this don't laugh this elaborate system where I sleep on this like special Matt that that you mitts what are called pulsed electro magnetic field frequency is called P M F, and it helps you to fall asleep. It's kind of like that concept of earth. Grounding going outside barefoot, but this kind of concentrates this frequencies during the entire night of sleep. So my body's like healing inflammation as I sleep. There's this little button on it. It's called forgives called a bio balance or body balance. Matt I'll all remember in put it in the show notes for folks, but you push a little button when you wake up, and it does what's called an energy sweep where it takes you from like, low frequency up to high frequencies here in L A brainwaves owned by the time you pop out of bed, and then I lay there, and I always read them. Morning devotional. And then I do my gratitude journal, I've got a gratitude journal, I design where you you're right down one thing that you grateful for one person who you can help that day and one truth that you discovered in that morning's reading, so even though I wake up I I'm laying there doing all this elaborate journaling and reading and getting blasted by my little Matt my wife is, of course, already up and out of bed. So I suppose if I were to follow that advice out probably the one making the bed every morning. But again, I'm in this unique scenario where my wife's gonna probably go remake it anyways. So. It's good. That's why it's it's like there's no one right answer. It's kind of like, well, it sort of depends on you and your situation and your values and your background. And what else you like, you know? So I I would never say like everyone should make their bad because some people just eight don't care or be, you know, feel like it's an exercise and freedom that they enjoy the one that I don't get is. So whenever I make my I'm the kind of person that makes my bed in a hotel room on the day. I check out 'cause I just can't stand to be in a room without a made bed. Just like Chris reason gosh at the funny thing is people would be like, oh because of dust mites. You should not make your I'm like what? Like, the one thing. I not worried about in this world is whether a sudden attack of dust mites is going to somehow interfere with me because I made my bed like that is in the category of things that I just feel like we do not need to something else is gonna come up. I, you know, rears its head as an issue for me. So that is that's something. That's like the one kind of. Objection to bed making, and I'm like, well, the bed might, but if you don't want the you're worried about the bed mites. And that's why leave your bed and done, then that's your value. And that's why you're doing what you're doing. And for you that would be the right choice. Now, what about this whole concept of outsourcing? It's kind of a two part question are there like people or organizations who could come into your home and kind of like do this for you to a certain extent like like clean sweep your home for you? And then second question is what about having like like, an assistant or someone that you hire an organization like that doesn't exist to like hand like hire somebody in hand them Gretchen Rubin's book and say take this book and go through my house and do it says. I think for I think except for the most like top level of clutter. It would be very hard for somebody to do that without year participation because because it's like, well, what closed you actually wear or you know, what what is important. And so I think there is a level of decision making. And that's what's partly what's draining the decision making. So I think it would be very hard to just hire somebody to do it. I think if you're the kind of person who could do that you probably through all this stuff away before. Like, if you don't have like a concert t shirt from college already like that's the kind of person who could be like, hey, come in and throw him a concert teachers. I don't care. But there's definitely people that you can have come in. And they can help you this can help for a lot of reasons. One is sometimes people just get so overwhelmed, they don't know where to start. So they want somebody who is going to help direct them and kind of help them stay focus, but you know, again, people are different levels like sometimes people you're like why you need professional help. But one thing that I've noticed because I do try to force myself on my friends is a lot of times people just they need somebody there to kind of help them stay on task. And maybe the help with a little bit of the grunt work like, okay? I'll hold the garbage bag open or all all tape this box that we're gonna of books that we're going to give away or you know, kind of help with that. Or, you know, seventy says, we'll do I does this look good. You could be like that looks that doesn't usually enters. No. That does not look good. If you're asking look good. No, probably does not look that kind of thing. But apart is just it's helpful to have somebody there for just kind of moral support. And it's funny to me how often I'm not even really doing anything. I'm just there as a quiet presence to help somebody else. Do what they need to do. So if you're like, I don't have the money for professional or go to organism like have your friend. Have a buddy come over tell them that like you'll buy them, you know, beer, or diet coke or coffee, or LA or whatever. And could they spent a couple of hours just like hanging out with you while you do this. I bet you have a friend. I would come. If I knew you in a flash a lot of people find this kind of relaxing weirdly, and like and don't we'll we'll find it like energizing, and helpful to be there with you. And you can do a lot that way. Now, if you wanna get into some kind of super advanced like storage unit stuff, like California closet, kind of thing. Like, I don't know how to do that. I'm not a professional organizer. I'm just somebody who like is very interested in like, do you really want to have this thing in your house or not or like, do you really need to sing in your office? Because it doesn't look it's covered in dust. So I'm thinking that it's not that useful to you. So I think other people can be held. It's interesting back condo who sort of like the giant in the space. Marie kanda. Really advises people to do it by themselves. And I think son you wanna have what's her name Maury condo wrote the book the life changing magic of tidying up which was a huge book about clutter clearing about five years. Yeah. She's got a very very specific system, which I think works great for some people. But in my experience, people often can't do it really her way they pick and choose because her ways very very like stringent. She buys you need to have the right kind of person because there's like a friend of mine, I was over helping a friend of mine clear her clothes closet, and she said she tried to have her mother come helper. But her mother was like a person some people are like the defenders of possessions. And they'll be like, but that's so nice. You could wear that. Or you just got that Taylor would fit grade. Oh, you don't want to get rid of that? Like, you don't want that kind of person because you want somebody who's going to be encouraging you to let go of things if you're trying to clear clutter, so don't pick somebody who's going to find it or like every time you put something in the pile to give to the the thrift job. They find you find them like literally taking things out and putting them on the shelves that happens. There are people who will do that. That is not the person that you want helping you want somebody who's pretty his like, you'll be happier. If you get all the junk out of your house, you know, there's a lot of those people know what about this concept of fish way. Does this tie-in to finish way? At all. I like, I know some people hire people to come in to their homes and based on. On this this this Chinese principle of using the the organization of the home to create certain energy in different rooms. Do you ever do any work with thanks way? Or you had someone come into your home and do anything like that. Functionally is really a set of beliefs. It's a very profound set of beliefs about the world and how the world works and and energies, and it's it's like, I don't believe it. I don't accept those beliefs. Those beliefs have no meaning to me. And so a lot of functionally I'm like kind of common sense, which is like if there's something related to something in your life. That's kind of dead or finished get rid of it. So have you ever done plant get rid of your dad plant? If you have framed photograph of your ex boyfriend who you now really dislike get rid of the picture of your ex boyfriend. That's just to me. That's a good common sense. But some other stuff, I it's really like hang a mirror over your toilet. Because that's going to bring prosperity or something like that. I'm like, I don't to me. That's just creating word taking a dump and look up and see myself. It's sort of like like purple ribbon around. I mean, it's like it's related to beliefs that I don't find to be true. And so I feel like it's just making like, I wouldn't do it. I mean, I think it can be interesting because sometimes anytime people talk about ideas, and sort of a different framework, it kind of shakes you up out of your own set of sumptious. It can be really helpful. So actually read several books about function because I think it's interesting to see how they talk about flow and energy, and like what things bring energy, and what things doesn't energy like wedding. They say is like don't have a bunch of stuff under your bed. Now, the argument that they that funkaway way proposes about why that's about idea. I do not accept as a matter of kind of like principle. But I think it's absolutely true. Having into junk is jammed on your bed. You don't even know what's under there. That's not good. That's this clutter. This is like a dead zone in your home. Get rid of it. You'll feel lighter and clear and freer and you'll also where all your stuff is if you get it out. So I agree with the idea. I don't agree with the logic of it. But I still found it helpful because I thought there pointing a lot. Things I wouldn't have thought about or their pointing it out in a different way. So if you believe in functional if you think it's I mean, there's people there are people who are whole office buildings are designed specifically for fun. Because people devoutly believe in the principle. So I'm not saying that they're not I didn't people who really believe it. It's like go f- go all the way that I don't feel like, oh, I should have a functioning person come in. If you don't really believe in functional. It's like. You know, I like the idea of mindfully arranging your home like like example, having natural lighting in areas where you want a lot of like gang energy, or maybe eliminating the TV in private place like the bedroom where you want more yen energy. I kind of like that idea, but the energy or you just believe like it's better idea not to have TV in your bedroom. I don't I don't have to bring the energy end because I'm like, I don't really energy. But I believe in the principle like natural. Light is good for people. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's interesting. So these are ton of really good practical tips, and the book is, of course, chock full of many more. And what I'm going to do is get a link to if if you're listening and you go to Ben greenfield, fitness dot com slash de clutter. I'm gonna linked to Gretchen book and her podcast and website, which he's also mentioned some other books like why we buy the life changing magic of tidying up and all all put some links to some of those other resources that we talked about as well. And I would recommend you go and check out our website. She's got some really great blog posts. If you look at some top one hundred blog posts on her Instagram channel, she does like a a Monday post of all the books that she's been reading. And so she's she's got a lot of really good information. If you don't know Gretchen don't follow her recommend that you that you look into what she's doing because she puts some some really. Good advice in her podcast. Happier has some good stuff in it too. So I'll link to all that Ben Greenville, thin dot com slash declutter on. In the meantime, Gretchen, thank you so much for for writing this book, and for also coming on the show, and Cheryl this stuff with us L is so fun to talk to you. Thanks for having me. Awesome. All right, folks. I'm Ben greenfield. And it's Gretchen Rubin. The name of the book is outer order inner comb decluttering organiz to make more room for happiness. Thanks for listening. I'm an amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben greenfield, fitness dot com, along with plenty of other goodies from me, including the highly helpful Ben recommends page which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion, fat loss performance, plenty more, please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that Nabil's me to keep bringing you this content every single week. So when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes use the promo code generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

Ben greenfield Gretchen Rubin Disney New York City kion kion New York Times Spar negoti Braun M F Juvan Andes Fisher Price roller blading Elizabeth craft J O Vivey
What Yoga Trapezes, Laser Lights, Kettlebells, Mini-Meditation & Ketogenic Doughnuts Have To Do With Building A Nutrition Supplements Empire.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:30:11 hr | 1 year ago

What Yoga Trapezes, Laser Lights, Kettlebells, Mini-Meditation & Ketogenic Doughnuts Have To Do With Building A Nutrition Supplements Empire.

"I want to help been like fully, manifest, whatever. This thing is there might be like cool and innovative products or fad of some kind. But like overtime. I just think it's fundamentally over and over again about humans it like planted a seed at that time in my life that that was you never have to be stuck if you're willing and have the energy and the courage to visualize and define what you really want. We're just a group of humans that were born into this life and trying to enjoy our life have beautiful unhealthy relationships with the people around us and be good people. I have a master's degree in physiology bio mechanics and human nutrition, I've spent the past two decades competing in some of the most masochistic events on the planet from seal fit Cuco, sparred Negojsa in the world's toughest mudder to thirteen ironman triathlons. Brutal bow hunts adventure races. Spearfishing plant foraging, free, diving bodybuilding and beyond. I combine this intense time in the trenches with. A blend of ancestral, wisdom and modern science searched the globe for the world's top experts and performance that loss recovery hormones, brain beauty and Braun to deliver. You this podcast everything you need to know to live an adventurous, joyful and fulfilling life. My name is Ben greenfield enjoy the ride. Out DO. For his tasty. Tasty Michelob light my beverage of choice when I'm podcasting Norma's kidding. It's Ziva sto soda with stevia in it. It's actually pretty good. I should get them to sponsor the show because I drink so damn much of it actually interviewed there. See oh sometime back. His name's Patty. You could go to Ben greenfield, fitness dot com slash Patty, P, D, D Y and listened to my interview with Patty from Zevia the soda that doesn't give non alcoholic fatty liver disease is that's how I think they should label their soda anyways. Today. I had one of my favorite friends and fellas on the face of the planet. Come to my house for the weekend and a podcast with me. He's really cool. His name is Angelo Angelo kill. He's actually the co founder and the show of my company kion. I should say our company kion of said that anyways. Angela just a fantastic guy and a wealth of very interesting information. We're information on these shows and speaking of kion, that's what this show is actually brought to you by you know, I don't talk about this a lot. But there's this. There's this stuff that you can squirt into your mouth insert dirty joke here that really really amps up your immune system activity. It's been there's a lot of books about it. Like the cure in the cupboards probably the best book about it kills off yeast bacteria fungus parasites when my friend Paul checks favorite little remedies for for keeping the the gut healthy, and it's called oil of oregano wild Mediterranean oil of oregano harvested from Turkey with a cockroach content over eighty percent, which is what we have in ours. It kion is the way to go. If you wanna stay healthy, especially if you travel lot stuff. Like, all it makes you your immune system. Unstoppable. There you go. How about that? Recording a phrase coined phrases, right and left these days, you can get it in any of the fines up laments. We have a key on if you just go to get kion dot com. That's get K I O, N dot com and the discount code that you can use over. There is very simple to be G F one zero get Kim dotcom. BG F zero this podcast is also brought to you by photo bio modulation photo by modulation light that you can shine in your crotch. It's more than that though. It's more than light that you can try it on your crotch. They've done literally thousands of studies on the use of red light and near red light therapy new found that it can increase collagen. Production skin hell to Kim, reduce pain, and inflammation. If he got a sore joint you shine it on it can cause nitric oxide release and might Okondo biogenesis for better athletic, performance can increase your tech. Dostram production. Hence, the part about shine it on your Nicot crotch. And there's this company called Jew that makes the exact photo bio modulating that I use every day you actually get to get a Jew along. With a nice little bonus gift. They're going to throw in there. And this is the stuff that's clinically proven wavelengths of light, very high power. So you only need like ten to twenty minute dose. Boom done. Don't waste your time. You can get the Juve with the gift at J O, the dot com slash Ben. That's jus J O, V dot com slash Ben art. Let's go talk to Angelo. Check check mic. Check one two mic. Check one two. You'll angelo. Could you get me a little Mike GIC? If I didn't have a mic check. I wouldn't have a check at all check one. Check to check three Wiki Wiki. Were. Okay. Whoa. Oh, my goodness up resent, and Angelo, keel, L can dude we literally just got out of the frigid Spokane river that was fun. That was find does you like today's workout. Duda was amazing. That was like. I guess my question. I love the workout. My question is like how good is that for me? And how is that? Good for me. I have no clue. Okay. It was kids having fun. Now, what we did for for those you listening in is Angela who will introduce you to second. You know clue who this cat is aside from his mad boxing skills. He and I went down this morning, Saturday morning his family's visiting me here in Spokane because Angelo lives in boulder where keen on offices are because he's the COO and the co founder of kion or remake all things wonderful magical unicorn, tears and formulations and things to make your life beautiful. But I digress. Angelo came up from bolder to Spokane with his beautiful family, and then I ripped him out of bed this morning, and we went down to the Spokane, frisbee, golf course. We have actually really really cool frisbee golf course here. And rather than just playing frisbee golf the way. I do frisbee golf is you either do ten burpee twenty pushups or thirty air squats each hole, and we played. All eighteen holes like an hour and a half long workout, and you get a mix of like we were talking about during during frisbee golf like the primal skill of Hurley an object towards target and the hand eye coordination. And of course, the fun. We can't strip the fun out of it. And then you get of course, the calisthenics the cardio the step count. I think we both got our ten thousand steps already. And then we cry. We went and jumped in the in the cold Spokane river afterwards and since it's four twenty. We had the guys boxing in their cars. Asking us if we four s yeah, we didn't do it. But they know for us. Exactly. No. We don't smoke weed on four twenty we go play frisbee and jump in the river. So anyways, though, that that was the workout. I loved it. I guess I after I do workouts. Like, I wonder like did I work hard enough because I just enjoyed the whole thing so much as idea I need to like suffer more. It's kind of funny. It's like when I go and play tennis like our family. Plays tennis on Sundays now. And my kids are getting good enough to where it's actually you're moving around, you chasing, down balls or. What's another example? Like like when I was when I was in a Kentucky, and we were waiting for breakfast to be served at the cafeteria that we all went to their data basketball court outside. So Dr Dawson, I went outside we just like shot hoops and played one on one and and played some pig and like jumped around and you're working on you feel great afterwards. But dude, there's some about getting out of the stale Jim environment count reps and count sets. And just playing playing what it is. Yeah. I like the play it's play. It's primal play. There's a guy named Darrell Edwards as a whole program called primal play. You just go to the park and crawl and jump around and hang from trees. It's pretty fun. So he. Yeah. So Angela's a lot of people a lot of people are seeing right now who are probably because they listen to the show connoisseur familiar that the I have this supplements company called kion, but they don't know a lot of what goes on behind the scenes there, and they all. Also don't know about you. And I like to interesting people on this podcast. Like, I didn't just want to get you on the show because you're you know, you're involved with kion or something like that. Like, you have a lot of cool things that you've done will be on your mad boxing skills. And I think you've got a lot of a lot of a lot of interesting insight for the audience, and I and I do want to dive today in to kind of what you see behind the scenes in the supplement in the health industry. How integral role you see things like company culture, and, you know, the health of employees and things like that playing in terms of building a business that can change the world. And you know, you also tie family, and fitness and all of that into the whole mix. And so I'm excited to have you on just just talk about a lot of the things that that I think you can bring audience so thanks, man. I'm excited to share anything that might be value. Yeah. Yeah. And I'm gonna taunt you over here while I sipped coffee because you're you're out. It's d- chat. Yeah. It is. Calf. On. This this kick where I blend decaf coffee with Salen cinnamon sea salt and organic stevia, and that's it super clean snow. No calories in it. There's there's no magical brain bending qualities to it whatsoever. So probably most people will find it really boring, but it say sheets my appetite. Yeah. Rich and earthy and. Yeah. Earth thirty chicory stuff on. How what I have? Yeah. Yeah. Some of course, all the carnivore folks will will step back and shock because chicory has all its natural built plant defense mechanisms, but but actually a lot of people who don't do well with coffee, they do really well with chicory, I think as a company called dandy T, they make like a chicory root based t that's also like a like a kind of a liver cleanse because Danny Lyon, route and stuff in it. So I don't I don't do a lot of sugar it though, but it's a good coffee. Substitute kinda sorta tastes like shitty coffee. Let's I never really tried to replace coffee anything. So I just it's black doing it. It's dark Brown water kinda like coffee is I guess so it's got that going for it. All tell me about where you're from originally. I was born in wimberly Texas outside of Austin. And I was born to vary hippie parents. They had a natural health food store and a natural health food restaurant wimberly, Texas, really. Yeah. I actually didn't know your parents had a full on. I knew they were kind of like hippy in the natural foods, but I didn't know the whole store. Yeah. I mean, I think is okay. To talk about it's so long past. But yeah, basically, they had this natural health foods, my dad before that was like, a big ginseng and botanical distributor like you had like his own business. He's kinda like a Wheeler dealer entrepreneur type guy, and then he had gotten into they bought this natural health food store. And then that was right at the time when whole foods like I I think they raised money. They built like these big stores like all the smaller ops kinda went out of business in the Austin area. And my parents started this restaurant to compensate for that, and then actually whole foods came and offered my dad to come and do the first restaurant, full foods and partner and not have to leave historian his restaurant and wimberly and he did that. And that's when we moved to Austin. Okay. So it's not like, you're bitter about whole foods. And you never go there because it's an evil giant corporation it in. It instead was served as like an employment opportunity for your dad. It was. Yeah. It was an original like my dad was a partner and that the whole restaurant and deal side of that. I mean, I don't this is like, I don't know. Exactly how well that went. My dad didn't go to whole foods ever again after that. My mom, and I did I remember going. There's like a little kid. I mean, we were we were Pesca -tarian. We'll maybe the way your dad felt about whole foods is the same way whole foods. Now feels about Amazon is just we keep we keep stepping up the plate and totally by bigger bigger corpse. Yeah. Grow growing up in an environment. Where did you get? Access to a lot of these natural compounds and herbs like, you know, whether situations where instead of using antibiotics you're raised with it. I mean, they were I was. I guess there's a hot subject of recent vaccination type stuff later on. I was vaccinate. But as a kid as a kid, my parents vaccinate me, we never went to the doctor. It was all like botanical 's and herbs and vitamins all natural. I mean, we went to whole foods. We went we never. I wasn't allotment. Never got like I was the kid that would go to school and not saying this is the right diet. But I would go to school with like either grilled salmon or like grilled tofu an onion like on like or nobody wanted to trade lunches with. That's like my is they go to school with sardines and like jerky, but it's not regular jerk is like Pam MacKinnon and rendered fat and avocado slices. Yeah. Nobody wants my kids launch. I just wished I could just have gushers, you know, and like now nothing to our upbringings were so opposite because because I grew up on Godfather's pizza, and then eventually when my parents decided. Healthy Papa Murphy's take a bake pizza. And like I ranch dressing. And I was just civically like I was like not allowed to have iceberg lettuce because it was grown in the same fields. And we'd be like so full of pesticides. Let me eat it ever. People don't realize it's like nature's bioremediation thera to soak up toxins, and like my mom would fill up the whole backseat of the suburban on twenty nine cent. Hamburger, thirty nine centuries burger day with bags and bags and begs for McDonald's, and that would just be lunch all week long. We would just have giant bags of the greasy white paper in the fridge. We literally could not have had more on us at. Yeah. Dietary guidelines as children than just kind of funny now. Now, I'm almost like more extreme you are more extreme than me. Yeah. Yeah. I it's kind of funny and Angela, and I will talk about this more for the listening in. But like, we'll go to health Expos or something Expos and stuff and walk around. And like, I'm extremely extremely attentive to the labels. Dow and. I know that you are as well. But I'm almost to the point now where I dislike don't even like try or touch anything that's even remotely and it's shocking. How many of these so-called health foods have, you know, not just like the like the key donuts. We were talking about last night with Ruth, Roland and everything in them. That's just bloating gas. But so many of these quote, natural and artificial flavor compounds are just rife. Yeah. I think like my my overall approach if there's something really good. I got from my family, and that is just trying to get as much from the food. I eat and taking a really minimalist approach to foods like just don't. And then it got some that's kind of an interesting way that ended up in supplement company with you because I took supplements and vitamins as child, but it was always like an very minimalist approach. Yeah. And food and a minimalist approach and like not getting like, I don't get really excited, but like Kito donuts, I need some special Sweden because then I end up with your throat all and then it makes me feel sick. It's like a make it too complex than it becomes. It ends up having all these side effects feel worse. Yeah. I grew up may eat a little bit of sugar. I did a lot of ibuprofen Advil Espresso right as a kid. Yeah. Yeah. Because I started getting a little workout and stuff, and I guess or, you know, mom Toco profile drove that had a coffee shop. So I drink a lot of Espresso. So those are myself laments was caffeine and non sort Atlanta toward drugs. Yeah. I was like I got a headache. They would never do. Or like, I would I wasn't allowed to have. I be pro drink water just drink more water. Yeah. That was always the solution. That's funny. So opposite. But but in in Texas, did you want to go into going to high school like like after after your dad kinda got out of the natural foods store and whole food? There's a basically my parents both ended up being like small business owners, my mom and account and my dad like IT guy. Actually, he got totally out of that and got into IT consulting. But. Yeah. I would say like over all the rest of my childhood quick summary would just be I was kind of alternative weirder kid. I mean have these hippie parents, but they're Asli? Yeah. Obviously. But they raised me like, you know, like a nicer school district, and so just like found my way like how to fit in in the world while having like kind of a weird or background always really well in school, then around high school, I got into a lot of trouble. Like a lot of trouble tons of trouble kicked out of school arrested. Just like controversial. I mean, like possession of alcohol smoking weed at school getting out of school now and getting kicked out of school getting put in like this, you know, like, but before that I've been like top performing student, you know, so I just I think I just you know, if there's a theme maybe it's like, I was really into people, and it's an exciting time for like people and social stuff at that high school time, and I just got really into all the, social dynamics and fun and like experimenting. And so it got me into trouble got kicked out. The school and then. Yeah. I mean, probably really transformative thing was when I was sixteen. I had a terrible LSD experience. Really? And. A lot of people now are kinda like interested in LSD. I talked on the show before about. But like when I wrote my first fiction book like I would write a tone on Fridays and every Friday with Microsoft LSD. I'd take like, you know, ten to twenty micrograms. And I'd get the merging of the left and right hemispheres of the brain. And I could just turn out creative work that had a little bit of the analytical portions of the hero's journey like I found it. It'd be really helpful for especially for writing fiction and also occasionally use it like if I have a long day where have to power through a lot of creative work like I'll use small amounts of LSD. I've never actually tripped on the most ever taken a little bit like sixty micrograms which is still nowhere near like a hundred microgram plus trip dose. So a lot of people are kind of interest in what was your experience with it? This was not that context. This was more like super irresponsible writing about princesses and clouds, just like Syria, seriously, irresponsible sixteen-year-olds taking way too much. Didn't know what they're doing wrong place. Wrong time being around the wrong people basically upsetting these people. I don't really actually know the whole story. But whatever happened they stabbed me multiple times and nearly beaten to death and left me like in this. But you you were on Ellis on Steven this happened like on a drain like, an drainage gutter kind of like an parking lot in the they found me. And I was like naked nearly beaten to death and stab. And we don't really know. Exactly. What happened? And. Yeah. So that that's that was me getting in trouble. So not like mild like getting trouble scaring, the Jesus out of my parents. Right. And you have this one on sixteen so kind of following that then I I had like a lot of like therapy personal development worked kinda do going out of that. And I ended up moving out of my house when I was seventeen. And start supporting myself doing manual labor stuff like painting. But also doing a lot of music I discovered this beat boxing skill. I was getting paid commercially to do like beat boxing, and and I was gigging fish like like for actual commercials or like kinkos, I was on the kinko's hold music for a long time do paper. Yes. Like kinkos? I don't remember what it was something like that, you know, and like Chili's thing, and I got like TV, I gotta just like gigs doing that stuff. And I was pulling a lot of drums in music and making money doing that. And I was like pretty became pretty independent in high school like pretty distant from my parents. And so that you asked what was high school? Like, that's did you also get out of like the whole like hippy food scene and health food and like change your diet and things like that too is part of the rebellion. I started I started let me just as like probably like teenage kids like the head cars, we'd like drink alcohol and go to McDonald's and go to Taco Bell and like eat bad. Food. But never like that. I still don't think I've ever had a twinkie. I don't think I've ever had a bologna. There's all kinds of stuff. I should I should take you to Carl's junior today. CBD burger. Oh, yeah. It's today. Only today when a recording. It's four twenty. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You can't eat just one literally. But so after after high school did you wind up studying university. I did it's kind of interesting turn then. So I was always like a really high performing student, but after all that can like blew up my whole world. And so I ended up going to the school in Austin where I went to high school called Saint Edwards university. It's like a smaller private liberal arts Catholic school. It's the same orders like Notre Dame. And I took this had gotten into. I'd also gotten into like this. This Christian church, basically, the very end of high school that was really into meditation or this thing called centering prayer, which is like a meditation. It's like a Christian met it. It's basically just silent prayer, but it kind of looks like meditation, but it's more like within a Christian context. I've never heard of that. Yeah. Like, I grew up in a Christian household ptunning church. But I've never heard of centering prayer. It's cool. I'll turn you on to tell me will be it's kind of funny. We haven't talked about it before. What what what exactly is it? Well, I guess just like the basic tradition is I mean, I have all kinds things talk about overall. I kind of religion stuff because that's what it is studying college. But basically, there's a really strong tradition from the early desert fathers. I don't know if you know about that. But as Christianity suddenly became like popularized in the third and fourth century. There were lots of Christians who didn't see it. As like a like a thing that makes sense to be super popularized and kind of like, not commercialized, but you know, like that lots of people could do required. More like a Sediq lifestyles people would go into the desert to. Live like Jesus during the forty days and forty nights, which is kind of like the beginning of the monastic tradition. And in that, they there was a lot of just silent prayer people would just sit in silence rather than like praying to God like asking for to help you with something you sit and you wait for God's speak to you, for example. And which they you know, they see all kinds of like biblical tradition things that Jesus said about that. But that grew and was really a large part of the monastic tradition for orthodox and Catholic churches, there's a ton of literature around it. I don't know if you've heard of Saint John of the cross there's really famous book called the cloud of unknowing. That's a lot of medieval monastic writings from the Christian faith, at are all they're all very much based in like sitting in quiet contemplation, it looks just like meditation from other traditions, and that's interesting. You know, where we're sitting in my office right now on my bookshelf up there. I've binged books on the left about the spiritual disciplines, which which are kind of, you know, high on my priority list study in that. I that I'm in the midst of getting it. Right now in two of them are silence and solitude, and I haven't come across the censoring prayer. But it's it sounds very tied into just the whole practice of meditation or evenly native American sit spots or this idea of just being with yourself and your own thoughts. But in the case of centering censoring, you're waiting for some kind of a message. Yeah. We'll so centering prayer is like a modern than there was like a big kind of there are a lot of Catholic monastic priests in the twentieth century. Are you familiar with Thomas Merton? So like lots of people kind of in that tradition of Thomas Merton. There's another guy named father Thomas Keating actually, just passed away this last year who really helped develop the movement nine around the last sixty or seventy years of kind of bringing that back to Christian culture, what had been a really big root of or some believers root of the Christian faith around. Silence. I guess I think it's similar to those. But I'm one who doesn't see all religions kind of like the same. I see them as actually different and having different belief structures. And it's not that as an I'm not saying that that one is better than another. But they represent different things and have different focus. And so I would just say that like, there's definitely a Christian theology. That's part of centering prayer that is different from like Buddhist. You I don't know like zinn meditation because there's there's just a different framework by how they see how you see the world. And what you're what you're looking for incenting prayer? It's basically about sitting in silence and seeking a relationship with God. So I got turned onto that. And. And so then I was like, wow. And I I was raised nonreligious like totally non religious. So then I went to this Catholic school and the religious studies class. So I took intro to New Testament my first semester, and it was like the coolest class I'd ever taken. But it was kind of mind blowing cool because I would just thought like, oh, if America Catholic school and their teach something like engineering testaments going to be almost like a indoctrination like they're going to try to get me to like Izumi like Sunday school teaching me abolish things. But no, it was like the historical critical method where you break down and analyze the exact historical context of winning. How religions came to be what the writings were. And basically it just like. I would say for most people who grew up in a normal Christian context. It would be very upsetting to their faith 'cause it would be kind of confusing because there's like you just learn all the details of like how the books were written in how the apostles were maybe not actually people actually wrote. It wasn't actually like, you know, John that wrote the book of John it was a community sixty years after Jesus's death who wrote that who had really different influence and insight, etc. And so I was just like, whoa. Like, this is crazy like how all these things come together. And so young college. I ended up being a religious studies major which I would have raised like my parents were like what like we raised you nonreligious. And now, suddenly, you're like, you know, into this church, and you're like studying, you know, religion like it was they thought it was a very odd. It was an odd. Turn is that what you want up graduating? With was religious study. I well ended up doing a major religious studies. I did a minor in music and a minor in philosophy. Yeah. Yeah. What did you do after that? So the other main thing I like really came up when I was in college was I got really into languages, which I'd never studied before. And I got really into. Service. So I started doing these service projects I started going to India. To like do these service projects with with with an orphanage there and developed like a program to send kids students from the university to run summer camps there. I did similar stuff in Central America. I got into learning. I I realized like I could learn Spanish she got suddenly really good at Spanish. And so when I graduated actually really so also when I was studying religion, I learned Arabic. I studied Islam. I studied Hinduism I learned a bunch. I studied pointing really hard language, isn't it? Yeah. I mean, I didn't take like multi show that gets you hard by the CI. I, you know, I didn't know what am I going to become going to become like a, Mike? Do I want to be like a diplomat or an academic? Or like what I mean? All I knew was that. I was really really interested in humans, and how humans told each other stories and tried to live better lives. I say like, that's the theme. Like, and I was really interested in in that morning thing else. So. Yeah. I also studied coinate Greek, you know, what's the what's the New Testaments Rinnan early in Spanish. And so when I graduated I was like I wanna go for sure overseas because I'd been doing a lot of overseas stuff. And so I moved to France and actually right before I moved to France, I met who's now my wife, she went with me, which is kind of a whole nother interesting story. I think it's most interesting around if we talk about visualization in manifesting, which you most want out of your life. That's probably like when I most unique stories, and like proofs of how powerful being extremely clear about what you want in your life is and how you can get exactly what you want. Tell me that story. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So I guess. I actually had been doing like an internship in France. And I had met my who's now my wife like a few months before. But we didn't really know each other not well, and she's fears older than me too. So she was meet lick a ignoring me. I wrote this song though. That really clearly described it's actually called like the wife songs, I was in a hip hop ban. Then I was rapper and a hip hop band like bass, drums, guitar keys, kind of like tribe called quest, but very like jazz players all my best friends. We're pretty successful in Austin wrote this song about manifesting the perfect wife, and it literally in detail described exactly what I wanted the relationship to be like like how would really function and it wasn't like a bubble gummy. Like, we're going to be the perfect fit for each other and be together forever. It was more like. I'm looking for someone who wants to be really real. And who I will struggle to be real with two that I will struggle to accept and not try to force to be a certain way, etc. And look pretty I think is surprisingly adult and mature perspective for me like twenty two twenty three. So I wrote that song when I was in France, I came back. I performed it for the first time. I literally had to read off my computer, my my now wife came to that show had never heard us play music. That was the first time she'd ever seen his play music played that song that night. The next day. I got invited to go over to our house. It's like a watch a movie, and we started dating and that like literally is my wife now. I mean before that had you kind of been in a manifestation, a, yeah. I mean, we'll so after that kind of serious acid trauma stabbing thing I was in the hospital. I got turned onto this book called creative visualization by shaggy goblin mentioned this one to me a few months ago called creative visualization. Yeah. By shocked gawain cool, by the way for those who. Listening in a show notes or at Ben greenfield, fitness dot com slash Angelo. Just like it. Sounds in G E L O, Benadryl, tennis dot com slash Angelo, all linked to anything like that that we bring up so creative visualization. What's it about? It is about. Visualizing exactly what you want in your life into into like in a in a distinctly visual way. And so I got that book. Within. Yeah. When I was literally in actually think I just got out of the hospital been in the hospital for a while. And I just got out one of my friends parents gave it to minister reading it. And at first I think this book, it seems like kind of woo like, I don't really get it, you know. And I started reading it. And I don't think I realized until probably ten years later how much that book influenced me and my thinking and my openness to. Having the courage to not complain about. What's going on right now? And not be confused about what's going on right now, and to actively seek to design and visualize what I really want from my life and to take the risk to try to go and get it and do it. Because I think in that type of situation I think when you're like so down and you made such a big mistake in everyone's disappointed in you. You're in trouble with the law. You're just like terrible like your the feedback. I was getting was like people were worried about me. But it was like, you're not good. I think it created like planted a seed at that time in my life that that was. You never have to be stuck. Yeah. If you're willing and have the energy in the courage to visualize define what you really want. And so I don't I didn't really like I didn't like start like hardcore visualizing that point in my life. When I see like how I got out of that hole, and somehow ended up going to college finding being successful in college. I didn't mention this before binding being the valedictorian and my college too and like developed all these cool programs oversee service programs. I really like flourished in college. Well, that's that's part of the thing with visualization or manifestation is you you begin to do it. You know, in, you know, whether it's closing your eyes in a meditative setting and imagining in bringing to life, you know, the tiny intricate details of whatever maybe let's say, you know, you wanna start a coffee shop. So you like see yourself, you know, in your apron there at the coffee shop, you know, hunched over the Espresso maker or you have a team of baristas around you and someone standing over the counter ordering and the thing about it is sometimes you don't even know you're taking some of the steps towards making that happen. But you're programming yourself subconsciously, and you're almost taking those steps whether or not, you know, it, you know, that that's that's a big part of the book. I'm bringing my Boise right now called the master key. Which is like one of the original correspondence courses in meditation is at just teaches you how to visualize an intricate detail. What it is that you want a cheese and then. Delves into how you know, whether you like it or not like your program your subconscious when you do that. And you begin you begin to take steps that you might not even be aware of towards achieving that. Yeah. I think that that alone is really powerful. There's even more you can do to like once you start to harness the power of visualization and being really clear about what you want. There's more you can do to like strategize how to get there. And like how to take more action and execute better. But simply alone having that vision and being willing to kind of program your consciousness around that then just sets up all your decisions within that context. Whereas if you think if you always think, I'm stuck or you always think I'm always gonna do this thing. Like, you're not even going to imagine that you could take different step. So every time that like an option comes up to exercise or not exercise, drink water or not drink water. You're just like, oh, I'm lazy. I don't like you just fell into the other decisions. Yeah. It's almost like a filter or let's even say like exercise doesn't really serve that purpose. Let's let's say. For example. I don't know you like, the let's use the coffee shop analogy that you want to build you know, is going to take X number of hours per day. Well, maybe someone someone invites you to cross it. Right. And and you have that option to do whatever, you know, five forty minute cross what workouts a day, and you might instead subconsciously make the decision to do like, the ten minute purple workout in your in your room. Just because you have that filter says, okay, I need X amount of time for this. So this is the decision I'm gonna make which I think really drives home the point of not only taking being willing and open to have the vision for what you want. But also taking the time just to really evaluate what's the current vision that you have what's the current belief patterns that you have because they're showing up in like all of my actions everyday like, they're just playing out all the time. So if I start to feel like oh, these act like what's up with these actions. You know, I need to manifest this other vision. It's like just taking the time. Even see like what is the vision that I'm holding right now that that that these actions are playing out from. Yeah. Do you like how? Oh, my knowledge is by the way are based on other coffee your exercise. I'm used to identify my two passions in life. So so you want getting married to carry wind up getting married and starting a family right away, or we'll start there's a there's like a five year thing in between graduating college moving to France lawn launching a satellite campus for university in France getting really close with apple leadership, I became fluent in French over there apple-france ran apple India. I got a job in India moved to India did a bunch of business development and training work over there. Then finally moved to boulder. Honestly, had like a really powerful retreat when I was in India that helped me have a breakthrough to realize that I want to carry to be the focus of my life and family to be the focus of my life. Immediately quit the job. The next day. I'm a little you might fight certify, I'm impulsive, sometimes I quit. My job. The next day moved to boulder and immediately got married and start having a family, and that was in two thousand twelve so a two thousand twelve what were you working at in boulder? Like, what was job I moved to boulder with no job, but I had made good friends in India. These suites who had like the biggest software outsourcing company, and so I launched that in the US and started doing like selling in developing software projects, and then I got turned onto some family run businesses one in behavioral healthcare, it was basically like a young adult mentoring program, and the other was this like a creative incubator. I started consulting with them to help develop the whole creative incubator program and via that they then brought me on alternately to help. They're actually trying to. They're trying to build and sell one of the companies. And so they brought me into help manage that and run with due diligence. And it was really great for me. Because I as you can tell like, I said, I stayed religious studies thick well, how this guy Nick like business chops? Yeah. Like, I learned all the sales and human stuff, but that experience gave me really helped me develop really super solid financial chops. And I ended up running this behavioral healthcare company that was about based on a boulder, it's like fifty employees million dollar company. Trying to help them. Developing grow and sell that and around December two thousand sixteen I realized I want to move on. And do something different. I'd left that. And I thought I just need some time to figure out what I'm gonna do next and within two weeks. I got this call about if I could help look at this project with his guy been greenfield. Oh, yeah. And it was like Ben greenfield. Which I think the biggest mistake if your life. But I do think that's kind of like one of the most interesting things about like, the the origin story of our relationship or the origin story of kion. You had already envisioned what kion was going to be before that and. But I almost wonder if your listeners of it'd be surprised to hear like this guy. Didn't even know who been was before. I didn't. Yeah. And so I got I got ninety and I went to the website, and this is the website, and you when he's been falling you'll while like three years ago like it was kinda ghetto you you mean? Mean Banchory fitness show, fitness Diallo. But I mean that entire website which originally just the traffic on blog. Yes. Me traveling around the world doing triathlons, and like riding rice reports like here's the energy bar that I ate before this race and at mile thirteen I decided to really put the hammer down and ventured beyond my lactate threshold which could have been a mistake because I think I got a little glycogen depletion at that point. And eventually wound up crossing the finish line with a big smile on my face, but my tire PSI being ninety five instead of one hundred probably held me back a little bit during specially those flatter button. Like that was the blog like it was just like me writing about like exercise, you make fun of the people love it. Yeah. It wasn't even bending like I bought brand Griego Venezia calm like several years of booze. Like, ben. It's still exists. There was like Ben greenfield, try dot blog. Spot dot com. And it was just like traff on adventures around the world with Ben and. Yeah, I mean, like like, you know, we've we've brought on an SEO team. And we've made it into a big. Oy website with an ice landing page, and it looks nice and everything. But yeah. For a long time, it was pretty ghetto. So you go to that page, and I asked a couple of friends who are in boulder, and you're pretty big in boulder because there's like just a lot of people in spandex who like to exercise. And people were like big greenfield. And so I had to couple of friends who are like just could not they're just like loved Unum sesame. And I was like, wow. I just take a hard look at this. And so, you know, I looked at what the business plan was and kind of what the ideas were and flew up here and met with you. And I think what. Going back to the sense of. I'm really interested in humans, and I'm really interested in helping humans fully manifest themselves. And just live the best lives. They can I was personally less interested in. Oh, this is a good business plan. This is a bad business plan, or this guy knows a lot about health, and fitness or these things I was like, I just like really liked you. I was like this dude is. You've been are so unique and so passionate and so thin tick like I'll just on your own terms. And I think that I really I like that. And I was like I I want to do I wanna help been like fully, manifest, whatever. This thing is for that alone because they'll be like cool an intimate in this might come up when we talk about products, there might be like cool and innovative products or a fad of some kind or someone who's like hot for a while. Because they said the right things are gone the right shows or these different types of things, but like overtime, I just think it's fundamentally over and over again about humans this whole thing business supplements this phone for me, it's just we act like it's we act like, it's something more. But it's just humans like doing things in the world together. And I was I was just like intrigued by. How unique you do it. And how much I think potential you had if I if I could support you in and then the the possibly like all the other unique people we could bring into it and make something really special. Hey, I want to interrupt today show in case, you're Pantelis or shortlists or shirtless in you need, some athletic gear, that is absolutely mind blowing -ly killer in the way that fits you. There's this company called V Ori, they make these wonderful athletic fit close with four way stretch with quick drying properties. They're sustainably made from recycled plastics, many of their shorts. They good for surfing paddling training, yoga, a cocktail party aboard meeting, depending on how casual said board meeting or cocktail party is they designed of your e to take a new perspective on performance apparel. It doesn't look like tuition will workout gear. It looks it. Looks sexy. Looks good looks Thailand looks Fash. Symbol you. 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That's H A L O N E U R O, halo neuro dot com and use code greenfee. Field. Right. Which would you which is actually what I wanna I wanna get into like how we've actually done that. Some of the things you've learned along the way, and you know, part part of that weirdness. Honestly is is that's the way I've always been even even being home-schooled growing up, which of course, just turned you into someone who thinks outside the box, or at least cares a little bit less. What other people think about you? Because you don't grow up with as much peer pressure. I was like a home schooler. But I was also a weird home schooler. Like, I I was just like totally independent and solve problems my own way. And you know, didn't really even, you know, do a huge amount of formal bookwork as much as my parents are just like, you know, Hanmi books. I'd I'd figure out how to study this subject on my own and then just grew grew up. Yeah. I've I've always been a little weird in that way. And I don't wanna talk a lot about me. Because the a lot of you listening in you might not know that Angelo interviewed me about the whole key on back story about my vision for Kiat about how I wanted to launch this company that. Would really supply people with everything that they needed to fulfill. This this adventurous life, everything from from mind body and spirit optimization the best supplements in the world, the best formulations in the world, the best bars and coffees, you know, everything that we're doing now. But I don't I don't want to exhaust you with that story too much because Angela, and I actually had this this long interview where we talked a lot about the back story of kion from my end and only to that in the show notes. If you go a bend, Greek, fitness dot com slash Angelo, even video recorded the whole thing. She can you can watch us chat at each other and try and set up like big, boys. Whereas right now, we're just like sitting cross lien on towels at my office. So so you and I worked together we co founded kion, you're now the COO of the company you're you're running the day to day in boulder, and I want to talk a little bit about that about how how. You're actually building a healthy company culture. But before we do that. I also wanted just just learn a little bit more, you know, after you having been through religious studies and grown up in a hippie home and done visualization manifestation, and you know, use drugs in high school, and and now you're you're immersed in the health in the supplement industry. And now, you know heavily influenced by weird guys in spandex like me like what's your actual daily routine? Look like like when you wake up in the morning like like, what's what's what what's a day in the life of just like you working on your own body and brain look like. I would say that there's a few things one is that the daily weekly quarterly and annual all go together for me, and they really support each other. But on the daily it really looks like pretty consistently since having children. It's trying to go to sleep at the same time. My kids go to sleep because what I've found is that I really need alone time, and I need alone time at hours that are like either late at night or early in the day. And I do worse late at night like late at night works. If I'm in like, some kind of really powerful manic creative phase where I'm just like fueled. But on a consistent basis. I just don't do really productive stuff at night. So on the same thing, I'll be sitting around at night, it'll be nine PM, and there'll be a lot of things one could do right. Like, everybody's telling me, you gotta watch breaking bad or you gotta watch this or that on that flicks. Or you know, there's this magazine that that I should read because my cognitive powers gone down at night. And I just I've realized the same thing like not a lot of productive things happen at night. Like, that's when you party this. You can watch TV. That's when you drink. You know, whatever the case may be and I've I've I've fallen upon the Santana when the kids go to bed I grab books and go to bed or go make love and fall asleep and like literally within twenty thirty minutes after my kids are asleep. I'm on out and it's enormously productive. Yeah. It's like it's a that's probably the biggest game changer. If there was anything, I could tell someone who would be go to sleep earlier at least for me. That's what we're for us. We were talking about this, though, we're playing golf this one of there's some people like we have tech people on our team who stay up late or who sometimes seem sleep deprived. And we have our morning team huddles. And it's like you kinda want those people to the night AL's who actually do get shit done at night. And you know, we could get, you know, Michael BRUCE'S book about circadian rhythms. And on different people are wired operate well at different times of day. But I think painting with a broad brush. And I don't think there's actually a percentage is like sixty seventy percent of populations like go to bed sometime between nine and ten. Get up some time to five and six and like life is going to get pretty pretty good in productivity standpoint. Yeah. And so for me, personally, I tried to go to bed actually, it's like closer to eight. And when I do that I feel like I need less sleep, and I can wake up around. I mean, I probably not actually I don't actually go to better on an probably like actually asleep around nine I can wake up around three thirty or four. And then when I do that you're a pretty early. If I go to sleep that early. Then I can if I go to sleep at like ten Jaakko wooden suddenly need to go to sleep. I need to wake up at like seven or something. It's really weird. Like, there's something that shifts. But yeah. And then it's really just immediately drink water just drink two glasses of water. If I don't drink two glasses of water like then it's kinda starts off my whole day weird. And then I drink in Americano, I always drink Espresso Espresso machine in my house. You know that and and then I go like to reading a read some type of spiritual or emotional development type taxed in I guess when I say spiritual. What I just mean is something that is a that re contextualised all of life. It's not just about like. Work or obligations or family or body or any of these things it's about like just just read the puts life in a in a bigger perspective. Yeah. And then journaling, and then some type of exercise the exercise if I know I'm going to have like an exercise later in the day that moment have time for bigger exercise later in the day. Then just like something really chill like it could be like just like hang from my pull up bar do stretching to some music do some yoga if I if I don't think I'm going to have time for that old used stationary bicycle in your garage that I crush whenever I visit. You have literally. That's that's what I do. If I feel like I don't really I can actually just do like a chill ride in the morning to and like you like kind of cheat than actually to get on my phone, and like do some worker to buy is kind of funny because because I'm working like this virtual CDC, right? Like like do doing during a lot virtually with our team. But when I go on my monthly visits to boulder for those who listening in. I'm I'm not saying the Ritz Carlton built like I'm crashing in Angelo's, grandma's bedroom. My mother or my mother or his mother-in-law stays it is house and literally like I go to to your garage and work on your used by with the with the old kettle bell got my ex three bar or whatever with me. And and crush it in there, you know, in your tiny little garage, you go to the park across the street from your house. But yeah. Like like in a lot of times, we'll do these little workout together. It's kind of fun. Yeah. It's it's amazing. How could have worked out you can get with without a frisbee golf course. Speak river. So they don't have time. I just try to make myself like I just try to. I don't have is an embarrassing thing. In terms of like, I don't if I try to get too complex about my workouts and like study in too much debt. It kind of turns me off. I don't get into it. So I do something chiller. I do something like just really hard where it makes me feel like I wanna feel about. So I just do like sprints on the bike to pull ups to push ups to kettlebells swings to. Squats? Just do like simple stuff and just do it hard. How are you journaling by the way before you get into that exercise routine? I have multiple different journals. And so I have I like doing I like doing visual stuff a lot. So I like doing mind maps where it's like this big white page. So I have journals that are more set for that. And then I also have lined journals. And it's I have a lot of different types of prompts that I do around it. But this was going to be like the weekly quarterly monthly thing. What I found over time is for the longest time. I wanted to be I wanted to try to train myself to be like, those people, honestly like someone like you who will get up and do like the certain exercise regimen, or whatever my stories about you. I'm not gonna say you're that the like, and there's people other people in our key on team that like literally will just like do these two a day workouts, and they do it in this very precise way. And they're super disciplined. It's like I have to be more in this like flow. And so what I've found is like what's the container or like the boundaries for me to? Can think or feel like I'm in a flow, but I'm still being productive of moving things forward. So I developed like these binders. That better for different aspects of my life where I've done really deep visualization and design and strategy work around like how I'm going to manifest something in my life. And I always come back to those binders every week sometimes every day, and then I use those as ways to prompt my journaling so less than it being like, I'm going to do the same gratitude journaling every single day. It's like every single week. I need to be having these really deeper check ins with myself about worm out of my life. How it's all kind of falling into place or not and what I need to reset. And then I use that as the guide for my daily work. So I can't just stop journaling forever. But I don't have to maintain the same thing every single day important because you know, like, I've got like the Christian gratitude journal that I write in every morning, and there's some mornings when I wake up, and I'm like, I feel like this is a morning where I should be like, whatever writing down ten amazing new ideas or reflecting upon you know. Like Benjamin Franklin ask what good have I done in the world this week or what good shall I accomplish this day or or different forms of journaling? And for me, you're correct. I mean, you you've you've identified me properly is that person who is pretty rigid in my routines and my habits, but I really liked that idea of giving yourself permission. You know, let's say you you do have a daily journaling habit of being opened other methods of journaling and not necessarily thinking you've got a journal the same way, you know, twenty four seven three sixty five. Yeah. I think it's just finding I guess in this kind of like minimalist approach again for me just show up and journal like if I can keep it that simple. And then I can feel like there's freedom for high express myself in it, then I'm much more likely to do it. Yeah. I am. I will do it. I just keep doing it. Because I feel like I get to be myself in it. You know, I think I think the important balance or trick in that is that I have to ensure that I'm getting I'm doing those weekly check ins and quarterly and more indepth annual retreats as well as making sure that the influence on me daily is a positive influence with good ideas. Because otherwise, I could kind of get stuck in a rut, you know, it's like, I think that's the thing. That's if you find a good thing like you find Christian graduate journal works for you. Then there's an element is just keeping it super simple just do that every single day. And you you even if you don't like it some days, you just keep doing it where it's kinda let yourself do whatever you wanna do you could get influenced by just kind of like lame ideas start watching the news too much. And then like your journaling is going to be about like. Just not deep stuff. So I think it's really important to make sure that you have I have really positive influences about personal development about thinking and visualization that support me like journaling about the right things. What happens up your exercise session? I take a shower. And then I just get into it with the kids in my wife. Yeah. I do alternating cold and warm if showers frigging cold, it's really cool in the summers. I do just like straight cold. But it's in the winters cold, literally, get ice cream headache within three seconds. So freaking close. Tony my strategy. Like when I'm at your house with my cold showers. I'll do like twenty seconds overhead then turned twenty seconds left armpit, then right armpit than the upper back then the crotch, and you just kind like do circles. But every time you hit the head. You can only last like ten twenty seconds like that will allow 'cause I'll do a lot like a two to four minutes sometimes five minute, cold shower, but I'm always turning in circles hitting different parts of my body. It kind kinda makes time go by two countdown facing forward. Then countdown facing the left in the back. There's keep on going around. I I got turned onto cold showers. When I took this Kunda, Delaney yoga class at college actually must been like twenty and how they got it. How this teacher got it accepted? But he like taught yoga and was basically just Kunda Leany yoga for a whole semester for like all these college kids, and we had to go through like one of the main Coon Delaney manage like script was and we did it was cold showers. We had to do mandatory culture hours. But they taught you to yell wakahi guru, which is like some. I don't know. It's God thing. I don't remember what it means. And I do that. And I still do that. We're like, I don't yell it. If it's early in the morning, but I'll be like why? Awesome about doing. I don't even know what it means. But it's it's like my little habit tunes. Probably spending your neighbors. Hopefully, I I mean, hopefully, all of our seek friends out there. They they know what it means. We're probably laughed at right now, you've probably pronouncing it wrong. So at what point do you? Do you head into the to the giant kion skyscraper downtown? It's actually not giant skyscraper. But it is a cool. We've we've cool off is pretty cool. It's like a tree house and even been even been back since we got all the plants hanging. There's like really cool hanging plants everywhere. Now, I'm typically there by nine sometimes earlier and sometimes later, but everyone's they're like everyone's supposed to be there at night. Our offices are really cool. I mean, we've got like stand up workstations now. And you know, there's like the Juve photo by modulation panels, where you got to be careful when you walk in the room because you don't know who's going to be like the half naked in front of a of a light panel. And we've got all this special coffee superfoods to blend up with her or kion cough. Fy and the the nice blenders that you can put all sorts of stuff into and whole saddle chairs tear. Yeah. It's pretty cool like how and I really liked that part of company culture. You know? It's almost like, it's, you know, we're sitting here in my office right now with the walking treadmill on the Juve lamp, and there's the know the stool and all the different things that I use the fluid stance, balanced boards. All that stuff. And I just really like being able to walk into our offices and see it's almost like a little playground. Right. Yeah. I think we need to add some some like rings and pull up ours. We're for for it's called break. -ation is the technical term for like hanging from stuff this week. We're going to have the rings the pull up bar in the yoga swing installed. Yeah. Which is good. Because we kinda we have like a pull up competition basically this year. I said it my own personal physical goal. And then Caitlyn are like HR manager did not like everyone. Try to if you're listening, and you're like kion customer, you know, ordering your bars your coffee or your flex over the case may be and customer support just goes to shit, you not able to get ahold. Everybody's because our entire office is like hanging from yoga swings. And they're literally doing break. Yeah. Like, yeah. And actually customer service Mike in camera like now, Bella brand, they're like the Belen Brandon. They're like the leaders of making sure breaks happen. Yeah. Yeah. How many employees are in that office onto just under twenty now? Yeah. So it's gone pretty darn fast from like none too. Like that does all the virtual employees. And. Yeah, folks, working contractors, folks. Yeah. Yeah. Which brings it to to do things significant more than thirty people for sure include all the contractors. Yeah. So one one big thing about managing juggling. All those people is the company culture. And I know you're big on that. I mean is somebody who you've already talked about loves to study, humans the way they operate the way they tick, and and how human stay happy. How do you how what are some of the the ju- just like the boots on the ground strategies that you use to maintain good, healthy company culture? I want to answer your question about like boots on the ground strategies. I also think that it's important to name that it's more than just strategies or tactics. It's it really is a mindset about what that what we're doing. And. Everyone that we hire. And the company's a whole we're all passionate about supplements. And we're passionate about health, and we're passionate about Ivars. What animus? We're not we're not as passionate about Animas as band. But yes, we all don't drink out of the stainless steel buckets at the on office. That said. There's a really healthy balance of we again, just coming back to the human thing. We're just a group of humans that were born into this life and are trying to enjoy our life have have beautiful unhealthy relationships with the people around us and be good people. Whether that's with or not with kion, and so it should be if we really want to honor that and we really want to help people in power, people lived, the most joyful fulfilling adventurous lives that that we really hold that in believe that day today. So it's not like he how can we do cool team stuff to make sure everyone's like happy in the cultures. Good. It's like a strategy to get the culture. Good. It's like being rooted in that belief, and I think the other big part about being rooted in that belief is that. I'll just be myself on this. I think oftentimes when people communicate with each other. They think that they're just communicating and I really got this from the behavioral health care company. I worked within actually really interesting book. I think his name's Paul guilt. Guilt ner. He was this book called emotional communication, and it's more like for therapists on like transference in psychoanalysis. But it's all about that. Oftentimes, people think they're only giving cognitive communication like I'm communicating a set of ideas to you right now. But actually every single time we're relating to someone. We're both wanting to communicate ideas cognitively that the other person will associate to in the be able to like have a conversation back with us. We're also communicating emotion always always communicating emotion. And we're trying to induce in the other person's some type of emotional experience in the same way that we're trying to like induce a thought in them and get the the thinking back and forth. And so I hold that. Really, dear. And I really believe that. And so when I think about what we're doing with people all the time like anytime that there's an initiative or we're going to communicate something about what we're doing. Why we're doing it just knowing that like the whole group all the time or having an emotional experience. And we're feeding off each other and the way in as as conscious as we can be about that the better the culture we can have. And so when we are hiring people. We have gotten feedback from our last couple of hires to like marketing director and the they're like, whoa, dude. That was like a lot of interviews. I dunno. They went to seven eight interviews. We really don't just try to understand what someone's skills aren't what their abilities. Are we want to be one hundred percent confident and clear that that person will be able to understand when they are communicating something emotionally to someone else frustration fear, happiness, joy and be able to realize it and name it and be clear about it and not have like drama or other garbage or just a lack of self awareness about what they're actually feeling what the other person's feeling because if that is not the case that we're going to spend all this time trying to talk about like business planning and like objectives. But people are having this whole emotional experience with each other. So almost sounds to me like a blend of like empathy and radical honesty. Yeah, I think it is. I mean, it's like really being able to sense what's going on with someone else and be really clear and honest about what's going on with you. But also people just have to be able to tell what's going on with them. So I think at the base like that's the keys like getting making sure that that that we have that fundamentally with the team, and then it's finding tools and strategies and tactics that like support that. And so, you know, we have. I don't know. How unique they are. I mean, we got many ideas from other people I brought a technique that I had at the last company. I was at where we begin meetings with a moment of silence, and so every single day at our daily huddles Villanova daily how huddle we start with three minutes of silence, all the people. The officer gathered around everyone is virtually is called in. You know, the zoom line we got video audio and everybody's gathered around at the end of the day nine forty five. AM we start with three minutes of silence. Yeah. So everyone basically starts in. You can be meditation can be breath work can be stretching. But we all start in silence together just to like get into ourselves. It's really cool. More recently moved into a different person leads every day. And then we just check in about what's going on that day what our objectives are. But we also regularly check in about emotional things or self care like just making sure people are looking out for themselves and taking care of themselves. Yeah. In so many companies will do what really the light bulb went on for me when I interviewed Todd white of dry farm wines and also went down to their offices, and and took part in their morning company culture, you know, which is like, you know, they they start off with with Wim Hof breathing and and then silence. And sometimes like like, I remember when I went down there. We were like gathering on table for a good half hour, just like doing breath work and meditation to start off the day. And then gratitude, and then everyone went around there the warehouse workers and the IT people in the tech people in the CEO and everybody just show. Knowing what it was that. They were grateful for that day. And granted it was pretty long like, I think are fifteen minute daily huddles are are almost more palatable because I was like. America, go. Good stuff don's. But but in all linked, by the way in the show notes to my interview with Todd. Why were we actually we we detail in pretty good detail about about how they built that company and their company culture. But yeah, this just this idea of starting off the day with some form of meditation or mindfulness or coming together. And gratitude, and it's it's beyond just like a a business building meeting. But is instead, you know, instead involves you know, what what are you grateful for today? What are you grateful for yesterday? Would you do to take care of your mind today or your body or your spirits? You know, what's one thing that you're excited about this weekend short? We also talk about our personal rocks and our big accomplishments for the day personal rocks. Are like our goals objectives or goals our objectives. But yeah, I mean that that fifty minute daily idol, I think is huge. Yeah. And so we like you said we alternate between things like expressing gratitude. Shout outs for other team members. Lots of good stuff. It really creates an awesome bond between the whole team were among the whole team. We do monthly team retreats with an annual or monthly team adventures in an annual retreats the monthly team adventures are really fun like actually missed the last one. But we had a one of the key on coaches, flew down. Everyone went and had. He's like a professional coaches meeting. Someone who's been through my my multi week certification program the caffeine or certifications years like twenty twenty seven weeks. And then we have we then there's continuing Ed like after you learn about all the different elements of body mind and spirit optimization, and it's a pretty intense physiology, and even like pharmaceuticals and biochemistry inbound mechanics, then we also have guests come in like our last guest was a doctor Makola came in and talked about out of contra before that Garrett Gunderson came in and talked about like how to build your your finances and your business. So it's a it's like this whole coach vacation program. But you got one of the coaches actually, come in to who. Happens to be like, I mean, man, the initial group of coaches that went to that program are like really cool talented amazing people one of them happens to be a professional snowboarding. Coach he flew down. Our whole team went out into day of snowboarding with personalized coaching. So sometimes it sucks being virtually. There's whitewater rafting next month. We've done. Archery, we've done I mean last one you around for when we did that big like snow hike, which is super fun. So we just get out and like an in take a Friday once a month to just enjoy each other together, do something cool and push. Each other parts about too is like people drink the Kuwait like we did the snow hike Belykh, you know, half the guys had their had their shirts off doing their cryotherapy is as their hiking, and you just got this team of employees marching through the woods, you know, in the frigid wilderness with our shirts off. And and I think that's a huge part of key on those you listening in like when you're talking to customer support person or you're you're ordering a supplement. I mean, like all our employees are out using this stuff trying it experimenting with it. You know, doing all the stuff that you hear me talk about from fasting cold Thermo Genesis two like we're trying we're trying to live. What it is that we're that we're saying, and I think that's a big big. Part of of creating not just a quality company culture. But also quality products is like people are actually using them. You know, democrat team, we we are all we believe in it. I mean, we're all doing it. Because we believe in it. I just got it's funny. I got almost like nervous for a second. It's talking about all this kind of like, Woohoo, cultural stuff, and I can imagine listeners who may more business oriented like. Yeah. Sure. Like, you do all that. But like you're making money. It's like we're running a good business. It's a profitable business. It's growing. Well, we're being we're have super sustainable month over month growth, we're not trying to grow too fast. But we're growing, well and solid. And we also have a really disciplined approach to cash that like we don't put money into things that we have to take risks sometimes, but we put money into the right things. But it's also out of like. It's out of respect for our whole team to like we're not trying to go on some big. We're not trying to have like this woo cultural thing and just have some like big dreamy vision only do that. It's like be disciplined business people, treat employees, really, well and build a culture where people really like being together, and they actually take care of themselves. And they I mean other big thing is going walks. I don't know three times a day. People are calling each other girl walks down by the creek. While also trying to go after this big vision like you can do all these things at once you really and and didn't really fruitful for us. I think it's important you bring that up too. Because a lot of people like why can't I buy my kion flex at whole foods. Why can't I get canned amino acids? You know what I'm in? I'm in London or in Sydney, and it's because we're we're building a high quality company. Yeah. We'll go wholesale retail. Yeah. We'll have an international presence. And yeah, we're we're we're rolling out. What over the next calendar? You're like three new amazing formulations that we have to hold close to our chests, but but we have some really really cool stuff that we're developing but part of building really quality company. And I think this is something people don't realize like you have to scale an amazing team of employees who speak our language, and that's really that is league hardest things in people. You can't just like hire like six new people. So that we can go wholesale retail and three months because. A lot of times, you know, the not only the the the customer service just goes to pot, but just like the employee culture just degrades in like we want healthy happy humans at kion. You know, who who are able to create something something great. So that people can experienced. Yeah. Our products over the world and other grocery store, but it's you know, it's it's a slow Bill to be able to do that into a well there really is it it's to do it. Well, like you have to be disciplined and focused. Nachos too many things at once and the biggest thing is the people. Yeah. That's that's the biggest challenge is how to again as I described for going to like seven interviews with people like it takes a lot of time. Yeah. It takes a lot of time to to build a team intelligently. And and and I think that's the other thing too. It's like. In terms of culture team like you can say you have a team approach. But do you really have a team approach in? What is a team approach? I mean, I think of I just quickly go to the metaphors of like large team sports, whether it's football team or basketball team or band a big band. Everyone's playing a musical band, which I think is similar as well. Everyone's playing a distinctive role, and then you do their role really well and the need to listen to everyone else they need to watch everyone else they need to be sensitive to in like you said empathic to what's going on with the other with the other players. So that you can all like move in unison together. So you don't just like throw sixty people on the field. You don't just like throw six new musicians in the bandages assume that everything's going to be the same. It's like, no, you gotta you'll be all over the place, you'll grow fast, and then you'll turn into just a horrible customer service and and crappy products, and so yes, speaking of crappy products, I know that you after kind of getting. Thrust into the role as as being the CEO, and then even the co founder of kion. I mean, you you you own a significant percentage of the company you've been really getting exposed to like the health and the supplements industry, traveling around all these annual expo west than the all the all the places that I kind of avoid that sends you to in my stead. What are some of the biggest trends that you've seen in for for better or worse in the health and supplements industry? I mean, there's really obvious ones within our field. I mean, you just see like Tito donuts heat us. I mean, Kito everything right? And it's it's interesting to see someone like you, right? Who I think was an early embrace her and spokesperson for Kito defined as Kito really two thousand twelve. Yeah. When I when I started using it for for endurance sports in greenfield tried up locks dot com. It wasn't really still not to the shown us. All right now. Yeah. So I mean, there's these kind of like obvious things like that. And I think other things that Pete me listeners to the show are aware of like bigger moves around longevity. Focus personalization of diet, and supplementation. I what I think is most interesting is the personalization aspect the degree to which you can get more information about your unique body and your unique behaviors and how new behaviors and new diet and new supplements. Could specifically help you to have a different experience being. That's that's the most admittedly. It's pretty Mickey Mouse. Right. I got it is I got an Email the other day, you know, from somebody like, oh, yeah. This new company were completely customizing in Personalizing. You know, everything, you know, based on your genetics and your labs, and you know, it's like. Like, a little vitamin dispenser that like, you know, gives you your vitamins basing laws, but it's so difficult because things fluctuate so rapidly. It's it's not scalable at this point. So it's very expensive. And there's also the there's there's not a lot of long term human clinical studies on it as well. Like like, yeah. Sure. Maybe you do have the genes responsible for low vitamin D absorption from the sun. And therefore, you fall into the vitamin d supplementation category. But where's the research that shows that or or your microbiome is deficient in x y and z probiotic therefore, you should take these specific probiotic strains, like it's tricky. And it's also, you know, again, it's not super scalable at this point. And it's I mean, yeah, I'm glad you. I'm glad you kind of segue into this. I think it's what's most exciting. And it's not really here yet. Yeah. And so. Similarly like for us. It's like how does a company like? And I don't mean to bring it back to us. It's just the most relag talk about like for key to like work within this field and try to offer people something like this because the solutions out there the partners that we could work with potentially to do things like this. It's just like you said, it's kinda Mickey Mouse like we could package it and put it all together until you. That's what's happening. But it's not really we're like selling you a story. Yeah. Hand too. It's it's a sexy story in and sorry to interrupt. But I I would rather. And this is what we're doing with a lot of our new formulations. I'd rather said what makes a human body? No matter what human body is. What do we know? Enhances motto condo biogenesis in motto condo, health and every human regardless of the genetics or or their microbiome. What lowers postprandial blood sugar after consuming a carbohydrate rich meal in every human out her you are, and then creating products that paint with a very broad brush using the highest quality compounds that we've researched and I mean like we do a ton of like one of our formulations we're working on right now. It's been like what like almost two years that we've been working on getting the perfect mix of Greece's. But when we roll it out. I mean that will be almost in the words of Ryan holiday his book about books it'll be perennial bestseller because it's something that just freaking works for everybody for your control. And you know, we've got another one, you know, working offer longevity. And I'd rather take that approach. And yeah, maybe five years from now, complete customization personalization will be Ford -able and research proven. And scalable, but like what I'm passionate about right now is just creating products that work for everybody. So and I feel like the approach at key on that we've been trying to take to this like interest in this type of personalization is on the content side. So when you when that was around and got exposed, for example, the fasting challenge the beginning of the year rather than saying, everyone should fast and this win. This is the only way too fast. And this is the right solution for everyone like everyone must do Kito. If you eat any carbs than you are bad person. Like, this kind of like just super straight story that this is the only story for everyone. It's not people have different goals and different interests and different body types. And so we tried in that in that we we did a fasting challenge that beginning of the year and did a fasting guide, and I hadn't seen anything like it before that just broke down all the different types of fasting options. And why they were unique and why they would fit you and your body and what you might want to do right now. And then encourage people to join us in our community too. Participate in whatever form they wanted to do as part of a and then us as our team again, we weren't all doing the exact same type, and we did different types that worked for like what worked for us that week. Maybe we were busy. Maybe we couldn't do a non caloric five day fast because we were concerned we couldn't maintain it will we were someone was training for something. So so they needed they needed some calories. So we just I think there's still an element to this is this is what I'm most interested in. And I think we're we I'm I'm I feel proud of what we're doing is not trying to tell people one story you must drink your coffee like this. You must never eat this thing. It's like, hey, these are the different. These are the this is what's going to happen for certain people if they eat these foods, and you should pay attention to and try to understand yourself better. There's a great article on on kion video about I can't remember the it's like a. Oh, man. It's there's like a bat. I came we ended up rechange in the name because it was like f- diets. But whenever it's just really breaks down. How people can analyze. Is your diets? I think it's an and again, I don't wanna I don't wanna sit around like bore people talking about our own relate. But that really is a big thing. I want to be able to give people is content that is digestible and is able to be adjusted in customized to everybody, regardless of their level. Like, I have a big new book. It's six hundred pages. It's all scientific research is the kind of thing that a physician could go through and learn something from every page, but at the same time something that somebody from the lay public who is generally genuinely and am very much passionate about their health could go through and also just get a ton of takeaways from. But along with that book when it launches like, we've got at kion like all the little pieces of that in tiny digestible format. You know, we're we're we're making contents that that will come along with that that that really allows anybody to dive in any level and get content. That's I think very very easy to understand. And that's that's what I'm excited about two is not just scaling are supplements to all levels, but also our content. So in just last blood for the supplements as you said before about the tr-. Coming up with with formulations that really work for that that would create the same effect, basically in everyone again empowering people with the information and the knowledge to know why they might do something at a deeper level, and they can be really thoughtful about win wine how they're going to invest their money and improving their health versus feeling the pressure. Like, they just have to do this fad because everyone else is doing it is what are your priorities. Is it more longevity focused is more like a weight loss focused? How can you balance these different priorities in a way that makes sense for you and your life? And I think all companies that are in the healthier can do a better job of that. Even if we don't have the technology to like analyze someone's genome and micro-biology and all that now for the perfect thing for them right now, they're still good work that we can do right now. The other the other really big thing I've noticed within being in this industry is just how hard if you're on the brand side like we are coming up with ideas, and formulations and may. Finished products for people. How hard you have to fight on the supply chain it on the manufacturing side to really get an awesome product. Yeah. That's what a lot of people don't realize it is like not. I mean, it you really you have to be the kind of feedback that we get from vendors and partners is like gosh. Like, really, I have to do all that information. And like it's like we are. And there's other brands out there like this to we're like annoying to the vendors because we've just found like if you don't if you don't examine all these certificates of analysis in push for like where this ingredient come from like comes back to bite you to if you go to a supplement website, and there's a product that every single product is in stock and everything's available. There's probably something wrong. Like, they probably have access to some pretty shitty ingredients, and they're just like films Fillon bottles up because nothing ever goes out of stock like, there's no high quality raw ingredients that you ever. Just can't get your hands. On because it's like not available seasonally at the moment, or whatever. Like, I did like that's one thing. That frustrates me is like I want all our products to be in stock all the time. But it's like, no the goats are not making Colostrum right now. We're sorry. This products out of stock like the goats are out right now. So I mean just little things like that. You know that are frustrating, but that are part of running a high quality company, and and you know, at at the risk of the the comments. I know we're going to get on this podcast already. You know assist? The king on commercial podcast, which it totally is. It's it's really I I want you guys to get to know some of the faces behind the company. Yeah. Let's talk about Angela more. I want to actually I know. I know we're running up on time here pretty soon. But I actually I'm very intrigued about like, the the musical in the creative aspects of you, you know, five years from now ten years from now, whatever like, do you see yourself going places with with music or or catoon anything else aside from kion? Of course, you know, assuming. Get fired from the company. Are you gonna are you going to keep keep the music or or whatever right elbow or anything like that? Like, what were you envision yourself in that respect? Yeah. For sure man. So I mean, I guess I stopped making as much music when I moved overseas. And then once I moved back to the US and start having kids it was like kinda taxing but of late I've been making a lot more music and writing a lot of music, and I just love it, man. And I've been getting cool feedback from people about like, hey, man. I'm like waiting for when you're gonna make your next Instagram post. You know, so. I'm really stoked about it. And I think that. The most exciting thing. I have a plan right now is like a one man show where it's music and visuals and like creative comedic monologue all mixed together. The amazing. Yeah. So that'll be in the fall. So I'm pretty I'm really understood also so fall of at the time of this recording to nineteen. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm still about that. And I'll be doing a lot man I'm excited. And who knows man, maybe you, and I will have some type of unique performance coming up that people not about this podcast might get released after that fact, Angela Knight some of cool things in the worst that well either way we've got some stuff we're going to be doing together in the music department that it might come out after this or before this pockets is released, but we'll record it for you. And put it up over at a over a geeky on dot com. Which is where you can learn more about Angelo. But you're on Instagram. I know you have Angeliki lead dot com is place. People just go check you out. Yeah. For sharing kale? I'll linked to that too. So obviously, everything go to Ben greenfield, thinness dot com slash Angelo. And that's where all linked to. You know, were I was in hot see angel interviewed me about in the initial vision for kion and how it got founded. And then all linked to some of the books that we talked about as well, as you know, like my interview with Todd wide of dry farm wines, and the kion you coach certification program. All I'll do a pretty good job putting together show notes for you guys. And in the meantime, we are we are about to take our family's done into downtown Spokane and show them the gun dole and the Spokane river front park in then my my executive assistant accused my life sane penny. She's coming into the house tonight. She's going to babysit the kids and Angelo. And Carrie and Justin are gonna go. Go on the town, have cocktail and go to my favorite restaurant here. Shout out to wild sage restaurant. Do eat some food a wild sage so. Thank you all for for listening in and for forgetting, the no a guy, who's really, you know, not only Mamane man kion, but also really becoming a good friend of mine and a guy I really appreciate an admire a lot Angela Kili. So Angela thanks for coming on the show, man. Thanks for having me. Ben. All right, cool. You wanna you wanna be box us out chairman. If thanks for listening to today's show, you can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben greenfield, fitness dot com, along with plenty of other goodies from me, including the highly helpful Ben recommends page which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion, fat loss performance and plenty more. Please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that Nabil's me to keep bringing you this content every single week. So when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes use the promo code generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

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The Best Way To Test How Healthy Your Heart Is: Ben Greenfield Undergoes A Complete Advanced Cardiac Evaluation & Reports The Surprising Results!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:00 sec | Last month

The Best Way To Test How Healthy Your Heart Is: Ben Greenfield Undergoes A Complete Advanced Cardiac Evaluation & Reports The Surprising Results!

"On this episode of the Ben Greenfield Fitness Podcast, I go out of my way to use things like beet root I've been Microsoft with Sildenafil before the active component in Viagra and I should also be sure that if I am participating in events where passing out contention, kill me such as a swim as you make sure I'm really really well topped off as far as mineral levels hydration, etc. We did the we've begun the treadmill and my favorite one. Yes. with the mask and all. Performance Nutrition. Longevity. Ancestral. Living biohacking. And much more. My name is Ben. Greenfield. Welcome to the show. I folks spent hours and hours and hours at a hospital in medical facility in L. A. Doing the most advanced cardiac workup known to man and frigging out what could a fellow or lady in middle aged do to test every last aspect of cardiac function had a videographer and offer walking around following me the whole time for physician interviews deep dives into all the lab equipment they were using. This is a ton of fun and I think you're GONNA learn a lot I've been wanted to podcast like this on heart health for. A long time and I'm really hoping it helps you kind of decode this whole world of just knowing and having peace of mind about what's going on with your ticker. Now, this podcast is brought to you by this crazy cool bundle that I just finished putting together for you. I call the immunity bundle. So what I did was I took the three things that I rely upon most often for supporting my immune system, a a synergistic blend of vitamin C. and zinc, and that was called Kion Immune be colostrum, which is wonderful. Not, only for supporting the health of your gut lining but also for your immune system, we have a great grass-fed Antibiotic Free Colostrum Kion, and then finally Oregano oil which I've been using for over ten years because it's incredibly Kovac content, which is wonderful for promoting a balanced microbiome and it's wild harvested. It's a Mediterranean Oregano oil in it's one of the best regular oils ever been able to hunt down on the face of this planet I bundled all three together, the key on immune, which is the vitamin C. and zinc the. Colostrum and the original oil, and then I convinced my wonderful team at kion to give you a ten percent discount on all three of these immune powerhouses very simple. You need a code or anything you just go to get Kion Dot Com get K O. N. DOT COM. You'll see the immunity bundle right there on the front page grab it added to your car and you're off to the races. It's the exact protocol that I use to support healthy immunity I. Think you really dig it. This podcast is also brought to you by. Something else that's actually wonderful. Not only for immunity also for sleep my friends at organic fi have cracked the code on making an amazing Pumpkin spice flavored powder that you can add to coconut milk or bone broth or hot water or anything else you want at night or in the day but they've added things like Turkey tail mushroom and Rishi and turmeric powder on organic tumor powder and they have all these. Different superfoods in there but it tastes like the really really great. You know like the Pumpkin spice. Latte. Get from the coffee shop none of the crap no artificial sweeteners, chemicals, flavors, expense driving time make it right there in your kitchen with no chopping or clean up our mess and best yet you twenty percent off. If you go to organic five dot com slash Ben that's organic with an I dot. com slash. W. Twenty percents off your order try out the Pumpkin spice. They call it. Gold Gold Pumpkin spice powder from war gamified. All right folks? Well, this is it. You have asked me plenty of questions over the years about how you can actually assess your cardiovascular function, how you can actually know or have that peace of mind that your heart is working properly or perhaps even find out some things about it that might require you to address things from from a diet or exercise or lifestyle standpoint. So, loved on his I'm coming to California to Beverly Hills to a place called Kellyanne help. And we're GONNA be doing is a suite of battery of cardiovascular function tests which are going to allow us to look at what my own heart health actually peers to be. Now today the person, the medical professionals you may walk through all this is Dr Daniele Lia, and he here to tell Ya and. You are are you a what? What's the actual style of physician you would describe yourself as I'm cardiologists? Preventative Cardiologists. So it the intersection of lifestyle factors and testing in titans, all of that. So I think this is GonNa be Great interchange. So looking forward to fantastic and again people preview, what are they gonNa get to see today? Well, we're going to do a full cardiovascular assessment. We're GONNA do some blood work we're going to do some ultrasound based assessments, get you on the treadmill as well, and then also get a calcium scored on. So with these tools, we're GONNA get a good You know head to toe assessment of your cardiovascular system and we'll also do some endothelial function testing which is very Important because that's a very dynamic look and it's a dynamic pretty vascular risk factor. Fantastic and we'll explain to you guys we each of these tests do as we go through. But if you want to visit the show notes to learn more about anything that we do. You can find all the information on Dr Daniele Delilah on Tele-. Felt on all the different tests that we do and you can leave your own questions, comments or feedback if you just go to Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash heart podcast that's Ben Greenfield dot com slash IHEART podcast. That's all the show notes are going to be and being said. Let's do this. All right. Perfect well I think we're going to get started with the getting your ultrasound done. So we'll have you come on here on introduced Michael. Okay. All right. So. This is going to be basically an imaging of the. Of the actual musculature or the the. Of Your. Heart Muscle. At, your carotid arteries which is signed. To build up of plaque right after Karadzic plaque and then we'll also take a trip, your abdominal Aortic, which is another place great, and then your your arteries. Rolex Okay Great so Bill Cardio visit. So we're going to be doing your ultrasound today. Okay. So, we'll require you to remove your shirt for me. I think I should be able to do tomorrow I'm wearing a Mike, but we can get creative here. And there are plenty of places I can attach this including my beautiful mask. And as for the rest of the casting which will include And all of that stuff. So so go ahead. Have you back on the air? Now one thing that I that I know many healthy active people will find on a on a ultrasound like this is enlarged. Heart then. Also known as athletes heart or correct me if I'm wrong dot Admiral Mega League or. Party. Magli Karya. Magli. We we see this not infrequently with our athletes and I think part of this is that we take some very specific measures on the ultrasound. Some physiologic parameters to assess whether this is creating an impact. On cardiac performance or it's sort of part of that athletic heart pattern. So some of this a little technical, but we can walk through it. But it wouldn't be surprising to see some thickening of the of the walls Will we call hypertrophy concentric hypertrophy? Patterns that we can tell you this is We're not. Great we're going to go ahead and roll it up over a little bit on your side so that you're facing toward me. So, like so great left arm up when he gets into a nice. Comfortable position. Best Tanic position for me. Right got. Of course. My mom always told me I had a big heart. We'll find out. I. Hope. It. will put that in his all of the measurements will be normalized to your body. and. So forth and we can. Get The visor area calculator I'm six, foot two and one hundred and eighty one pounds. All right. So this is an ultrasound so just like when they look at. we're going to be actually looking at your heart and all the mechanics within the heart valves. The Walls Chambers We even have the ability to turn on something we call colorful, which is a doppler. Artist. So we actually watched the blood flow. To the heart. So, we can look at those leaky valves or things that would cost that hard to enlarge, and then the best part is we can take. Those. Visions that we see with the color we can actually measure. So actually see the velocities going through without amazing. So here we go. It's going to be a little cold. For those viewers out there. That did wonder he does have a heart I. Have a heart you have a heart. Surgeon lines me of when my wife was pregnant we went in and she said. You have a baby. Although in her case were to. Now is it common doc when you when you bring in healthy people, athletes exercising individuals that you do indeed find things they may have been unaware of or you do indeed find issues that would have surprised. The average person for for healthy, you know healthy unquote active personnel. When I think what's really important is to look at family history. You can be totally helped healthy normal cholesterol, and then you actually have when we do some of the scanning and so forth we calcium scoring find out that there is atherosclerotic plaque developing, and that's that's something where it's early enough for those folks that are younger that they can really alter the trajectory of the disease. Yeah I. Think it's interesting believable with James O'Keefe who I listened to lecture. At the ancestral health symposium I believe and he was speaking to arterial stiffness and athletes particularly endurance athletes and he was finding when it comes to cardiovascular mortality. A law of diminishing returns in terms of heartfelt. Wants someone was exceeding about sixty minutes of intense moderately high activity per day about ninety minutes of aerobic activity. And he was actually finding markers of inflammation after sclerosis on arterial stiffness and people are overdoing it. Yeah I think that's absolutely true and there's increasing data that those those folks can have accelerated atherosclerosis else scores can start to be elevated out of proportion someone in an agent. we do see that I think it's a certain type of inflammation depending on you I. think There's a exercise type for everybody that's that's GonNa. Find that out and figure that is going to be key and. confiding variables to like that that's also population is eating noodles and Pasta and scones. And in many cases, you know very active persons also. Someone, who is inducing a certain amount of insulin sensitivity and you know rampant levels of blood glucose and other issues related to The the training to eat and eating train phenomenon. I I know many cyclists who pretty much live on on. You know three glasses of wine at night after they've ridden and a bunch of bread and pasta during the day and. You know. Consuming seventy eighty percent carbohydrates which. In many cases, I don't think many favors from A. From a from a Litho knock sedation standpoint. That are very, very high intake a- pufus. Which I which? You know I was recently over in. India. You know we're we're seeing a lot of obesity and cardiovascular disease even though the carbohydrate intake has not appreciably risen, you know a lot of the natural cooking oils like G. and coconut an extra virgin olive oil have been replaced by vegetable oils as a matter of fact, I, personally from the data I've seen think that. polyunsaturated fats and lake acids and. Other sources of vegetable oils are just as big a culprit for things like diabetes and insulin resistance as carbohydrates. Think you raise a good point You know we've always. Advocate in the cardiology community plant-based Mediterranean diet. All of oil that type of thing. Now there certain purists Calva Leslie in his group in Cleveland Yeah that really suggests no, no cooking oil because concerned about when you when you cook things and oil. So forth, there's there's damaged into yep that can occur and so and we can see that with some of the testing that we can do. But it's hard because these are not the most accessible test to sort of a general population. Is there and it's There's some really good validated datas that's coming out of that yeah. Yeah. I certainly opt for heat stability, but that's always crossed. My mind is you know would would less in general? Be Better you know even if even if they are stable. And I think a large part of that can be genetic to I think the populations that have subsisted on. Whatever, you know wail. The or you know high amounts of marbly fat or you know milk and blood like the Masai Warriors, they might be more genetically adapted to to those types. Of Fats. I think anytime you're dumping oil into a hot skillet and cooking something it's. increasing. Risks. I'm at this point. Although it's it's hard to have a good pork belly though that that that hasn't been cooked down a little bit of fat get crispy. And so as you go through the ultrasound or simply identifying different areas taking a photo listening exactly. So what we do is we have a specific protocol that that'd be. The knocker dandelions use to so it's a series of images. And then we take each chamber and each valve and do a set of diagnostics. So use the color and watch the blood sweat right and then you the sound that you've been hearing is the doppler. So that's already taking. Actual measurements of the velocity through the valve. So remember we're checking the Alpha. Two things we're checking for function. So making sure that it's opening and closing. Incorrectly. It's not pro lapsing. It's not style Nautica meaning heavy calcification. Valve can't open close or sometimes they just get a little piece of calcium on it. And the leaks. Faucet in the house right. So you know routinely we do the ECHOCARDIOGRAM was to monitor chambers sizes, value gorgeous. And then progressing of those. Fascinating. and. Then you're also seeing some of these parameters with with actual blood work as well. Yeah. An advanced panel. which move beyond our traditional. which is really been. In their decades right. You're right. You're actually looking at Lipid. Particle size. Park Account. For you because you've seen that observation that. Just standard lives alone can underestimate risk. This is where we pair with Calcium score and Leo function we can get great composite. Risk above. And there's some fascinating. Things in the advance lipid panel. Things like LP little lay yeah. Yeah. Particles that we can. We can deep dive when we get the results. Yeah. These days Walking, I'd probably walk. Anywhere from five to seven miles a day. Just just We'll talking on the phone or consulting with people or. Recording and Typically, Sauna four or five times a week. Some kind of a cold soak after for and we're from two to five minutes and you know often another cold shower jump into a cold river pulled tub. Later. On the day and then about four times a week. I'll do about a round a forty five minute long. Like Kettle Bell, strength, training session or. high-intensity interval training session or something. That's a little bit more of A. Of a difficult workout. and. Then Sudd- from Outta some tennis with the family usually hike on the weekends. And I'd say the hardest thing I do those those four sessions a week where you know like the Monday Tuesday Thursday Friday all. Go to the garage and course the tell bells of do a Lotta. Sandbags. Unwieldy. Objects Terry's I quit racing professionally. Last year. And so So I do a lot less of the extremely hard voluminous intense training. There was a time when I was probably. Getting close to about sixteen eighteen hours a week though you know when I was racing triathlon, for example. The No. It's a primarily walking kettlebells and so on us and cold. And then just a little bit of sports here and there in between tennis paddle boarding hiking things like that. TIKI. All right. So that is test one completes. One thing that I thought might be cool. Once we've done all of this and you know whether it's A week from now or whenever we've got all the all the results anywhere ready for a summary. Is I was thinking of other a lot of recorded podcast where I can skype gear, call you and we can do like a fifteen twenty minute. Daybreak has kind of like you know tack on the Audio at the end. Put put a little bow on everything for people. Be Great so. Reluctant. On your back okay. Great. So what we're going to be doing here is called a karate duplex. This is an ultrasound of the two large arteries in your neck. Taking blood flow to the brain. I don't have a lot of Boyd told my brain. Find Out. What's great about this test is the arteries extremely superficial. So it's easy to see And, we're able to really get an early look. any. Buildup. On the arterial walls. And then again, same type of predators with the echocardiogram that we we have the color. So we can see the blood flow actually going through the artery. We have the doppler. So we're going to actually get to hear that flow. going. Through. I have a karate kid. And a heart. So far two for two to. Are there certain populations that you found to either be surprisingly healthy from a cardiovascular standpoint or? UNHEALTHIER, than would be expected from a cardiovascular standpoint doctor. It's a good question. You know what you think what's Nice about being in La is that we see such a diverse population. Of Folks What's interesting is that some of the folks that I've family history that come in we deep dive and look at some of these parameters we'd find that truly there is a significant genetic component. With some of the lab work that we see and so and then we start to do some of the tests, the ultrasound, and so forth, and we can start to see early disease. So that is somewhere where we can definitely alter the trajectory If we can get to the disease, you know five ten years earlier, we could make a huge downstream different. but you know it's interesting I do see certain folks that have done very hardcore. Ketogenic diets knows your. Expertise for you. Interestingly their bids can be. Very alarming So there's a balance on that that that. Certainly in the in the in the people who I've. Worked with and and he helped out with their lab panels are a genetic diet. Often, see pretty rampant triglycerides someone out of inflammation. In company with With High L., which I don't think is Is Sufficient for heart disease, but definitely necessary component. And a lot of times I'll find that these are the people who are not necessarily achieving ketosis visa. Carbohydrate mitigation some amount of fasting good plant in take. And none appreciable intake of saturated fat but instead people who are doing. You know the the coconut oil bombs in the half, a stick of butter on their coffee and just. Ramp, in amounts of of a particularly saturated fats with the absence of much plant matter. And I think there's kind of two flavors of Akita Genyk. Diet one that is favorable for heart health potentially in one one that seems to accumulate a lot of risk factors for disease. Do. Agree I think. There's there's a certain diet type that is optimized to the individual and. Interplay of micro biomass and right? So I, think it's really fascinating and I think it to just. A lot of known yeah. Yeah. He you can fast. You can eat fish you can have eggs you can you know drench vegetables and Extra Virgin Olive Oil and You know still maintain low blood glucose, low glycemic variability, and and somewhat high levels of circulating key towns. And have get help and then you can also like I mentioned just dipa giant spoon in nut butter, coconut oil and butter all day and do it that way and. Think you'll see two different outcomes. Do you have any opinions on this new Trendy Carnivore Diet, a lot of people are falling. Uh. Well I tried to take a balanced viewpoint on all these issues but I I do see some problems that yeah run into again I see you know people are able to keep their inflammation levels down and keeps lipids under control and certain things like. You know like we talked about all. Patients that type of the Diet but my personal feeling is that it's It's a little bit extreme. Again, you know there's really hasn't been. Control data on that. These these studies are obviously hard to do. Again I kind of tend to see a the same thing it can be done right or done wrong. I think there's people. Eating rely stakes from Costco for breakfast lunch and dinner. And then there's people you know consuming bone broth and liver and. You, know lots of glycemic rich you know organ meats and. kind of taking entirely different approach and. I think the ladder is if if you're GONNA, use that type of approach just from a nutrient density standpoint. And A. and. You're also limiting the the mass amounts of Matthias intake. You get from just eating muscle meat all day long. And I know there's some definite linkages between the pioneering and. Constant mentor activation to the accents where he might be you know. Limiting longevity to a certain extent. So. Yes I. Think you know for that diet more of a A. So called nose to tail approach seems to be favorable. It's very socially limiting diet. You know no, no plants at all. It's like it's As difficult to follow. I, see it being. Of, some utility for someone who just wants to eliminate all problematic plant compounds from an autoimmune standpoint. Short term but. I don't see it being a long-term. At least a strategy that that I personally could sustain just because I love are vegetable garden. Plant foraging. More more expensive diet. You know the same set of like a like vegan approach to write. Can Be Vegan and have granola bread all day long or you can you know be fermenting and soaking and sprouting and and Greens, and shoots, and sprouts and Always seems potato chips or Vegan. Diet. Yeah. It's between nutritional deficiency who talked about but certainly Base of Oakland plant based eating is Is is good. Everyone agrees on that? Yeah. Near nearly everyone. Except the except the the carnival population and then. Think to a certain extent. You know the Paleo Diet. Crowd issues a lot of. A lot of things that we know could be metabolic we favorable lake legumes. Or you know grains. Certain. Things that that. I. Don't necessarily have a problem with if they've been prepared properly. How do you recommend young folks that are interested in attrition? What is where's the weirdest store? because. It's it's very confusing and there's a lot. Choices out there. How do people find their new happily on confusing as dog matt if somewhere interested in it as a career. Then I think the very best thing to do is to. You know tackle it from a from from a standpoint of. If you look at the education rather than focusing on nutrition courses or dietetic courses which are always going to be biased. Will you do is instead take. Chem Biochem okay microbiology. And you're essentially equipped yourself to build a understand. The underlying building blocks of what it is, you're talking about and. If you start there, you know physics to a certain extent just understand some of the the energetic equations. been here, step back and look at any diet. And you know especially if you pair that with some type of education now being physiology. Rather than simply. You know learning about. Whatever? carbs protein fat, and the Mediterranean versus the Paleo versus the Vegan. I think instead of deep underlying knowledge of the science is. Going to set you up to foundationally understanding diet if it's something, you WanNa pursue from a professional standpoint. I think that's the key missing component is a lot of people just don't. Understand the science behind the actual molecules we're talking about. Issue Nutrition no matter which which route you go from from an educational standpoint there is going to be a certain amount of bias. And I think in medical school just thinking back you know we had. maybe a handful of lectures on nutrition does more geared towards nutritional deficiencies. Vs and things like that. So we don't really encounter. In just modern society. But the true practical nutrition training was really gone to there. Yeah. Yeah, there's a fewer the Institute for Integrative Nutrition is one that does a decent job I N. Good certification seems to be a little bit more. More. Well. Rounded and holistic. Then, there are there places like the. Break here. Okay. Awesome. The functional medicine, they put out some good resources and. You know there are guys like Chris Crosser, who have good training programs You know Paul Chat who's a little bit more of a fitness trainer. He has some really good programs as well. Based on. Based on an education that that's more more addressing each person individually you know and also looking looking at things from more ancestral standpoint. And you know but a lot of a lot of the the university courses there steeped in Essentially, this same food philosophy that has sparked from. You. Know government subsidy of grain corn and soy monocropping agriculture in this idea that. You know fats are largely vilified. Just all lumped into one category and You know it's still very kind of old school food pyramid asks a lot of a lot of education shockingly enough. All right. All right. So as talked about looking and identifying areas where there's risk in with the vowels harder argument, cutting out the fees mainly etcetera as we look out for with the echocardiogram. We looked at the Karatas. Looking for parking disease. So on the other big one that we like to do is looking at the abdominal were cut on. That's where we unfortunately here about your aneurysms in elderly. Folk. Chore Not Been Able To survive it because if it doesn't happen in the parking lot of the hospital, it's it's a tough. So We actually Medicare has great privilege that anybody over the age of sixty five can actually go get a one time only abdominal ultrasound, and if they've ever had one in their family, if they've ever been a smoker, if they've had high blood pressure, there's about seven or eight parameters that Medicare will actually gift you one at the age of sixty five, which is great because it really is truly one of those silent killers. So but it's nice. Again, you know here that we have as part of our, you know packages. Interesting. People. Talk. About. That a lot of people talk about it is a silent killer. So. Wow, what is important to to have that evaluated so again and the great part about all of this and everything that will be doing to you today it's all noninvasive. All ultrasound or pneumatics. Yeah part it's fantastic. So you're getting A. Of testing. With. Little. Essentially to know rinse. The treadmill. I'm not afraid of treadmills. The to me time on those things. About the Guy Operating. Exactly. Although I just interviewed someone on my podcast swears by for medical benefits to low amounts of radiation. What was his thesis? Her name was Jane Goldberg, and she was talking about. Everything from radon exposure to you know the fact that. You know in rodent models living around Chernobyl, you're seeing extended lifespan. you know UvA need to be radiation from sunlight and low amounts having a hormetic effect. There might be something to that that low level natural radiation we get from Earth or the Sun. However. In what's the idea that would stimulate your innate? Stimulator. and. You're getting right eye endogenous antioxidant production of DNA. Repair regulation. It CETERA You know. I don't necessarily plan on. On. She does in her book in certain places shooing the benefits of say the atomic bomb or something like that. But. You know I think there's something to be said for these. I. Think they're called geothermal hot spots or In Alternative Medicine, they're called energy vortices these areas on the planet where. There's natural radiation emitted by rocks and geological formations, and you'll find a lot of. Native American hot springs and healing spots actually built up around those locations like in Sedona or Sir. and. Then, also you know some of this idea there there are certain. Rocks and stones that he met low levels of Radon. For example, you know she'll find a lot of rocks that they would harvest from say King Solomon's minds Israel and she's got she got some interesting data on A. An increase lifespan or at least increase cellular resilience, and there's lots of someone that. I generally try to limit by exposure to radiation from. A lot of more modern sources Where my ems blocking underwear on the airplane and all that good stuff. Hopefully. They're still not read. The underwear. Yeah ems that's always read is always. Yeah mine are blue and then some some company out of Germany actually sent me this slick kind of like travel suit. That's that's all Essentially comprised of almost like a Faraday cage material like a full body. But. It doesn't. It's not unsightly. It just looks like more kneel some Nice slacks and. Yeah Hey, we're talking about health today show and heart health specifically and man. There's one thing for cardiovascular function for detoxification for nitric oxide production for lot of the things that we discuss on today's show is fantastic at increases chuck proteins for cellular. Resilience. Red Blood cell production, human growth hormone production. And it is infrared light have a giant inflatable sauna that I'm almost every day in the basement of my house. It emits near mid and far infrared heat. The model is called the sanctuary I can fit four to six people in there for a dinner party going there by myself to do yoga swing kettlebells hop on a stationary bike if I. 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This podcast is also brought. To you by thrive market, which is a sweet website for shopping for all things. Healthy groceries. Why can't you just shop for healthy groceries on Amazon. A well, a whole bunch of the stuff that you'll find in the thrive market catalogue. You can't even hunt down Amazon plus they give you a twenty dollar shopping credit if you join today plus their. Prices are already dirt cheap like a twelve month membership comes out to less than five bucks a month. Then you save even more because it's a membership and unlike a lot of other online healthy shopping websites, carbon-neutral shipping zero waste warehouses, and they let you easily shot by seventy plus diets Kito Paleo Gluten Free Vegan non GMO fairtrade certified BP free. They. Also, have not just groceries and supplements, but they also have things like nontoxic home cleaning supplies a clean beauty products they've got ethical meet sustainable seafood, clean wine. They are crushing it in the healthy living and healthy shopping department, and again you are gonNA. Get a big old discount anti twenty dollars shopping credit when you join today if you go to thrive. Market Dot com slash Ben, two membership options. There are one month or one year you'll save up to twenty bucks you get that one year and you'll get your shopping credit to go to thrive market dot com slash ben from sprouted nuts dark chocolate to any other Gilfry item you WanNa Stock Your pantry with grab a thrive market dot com slash. Ben. We're going to launch the endothelial function tests now which. As you may that into film as many considered that the biggest one of your body, it's like the Super Oregon. The layer of cells for a layer of cells that line all your blood vessels sixty thousand miles of your blood vessels. So understanding filial function is really critical it's been. Thought to be sort of that canary in a coal mine sort of thing with tenure. Risk prediction ten years ahead of time before even atherosclerosis can appear. So there's there's great data that's been validated and socio FDA approved. So it's a good baseline assessment cool and also with nitric oxide production. Yeah which is really what it's all about. So yeah. Find out if all that walking outside and the sunshine. Shyness. Helping with the end of feeling on nitric oxide function absolutely convinced. It's one of the best things you can do. A lot of good sunshine. See. You see some dad on. Even like the like the Sauna and the Cold Thermo Genesis. INCREASE IN NITRIC OXIDE And then L Arginine Supplementation Yeah folks tends to be helping through diet so I don't know what you are. Yeah. So I just think of I agr- every morning. Illogic. Out Outta, Hack your cardiovascular function task, just take sildenafil before. You'll feel great. So this next test is called an Indo Pat. So. It looks okay for Jeremy Say it three or four times at least. TRYSOFI. Looking at nitric oxide. So you talk about. Say this. is a heavy measured oxide mean we all know. Exercise products and stuff like that. Always boost in nitric oxide. So we're actually able to measure it on. It's actually a medically word Lane Formula House. You Probably Know Noble Prize behind that I diagnosis of Nashville. So, very important. And this was called the Endo Path. This is called the Endo. Endo Pat and do pats. Okay. Not The endo past the endo pat correct. Standing for endothelial. and Andy for peripheral arterial tone. And that's going to be these guys. Right here. So very cool. Little device has a pneumatics inside. Your finger will go. Inside. and Are you right handed or left handed right handed. Your. Index. Finger. Goes in. Just a little finger condom. From bumping into that sensor could. That's what those are for. Keeps the stability. Of. The test. Finger from shaking. Cool unique test and the respect that. We actually put your arm to sweep. On for this guy so My arm to sleep which I is sleep. So, for Lovely viewers. They're going to get to. Miss out on the boring component of test is also conducted over fifteen minutes. Where the patient? Is Not Allowed to move. In I to speak. Okay. So. So we'll have a couple portions of. Control in the test. All, be doing some talking. Then again, you're going to be a good way. That's fine. I can go. Add chequered. Warm me, I WANNA put headphones at an audiobook in. Mala. Just have to go inside my head. Yes. I'll try to be like one since I do about three a month. That's right. Tell me tell me stories. Why don't you like them listening to now? earthrights. Was Funny sometimes you listen to them you can't remember if they're a movie or if it was an audio book like some people popular here but I gotta remember that great scene that wasn't a scene that was an audiobook especially the really good one. All right perfect. So fingers go all the way down. You're GonNa stay just like that and I think the air out of those in just two seconds. At, six to right. And I hear what? Eighty five? By one eighty actually. Quitting as many river is. Alright. So fingers should all the way down don't move as still. Perfect okay. So we're going to and put you into the testing position, which is exactly like. Exactly like that. All right. So we have good signals strength. Ready to go. All right. Here we go. So fifteen minutes no moving no talking. All right. So we have begun. As I said fifteen minutes no talking no moving the test is broken up just three five minute segments. First, five minutes is called the baseline and that's why the two probes on your fingertips there are capturing your pulse data which we see represented over here. On the screen. And we're going to maintain this measure for five minutes, and then we'll inter into the second stage, which is called the equation. And that's going to be right pump up the pressure. And put that route arm to sleep. Through, the signs they found out that is the non dominant arm that we liked to test. And so give him for five minutes and then the last five minutes, it's called the dilation. And that's where we're going to watch as the blood is returned back into artery kind of that review. Process. So since we're looking at polls in terms of amplitude. The higher the amplitude. So we should be watching that amplitude increase. After we will be pressure cuff and in their proprietary. Software they're able to give us the measure of nitric oxide. Through how the voltage so how? Is and how long it lasted. So based off of those parameters, we'll be able to to get that score for you to. Three minutes, twenty five seconds left, of baseline. Forty. Good So. When release the pressure cuff. In humans. From seconds. You'll just fuel normal rush. Blood going back down your arm. No discomfort. Two minutes. Doing. Good. And forty five seconds doing good. Ten seconds ten seconds with that air out. All right. So, five minutes still no movie. No talking. Are Alright. Got Houston. Also, close right at the Mike. Great. So what we're seeing here is a response in a artery. So as we reintroduced the blood flow black, we see that the. Attila on. Our screen. is actually higher than it was when we began, which is exactly what we expect to see happen. This is the reactive hyperthermia we're talking about. Absolutely. Absolutely. Agree about this test is we can actually see it in the form of the high amplitude polls In the machine will take this data and apply calculations and normalize it to its database crowd, and then we'll get the H. I. Number, which is the key number that we're looking at to t to to get a indicator of art of arterial health and Endothelial, function. And what I love about this test specifically is that we get the results now. You take some of the tests that we talk about even our favorite tests that we like. Sometimes, we have to send that out. Right sometimes, we'RE DEPENDENT ON GETTING THOSE TEST results back. Sometimes, that could be a day. So that comes be a couple of days. You know what's great about this and the practices at. Number. Number. Hewitt's twenty seconds left. Doing. Good And coming up on. Two minutes two minutes left. And then we'll be done with this test and then we'll go ahead and transition over to the stress Echo. Doing Great Homestretch one twenty. Fifty seconds doing good. All right. So in fifteen seconds, we'll go ahead and stop all of our recordings Login, el-amir safe to talk and safe to move. Will initiate the program, go ahead and give US rapid results. You can talk you can move. How'd you do? I don't. Land. I. Hear your voice running in the background, but I was so deep into meditation. Got Some good data here. I have to admit I'll probably need to take a leak than before. For sure will last. Pause for station, identification. Here. Got Up occasion. I'm. Glad at least one person in the room. Radio before. Interest. Test. I really wanted to see what you thought about it. Yeah. It fell asleep then. I've done a lot of blunt flow restriction training before we're I'm pretty used to having having the arteries included. Training for. Craziness sensation for me. Already doing here. All right. This is one of our most fundamental tests and cardiology. We're doing a twelve lead electrocardiogram. So Brenda's putting these leads on. So we're going to be recording electrical signals from your heart. A resting EKG rescuing ekg. So we can ascertain your heart rhythm We can see if there's Any kind of athletic pattern, chamber, enlargement, and so forth. So it's just It's our fundamental tests so we'll get. That you look at that. You are S wave that cure. uh-huh. The heart. That's right. We'll look at the way form and. The. Other way for him. So absolutely. Now, explain to people who might be wondering why you can't just put an electron say over the hearts for that's why the electric known so many location. Well, we're looking at vectors so think about. When we talk about a twelve decay g were looking at the heart from twelve different angles So we can localize certain disease patterns As you probably know, there are some consumer devices that are really pretty equal that you can record your own heart rhythm. At home and you can that attached to a smart device. So those are what he's one for that to measure hurry berries. Hilby called the nature beat yeah and so those are good for and allosaurus. This is good for not only rhythm analysis but really looking at. Again. Hard thing all these different leads and localizing any other issues. So it's a little bit more detailed. All It'd be an example, an issue you might. On the G.. M.. went to. Red Neon Arrhythmias. TYPE OF CARDIAC. Older folks atrial fibrillation is a is a common thing that's picked up on an Ekg We could see Leifer trickier hypertrophy. We could see left atrial issues with the Atrios well. So different. Chamber abnormalities. Sometimes, you can pick up electrolyte abnormalities also. Some really interesting things on the UK, and then of course, a Bagel tone I suspect you'll have a low resting heart rate. So we'll. We'll kind of just see what your resting heart rate is on the Ekg So yeah, we can pick up all of that. This also picked up. Very. This one does not traditional twelve cagey. Does. Not But, my sense on heart rate variability is that you can see that on some of the devices that were rings and so forth where you can get more of a consistent day to day measure of that that's probably the most useful to develop a pattern. I think isolated measurements on that can be a little bit hard to interpret. So it hasn't quite made it into the traditional cardiology world, but I think it's It's GonNa be fascinating when we have wearables and sensors where we're just gathering data on a continuous basis for for folks to be able to aggregate the data and see what this all means. Great. Thank you so. As predicted Hartley to forty two. So high vaguely tone pretty impressive and. Otherwise looks like a a good ekg no major red flags here. So we'll. We'll review this little bit more in detail but this is this is overall good. We'll see resting heart rate usually detract that. Usually. If I'M GONNA sleep on kind of upper thirty low forties. Yeah. Fantastic. Excellent. So this part looks good. Up to day whether My mother-in-law is. Also this podcast Nabet. Excellent. Right. All right. So resting heart rate forty two. So that was accurate. Yeah. So all right on the home stretch here I think we're going to get you on the treadmill home stretch. Perfectly. All right. So yes. So we've hooked you up like a standard. Resting Electrocardiogram. Again as we discussed earlier a little bit different electrodes. Because again, this is a stress. So you're expecting to be bouncing on the treadmill exercising sweating, etc So the electrodes have a little bit bigger surface area designed to stay on your during those phases of your of your test, and then what's cool is we will then use the ultrasound machine again in conjunction with the treadmill. So what we do is we take pictures of your heart at rest. So we look at the regional wall motion. So the heart should look like a bellow. So the heart is GonNa Contracted Cabello, would it base that moves up? Essentially, what the ventricles should look like. All right. Well, each areas around that. Belo. Essentially. Segment and our coronary arteries feed various segments of those walls. So we do the rest images of the heart and we bring you over to the treadmill and exercise you get that heart rate up. Now, what's different from a traditional treadmill is normally, of course, at the gym. As soon as you're done, you generally cool down we don't have a cool down stage. We go from maximum exercised back over to this table as quick as we can perfect back into our imaging position and we take those pictures again, and that's what we can see that that heart beating extremely fast and obviously looking for any type of blockages along those walls. So back into your titanic post. Thirty one. Good. Left on this I. Well, that's why you don't know the come over on your side. Of the most famous scene in the movie is this is right here. And I think she got a dime nickel for that. event. Oh Hard time people just never been to movies read a lot of. Fun Jim. Let's did you can get a lot more from a book something in in most cases, the movies. All right let's see. We have. Movies. International? Flight. Really on this test, it's patient preparation this just you spend that extra couple of minutes getting the electrodes right and getting the right pictures it really. It really goes such a long way to get a good quality studies. So we don't always get great windows like yours. You know to look into the heart. So we just have to do everything we can with the patient prep. Makes up. Fascinating all this goes down we're getting. All one place. Now In terms of of this work that we're doing. is in common or someone whether it's it's an executive or athlete or someone like that come into your clinic and. For you to to do this battery of tests. Yeah it's I. Work. Full kind of cardiac preventative workup And again, we're always looking at new technologies and tools to put into the into the mix part of it is that. There's a lot of technology, but just hasn't been quite validated with some of the data but this is a good representative thing set of things that really does have good data. So we like to look at it. This same panel, they would just be able to contact until he help and and say, they want to fold cardiac preventative cardiac workup. Then greenfield specials with right. Then, people. Start to. See if they can. They can be my results see who's got the biggest heart. Reading an article, the other day about Broken Heart Syndrome is becoming increasingly common. We're loneliness depression is increasing. Adequately. This idea of of impaired berry function due to the emotional. Fascinating. Actually. Have Broken Heart Syndrome very similar. So my experience as a loved one but. This has. Gone he get the same thing for loneliness through depression through losing your job overhead. Yes. You can. The emotional impact, the stress that's created during those types of events. You know they're very theories, but can really create a catecholamine. Rut You know fled the heart with catecholamines and that can create a stress cardiomyopathy. The other term has been a Takasu book cardiomyopathy called before. Yeah. So so here we're just getting some good baseline pictures and a couple of different angles. This is called the personal long access view, and then Michael will switch over to a few other views as well. Just, like a film editor or Capturing snapshots. And they loop. And the software that on the machine and plus the software that Dr Dan Delilah uses post ex post test to evaluate all your images It puts them side by side. So you can actually compare the walls as we discussed earlier ground lean back a little bit more stop right there. So these Michael are obviously a terrific images. So. We have a really cute clear view of all the segments and we're going to compare these resting to the what we call the post stress images, and we can see if there's any differences or abnormalities and if there's corridor disease there would be a segment told wall mushroom reality on stress. So that's the the rationale behind doing US perfect. Okay. So ready to go ahead and transition to the walking portion of this test. All right arm forward. So we're GONNA go ahead and start. Okay here we go. So. Just go ahead begin walking. Great. So the way that this test works is every three minutes it goes higher and faster. It's on a predetermined course. If you will we use something called Briefs Protocol Bruce Protocols Pre standard throughout the United States It's what most cardiology office. That's over here. Typically we will do this. We have a couple goals we like to achieve, of course, maximum heart rate as one of them when we of course, no secret. To twenty minus your age. You know is your maximum heart rate So we're looking to get to that in most of our healthy patients you don't have significant amount of orthopedic issues. We're GONNA cause more harm than good, but we like to get everybody after that can. To a minimum of eighty, five percent though. So for you today because I do believe we're doing online betting on how long you go you know we have to take you all the way yesterday was partners. What is their target heart rate What one eighty, two, hundred, fifty, four. One Eighty, two won't. Remember one hundred percents that one eighty to. Seventy five percent was good. So that'll be that one, thousand, four, hundred. No prompt you find. Did, you have the device over your mouth like you do. Now we ask. You. WanNa come wearing just. com. You give the address. I. was. That's right. Yes Yeah Doing doing good. So four minutes thirty, five seconds on the belts. Hurried still ninety four. Great. So the foul thirty seconds we'll go ahead and. Transition to the next stage and it'll turn into a little bit more work. Young healthy guys the Endo Pants torture on you your stress tests or torture on us. Good. So here we go. We're going to transition to that next stage. Good doing good seven minutes. Heart rates finally up to two, hundred, twenty five. Superman is unbreakable rubbishing. Doing good heart rate going up. Great doing good. So Next. Age is either going to be very long shy or low run. A study. Just. To make sure thumbs up. Doing. Okay. Yeah. Perfect. Good job. Don't want you talking just doing what you're doing concentrating on that breathing. One sixty. So we have men our eighty five percent mark again, trying to get closest to one eighty, two as possible. All right. Some fifteen seconds. Do you feel comfortable pointing to the next stage minute just? GimMe a minute. Okay. Perfect. One seventy. Seven. Good. He's going to recover really. Yeah. So we got. With the stress test and then we remember right back over to the table. Stop to simply say stop it takes me a second. Doing Good Trying to give me forty seconds. And we will stop. Anything sooner just need to hear from you doing good. Keep it up to. Just. Still Great One, seventy, one going for one eighty, two lessons. All right. Side. We'll get the lights. Out. On the outs try to slow down for me a little bit. Good breathe. Out. Breathe good. Keep going. Out. Good. Job. Good job. Good job. Yeah we love those outs. Out. Perfect. Your rain is coming down coming zone. Normalizing doing good. On a side note, you probably have a very good discussion on mask and full on. Feelings and unbiased opinion on feel a little bit of resistant listen but you're here. Agreeing, not blue you know it's not easy. I can I consider it to be more laboured harder. It's almost like a little bit of a weight on your lung. Essentially you're still moving oxygen you're still moving. This whole this whole mass for adverts. By started. Talks Right. would. You really turned back to normal. Yes. Goodhart hardy back down to seventy eight phenomenal. Two minutes imposed. Incredible So. We monetary about five minutes afterwards just to make sure that everything is. Good and returns balancing. act. Position. On your back. I like the little girl. Donate no coffee come in. Wires on. I'll try now. Don't say anything for fifteen minutes. Mobile. Own maybe seal training. And I expect five star Yelp reviews I don't think it's a tall request. You had me at hello. A loss of. The door. You, did good. All right. So we're three minutes, twentieth imposts you're doing good. That's next. All right. You can go ahead and. Sit Up. I promise I. had no pleasure from that. Harry Act have. Asked me to do to tiny more yes. All right and perfect Oh thank you for this instance. Much the. Here we go. Russia I camera. To sound. System. the treadmill patient. Ready. He's Okay Michael Will we just need to take. Yeah he'll do it now. What yeah we're doing on him. SCOPE sculpting over. I know perfect. All right. Go. I think those are last procedure here. All right then. This is amy initiative. Has Been Greenfield the biohacking for. Amazing Yeah. We got your blood so So. So what we'll do is the video you. No you can keep keep it up. Right. All. Right. So that was a whole battery, whole battery of task now well, you guys are going to see Naxos are going to go to to one other facility for one more task. You know the name of the tests that were calcium skin give me a coronary calcium scan. And then after that once you've seen the coronary calcium scan. You will be subjected to an executive summary with me. About the results of everything that you've just seen me go through again, show hosts for all this are going to be Ben, green till finished dot com slash. PODCAST. So I hope you haven't gone with this one. All right now it's time for the cruel stuff we gotta someone tone. Calcium down here, and this is actually GonNa scan my arteries for any amount of calcification or calcium build-up which itself to cardiovascular risk factor. You ever read the work of folks like Dr William Davis done on my podcast. We actually talked about this test on that show. And it it can be a really good indicator cardiovascular risk potential. So we're GONNA find out if I've got too much calcium in my arteries, which could be a result of everything from inflammation atherosclerosis to Even, access vitamin D intake, or else excess calcium intake. So. You'll be interesting to see results with like. All the way to the white that's calcium deposits. It's a huge. This person scored the thousands. And stemmed. Forty four. So they're not doing so well. you'd have calcium also. An artery over here, this is the left anterior descending. Tori felsen lefty something. Here. Small tells patients there you right side there's. Score. Is Forty two. Now. That score. Isn't particularly high. Compare people, have? Obstructions in your corner. Usually, they have quite high calcium scores in hundreds of thousands. on the other hand. Your. Age. Thirty eight. Typically don't see many people calcium. Interesting. So The takeaway here is it's not a huge amount of calcium, but it's showing up early. and. You know a lot of people would consider that loose. And depends on how you look at it. If you say gee, I. Don't like being there early I guess you could say that that's bad on the other hand. If you don't have a test like this, you don't know that it's there. and. So then you kind of go along and you get to be forty, five, fifty, fifty. Five sixty, and then all of a sudden. You got a lot of heart disease. Whereas by spotting this when you're thirty eight and saying, Hey, this is starting early. You work with your doctor. To slow this down. Considerably. And it depends upon what's causing it. In most cases, we don't know every reason why it happens. You know if you have high cholesterol contributes to this, but innovation usually kicks it off. You aren't obese. So you probably don't have insulin resistance and. Glucose, that's. That's the most common reason. But heredity has a great deal to do this. Interesting as well. So he can't explain. Everything. What we do know Is there is some component of information. that. Causes the inner lining of the blood vessel. To. Inflamed. And then in conjunction with cholesterol in your body. there gets to be plaque and as it heals becomes. Yep. Okay interesting. Little spots. The pregnant. I. Yeah You have plaque. Yep. Yep. So this is like the deal with this like nine where the dealers holding every play blackjack. How old are you? This is this is very Early. Early and you have a family history of heart disease know would how it hasn't a guest it's it's possible that some inflammation might be contributory due to about twenty years of competing and some pretty masochistic You know adventure sports trying to earn sports, lots of IRONMAN triathlons and. Quoted. Quite well hdl is somewhat high ldl is fine. He triglycerides ratio is good. As low cop is low. Is Not low enough. So that, there's no such thing as when number fits all. So, if you had no plaque. I would say that I don't know your numbers. But this says that whatever your cholesterol is it's too hot. Because you should have, you should really thirty eight. You should have any Clark. This is this is a finding. What's The percentile for his age? It's over the ninety fifth. Yeah. So you have actually more plaque the ninety, five percent of the. People. Well, this is good to know this way they intervene. Now because probably if you intervene now with cholesterol lowering what happened in, probably it will save you a lot of. Life. Pricey. The it's very unusual to see thirty eight year. Old I'm going to be headed off to do some research on on calcium scans score lowering. For sure I told them that it's good news to find this out when you're. Yeah. Yeah. Doctor Dr. William Davis. Is The guy I talked about this scan from and I might think his brain a little bit too. About some patients he may very. Simple and quick to you guys send me the results and he released doc or. Release it about. So how can't you? What's the best way to do that? Just make sure you give the name of your doctor, your contact information. Okay perfect. Perfect interesting. So this is this is it is it is. You know the devil you know they say it's better than it down oh? Yeah. Absolutely. No I'm glad to to found this. This is actually surprising to me but at the same time I liked to find this why doing these sites information is this is really important for heart health and for. And it's a it's a really important prevention. Yeah Example. So this is what we do that. We take this information integrated into your dream. And and mitigate risk. So this actually allows us to personalize your saying that a particular number is normal. Or good is actually is actually not the way to look at it, but I have to do is you'd have to. Take the number your goal which is related to your risk. So. While the doctors will say Oh your cholesterol is okay. But it may be okay for some but. It's not okay for you. So you know so this doesn't lives it's the action you take. With. This actually saved. Cool. All right. Thank you very much. Right. So, how often does one typically re-test prototype? Test because we want to do what you may WanNa do at some point maybe three, four, five down. Line. You may want to get what they call a coronary saint, which contrast. This particular test only looks at calcified black. So and a guy like you. This may be the tip of the iceberg. So you may want to do actually get the full corner CT We're GONNA look at not only the heart attack, but we can actually look black. Along entire curiel supply. We can tell you there's any soft back, which is actually dangerous plaque. Located at. Down the road yeah I'd say about three years down the road. That's the contrast. And it's a much more comprehensive exam exam. I think will provide a lot of attitude because. It really represents you know knowing what's Going exactly what the status? Of atherosclerosis. Coronary deandre grandma readers noting. All right. All. Right. Well folks here we are the smoke has cleared and I am actually on skype right now I'm I'm backup in Spokane but I've got Dr Don by Dr Tony Lion. Who you met. In the entirety of all of the audio that you just listen to in which I went through to the tests well, he and I are now going to pull back the curtain and reveal what we found and He is, of course affiliated with the Cedar Sinai Heart Institute extremely experienced in cardiology and internal medicine. So he has a lot of experience kind of going through an interpreting these reports. So he's going to reveal what we have found and What do you think Dr Don Delilah Ready to do this I'm ready. All right. So where do you WanNa start well I that thanks for having me on it. So great to be here. So a ben as you recall, we put you through a battery of Eight tests essentially I'M GONNA, go through each one Kinda describe it a little bit and then go over your specific result. So the first test we did was a twelve lead electrocardiogram or ekg very standard test in cardiology my observation for you you a sinus rhythm with a rate of forty two and again in EKG looks at the some of electrical activity in the heart. So right just to step back you know we find folks sometimes incidentally there in another rhythm like intro fibrillation. They sometimes can have chamber enlargement or what we call left ventricular hypertrophy We see that in some of the athletes and we see these athletic heart patterns and it can be sometimes alarming if you don't know any history and you see Ekg it can look like someone's having an acute heart attacks. So we see these early. Changes in in some folks. I think you may have. Some of that and some the lead. So again, we'll send you a copy so you can have some of the visual on this, but that's called an early re polarization. Early. Pattern, which we see in a lot of healthy young adults and it's an interesting anecdote. I remember I took care of a basketball player who had very severe early revelation changes and he didn't have a copy of his baseline. EKG and. ended up having some chest pain a few months later went to an emergency room and they took him straight to the to the Cath lab to get an angiogram because they were worried that he was having an acute heart attack. So I always think for some of the high level athletes that have these changes they should keep a snapshot of their Ekg with them just. So just in case they end up with some chest discomfort and they see another physician, we have a baseline. So the theme that you're GonNa probably for me is just getting baseline data. And being able to have a snapshot because things change over time and it's really helpful to track that overtime. So yeah. So so essentially, you're saying there's a differentiation from a pathologic condition when you see early reprioritisation in an athlete, correct yeah. Correct. That's very key to distinguish and many times. That's why we follow up with some of the imaging studies but the other interesting thing again is that you have a resting heart rate of forty two and so that tells me that you had high Bagel tone again, we see that in the athletic population, we had a guy the other day that had a heart rate of thirty one. I was GONNA say. Some humble humble brag. Mine's actually thirty four but you know I was a little bit excited during that test. The same thing could be diagnosed as a pathologic condition sinus Brad Cardia unless someone actually knew that this person like had a history of aerobic exercise, for example. Correct. Correct and I remember anecdotally many years ago I always read the Tour de France athletes. You know they had heart rates in the high twenty s and. It's just a marker of such robust. Cardiovascular function that they have such an efficient pump that they're getting all their their bodies needs through through a less number of heartbeat. So it's it's generally construed as a good sign. I think the problem sometimes you wonder is if you get a little dehydrated anything like that, those conditions can lead to syncope like a Bagel episode Basil Bagel episode, which is passing out which which has happened before. In in triathlons, for example, I believe that's one of the common causes of deaths in triathlons you get a whole bunch of aerobic Catholics in the water they pass out due to that that Vasil Vegas in cope and or syncope, and I've always pronounced. It said Cope when I see in in in writing. So I have to get used sing as syncope but that basically is something that occurs in many cases because they're. Stressed out, they're mineral depleted. They're under stress and all of a sudden that Bright Cardi becomes an issue. Yeah. Yeah. So so definitely again I think this is just going to be your pattern, but I think it's fine. You're not having any symptoms of dizziness no blacking out that type of thing. So and by the way related to the Ekg, I know the atrial fibrillation you know the irregular often rapid heart. Rate. That occurs when when the two chambers get these chaotic electrical signals. That's that's often seen in athletes as well from what I understand that be diagnosed on an ekg. You don't see something like Abe correct correct, and it's really interesting because we're we're moving into the the era of just personalized monitors. So you can literally have a six lead ekg sort of in your pocket There are companies that make that. That's thanks to your smartphone just transforms your smartphone into an AK pocket ekg. So that's extremely helpful to have sometimes Especially, some folks have these little skippy in palpitations. And you're really only as good as the data you get So you don't really know what that may represent unless you have a a a a picture right there. So E- atrial fibrillation in that athletic population is is interesting and there's various theories about why APP may happen the effect of intense exercise on the electrical system role of inflammation. So and of course genetic. So yes, that is an interesting population interesting. All right. Cool. So ekg no big issues there aside from the fact that you keep a copy of that on me and I should also be sure that if I am participating in events where passing out attention, kill me such as a swim as you them really really well topped off as far as mineral levels hydration, etc. Exactly. Exactly. I, guess that's that's his kind of a thing you have to customize for your own sort of body but Absolutely. Got It. So? Yeah. Moving on we then worked on the ultrasound you remember we did. A battery of ultrasound tests that looked at your heart and vascular system. These are called when we when we do an ultrasound of the heart that's called a an echocardiogram and an echocardiogram looks at in real time, it looks at heart function So we get a a a number called the ejection fraction, which is a measure of the hearts contract Tilleke We can visually look at. The size of the different chambers of heart and also the thickness. So it's kind of a nice core to the ekg because the ekg if it's sort of like the. Black and white TV THE ECHO takes it up to like a color TV and then we have things like cardiac MRI high stakes it even more. But the ECHO is really accessible in in almost in most doctors offices and they can take the pocket-sized. So in your echocardiogram very normal Tom. Looking at fraction yet injection fraction we calculated out at sixty three percent. Normal is generally you know fifty plus percent it doesn't go to one hundred percent but a typically cagey g like sixty six echo the EH sixty, sixty, five percent. Percentage of blood is leaving my heart every time it can tracks, right Yeah it is a measure of the stroke volume sort of the the stroke line that's coming out of the coming out of the heart and people who have. There's a term you may have heard congestive heart failure those people basically they're in in one subset of congestive heart failure called systolic congestive heart failure. Those folks can have injection fraction of forty percent and low work, and they are at risk for things like sudden cardiac death arrhythmias and things like that and they're they're obviously very symptomatic because. they can't meet their body's metabolic needs soreness of Brad than swelling in their legs. So Fort. So that's a that's a that's a pathologic sort of finding on the Echocardiogram, for example, and for you, we also looked at chamber sizes as Ray. Happy Looking at the wall thickness You may have also heard of a term called hypertrophy cardiomyopathy, which is sometimes diagnosed than athletes there have been some the the so called heart and my wife does always tell me I have a big heart by the way. That's right, and so that's a that's an issue with overgrowth of this called the separate wall of the heart, and so it's really important to take those measurements and you had very normal measurements on the on the Septa while you're you're post, your your wall was slightly thickened at one point one and again, these are these are millimetre measurement. So there's always a little bit of variability. But again, when we see in athletics person We know that they can have a little bit of. Thickening of that muscle. I don't see any patterns because we we do something called Doppler flow where we look at blood flow patterns across the chambers I don't see any evidence that that's causing a problem because what happens in some folks for example, when they get high blood pressure hypertension, the wall starts to thick and out of proportion it gets it can get actually very dramatic and they get stiffening of the heart and they actually can get a type of congestive heart failure heart failure. So this is very good to see this kind of a normal patterns he had normal flows across the vowel Michael. Vowed there's four valves of the heart they all looked good. And overall contractor. Great. So got it. So so despite there being an enlarged. Musculature in the heart you're not seeing any of the Arctic abnormalities are valvular. That might accompany that in some cases. Yeah. I see what we call normal systolic function normal guy function. So your heart is relaxing appropriately. Interestingly enough. You know as cardiologists you know we will always in the past refocused on the contract, Tilleke of the heart, but there's a lot of activity in the resting part of the heart is well called Diaz diagnostically and that's actually very energy dependent process. So we're starting to focus more and more on that because we're seeing folks that have problems with that relaxation part except high blood pressure and aging and so forth. So it's sort of kind of the next generation of our research is really focusing on how to treat treat that aging process of Bihar stiffening of the heart. Called Diastolic dysfunction. So again, great base line to have so very, very pleased with this. Okay. Good. Good me too. Moving on So we then looked we then scan with the ultrasound. Your carotid arteries on bizarre arteries that go up to the brain the come off of the. Right and left karate kid and again it's interesting because in some folks you can pick up platform that starting to develop. It's a it's a large artery. So it's really nice to visualize the different layers of the artery and in some folks you know they've had a lot of cigarette smoking in their life and so forth, you can see some calcified plaque and a it's a warning sign again, we we worry about stroke when we see plaque in the crowded arteries and again. Happy reports for you very normal looking crowded arteries really pristine. So that's that's that's great and Again, having, this is an easy test to do as a baseline into look at every couple of years because if you start seeing thickening of the artery you're GonNa, you know potentially make some additional changes to your diet lifestyle avoid exposures. We always think about air quality and being in La on the role of air pollution and things like that smog anything inflammatory that's going to. Affect that lining of the vessel We'd want to take out of the picture. So again, that's why the creditor really Nice because they're easy to easy to do but a good bit Testa to an unlike x ray imaging. There's really not a great deal of ionizing radiation exposure associate with ultrasound imaging. I know some of my listeners are concerned about that but but really the radiation risk from from that type of karate tra- sound is is pretty low and that's interesting. So she said about how how often do you think people should do a if they decide they want to do. You know I think it's really a customized recommendation I mean there's you know of depends on your your viewpoints on early detection and prevention. I certainly with risk factors I mean I love getting the getting a baseline sooner rather than later especially, if people have been smoking and things like that just because we can suddenly show them hey, listen this is what's going on with your artery but certainly at age forty I just like to get a full baseline of data and then depending on the finding you know you can. Kind of customize based on some of the other risk factors how often you WANNA follow up annually may be aggressive of course, but every couple years it's good to preoccupy look at this right. Got It. Okay. Cool. Well, that makes sense I'm glad I don't have any type of stenosis that's music to my ears. Yeah. Yeah. That's. That is that has tremendous and then we did what's called an abdominal era ultrasound. So this is when we put the probe, we put it right in your abdomen by your navel, and so forth. This looks at the diameter and size of the a order, which is the long tube that comes off of the heart, the artery, all the branches, feed, the different organs, and so forth, and it's interesting because A order can become aneurysm in some folks. Again, there are some risk factors with cigarette, smoking, some genetic factors and so forth but it's a it's like a three or four minute test to screen for this for an aneurysm, and if there is Station. Then of course, we want aggressively look at underlying risk factors and then continue to follow that closely Again, very happy to report that you had a very normal looking. To No, no atherosclerosis and that term I mean build up of plaque that said the hardening of the arteries. So No atherosclerotic changes no delegation. So again, an easy easy tested do gives us a lot of confidence. We see that got just knows the listener if you're not familiar with the term aneurysm, that's just that's just if the your to get to a certain extent where the where the walls can become weak and balloon out words, and then you get the risk of a of a rupture that's basically an aneurysm is for those who are unfamiliar with that that term. Okay. So abdominal ultrasound, look good and and sorry to interrupt you. What were you saying next the next thing we did we put, we did a stress test for you. We did the. We put you on the treadmill. Right my favorite one. Yes with the mask and all. So again, in the era of cove it, it's been really hard to do these and many places. We we just almost don't do it because Air Station in all of that. But on a case by case basis you know there's just some data that's really helpful to see just by exercise and so on your your treadmill test again, just to give your readers a little overview stress tests have a standard protocol. There's different ways to stress tests A treadmill stress test as implies we put you on the treadmill generally every three minutes The grade gets increased as well as the speed of the treadmills kind of a standard Bruce Protocol and then we measure heart rate blood pressure response. We did a type of stress tests where we actually did some baseline ultrasound pictures of your heart because what we WanNa do is compare baseline to the peak stress images to see if there's any difference and to see if there's a normal response in someone who has a blockage in a coronary artery the stress tests can be abnormal in. Many ways the Ekg we're also doing a continuous EKG monitor so that ekg that we did for you arrest those leads those leads are on their modified a little bit position. But if there's a problem, there would be different. There'd be certain electrical signals that would alert us that your your heart muscle is just not getting enough oxygen will call. Kimia. And apart from that clinically, if you say listen DOT COM, I'm getting chest pain and it's like three minutes. That's a bad sign and what's interesting is I've had some women that put on the treadmill and they came with sort of nonspecific complaints of like heartburn and I remember one lady in particular she said quotas burning up for like three minutes on the treadmill she said it's it's I feel like my throats burning and I said and I looked at the park and there was what we called profound st segment depression which basically on the ekg tells us that her heart muscles not getting oxygen. So we immediately stopped the treadmill and we brought to the hospital for an Angiogram and she had a ninety five percent led blockage. That's the widowmaker. She was very, very lucky but just again to let you. Listeners know that you know corners Houston presented in different ways in that atypical symptom of just even heartburn we we just want to get it checked out especially if there's an emotional component to it. so by up again, going back to your specific case, you had a phenomenal workload I think you exercised to stage five of the Bruce Protocol and you probably could have gone more but we got all the data we needed for over fourteen mets I'm gonNA blame I'm. GonNa Blame. That by the way on on squat day the day prior. Okay. Yeah. So that's a again stage. That's a again with the mask. That's a tremendous workload again, and we look to make sure there's no arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation and make sure that heart function increases appropriately on the stress response than every check all the boxes. So really a phenomenal highly conditioned athletic performance on the treadmill. So No red flags. So against excellent job on that blood pressure response goes up. As a normal normal kind of thing. So again, no no no real concerns on my side. They're fantastic. Cool and I'm glad I I'm glad I got got done with that one that was a painful one. Yes. Yes. So then we did we drew your blood. And we did an advanced advance lipid panel for you through one of our specialty labs, and again, the traditional lipid panel which everyone is familiar with you come in that's been around for thirty forty years you know I, it's a standard part of our physical exams. The technology has advanced and there are there are more advanced ways to look at the bids and correspondingly these are essentially biomarkers of risk and so beyond the the. The Lipid panel we can look at what we call lightbulb, protein fractionation, or Lipid subtractions. So we can break you know your cholesterol has good cholesterol. HDL, bad cholesterol, which is elbow and then triglycerides and again not to get too technical but some of this is a is a calculated value. So technologies advanced where technically in some labs, you don't even have to go go in fasting because you can get direct measured. ldl Cholesterol, which is your bad cholesterol. By, and the other thing is you can break down these particles I. I wish they quit calling it bad cholesterol because it's I mean I realize it's necessary but not sufficient for cardiovascular disease and I've seen you know ldl to be quite necessary protective and and if we didn't have L., we'd all be dead I. Just don't know why people still call it bad cholesterol. It's it's the particle size it's more. Important right along with you know things like triglycerides Inflammation Blood Glucose, etc. Yeah. And I'll tell you I think part of this is you're absolutely right I mean cholesterol is essential part of membranes and you know it's a backbone of hormones testosterone etcetera. So it's very, very critical and I would say you're you're right I. Think the truth is really nuanced in this area and I try not to you know. You're you're only as good as the data the have again many much of this aren't large large scale trials on SMS with certain patterns. But we are seeing a lot of associations with certain things I'll give you an example and this is where this fractionation or breaking down the the the. Particles can be very interesting. You can separate out you know you can measure your your elbow, which is traditionally that quote unquote bad cholesterol. You can. You can actually measure the size now and smaller will be called smaller denser particles actually are are more likely to create flack. So in certain diabetic patients, we see this small dents pattern and it corresponds to the fact that this this lip these lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and they get they can get oxidized and when they get oxidized through inflammatory response they attract all sorts of bad players from the bloodstream immune elements and so forth that then. Kind of attack it and sort of create more of a plaque. So it sort of a byproduct of that's how atherosclerosis starts. It starts off with You know probably in our teens when we have a little bit of this fatty streak but I do agree with you that I think there's been a over sort of emphasis on ldl cholesterol we've seen that if you look at, I'll give me one more observation. There was one research series that looked at young people that have heart attacks and young. We defined as in their late forties fifties, kind of thing the correctly. And when you look back at their cholesterol A large proportion of them actually had quote unquote normal cholesterol. They wouldn't even qualify for utilization of stab. So it sort of begs the question will listen how big of a risk factor is cholesterol. So again, there's there's some good arguments that we need better biomarkers and that's where we we we we have some of them. So again, looking at the size of ldl particle looking at the the this absolute number of the ldl particle. is also helpful and I can tell you for you. You're just to go back some basics here. Your total cholesterol was two, forty, eight, your hdl again, HBO's the high density like a protein hdl which traditionally has been thought to be very protective form cholesterol because it is involved in reverse cholesterol transport back to the liver. Kind of scavenging, the LDL, the the bad cholesterol, and taking it back to the to the liver for disposal. So idel has a very interesting role. that. Again, still being worked out, but your HDL was one hundred and four which is extremely high Traditionally, we've always thought that someone who's got such high hdl's is really you know really well, protected again, there some disagreement in the cardiology community about that there's a term called. Functionality and so forth that they're that. There's there's a lot of research in but This is a great number and this is why your total cholesterol number is higher and I we we shouldn't. We shouldn't necessarily discount. The fact of what you've just said in case that skips people's notice is that there is a paradox of I hide NC, leiper protein, and elevated cardiovascular risk in some studies potentially due to the fact that each may play a role as an anti inflammatory substance and and potentially could indicate that there's some kind of chronic inflammatory condition going on there's one example but yeah, extremely I- HDL I think that one should look at things like you. Know by Bernie Jin, homocysteine CRP, and other inflammatory markers to ensure that those aren't extremely elevated in the presence of a very high hdl at least in my opinion. Yeah. No I think it's all it's all fair and so and then the other thing for your list rides were eighty two again, great great number and again when we see metabolic syndrome and metabolic patterns, we see folks with low hdl high triglycerides immediately those were always. triglycerides were always seen as kind of a soft cardiac risk factor but I think there's going to be more important send optimized as a general sort of barometer of metabolic health. Yeah. The the so-called at throw atherogenic index, right? Yeah and so one of the things also mentioned. So your c reactive protein was Essentially at the lowest. Number. Was Less than zero point three I think they. They don't even bother to sort of break it down further. So that's really again, quite phenomenal because. In our theory of Atherosclerosis and probably most disease processes, it really is the Chronic uncontrolled inflammation that's a problem and So that's great and c reactive protein again, just a word about that. There's a little bit. Different viewpoints, you can alter your c reactive protein. It can probably change fluctuate many times a day. There's data about that data about dietary patterns I can suddenly change us he reactive protein. Gut despite osas can suddenly. Alter us you reactive protein number. But when I see a track record of c reactive protein that's well-controlled. You know that that's a good thing I'm so so that's great for you. Again, one other marker we did when other inflammatory biomarker we did was called L. p. p. l. a. to a type of inflammatory enzyme time, and usually we like to see less than a hundred and twenty three. The significance of LP to when it's elevated is that it has been associated with heart attack and stroke risk part of the reason is that it's felt to be an inflammatory enzyme that that is localized this to plaques highly inflamed plaques in the Rene Treat and the hypothesis of vulnerable plaque is that some folks have. A lot of inflammation in their in their coronary. Coronary arteries and these plaques get inflamed and they actually rupture because that Platt becomes unstable the morphology or the form of the plaque itza unstable, and we don't have a great technology right now to say, Hey, listen this person you have to people you know this person has a plaque because they've got a lot of inflammation in this particular area we may be getting there with some of the advanced imaging would ct, but it's not quite ready for primetime as they say, Gotcha. So again, LP Lake to is an interesting marker. So you're. Marker was one hundred and fifty four. So it's is a little. It is elevated Again, something that we should you know we would want to track and understand there could be some genetic components to this But again, kind of creating that baseline set of data for you is going to is something we have. So we just want to note that yeah, that's interesting I if there's any evidence that you know, for example, Kinda like CRP working out in the days prior or something like that might actually increase vascular inflammation acutely. got. To be elevated. Certainly I'm sure there is some role of that and then the other thing I will point out. So the other thing I did was a elke little like a protein little a which. In many times there there there's a lot of genetic and ethnic differences in this but an elevated lack of protein relates basically a form of elbow cholesterol a very after a generic form of ldl cholesterol maybe ten times more atherogenic, your level The level ideally should be less than seventy five year level was sixteen. So in some folks still very high level and it's hard. To, get it down traditional statins. Nutritional therapies don't work. Well, we have a new class of medications called the PCs Canine inhibitors and they may be able to lower that. But fortunately, you've gotta level that's all within within normal limits there's as they say so that's that's Great Gotcha and just a backpedal just just just just briefly you know when it comes to LP. which in my case was elevated let's say that that it was not due to some type of lifestyle factors such as exercise leading into the test I know that Alpha lipoic acid is one thing that's recommended as a potential antioxidant to lower that value I. believe some research has been done on fish oil as well in that respect anything else you recommend for decreasing P. to yeah. No. I think those are those are all good things I mean you know aspirin has been kind of fallen by the wayside a little bit for primary prevention for various reasons in large clinical trials. But I think I think looking at a just kind of focusing on the anti inflammatory pathway through Diet tends to be a really good way to to counteract that and so. But those are all good observations. Okay. Got It. the other the other interesting thing that I wanted to spend a minute on was TMA. Oh, So Tma oh, stands for trying Muslimeen an oxide It is a biomarker. and. It has been associated with elevated levels of TM. Mayo. Has Been associated with increased cardiovascular risk independent, cardiovascular risk published. It was discovered in essentially a lot of the research has been done at Cleveland. Clinic and it's interesting and I I don't know what your viewpoints on TMA or but we're tracking this on a lot of folks, and interestingly we see in some folks that you know they're eating very well eating clean. They haven't elevated number on this and you know an optimal number is less than six on this reference range greater than ten would be high and so on. Your TMA Obin, you had a level of of eighteen point nine. So it's something where we need to look back a little bit. You know traditional Bob's is dietary patterns that can lead to high te'o dairy eggs. Certain types of red meat could be the CARNITINE choline of products that basically get transformed from the Gut microbiome into this more inflammatory from TMA to TMA oh. Yeah. I mean I think Tim O. is really interesting because if you look at it, you know. Meet and Choline and Carnitine are vilified in respect to tim. But if you look at fish and vegetables, you also see a steep rise in Tivo in in response to. Fish up forty times more preformed in fish. Then you get from like the Choline and carnitine coming from meet in red meat, and so I suspect that the elevated tm Oh, in people who eat a lot of, let's say red meat could be due to a gut despite osas condition or some type of other laboratory components such as you know, burnt bits and carcinogens that might be present and coming into the Diet as part of. That red meat or just the fact that people who eat a lot of red meat a lot of times are also not the healthiest folks on the planet right? They're also like watching football drinking beer and you know immersed in in environmental pollutants and toxins not being too broad a brush. But I, think there's a lot of confounding variables a mail there are, and you know it's interesting. You know what I've read is cameo. Is really has been predominantly found a lot of the deep sea fish. As I recall, and you know the role of cameo is thought to be almost like a anti freeze for the for the fish for so that they could survive in that kind of colder deeper. Water climate. So I don't I as I recall I don't I don't believe freshwater fish have as much or have any TMA. Oh, but again, kind of depends on kind of what you're eating where it's caught and so forth. So I do agree there's a lot of confounding variables with with with with some of the data. Yeah. Yeah interesting. Okay. Well, that's notable though okay. So elevated TNL elevated LP to got it. So move on we then did a test of your endothelial function SA- call the end of PAT tests than this is a FDA approved has that really looks at the the function and the health of the lining of the arteries of your system. And that's called the endothelium and if Villian is a single layer of cells that goes to all the all the blood vessels. It's kind of considered a super oregon many ways. It's it's it's almost like an endocrine organ in some ways nitric oxide. Secreted by then to feel him really. For, good vascular health and Dylan Dylan when needed. So. That's why. One of the schools of thought is that good endothelial function or battlefield endothelial function by that measure that can be predictive of things further down the line but it's one of the earliest earliest markers of cardiovascular issues that we sometimes see. Again, a lot of confounding variables. I've seen diet acute changes in Diet alter the the called the Endo. Pat scored are H., which is reactive hype remake index. But this test as you remember, you were lying down for fifteen minutes. You have basically probes on your fingertips to measure blood flow, and then you know we have one arm is the control. An arm is the test arm, and then we basically include the artery with the blood. Pressure Cup. The break your artery, and then we do that for five minutes and then we and then we release it and what we're measuring is that the blood flow pattern when we released the cups, there's a very characteristic normal pattern that we see that shows that endothelium is responding appropriately and essentially dilating in allowing good blood flow to to the to the. Fingertip and so they have databases of what's normal and what's abnormal, and again this is something that based on what we see. We generally try to recommend increased foods that that can produce nitric oxide and there's you know you're you're an expert on all that but your are h. i., which is reactive hyperthermic index. A normal is one point six seven. Number of one point four, eight, a little bit on the lower side Again, there are a lot of confounding variables on this, and again, we try to have people in a fasting states when we're doing this caffeine. Some things that some other things can interfere with it. You're not really on any medication I recalls. Yeah. Yeah. It is that that is really interesting go also because I've actually done testing via company called strategy in which assesses a variety of different so-called dirty jeans. My nitric oxide synthase pathways actually are a little bit impaired genetically, and I actually I go out of my way to use things like beet root? I've been Microsoft with Sildenafil before the active component in Viagra I do a lot of sauna you know granted I came in facet without having taken any of the type of things I'd normally used to support eno production and so You know it's possible that this just might be a genetic defect in an Oprah Action. I just need to four four life. Be Sure I'm getting. Sunshine, Sauna Beets and other and supportive compounds. Absolutely L. Arginine is another popular Supplement to augment nitric oxide. So So yeah, this that actually totally make sense you know So that's that's that's interesting So yeah. So that was the Endo Path and then we did your calcium score you WanNa Cross the way and got that ct it's a very low. Basically C. T. scam that looks or calcium. In your coronary arteries, we get a score score can go from zero to thousands. Higher, the score higher, the risk, the tiny radiation with this test, but it's a great test, the cardiology world because. There's been a lot of data on the general population that higher scores Corley. To higher risk Again, ideally scored zero and this is where you've got Europe special case here based on your athletic performance and everything, and we'll talk about that. But you did have a score of forty of forty two I believe and that's actually in the highest higher percentile for someone in the same age and gender. So and we'll we should kind of review what that may may May represent Because traditionally, when we see a very high calcium score, we say listen this is a prognostic leave you know from a prognostic standpoint, predictive standpoint There's some concern that this could lead to future coronary events or coronary obstruction How do we mitigate that risk and that's where you know we should but we should talk a little bit about some of the factors that go into this because when you look at the data, there's been some recent data coming out of there was one one good study coming out of the Cooper Clinic. In. Dallas in Texas they do a lot of fitness studies where they look at they looked at the cohort of patients that were extremely high athletic performers and they should that not only did they have high calcium scores in many cases sometimes, the score was one hundred. There wasn't an associated increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, and so there's various theories about why this calcium score becomes positive or or starts to developing. It's possible. It's the type of exercise creates a stress response but the observation is that calcium actually is a very stabilizing. In some ways for the plaque. The reason why you know calcium scores ordinance that we worry about uncontrolled inflammation in other parts of the coronary tree but a house, a fight lesion itself is in on one level. It's it stable. You know it's almost like. Is it a scar? Is it just stable kind of thing? It's not really bound to rupture. It's really the soft plaque. We worry is going to rupture, and so again, we didn't. We didn't go through the full see corner angiogram because again there's there's there's radiation and there's there's some other considerations. But again, if we did see Corner Andrew Graham, we saw a bunch of soft plaque. You know that would be that would be a question is you know what? What should we do? What? What should we do differently? But really again with your background of activity I again I'm I'm I. Think we have to take into consideration. I came across the same studies. You know about how prevalent calcium scan scores being elevated as common especially in high volume, endurance activity athletes but. Long term risk for mortality when present and I found the same things is the nature of the density and the kind of like the tight packing of the calcium that doesn't appear to be problem versus the soft loose stuff. So kind of a corollary here that you could. You could say it's kind of similar to having high cholesterol, but having it all be like big fluffy cholesterol versus small. Small oxidise. Or Small dents party is yeah so that it's super interesting. I think what I plan to do and what the doctor advised me to do is a repeat calcium scan score down the road just to see if any of that is growing. So to speak and I'm I'm really keeping my eyes on the literature to just just to see what further studies come out on on calcium scans scores, particularly an active populations absolutely. So I think it's again in our regular population. You know we do calcium scores maybe every three to five years, and again it's it's very interesting to track. Progress and we just we just need more research and data to see what this what this means. But again, I think the the the data set really suggests that. We're seeing this on a lot of the athletes on their their actual league you know doing. Okay. Again, we do want to make sure that we do look at other traditional will we call Framingham risk factors family history but again, with everything I'm seeing your for you. You know this is this is just your Disa- gesture pattern and we just we just optimize everything else we can. Yeah. Well, this this has been absolutely fascinating and you know big big takeaways here for for me personally is to. Keep my eyes on the LPGA to number and potentially even do repeat tests. Events Lipid talents point continue to pay attention to the research on on Trimethyl lambing and also keep Maya nitric oxide levels topped off keep taking Viagra and keep my eyes on the calcium scan score data as well though not I'm not super alarmed at this point and then also regarding the vascular inflammation l. p. p. l. a. to look things like Alpha, lipoic acid, fish oil, and just a diet rich in antioxidants and then. Finally even though have a big heart, doesn't appear to be be a big issue. So this has been super interesting. You know 'cause 'cause the overall goal here was to just give people an insider view of you're GonNa, do like the gold standard battery of tests for cardiovascular fitness or health. What would it look like and I'm hoping that folks after hearing about the twelve lead Ekg, the exercise EKG abdominal aortic crowded ultrasounds, the ultrasound Echocardiogram, the advance lipid panel, the calcium scans. Score and of course, the the Endo Pat are realizing how many things that we can look into and I just think this is this is fascinating and Now I WANNA. Thank you too. I know your time is limited today because you have patients I'm I'm well aware of that I think even overtime. So I don't WanNa, hold you too much longer but I do want to thank you just for just opening the eyes my audience to all of these cool ways to test. Yeah no my pleasure. I think it's It's great I'd love to hear feedback. No, there's you know I it's it's the technology is moving. So quick you know we didn't even talk about some things with heart rate variability and things like that but I think really we're GONNA. Come into an era where we're GONNA, be able to collect all of this data on a continuous fashion through our smartphones and sensors and everything, and we can really create almost like a threat. Matrix. and really you know because still there's still a lot of folks dying of Corner Disease and there's some people that just should be identified earlier and make the right changes with lifestyle So We'd love to identify those folks and get them on the right path quickly. So yeah. Yeah. Well, it's it's absolutely fascinating and folks you can, of course, go and leave your comments and the show notes over at Ben, Greenfield Venice Dot com slash heart health and In the meantime if you WANNA look up Dr Daniele, all link to his website is well in the show notes if you want to visit L. A. or Beverly Hills more specifically and go through battery of tests with him similar to what I did and. Also, shot out to the folks at next health till who helped to organize this entire podcast and you can go listen to a podcast with Dr Darshan Shaw next health if you WANNA learn more about them and they do and in the meantime Dr Don. Delilah. Thank you so much for coming on the show man. Absolutely, and yet wanted to also give a quick shout out to a Darshaan. Join US today but we should do another one with all of us but I wanted to thank Dr Shawn to connect connecting this and making this happen it was a real pleasure to do this with you. Awesome. Awesome. Thanks well, folks until next time I'm Ben Greenfield along with Dr. Don. Delilah. Signing out from Ben Greenfield fitness dot com have an amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show, you can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned or Ben Greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful Ben Recommends Page, which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormones sleep digestion, fat loss performance, and plenty more please also know that all the links. All the Promo codes that I mentioned this and every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that enables me to keep bringing you this content every single week. So when you listen to be sure to use the links in the show notes, use the Promo Code generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

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Improvising Through Injustice with Keyon Harrold

The John Roa Show

52:05 min | Last week

Improvising Through Injustice with Keyon Harrold

"A jumped out of a plane before. And once you get in a plane and they take you up and drive and then it gets to a point where there is no turning back and you gotta do it you. You're going. you're going to jump out of his plane. So when i was doing that it was kind of like listen. You've got to fly for as long as there's been humans there's been music. Music has been one of our most useful tools for inspiring change. We play music at weddings for celebration at funerals to grieve and even in times of war for unity. I sat down with my friend. Grammy winning trumpeter. He on herald at my studio in soho back. In june during the height of the racial protests across the nation. Not only with our conversation deeply insightful. After we recorded this interview he on and i had a walk around the neighborhood to observe the protest and the collection of artists. Had descend on soho to paint all the plywood intern. This neighborhood into a beautiful open. Air art gallery. Luckily we were miked up when we did and kion had his trumpet with them later. This week we're going to release a special bonus episode here between us where you'll hear our discussion from that evening as we walked around plus the song that kion played on the streets. That quite literally stopped traffic. What's up everyone. This is john rowe and welcome between us. What role does where you're born in who you're born to play in one. Success in life kion herald was born into a family of pastors. The grandson of a police officer alongside fifteen other siblings in ferguson missouri. A location that would later become famous for racial justice. Protests after the killing of michael brown by police officer darren wilson kion gave me his unique perspective on what it means to grow up black in america and the advice. He gives his own son what he learned from growing up in such an unjust system in how he's able to find the peace and success that he now has and what now drives him to seek solutions for mankind. The answer to that is in a word music. Through a love of music he on has become one of the world's most accomplished jazz trumpet players so much so that he played the trumpet. Recordings with the miles davis bio-pic miles ahead and grammy. For his efforts we talk about that experience. How to find the courage to chase your dreams and future of music going after the cova crisis without further. Ado here's herald. Put yourself ten years now the years now twenty thirty okay and your son who's now eighth grade will be in his early twenties. How are you going to describe. Twenty twenty son man that will be from the standpoint of first of all. You didn't go to school for months like you weren't sick. Nothing was wrong but was out of school and it wasn't summertime yet. You know first of all when you think of going to school with your friends. That's everything at an eighth grade. That's like a. I like parties. You start to do wild things in your parents have to look for you. And that won't be the same. Because i've seen him every day. Since then the different thing just the exploration been stunted for months for kids. That's a whole thing. How do you deal with that as a father. He's gotta come to you right. He's got to come to you and say what am i supposed to do. How am i supposed to do my schooling. How am i supposed to get through this. I mean does he ask. Those questions still absolutely. I mean you know. I get a chance to really be with them. More now. Coming with like we did a simple machine exit project the other day and it was a what's that simple machines the The the Rube goldberg tight. So we did this code thing to where you know the the the i don't know i to show it to you. The cars hit this thing incomes down in history as beat machine and it makes it sounds. I'll i'll show it to you after. Wanna see yeah. I've had the opportunity to be closer to him. Which is a beautiful thing but at the same time i know when i was in a grade. That's when i was starting to kind of do my own thing with me. Yeah it's a hit a crazy. Age man transitionary age. Thirteen fourteen years back. He's thirteen. yeah yeah man. Can you imagine if you're the fewer transition to maybe to manhood maybe is in twenty twenty like holy block man and i mean from the standpoint of not being able to go to school because of the virus in at the same time for him double because he's a black kid a thrown. Oh so you have the idea of wearing about catching the virus and at the same time wearing about police brutality. So it's a it's a double whammy as to how have to speak to him about everything like literally. We had a conversation in this downer but at the same time is the thing that keeps me going by keeping him going. He was like dad. I don't know if i'll make it past was was like a scary. I want to tell you that his perfect that has. Everything's gonna be alright. But i don't know that. Why do you think he said that is such a heavy statement. Why do you think he said that. You find new things to make sixteen a main heedless. He watches the news. Here's any talk. Here's me talk To to my golf any. Here's his mother. Talk and heard partner talk in here. He here's what's going on. He knows the vibration of the city. I mean he sends me stuff from from instagram. That he's checking out a news things that he's checking now and makes it spooks me but at the same time it gives me an opportunity to really educate him rahm town to get him on the Keep pomona trajectory that he needs to be in in a listen. I i can't relate directly for a plethora reasons must not less than i have a son but how do you respond to something that that real that heavy from your son who who thirteen years old that such a vulnerable age is wondering if he's gonna be alive in three years like i mean that literally gives me chills just thinking about. How do you respond to this father. Man it is the epitome of looking at somebody with with the deepest an earnest love and compassion and not being able to give them a genuine answer. you know. Most of the things is apparent. Our job is to provide a security provide a you know a place of comfort in refuge and all else fails. Dan knows the answer right. But if i can give him a direct answer that's a you know is disheartening. Connor thing But is very is very real. So i have to educate them on how to survive or how how to how to navigate How to dad navigate how to damn make it to where he is You know that's that's every day it's the world we live me. Not that is right now. then it's wrong. It just is the way it is so as. How do you navigate this Frigging amusement park. That's life every day is is is a new journey new lesson than i have to keep him abreast of when i'm doing what he's doing what the world is doing and how he should be the interesting thing man. It's is interesting. it's a combination. I think it's a middle ground between inspirational tragic right because the opportunity to guide and lead your son. I think is something beautiful. The reason you gotta do it is something that we should all be You know we should all be saddened by absent. Especially in this day and age you've navigated life. Do not get like you've navigated success. You have risen to the upper echelons of jazz music when you use something that you don't hear very often these days right like when i think of jazz musician i think of of these guys doing it since you know my grandparents generation and it's an older craft and you meet a guy like you you're a young guy you're literally at the top of your game. You won. grammys you hard. The guy and you play the music for miles davis during the bio-pic when you were miles davis miles ahead like i mean. That is a ridiculous thing. How have you navigated life in success. What would have been some of the things you learned and and maybe you were told or you you experience throughout these years of getting here. It's it's a long journey in like is still going day by day day by day is always day day But having many opportunities you know too much is given much as required ominous. My dad always told me that you gotta you gotta keep pushing them out of. What whatever life does you gotta be able to as a jazz musician. We have to improvise. You know you get a set of chord changes you get a form like the blues and you have to make do with it you gotta you gotta make You know you gotta make cake out of out of out of the lemons work so I come from ferguson. Sixteen of us so you know in a three bedroom house. We had at one point. We had a fire in the whole house. You know literally. We only had three sides of a house so it was a very real. This'll reality of you know literally not having and into a point to where i do have Miss a whole process in between. And that's always trying to not go back to where i come from and always trying to you know see better For for my seeds. See better for my my my son in future gates at the same time where you came from obviously to find who you are. Today you grew up with sixteen siblings which you know we had four. I thought that was a big family. I mean sixteen in an incredible number. And you i think you all became musicians day less. We didn't have a choice. I mean my grandfather. started drum and bugle corps. So we had we we learn how to play. Not everybody's professional myself. He's i'm a professional umbrella. Manual plays with mazen jazzing. Greg reporter super super famous for amazing singer so he works with him. And i have a little brother. Who's a music producers Fifty cent in a lot of different people. You know it was always. My parents were were passes so the idea of music. The idea of Love coaching and character was always. You know in front of st with us always and you know it's very interesting because we didn't have that you know it could have been opposite from the people that i grew up with in the place that i grew up in it was it was a jungle literally. We'll eat. I can only imagine where two thousand fourteen happens. And the travesty. That happened in ferguson You know in your point of view on that not only coming from. They're not only being one of the lucky ones in not lucky from the rolling the dice but luck as you have the skill and now that you've risen out of it but at the same time your grandfather from what i understand. Police offs And so how you're laying and your your parents. Were were passer. So you're looking at an incredible lineage. That has brought you to a perspective on what happened in ferguson. That that i gotta consider unique when you were watching what took place in twenty fourteen. What was going through your mind man. It was crazy. I remember being on a tour bus. I was on tour with them. I'm trying to think was what maxwell singa maxwell and seeing it you know. Basically seeing where i grew up look like a war zone very similar to what's going on now. You look on television. Eli go shopping. Would you know but what you know. What's really going on as scary thing. But we had to make sure we consider why it's happening. Not just as what just happened but why. What is the tipping point. You know were With the tip of the iceberg with everything that's happened with the with the system that has created inequality unfortunately which is a very real thing that needs to change. And i feel like as a country as as people were having to deal with the front and center is not really running away anymore so you can't just pose down it's like okay. This is real. Yeah and as an artist my job is to create solutions to to to what's going on in the world. Hopefully i can. Do you have a solution for us. Because it's it's it's a lot of moving parts we to solution. Tell us tell us. What is johnny. No music hills the world. You know i agree with you there. You know it's a it's a it's a thing is so many different things that needs to be done automatically answers. You know But i do want to be a part of the solution in some ways Every day i'm trying to rack my head trying to write something trying to give give perspective you know because one of the biggest thing is things that are happening. I was talking to a friend From vermont Just about the idea of racism about the idea of it being something. That just wasn't seen right. Not that you're racist. not that anything is just. You didn't have to deal with certain things which is an interesting thing because in my track i had to deal with things all the time. Still have to deal with it after about covid when i go inside and have to wear about if i get pulled over the cop not gonna kill me. You know literally kill me so is it's a very different track but if you had that all your life of course yeah of course i mean i can give you example after example of being stopped. i've been willing to have to go there but no yeah yeah i. It was always a thing isn't is nothing new and anytime i see a dislike. Yeah i'm seen have you gotta get it. I get it happens all the time unfortunately is normalized to away that you know for some. It's like wow right shit really happened. But i'm here to talk about it right so cool do you. Do you feel more more room to talk about it these days and you have before because it. That's one thing i've observed is you. You look back in history before we were alive in the sixties when when the civil rights movement really took shape and and you've seen probably from a decade to decade perspective. Something some rising up. You know. I remember being hyper aware of what happened. Ninety two la riots which you know an unbelievable thing and and things that have happened. Since do you feel anything different this time around. Do you feel that we are we are. We're giving voices more room. Do you feel that. We're actually striving for real fucking chains time instead of just talking about it. I just say. I hope so. Yeah you know. I hope so. I mean i speak to over the last couple of weeks. I mean i speak to so many different people. My white brothers and sisters. I get a chance to really talk to them in a visceral way away. That most of the time it's like we're always struggling through niceties about you know race about maybe five seda and i'll make him uncomfortable. He'll make me uncomfortable if he says it but he really really genuinely wants to know what's going on. I was the perspectives. A lotta time. We don't get a chance to share that. Now i feel like there is room for like real conversations that you don't normally have you don't have to have it but now the idea of race in america and not just america in the world idea of everybody's literally taken knees you know it is it's important you know i feel like it's important for the next iteration of what what our country's you know. Yeah i it's. It's been a remarkable time to be alive and reflected on it from two perspectives than that are not. I don't think this is what what people would maybe expect from a guy like me po. I come from a mixed race family. My dad's from from venezuela. And and you know. He was the minority that i i didn't recognize him as that. But that's how we grew up in a super wide area and we had this venezuelan. Dad who was not the best english those kind of things and and it didn't occur to me when i was a kid that i was experiencing racism like i'm one white guy right by all intents and purposes you'll like the white guy but we experience our share and there were things that happen publicly and privately and and i realized that those did shape me but then i got to experience white privilege because no one would know that my father was an immigrant from venezuela and so i feel lucky i guess to to to have an appreciation for discrimination the first hand of when my friends. You know you're when you're in high school. Everyone was being a fucking idiot when people are teasing certain races. And you're like they're talking about me. You know or whatever but then to never experience my skin color or my nationality hurting me throughout my career and in business and stuff and so. That's that's a perspective that i appreciate but i've really tried to put myself in the which is possible but i've tried to think about what it must be like. Where where what those those moments that. I felt when when my dad was accused of kidnapping my sister. Because she's a blonde girl dark brown guy or when my friends would be you know making fun of specs. And i'm like pretty sure they're talking about dead lake without realizing that that i wasn't as white as they were only like it but now i'm trying to think about what that would have felt like every day of my life for now thirty six years and i can't imagine i can't while could you When when your imagination. And i think that we all need to think a lot more about that and ended to have as much empathy. We can put together for that. I agree with you and it's one of those things as men is the same thing you know. Imagine if we were to go into. A building in. Every building was only built with men's bathrooms. No women bathrooms are bigger it out. That would be a very interesting situation. You know you gotta go somewhere else. You gotta figure it out. You have to wait till all the menus the bathroom or what have you know. The idea of of of a specific privilege literally angled against you as a a thing that you know. It really is a journey as an uphill battle everyday that you have to consider what to do. How can i do it. How can i. How can i make. How can i I literally just want to be on. What the basic things in life. I want to be able to live. I want to be cool. I want to count on getting a phone call from my son and he's just fine right you know. I don't wanna be afraid when my when my ex wife calls you know. And she has something to say about my son. You know it is a very real thing that is like okay. Everything cool is not a. It's not a way to live. But it is the way that i live. If that makes sense it's not a it's not a not a great feeling unfortunately and the idea that we have these conversations kinda can just give some awareness that does not is usually out of sight outta sight outta mind but now is front and center. So i appreciate the opportunity to have these conversations so these last couple of weeks have been in. This has been that the fervor of this movement and obviously wildly important movement. What has been has been of a shining. Light has been a piece of this that we can look at it and say fuck that was amazing or that was positive for that. That gives me hope. Have you had one those moments. I mean there's many ultimately A lot of things happening that people you know. Many corporations really putting them money. You know what their mouth is. Which is a beautiful thing To help put some fi. Into the decis stemming problem Mr beautiful thing. I mean as african americans. You've got thirteen percent in america and forty percent as consumers is kind of like okay. We need each other you know. So that's that's that's a ball of light. You know to see certain companies. Come up with one hundred million dollars in a week. You know. it's a beautiful thing so Hopefully that changes. I mean like. I said the idea of these conversations you know is really opening up understanding most of time. You don't have to understand you don't have to pay attention to it you know Grew up in a certain place. And you don't know raises men as amina doesn't exist means you're far enough away that it doesn't affect you. That's right that is that's a thing that we have to deal with not have so many friends all over the world. Amazing in every facet of life but just have different experiences for switches. A beautiful thing but at some point we have to know and realize that we need each other. We need each other to to to make this world war round in in the way that he does. We talked to two months ago. I think when the only problem was a global pandemic when it went on that one the when life was simple and all we worry about global pandemic and and and the harnett the what is the killer. Hornets killer almost made the headlines. Quite when that was all we had to worry about global pandemic the killer hornets one. The simple days of twenty twenty and i was asking like where's music. Oh and because we've now we've now shut the world down and people like yourself that are true creatives bleed your art and you put on shows that inspire in move people and now you're locked up in your house. You gave an answer. That i just i love and i tell people all the time i said you know. Where are we at and you said the thing about performing live as you you know you can do like things in the web and instagram. But you said when you're playing music in your house it's like masturbating when you when you play music at a club. It's like having sex exactly and and and i love that and i every people's a great line so when are we going to get back to having sex. When are we going to get back to again. Like being normal again in a hearing you at smalls like what is what is going to come next for us. I mean i'm hoping the governors and they're going to go to face to again up for that i mean. Are you ready to go back are you. Are you feeling faint into play. Ask lowlier absolutely but you know. I do wonder in what context out that'll be. Will it be that. I can bring my whole band will be me. Ten people born in in the venue will be five hundred. You know So knowing what what what that's going to be is what we all talk about his musicians. Entertainers what will it be like. Literally my friend sent me This Vinoo in europe. That literally took out almost all of the seats. And it's like into ram and dave chapelle thing you it's like it's awkward and you want clearly. He wasn't doing his main bid right he can't really call it a comedy special going to send a message and it was a powerful message. But you gotta wonder if that's you i mean. Listen there's something to be said about. People paired off and loving each other and listening to you but there's got to be a lack of energy on the air. We share air. We push airtime vibe to each other. You know nothing like hearing the glasses trickling in you know somebody bumping into you looking up like okay. You trying to pass is nothing like that is good energy. I mean i don't know when it will come back. Honestly i mean you know some promoters in manages the sane realistically maybe next year twenty twenty one which is scary. I mean obviously than p people trying to push in. I wanted but also want to be safe. I want people to be safe. I don't wanna be the guy that did this concert now. All of a sudden you know. There's a new pocket of of covy. You know after after the canine harrow. Show how. I don't wanna be that guy for safety overman. Sorry any day hope but sooner sooner the better for me you know i can get back to torn and seeing people all over the world which is a beautiful thing what do you miss most leisurely sam people's expressions talking to people after the shows and you know seeing them moved and being changed you know Right now we have so much time at home we have. You know to be connected to the socials and you know the news and everything. I'm used i'm used to last resort. After that you wanna get away you might want to get away from your spouse for a few minutes. Come have a drink. And here's some music and be lifted for a while. We don't really have that right now. There's no disconnect. So eventually some point. I want to be that disconnect that that that people can take advantage of so hopefully when it comes back people flock. Yeah you know to to check us out wherever when it's going to happen. I don't know not soon enough that answer. I saw this picture of you on instagram. E brought it with today so you can't kiana got his trumpet. Here on the table in the podcasts radio. And your bag. That says this is a trumpet. He's written on there. Which would be hilarious. If it wasn't so tragic as the why you had to write that and you put that on there because you're walking the protests you're gonna play. Some music wanted people to know what was in the bags which you know get to get away from just how sad that that is what you did in those protests was beautiful and and you guys got to go to to to kion herald instagram. I'm sure it's up there somewhere on tv and you can. You can dig it up you. You moved hundreds of people during the protests in brooklyn what that feel like oh man. It was amazing For me as an artist always trying to be genuine as possible to try to you know go would very real Spirit of empathy and You know also morning at the same time. I'm the type of entertainer or artist. That you know i give my whole heart and it to me. It's about but it's not about entertainment. It was about literally mourning the loss of a couple. People brianna taylor ahmad aubrey and floyd and you know i was playing for them for the memory but at the same time i was slow playing footed the city our country you know the rift in between law enforcement and other people the rift in how we see each other Ethnically and just just ridiculous. You know super Column superficial differences But they're very real on for whatever reason they should be superficial know. I think that's what i think. People who can. who have the level empathy. That they should for this is like it. It haunts me sometimes because these stories that you read and what. I've you know what i saw as a kid and i've also traveled the world to a lot of places i've been both the minority and majority in places i've been i've been in all different status is i've had some scary at the opportunities but i've seen a lot of shit but the thing that you learn quickly as we're all the fucking same we are just all the same and every single person and i don't know how many dozen countries it's been now like that's the one observation you can come home with and we are all the same the same minds the same struggles the same opportunities the same dreams same wishes and and a lot of it's quite basic ryan the e you wanna have a good life you want people that you care about to be to be healthy you want to improve your life in ways that you can and you wanna live you want to do to live for as long as you possibly can and those things are not specific to any race or creed or culture and and it is difficult to think about that is too. You're you're using your word superficial things that have brought us to here Absolutely often is really tough. But we gonna change it though we are gonna change. Yes it's going to people like human because you move people you literally get up there and you make people think you make them feel you move people and that's such a gift and i assume that that's where tell me if i'm wrong but i i assume in knowing you as a friend that that's where a lot of this comes from right is is. It's not just recording music. It's not a paycheck. You're looking to move people housing to get into the think differently exactly give give new perspectives and And let people know day lesson. We're more like than we are different. That is for damn sure that and that certain and the fact that you know many of these differences are just exacerbated an an exploit it is our problem performing for people implant for people in brooklyn you know it was to me was magical because it's the idea of the image of what was going on as far as the looting was concerned. Was you know a bunch of black people in a run out in you know tearing down walls of everything but i wanted to give image that. Listen there's more to it than that you know so i literally went out with the standpoint of listen. I'm going to play just to show you that. Listen there is a difference. There's loved and then needs to happen. There is emotional connection that we all have that. We need to just slow down a little bit. Because before i went. It was supercharged. Everybody was you know and there was calm. You know idea of this land is your land. Lennon's marlene idea. Amazing grace in you know. Many other tones that i played at the time it was it was just like a time for reflection a time for just people filling the vibration of love and inclusion. And you know and morning at the same time you know it was a beautiful day. It was either the videos fantastic watch multiple times and shared at around. Because it's we need more of that you know in you know obviously. The power protests has been proven. There's there's elements that can even make it more important like what you did. I truly believe Architectures that so to have here and talk to you upsize. Honestly i think about our conversations lot and one of the things that we talked about back in the glory days but twenty twenty which was five months ago is travel and we in in your ear telling me how your your priming for a journey. I'm guessing that's changed a bit. Absolutely not it okay. Then i'll me into it. I wanna go man the way you lay it out the way i've heard about your travels. I'm like man if i could just do that. One that's gonna to go to indonesia and just tune out for like a month. Yeah i don't know when that will happen. But i want to do that. Man i it's it's one of those things have you tried. You've been around possibility of you. In croatia or somewhere. Yeah i've been on all over the world but you know for different reasons which a chance to sit down for a month and reflect off. Yeah okay zach. I wanna do that. I mean you know in his quarantine. I've had plenty of time ample time to think about a lot of shit in a lot of different ways and it's been cool but you know i want to go somewhere where i don't have cell service for will i. I love it and we had talked a bit about it. And and that's one thing that that i feel so fortunate to have done more than the average person in that started with me. Doing some wonky ask travel. I was sleeping in hostels. This is not an exaggeration that were six dollars a night in in in latin america and europe. Just gnarly. i mean you're talking. Bedbugs capel and stained sheets. That was my world for way too long park benches beaches like. That's that was my game. What made you do it. Man what put you on that. You know the. I had a i was drawn to it and i can't tell you where the draw came from. I think it's just a mindset. That i intuitively knew moore was out. There didn't know what that meant quite yet. Even write this line in my book. I'm like i just felt the european again i am. You know i'm not even european. I'm just. I was drawn to the rest of the world gotch and my cousin and i this is two thousand five or something or six. He's in med school or starting medicals. He's eight year journey beginning doctor. I'm failing entrepreneur and we add negative. Hundreds of thousands of dollars to our name with that point is from like student loans and bullshit. We scrounged up enough to go. Do this trip to europe. And we started in london had a one way ticket in one way like unlimited train. Pass unless you doubled back you could keep going. Why basically. And i think we spend like four thousand miles on trains across europe and you just fake and this is pre like cell phones and so you just figured out you get to a new city. Sometimes we weren't even sure if you had shown us a map we. I really couldn't have told you where we were on map on. A continent is pretty sure in this region. Like you know we go to an internet cafe. Which was what he did. Yeah and you pay you know few euros and go online. You'd go to a hostile website and you'd find somewhere to sleep that night and we. We did this for months. Man's grazie and after that. I i kind of became addicted to it. I kind of became just like anywhere. You can go that i haven't been is worth going to and and it started pretty janke traveling and then it slowly became more for like business and then like in all sudden doing like pretty posh stuff right you know and you know. I've had a weird weird spectrum of what i've seen from like incredibly high end luxury to like. You know you're getting bedbugs tonight. And everything in between. But i've always had a draw to it man and and my life has been defined by that and so that will you to set like that month in indonesia of just. That's what i went to do. My book i spent Whatever was seven weeks or something alone malaysia. I stated a yoga retreat. I did martial arts in the morning. I wrote in the afternoon. That's blocking it at beautiful and it's in a does change you and it is amazing thing and i know you're going to do it and what you do. I wanna help you plan. It might come visit you if you're gonna allow yourself not to be alone the entire time but it's amazing man so so use anywhere else. Would you go. Indonesia where is where else in your mind that you're drawn to out. Say you don't wanna give away the secret you know just in general way like i said i've been all low probably been doing. Six continents never have never been to antarctica. Plan on counting either. But i was in chicago for ten years which is close enough to antarctica. So who had a win coming off of that lake. I mean being saint. Louis we did something else man we get a little win but not like chicago but anyway i don't know i'm going to go to fiji manono gotta couple couple place but anyway. That's not that deep. I wanna find some places where i just need to be deep. Were drawn to going like going chill l. I get it and it's there's you know there's so much to see out there. And i also think that i honestly believe that if every american were to get the fuck out of their normal world and go see what's out there. I think a lot of our systemic problems in this country would go away very agree there. I agree when you live at insular life. And you're told one narrative and use in your you know and that's a generational narrative it becomes clear why it exists right but is soon as you've you've seen that there is a lot stuff out there. They're seven and a half billion fucking people doing their own thing and they come in every shape size color creed you know. And they've been here is nothing nothing new like. Our problems aren't unique. We just make more of a shit show out of them than other people. I think it's that perspective that many people in this country missing and they might say i've seen the world. I go to mexico in dali seriously. My dad used to tell me growing up that you know a saint louis is only a cow plaster. You can't stay who you gotta go. So i literally from my entire life to the today turn like seventeen. I'm like i'm leaving. I'm going in a mood of new york city. And i was like a fish fish out of water near saint. Louis man it was. It was different. Because i 'cause i didn't visit I went to the new school. I didn't visited before it was like i applied got in and it was like okay in august. You're going one way ticket. So i went and drive that first day. Oh man it was. It was different. It was literally. Bright is in gray's papaya and you know just like a kid with big dreams knows beautiful thing straight to the upper west side. It was cool. That's incredible when you hear you talk about how you got here. And he's experiences you've had it becomes clear why you are who you are you you broke the mold you you chase the things that weren't necessarily easy or safe our low risk but but that is normally where greatness comes from. It comes from began. We we do want to research for this and his well known as a friend. I really wanted to learn more and like you've won a grammy man. What is it. What does it feel like to win a grammy minutes. A thing that validates you know Valla days what you've been working on what you've been working for and unless you it gives you some kind of a reason that you've taken on the years of practice. The years of no touring the world years of not being able to be around for certain things and miss certain things you know. It's just validation right and an opportunity for people to to really respect what it is that we do you know. I'm happy to have been part of several records and several projects that have won grammy awards from maza Film with don cheadle and robert glaspie de maxwell lynn. Pj morton you know. Couple of things just been happy to be a part of some amazing projects. Miles ahead come. Does donte will call you up and say i want you to be miles davis. It's almost a surreal thing to think about. It was it was interesting because my good friend. One of my best friends in the world my son's godfather robert glaspie Hit me up because they called him to film score for in and they were like you know is doing a movie about miles davis and we need trumpet play. It was like okay. You know you think you can do it even want to be. A part of it was like okay. I'll try. i'll do what i do I showed up and it went well literally to the point to they would send the demos off to people very high up in in that miles davis estate and whatnot and they were. They were tricked as to what it was whether whether it was you know the old classic quintet amounts davis orb something new so it works so i got the job to do it and it was a beautiful thing. I'm from saint. Louis miles davis. The first band was in was in my second cousins band called the blue devils in saint. louis andy. Random was that was miles davis his first gig in saint louis. So the idea of that lineage. Was it worked. It worked. well i mean. I love that that the family couldn't even tell the difference between is that the epitome of a compliment for a jazz trumpeter. What else could you wanna hear. You know is is is. I don't know of is a compliment. A gesture of respect in in the way that is like you know what. I appreciate miles davis so much but i'll never be him. I don't wanna be him right. I'd i will give him. You know the homage that that he deserves and then as a as a musician trumpet player you know. He's one of the people. I wanted to be like as an artist as an entity as a person who changed things you know. Miles davis changed music like six times. You know but you know as a trumpet player me. He's like god news. Like okay i get. I get a call to literally carry on the lineage of miles. Davis like that was special to me. Yeah it's it's a lot of us who have experienced accessibility younger age. We struggle with impostor syndrome. We struggle from from that moment. That you're like you the confidence you say. Yes this gag. I can come be miles davis and you go play. I note and you're like i'm not supposed to be D- do you go into percents experience. That like i'm so out of my element even though you're not but does your mind fuck with you. In that way. Man is one hundred percents that way. It's like literally when i when i got the call. It was always you know an object back of my mind that i'm not going to pull this off but on the other side glass half mpm like i'm gonna kill this you know and it was really like the kind of jumped out of a plane before and once you get in a plane and they take you up and you drive in against to a point where there is no turning back. You gotta do it you. You're going you're going to jump out of his plane. So when i was doing that it was kind of like. Listen you gotta fly. You gotta fly so the way it worked out. I had a skill set as a music producer. That allowed me to really go through each thing in a way that most people wouldn't have time to do like i had a you know. Certain tech savvy about how to make it happen You know if if people watch the moving the mouse ahead film but don cheadle. You'll see that anytime. Don cheadle was moving his fingers every notice correct. There is no like you know when you see certain things People recorded movie and it's just like brass trumpet player. You just flew finger but this is a one hundred percent correct typically when they when people do music movies that record the music and the person as an actor would literally learn the fingering. And that'll be what it was but it was opposite. Don cheadle recorded the film. They sent me the film. And i basically had to put my fingers to what he was doing and actually make it make sense and make it sound like miles davis was with with with businessman. You only got you only got three note and when you see if you see the horn and you see the fingering. There is no chance for air on a piano. You can just kind of press them. But this if i press this i know is going to be the note. Be technically. it's going to be. You know it's going to be see shot you for me. My job was to make that right as to what ever done. Cheetah was doing which is a. It's a it's a freaky kind of thing that think about but we made it work. Well it's it's an incredible film so you did make it work. And did you work directly with don. I did yeah. He seems like the coolest guy. Sober never had the pleasure medium. But i assume it's just the man. He's got back to richmond and he does a a bunch of things. Well you know he. He learned how to play the trumpet for the movies. I mean it's me planning. Who taught him none okay. He learned how to play. And you know to a point to where you think. He's planning to trumpet. Well i mean he actually played but then obviously it's not him. It's me plan But he knows how to play. He actually had the option to go to music school on on on jazz saxophone but obviously we know he chose acting. Yeah you know so. I'm glad i did. But he's he's amazing musician as well a bass player saxophone play. Lows knows how to play the trumpet. You know it was a beautiful day to work with them. Would you be doing if you weren't a trumpeter man. I'll probably be in. Somebody's science lad. There will probably be trying to find a cure for corona. I'm like literally i mean. I was very interested in genetics and stuff like that coming up. What drives you to that solutions solutions. You know for me. That's that's my new description of being artists. A solution est a person who can who can give another perspective to somebody And if i'm doing the repertory thing. I'm not really providing solutions. I'm really just doing what somebody else did. But as artists artist a a person who who who aspires to eight. I gotta give a solution to somebody whether that be life with an mba in sound and sonics or or even in technology. You know i'm right now. I'm trying to figure out ways to get rid of latency playing live if if it never goes back. What happens if we can't if i can't play with a big band you know. How do i make you work to where it still feels like. We all are in the same room together. Wow so we'll the that's that right brain left brain that that's a unique common. Most people don't have that incredible is doesn't surprise me though Men as that is so great and and every time we talk. I just i feel strangely better about things after we get done talking like. I don't know you know you're you're an inspirational guy. You're you're positive guy and we need more of that But you're a creator and we certainly need more bad and i been you know. It's been a weird few months or everyone planet in i. I went from being isolated here to then you know the movement and participating in that but then watching you know some of the rioting and looting went on outside my front door wild experience and then and then i want artists swell in here in into into repaint area. Where were in soho manhattan and to make it basically or art gallery. And i've i've had so much appreciation for creators even more than normal. I mean i always respect creators but in the last week of watching people. Who don't they don't need to come do this. They have no obligation to do anything. And it's not for me. They're doing it for the city of doing it for the movement but it has been just beyond inspiring To deceive you know people like them and you at who who are going a step above what what we should be doing which is to get involved into bringing their art in their energy to create positive change man. We need it man we need to we need the vibrations menaces so much negativity out here you know we need to counteract that is as much as possible ms must audible on. You're the man When we get back to normal one twenty twenty self where can people find you. Follow you see you because everyone needs to every single person. Listen to this. You need to experience on aware. Can they do that now. Or when we get back to normal more important now you can listen to my music. I mean if you have a record outcome the magician That's magic in music like that. You know i'd say his record about love. It's about love of humanity love of of people in every relationship from the love of a child to love love one in love of losing somebody you know so all of those things. Are you know evident. That record is called the musician Sony sony legacy as far as following me if you just look me up herald backslash herald on twitter instagram and facebook. I'm i'm around in. Always you know china post something positive and uplifting and inspirational and informative. So i'm i'm i'm that guy you know and when we can get back to the real world around with surrogate new york clubs normally at o. Cam normally at the blue note. Un's matter of fact. I do some livestreams though. I'll i'll look forward to literally hitting the streets again and playing but people like literally when i play for the protests. That was the first time. I played for people in like two months. If you're going to detroit. I'm going to come see you there from and i i need a trip back there. I got my family since all this bullshit started. I got a pregnant sister-in-law t. My mom still cook. If you're doing that. I'm you know i doing it kion. You're the man. Thanks for being here with us. Marley flash john. Thanks for having me seriously seriously. I felt like the conversation is very important. You know most people don't have the opportunity to really share. You know what they what's in their heart and outside of the once again the cosmetic the cosmetic stuff the real stuff the stuff that makes this world go around That makes people appreciate you or hate you. Unfortunately you know we we get a chance to show our humanity. And i really appreciate that every conversation. He on said that if he weren't a musician he'd be a scientist because of his obsession with finding solutions. But you don't have to be assigned to heal the world. He on the solution in music. Life can be a lot like jazz to the untrained ear. Things can seem a little chaotic. Or like there's no reason for the madness. it takes a very special person. See the beauty in life imperfections or to recognize the patterns in. Turn them into something beautiful. My key takeaway from the conversation with kia is being reminded of the power of music and art in our world of technology we can often forget the power that are has and how important invaluable it is our culture an livelihoods. I wish we had more people like kion in this world in all of us have some ability to affect that. So i ask that everyone after the world comes back to normal here. Try to do your part and supporting artists paying for music and going to check out a live concert a to remember to tune in later this week for special bonus episode of between us. We're key on. And i walked around the streets of soho back in june. That's it for today. Thanks for listening my memoir. A practical way to get rich in die trying is now for sale at all online booksellers and in person at barnes and noble. You can find me on social media at the john rolla. that's j. o. h. N. r. o. a. And the podcast at between us underscore pot a big. Thanks jams rate media and matty start amanda rosenberg case. Franko for producing. We'll see you next week.

kion kion herald ferguson Air art gallery john rowe darren wilson Thirteen fourteen years america bugle corps davis singa maxwell thirty six years venezuela thirteen percent forty percent one hundred million dollars michael brown grammy dave chapelle mazen
How To Simulate A Full Sleep Cycle In 20 Minutes, The Best Stress Biohack That Exists, Vagus Nerve Stimulation & Much More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:26:32 hr | 1 year ago

How To Simulate A Full Sleep Cycle In 20 Minutes, The Best Stress Biohack That Exists, Vagus Nerve Stimulation & Much More!

"The stress kills you very simply, and it's over the course of time the key here is balanced. The nervous system is zero sum game. And most of us are not getting enough parasitic nervous dominance. It literally consumes you, if you can never relax, you can't get restorative sleep. If you can't get restored asleep yourself, don't clean their toxins? You don't heal your immune system. It's compromised literally, you're stressing out to death. I have a master's degree in physiology bio mechanics and human nutrition. I've spent the past two decades competing some of the most masochistic events on the planet from seal fit Kiko Spar nego- g in the world's toughest mudder thirteen ironman, triathlons, brutal bow hunted. Venture races. Spearfishing plant foraging free, diving bodybuilding, and beyond. I combine this intense time in the trenches with a blend of ancestral wisdom, and modern science searched the globe for the world's top experts and performance. Fat loss recovery hormones, brain, beauty, and Braun to deliver you this podcast. Everything you need to know to live in adventures, joyful, and fulfilling life. My name is Ben greenfield. Enjoy the ride. Two days episode, we talk about stress dot about stress a lot and one of the things that I find myself, recommending over and over again to the hard charging folks, that I work with to help to mitigate stress is a Chinese adopted genyk, herb blend. It's known as Tian. She my friend Roger drummer a Chinese Bala, just base out of Portland designs and hand makes this stuff using all wild crafted herbs. And not only does it have a bunch of things in there that help to mitigate stress like actual Gonda, and rodeo. And Shas Andhra, but it's also got a bunch of things that can support sexual performance in there like EPA medium into starchy, go to Cholla. It's got some longevity. 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I'm instantly alert as soon as the thing shuts off, and as a guy who gets just boxes and boxes of crazy biohacking my front door all the time. I am. I'm pretty almost like suspicious now of a lot of these devices that that claim to do things like enhanced sleep or have some crazy app that place. Sounds because it seems like those are a diamond dozen. But something about this thing has just been working like gangbusters for me. So it's called the new calm, and I didn't want this to just be one. Big commercial for you guys for me to, to get the person who designed this on the show and talk about it with you. And instead, what I want to delve into is how your your, your Vegas nerve in your nervous system, respond to tactics like this, how your sleep architecture could be affected by something like this. And how devices like this actually work, particularly on the human automatic nervous system. And so the guy decided again, the show. To talk about this device in the nervous system, and stress in general, is Jim pool and gym pool is the president and CEO of Solis life sciences. That's the company that actually makes Newcomb before before working with Solis life sciences, Jim co-founded focused evolution, which was kind of like a strategy consulting firm where he managed a bunch of different mergers and acquisitions and growth strategies for venture capital, and private equity firms and grew that into a multimillion dollar consulting firm and now he's on the board of directors of a bunch of different medical device firms around the world. And he's published over thirty different articles in industry trade journals, his background from a collegiate standpoint is in psychology, and also international business, but in the few conversations that I've had with him in particular about the Newcomb. I've realized he knows quite a bit about everything. From, you know how to use a different forms of software to take the brain to brain wave length to how to use. These mild stimulations to actually simulate sleep cycles, or somehow, relaxed, the nervous system, give you many of the benefits, you'd get if you were to say, have a full night asleep or big long nap. So anyways, Jim, thanks for coming on the show, today, and also for, for being the mastermind behind this device, that's kind of change the way travel, and nap these days, then, thank you for having me thrilled to be here. Yeah, yeah. I'm stoked. You're on. And I mean, like obviously, this, this will rabbit hole little bit. But I think probably the perfect place to start is for people have never seen it. Never been to the websites. Never seen a photo of it never held one in their hands. What exactly is the, the new calm? New comb is a game changer. It's a it's a poignant technology, that's going to deliver a couple real key elements to the condition. We're gonna resolve stress when help your sleep quality, the technologies comes to you when you purchase it in a backpack so easily portable, but this was designed expressly to put the brakes on the sympathetic or stress response. In raise the pair sympathetic response. In fact, Dr Holloway, the neuroscientist quantum physicist natural path who developed design new call that's quite recipe it, he's even he's a brilliant, compassionate ima being. But it took him twenty years to figure out new call. And I think one of the things I've is one of the driving forces just a passion to help people out drugs. But one of the cool things about his background, is he's not myopic or stuck in any certain vertical. Medicine. So you'll gonna find biochemistry involved here. You're gonna find electrical signaling here frequency, but at the highest level, we are all kind of suffering the same fate, and that is we can't turn it off and the advent of technology and the pursuit of technology literally has tethered to the sympathetic arousal in constant foot on the accelerator. This technology is the ultimate bio, hag in that, it's the ultimate Wade unplug and we're going to talk about this, but you're going to lie down, and you're not gonna do anything biochemistry physics is going to work for you, but you will have the physiological benefit of living like a monk. Yeah. And it is kind of interesting. I know you're you're going to get a bunch of people commenting now on the podcast. 'cause you thrown out a bunch of stuff like quantum physics and, and use the term, like ultimate biohacking so people will push back against that a little bit. Unless, of course, we delve into the technology behind this and how. How exactly it's working on a physiological mechanism. So the first thing is you mentioned it comes in a backpack, I guess it's more like a small little bag that comes in. It's, it's not so large that fit in a backpack that the main hand-held device, or the device, that, that the electrodes attached to it's about the size of approximately a cellphone in. It's this mine is blue. And it's, it's a device with some controls on it. And with these two electrodes that, that are these patches that go on either side of the body, kind of underneath the year, the soft part of the year. So the this device to me is very similar to another device. I have that's almost like a, a cranial electrical stimulation device made by Fisher wallets called the circadian and originally started using that device, as kind of a way to stimulate the Vegas nerve. And that one had been studied to decrease cortisol to activate the pair, sympathetic nervous system into improve vaguely nerve tone to assist with sleep, onset or to decrease stress. And so when I got the new calm, I thought it was just kind of like a relabelled version of that device, but can can you explain to me, what exactly the, the blue thing, this hand-held device? That seems to be the core of the new, calm is an in what exactly does. And why these electrodes are placed on either side of the, the neck underneath ear lobes. Into issues but on this is crazy. Electrodes stimulate the visuals devices similar technology. So it'd be alpha Ston that technology was invented in Saint Petersburg, Russia, over seventy years ago. So your brain in body communicate only two ways chemical messaging and electrical messaging and the key for new calm is to present your brain with a pattern using physics to cycle your brain wave function into data, but to do this, with any predictability, we really felt that we needed to manage the adrenals, so the chemical messaging of new calm, there's a cream, and there's the stimulation device you speaking about. So for us, we are FDA cleared. The treatment of insomnia anxiety depression. You'll never see or hear us talk about it. We use that device as a catalyst to help the absorption of the cream. So the body has tremendous abilities to resist. We were stage for cancer. We work with PD as de we with the diction we. Work with high performance group professional athletes. We work with delta force navy seals, the body can resist anything whether knows it or not. So we're going to manage your drills that put the brakes on the age axis using this cream in the stimulation device. So the cream contains amino acid, Gabba gamma, MU deter Gasset the bodies primary inhibitory neurotransmitter designed to put the brakes on Drennan. Everybody's heard of dren land, catecholamines, nor Burnett fron, red bull, Espresso all this stuff to get us jacked up. But very few people understand Gabba in Abbas the intensity of the drill site. So Gabba and gab or system is really important for balance and really maintaining the balance of the nervous system from the stress response to the rest response. So we're gonna present Gabba to your brain to transform a crane at the blood to your neck now, as you know, Ben supplementation is awesome. But the body is built to extract a high yield nutrients from food, not from elements. And when you look at the literature and look into science, you'll see the body may be able to extract seven eight nine. Ten eleven percent of the yield of the nutrients in supplement our cream suffered same fate. So after years of testing into a neuro transmitter panel testing and finding out why is the gab not being absorbed? Dr Holloway move to Russia to study, grainy electrotherapy stimulation, now, our stimulation device is used in a low low frequency zero point five hurts and point one million is designed to electro, forty eight the cell membrane in kind of like opening the garage door for the Gabba. So the cream presents gab into the brain. But during the day, when we're trying to impose a Napa new their bodies. No, I don't want this adrenaline, the receptor site to gab is not open the stimulation device for new, calm is a Cadillac. To ensure that there's a rapid relaxation response in we shut down the HP access, which is the adrenals, that's the key for us leveling the playing field in creating very predictable fast response. I got it. So, so I was when, when I was attending to ironman sports medicine conference several years ago. Dr Jeff Spencer who at the time was working with team radio shack believe the professional cycling team. He was discussing how he would use a electrical muscle stimulation not cranial electrical stimulation, but rather electrical muscle stimulation patches over an area that had been injured in athletes, and that in many cases, he would use topical lotion, like a trauma or Ourika or magnesium or some kind of topical anti inflammatory like MSM, and you'd place the electrodes over top of that cream to help drive the cream or the lotion or the topical. More deeply into the tissue. And that's a tactic that I've, I've actually successful used for injuries and sore spots since hearing him describe how to do that. You just basically put the cream or lotion on your plight electrical, muscle stimulation on top of that, drives, it more deeply into tissue. So when I first got the device, the Newcomb and received that cream and place, the cranial electrical stimulation electrodes on after plying cream I was under the impression that the electrodes were simply kind of driving the cream deeper into the tissue. But what your saying is that instead what the cranial electrical stimulation devices doing is it's relaxing nervous system so that the gamma amino, botanic acid or the Gabba in the cream is actually able to work. It's not that the cream isn't being Zork properly, it's more that the nervous system would not be open, as well, in terms of the, the receptors being able to, to bind Gabba unless. For some kind of Paris, and pathetic. Nervous system. State is elicited the electrical stimulation. Absolutely. That's exactly what we're doing of catalysts to the biochemistry of Newcomb interesting. And the, the cream by the way, it's not just Gabba. I noticed that you also have speaking of red bowl touring in there, the anti-russian current, taurine glycemic, which is an amino acid that a lot of people, for example, we'll have a couple of bone broth prior to bed to relax them. And part of the reason for that is because the glycemic in the bone. Broth so glycemic in there as well. And then also something that may not be familiar to people called casing. Triptych hydraulics, eight, what is Casey in trip to Kudrow site? It is the protein mother's milk, the helps babies go to sleep. Okay. The amazing world of biochemistry. It is. We don't have the milking farm. We're not breastfeeding women extracting milk. But through chemistry we can mimic, that same protein, are you getting that protein from from like a safe source because I know there are some concerns in the industry about sourcing. Everything's drawl size. Yeah. So any of the casing issues is zero. Okay. You have no no issues of you have any Milton tivi there's zero issue whatsoever. Plus, it's kind of a microscopic level, but it all hydrolysed also in. There is L, teeny. And I'm sure that's it's up regulator of Gabba. So it helps will absorb showed Gabba, but it's also a mood enhancer. So yes, that green took over four years for our neuroscientist to formulate and the whole key is to create according to copy of inhibitory neurotransmitters. Tari in there as a dopamine agonists so that there's some balance. But there's gavitt eight and Gabby there. Now, gab the gathering system. I don't know if a lot of your listeners familiar with this, but the Gabbard exists is responsible for almost anything anti litigate new brain chemistry, so anything that the anti-anxiety binds to the Gabba, a receptor site, any Sipa, Balch hall buys the Gabbay, receptor site. So you have a tough day and the world against you. The first sip of wine and all sudden you feel the weight of the world roll off your shoulders. That's the Gabbard system, every sip of alcohol by the Gabbay receptor site. Any benzodiazepine binds, the Gabbay receptor site, any bar, bitchy buys the Gabbay, receptor site. So what do you think's going to happen, Ben? When we apply Gabbay to the Gabbay receptor site, it's going to begin a fascinating. We like sation response. And you've probably found through your usage in exceptional predictability to new goal. You just go now the journeys different because your stress level, your sleep lovelier jet legs always different, but you're always going to the same place that kinda hip hip Nagata dissociate of in and out of consciousness, plays remind as wandering, but your body feels very heavy and that's the healing zone. Yeah. And that's, that's the really interesting thing, and I kind of want to get into the difference between this and sleep. But I've certainly read much of the literature on cranial electrical stimulation, which some people may see breeded a CBS, if you're digging into the research behind it, and in both animal, and human research, they've shown some pretty significant alterations win electrodes like this are used either on the temples or in some cases on the side of the neck or in the case of the new column. It's kind of run into soft part of the year on the neck. But they've, they've shown significant alterations and things like neuro transmitters and, and thyroid levels, and some of these immune acid activities, and of course, also something you briefly looted to earlier electro lager fee like the actual change in the brain wave signals, whether that be down regulation of beta brain waves, or up regulation of alpha or Theta or some combination of the two but when it comes to this electrical stimulation device along the cream before we delve into what's going on in terms of what might simulate either sleep architecture. Or what kind of occurring from from a big picture standpoint in the human body win? These things are combined. There is one other pretty important piece that we really haven't discussed, and that's the fact that when, when you get this new, come the vice you get access to this app in the app place. Sounds and I've experimented with a ton of. Different sound producing devices like the sleep stream brain FM another one, I've talked about is, is the Czyz PI Z and the new calm has I believe about eight to ten different tracks on it, and particular one, one of my favorite. The power nap track, which is the one I use ninety percent of the time the twenty minute power nap track but the, the sound and in the beats in this audio are significantly different in terms of their affects compared to most of these other audio devices that I've used to elicit state of relaxation or sleep. So can you delve into what's going on from an audio standpoint with the actual app itself? K buckle up. This is where it gets fun for us. That's fine. We got time by neural signal processing vinyl beat was discovered by German scientists in eighteen thirty nine in essentially, it's using physics to trick, the brain. So your ears are source of creating signal ears. Don't here they bring in the signal to the brain and the cauda note nucleus of the mid brain is processing the signal from the ears. So if you want to present your brain with a beat and, for example, for Newcomb, we want to present your brain with twelve down to four her, which is the alpha Theta region. And so you can't hear twelve hurts, we can't presented in a pattern educate here. So we're going to have to use some type of way to trick the brain. And that's what binary signal processing all about. So for ease of simplicity if we wanted to present your brain with twelve herds bait in the left ear, we will put five hundred twelve hurts in the right here. We'll put we'll, we'll put five hundred when the brain got nuclear of the mid brain gets these signals. Played as this is a synchronous, this doesn't make any sense. The brain literally subtracts difference, and you're left with that beat. That's what's called by neural beat. You have to listen to headphones because we need the headphones actually present the frequency. You couldn't just play this on your phone as you laid there with the electrical stimulation cream on just listening to passively via the phone out headphones in, because you're not going to get the effect of the binal beat played in the left and right ears. Correct, correct. Yes. There's a there's a wave on wave form to listen to Ambien late, but it doesn't have the treatment properties by neural. So by naral beats our diamond dozen. You can buy them for nine nine cents. Dollar ninety nine days is going to say it's not rocket science if I'm vinyl beats is not so you tailgate in. Why is your technology for thousand six hundred ninety five dollars classroom medical device with FDA and health candidate all this science behind it? Well, we are tricking the most Fistican complex organ on the planet, the human brain now for those listeners out there, who committed with the brain works, there's some two color particular, activating system. It is the stimulation filter to everything that comes into brain, whether it's visual. Auditory. Tactile. Excetera. This ridiculous. Activated system is very sophisticated has two primary functions. One pattern recognition to find a shortcut think about this. You can live on a certain street for ten years and drive down one day, and you see a house, you didn't know was there and it's six houses down from your house, your brain can't take in all the stimulation from all your senses. So this particular activated system is very powerful now, in developing the new comb your acoustic software. Dr Holloway understands the complexity of it, and the need to Trickett, so new call in our neuro coups accelerator by way of simple, analogy simple, the typical song you download for my tunes five six seven megabytes one track of new goal new calm recovery to, for example, is seven hundred eighty nine megabytes of information were forcing brain to process, so we are using by normal signal process, and we're using pitch and frequency mathematical matrix, where using Tamboura. From tation by Brayshaw invitation. But most importantly, sets Newcomb apart from anything else on the planet while we have only patents in the world is a non linear oscillating. Algorithm. So when you download a vinyl be file the first time he listened to it. It's amazing. It works really. Well, the second time listen to it works, really well, the third time listen to it. Not so good four-time. You've really reached diminished returns, that's the effect of the ridiculous activated system. Understanding that pattern. So in new call Ben were taking your brain wave function from beta. Because you're wake when you get into new gone down into alpha and Theta alpha slower brainwave form in his twelve day Turks, and that's an honest with creativity. We like sation being in the zone and transcendental meditation fada is the Khuda gras and had slower way form. Now fo that seven Hertz, four herds in it's just above deep sleep. Fada is really important for everybody to understand because. Is the second stage of sleep? There's a lucid dream element to it. But the key to fade is the only time that your cells clean toxins out of their cells, and do their maintenance and also create the my Conrad energy source for your cells. This is quote unquote the healing zone for the human condition so that second-stage asleep or data is pivotal to our health. So with new calm, we are going to use all this complex physics, algorithms mathematics to present your brain with a pattern like a NASCAR pace car, but again is non linear. So when you're using new combat, I know invariably, every time you do it your mind, wandering that's the result of the linear also leading algorithm. For example, will start at thirteen hers. We'll take you down to night, then we'll take up to eleven then it'll take it at ten. It will take a thirteen. They'll take eight we can't keep it static your ridiculous activating system will figure this out. So when you look at the complexity, I can't overstate it, and I'm certainly beyond my pay grade. This is absolute intense quantum physics, biochemistry electrical signaling just a host of incredibly sophisticated elements, so that we can trick your brain and you'll never builders as new, you can do the twenty minute power, nap for the rest of your life, your brain will never figure it out. So I'm basically going from about four to twelve hurts when I'm wearing this thing, if I'm patterning between alpha and omega brainwaves, correct. Okay ghostly into data. So the twenty minute power up. I'm not surprised that your favorite because it's twenty minutes, right? So any high performers. Hey, I'd rather do twenty minutes and thirty or forty the twenty minute power nap was really a herculean effort in amazing technological advancement. So back in the day, two thousand ten two thousand fifteen I didn't invent new goal. So personally as the company, I'm like, okay I need to go. Find the best scientists in world approve. This works doesn't work and into go on a path to get patents FDA and Health Canada. Well, when you've. Invented the only technology that claims to lower stress and improves caudill drugs. You get the attention the scientists in the world. So we worked Dr Tung campaign, the world's preeminent expert in our very ability. He's world's leading statistical biophysicist with over thirty four thousand medical citations using non your frequency, domain quantum, physics mathematical model. He showcased that twenty minutes new calm as equivalent to about two hours of restorative sleep. That's an amazing statement to make and the benefit there is because we're cycling brainwave function fate event. That's where the body is literally getting the healing. Okay. So we go to the consumer electronic show, and we win best of ES. So here's a similar narrow science at a Delaware with one hundred eighty two thousand attendees over four thousand people there, we win the best of the now, you'd say, well, why did you do that? We're in the convention center. We've a big booth were in the sleep section. And we have all this literature saying, get two hours of restored asleep in twenty minutes. Most humans in every heard a new calm, they would just pointed that signs in a need that we did a one thousand eight hundred forty seven people over the four day mating, and they all came into the twenty minute power nap. So I talked to Dr Holloway, Don Holloway. I understand the physics I understand, you can't just glide tillman's, brainwave function debate, and there's this whole process, and we need to do all this, cool stuff. But if the research says twenty minutes is a two two hours, restored sleep while we haven't people knew for thirty or forty minutes. It's inconsistent. Do something about it make twenty minute foul. And he said, Jim, there's no way I can do that. You can't just take a human brain in beta or high beta in high stress in bring it right into fate doesn't work that way. Well, seven months of work. He figured it out. So you're seeing the benefit of concentrated version of literally taking a fifty minute five zero master comb track. That's working through all the. Advocation relaxing, the central nervous system. Relinquishing control from you allowing your body and brain to go on this journey into fate in deep relation, and he truncated it into twenty minutes. Furthermore, Ben, he added some of the physics and the elements from the ignite warrior brain physics of allude to later. So I know why you like it because that is an absolute as kicking file where you get in you go down into data faster and then you probably go in and out of consciousness. And the when you get up, you're just, you're just feels completely, energized, focus and ready to go. Hey, you know, when you're out at a restaurant in bring out that fancy bread basket with the sour dough rolls in the pretzel, sticks and the wonderful multi grain bread. And you sit there and your mouth is watering, but you can't eat it. 'cause gluten makes you blow crap all over the back of the toilet seat. Or maybe you wanna have. Pasta, but he can't have pasta this homemade wonderful hand-rolled weet pasta, because it's got gluten in it. You can't have that carrot cake cupcake that they have for dessert, because that's got. Good. Gosh. Everything's got gluten. Well, here's how fix that. I travel, you'll see me do this in my fanny pack, all the time with Diepen pep today's an enzyme that's clinically proven to breakdown. Gluten so you can have your cake and eat it too. I'm not endorsing go out and stuff. Your face full of GMO wieght. But at the same time I mean if I'm at a fancy steakhouse sipping on my Kochta waiting for robotic get there. And they bring out that breadbasket with the wonderful bone marrow butter and seesaw. I'm gonna have me some bread. But I'm getting my gluten guardian I and gluten guardian works. I pop two to four capsules before any meal in which I'm getting exposed to gluten, and it just works. Not only that, but I am going to give you a big fat discount on gluten guardian. So if you go to Ben greenfield fitness dot com slash gluten guardian you're going to automatically save a bunch of money on the flagship glues garden supplement that they have over there. But in addition to that, if you use code greenfield, you'll save an additional ten percent over at the Ben greenfield finis dot com slash gluten guardian website, Rican, read up more DiPoto pep today's and how it works to allow you to have your cake and eat it to this podcast is also brought to you by speaking of eating fasting t-. What is fasting t while Dr Jason Fung? My previous podcast guests and the author of multiple books, including wonderful book on fasting has helped the company peak to develop a high catechin formulated tea with twelve times the antioxidant. And also triple toxin screen for heavy metals and pesticides toxic mold, which are actually an issue with a lot of t's these days. 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PI Q, U, E, P, IQ, peak, T dot com and enter code greenfield to get fifteen percent off your purchase peak, T dot com and use code greenfield. I have experimented with some other tactics that have reportedly been able to simulate a sleep cycle without one sleeping, probably the two I missed with the most prior to getting the new calm was a form of meditation called EKO meditation that involves kind of looking into the empty space in the back of your is dropping your tongue to the bottom of your mouth. There's a little bit of, of EFT or tapping involved with that along with some, some breath work instruction. And then the other that I had experimented with a little bit was yoga ninja as a form of meditation. Also barred from the yoga practices that also reportedly simulate to sleep cycle now. Everything I'm talking about by the way, I know of mentioned quite a bit all linked to if you go to Ben greenfield finished dot com slash new, calm podcast, then greenfield finished. Dot com slash new column podcasts, new calm as N you calm. You can also go to Ben greenfield finished dot com slash Newcomb. If you just want to see the device, same thing, spelled N you comb. So anyways, I experimented with Eka meditation, and with yoga, and then when I got the new comb started experimenting with the power, nap setting after you telling me about some of this research, that had been done along with some, some anecdotal data about the simulation of sleep cycles, and found that it worked literally within a single session in surprisingly worked better and better, every single time after that, you know, kind of laying my fear is that I might grow used to fix it. It's simply gotten more effective over time. I almost instantly now begin to slip in and out of that conscious and unconscious state as soon as flipped the thing on and begin a session, so it doesn't deed. Work in the way that you've just described, but something I wanted to kind of ask you to delve a little bit more deeply into was what's going on from a sympathizer nervous system, stimulation standpoint of for example, heart rate, variability, is something I've discussed multiple times on the show, and even alluded to the different branches of the nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system being something you can measure using a hurried variability device that is reflected in what's called the high frequency or I'm sorry. The low frequency the l f response would be the sympathetic nervous system. And then the para sympathize with the rest digest nervous system, we would be trying to, to, to, to stimulate using something like the Newcomb would be the h f frequency. Now, have you measured anything like HR V, or L f h f frequencies using the Newcombe? Well, you can't see me, but I'm smiling ear to ear number one year noticing the same thing we all noticed. I've been using new comb for almost ten years, you'll never build resistance to this gang in two thousand thirteen were working with the top statistical biophysicist mathematicians on the planet. Our medical school in said, hey guys, why don't you guys just be our first Guinea pigs for sample? So four of our executive team went up there into new home with a single easy G device. An FDA approved vice a Catholic two hundred fifty data points, a second fifteen thousand data points a minute, and he got a new call. While we looked the data, all of our executives were reaching resonant frequency of point one, which is synonymous with monk like meditation within one minute. So your experiences executives both to be you're noticing your body and your brain is being trained in an exceptional high level to reduce the sympathetic noises. Raise a pairs of possessing thick really quickly. So you're. Experience personally is par with everybody else's. It's funny to hear. So here we are. We have this technology, and we know that what it can do, but we have to prove this, and so we're seeking a patent for the world's only technology clinically proven to lower stress and improves quality without drug. So anyone listening if you're in patent law, you've gone through the patent process, you can imagine when you ask for the moon, it's going to take a while to five years to execute this patent into to do, so we literally went out and worked with the best in the world for our very ability. So for those listeners view Ben, who's interested in our very ability, the research, we have will blow your mind for two reasons. One, we're using the world for Nahra very ability under CK paying all the mathematics out there the multi scale and to be mathematical model. The Hilbert transform algorithm. All the mathematics, every our HR V device is Dr pangs. He owns the entire mathematical spectrum of HR bake. So what we did man was. We captured data two different groups one stayed for metastatic cancer to professional athletic team. That was our research population. You learn most the extremes. So we went for the people who are, I think the sickest people on the planet, dying from metastatic state for cancer and consume of fear. Can't turn their sympathetic nervous system off and professional athletes, typically high level butter, always under a lot of stress jet lag Petillo cetera. We use that single easy G device capturing all that data. The research was really simple. Five minutes before you put the easy G device on wouldn't do anything, then you do Newcomb you have the device on the whole time than after new Komeito way for five minutes you take advice off. We download the data Senate to Chongqing Pang in. He would use the non linear transform algorithm. Developed by Norton doing at NASA to spit out the most sensitive anchor report of your HR V on planet, and I don't know. If I've sent you data. But I will you will see h f l f ratios you'll see the simple ratio. But most importantly, you're gonna see this within five minutes, you're taking that person's LF these stress response number and you're lowering that while you're raising the HF. So you're, so you're seeing in terms of l f h f ratios you're seeing a drop in l f h f ratios as the h f the Paris pathetic nervous system. Score would be increasing in L F. The sympathetic nervous system. Scored be decreasing and you're seeing that within five minutes. Correct. Reason research was published in the annals of depression, anxiety, Australia, Conti another statistical biophysicist studied one hundred patients that had been hospitalized with depression anxiety. The conclusion beyond powerful. It shows that the typical elephant ratio, which is sympathetic on top of the was four point eight so four hundred eighty times, you know. You know, sympathetic over pairs with new calm when they were done. It was one is equal five hundred percent increase, so we know without a shadow of a doubt. So the listeners here, everybody intuitively, even if you have an IQ in any curiosity when you hear about new Komen variable, you're gonna be like the sounded good to be true. Allison, same way nine and a half years ago. I was the same way. But when you work with the best, scientists in the world, and they design any study, they want, if fifty two doctors on your medical advisory board, if the only patents in the world, you're FDA cleared your proved by Health Canada. You're innocent defy for sport in your poop Anez military, we've done all the hard work. This is not a gimmick. This isn't an off the shelf type technology. This is a hard core. Neuro science company that's pushing through lower your stress improve your response. So the para sympathetic, which you loaded to that is pivotal to our health. If you look at the research from Stanford as ninety percent of all disease. Is created by stress or Harvard Medical schools as ninety five percent diseases created by stress people intuitively understand that, but no one really knows why. And there's two blind spots human condition really quite plaguing. All of us, number one, we can't understand the intangible. Yes, you understand that when you're stressed out, you're not psychologically, emotionally physically, performing at your best. You're not patient, not the best dad. Not the best son or not the best love. You're not the best business person. You know that intuitively, but you don't really know what's going on inside a level. The second thing that plagues us in our blinds. Bide our time horizon. You would never pick up a cigarette. If you knew that it's going to result in cancer, but it's so far down the future. You'd never go lie. The sun this summer if you knew Milam was gonna kill you, but it's too far in the future. So if you're thirty forty years old, he's a hey, stress is gonna kill you. You don't care 'cause he can't understand long-term time horizons will it simple. Stress kills you very. Simply and it's over the course of time. What happens is, when you are high stress poor sleep poor sleep, tightropes, four sleet, which is most humans typical cycle. You're not getting your brain wave function into fada, and you're gliding to quickly through the second stage of sleep. And remember earlier, I said, fate is the only time yourselves clean their toxins and do their maintenance. So over the course of time on fifty years old, I notice inflammation in areas that I had wounds or injuries growing up. I noticed that I'm not as fast to do things. What happens is your cells. Don't understand their job. Any more the best way to articulate the breakdown on site or level in how diseases created by stress is cancer. We all have cancer cells right now. You have cancer yourselves today at cancer in my body's, well, yeah, a lot of people don't realize that, by the way, that, that everybody has cancer, technically everybody, but you have killer cells in your body near killer cells have expressed message expressed. Work is what they do. They go locate the cancer cells they introduce themselves and they kill them. That's their job. So how does e start? Well, over the course of time when your body doesn't get the minded kind of the energy source or cleaners toxins, they get filled with debris. They start to forget what their job is. So over the course of time say, you're fifty one fifty two EPA genetically predisposed to cancer. The cancer cells are proliferating your killer cells, go to the party. Guess what? They say. Hey, this part is kind of fun. They forgot their job at you develop cancer. That's how stress kills us when I lecture all over the world, I start by saying, hey everybody, in this room is going to die from stress. That's our reality, unless you're lucky enough to dine an accident. The key here is balanced. The nervous system is zero sum game, and most of us are not getting enough parasitic nervous dominance. Newcomb is incredible. Facilitator. I work with some of the six people on the planet gives me probably the best reward because Newcombe doesn't take any effort. And you know this from using it, then you just lie on your bed. But the cream on the stand the mask, and a headphone and off you go within a few minutes. You're in Thane of brainwave functions. Being a monk, but physio logically, the benefit of this is really simple. We are activating your Vegas nerve, which is the communication pathway of the nervous system. We are slowing down your respiration rate to one breath, every ten seconds. So six breaths, a minute. We are synchronizing your heart with your lungs, and you are fully auditing your body's absorbing much oxygen as humanly possible. So Ben your high performing athlete demand, a lot of yourself physically. So when you do comb, after you work out, you're getting the benefit of oxygenated, red blood cells pushing lactic acid on reducing information so physically feel loose, but at the mental clarity that so powerful you getting on. Red blood flow to the hippocampus, prefrontal, cortex frontal cortex. So when you're done new combing, you have a presence of mind, you've focus, you're not used to simply because they're oxygen Ridgewood blood cells in your cognition, in your frontal, lobe, basically, allowing you to create new neurons. Coherence baths, the benefit of Paris that nervousness, dominance in there in the right place to the blood, because, you know, one of the things with excess sympathetic fight or flight response. Is that you're going to get, you know, cortisol adrenaline, and few other stress and wakefulness activity hormones in or transmitters released. And that does cause Vasil constriction, particularly to visceral tissue and visceral organs, right, like the kidneys and the liver and the stomach, and the intestines and the colon in the appendix. And because those responsible for not only recovery, but also food, and nutrient absorption, and excretion and detoxification and production of. Of, of particularly, you know, in the case of something like, you know, bone marrow the mobilization of stem cells. For example, anytime blood because of cortisol and adrenaline is rushing to the tissues of the arms and the legs, the visceral organs suffer in so long term suffering, the visceral organs do para sympathetic down regulation, or sympathetic up regulation can affect wear any any of those nutrients that you're working so hard to say, get from your diet are actually deliver nothing. That's something that flies under the radar as well. Is anytime that you can check out an improved blood flow to visceral organs even for short period of time. You're activating a recovery sponsor that is pretty dang profound. So we work with the worldly warriors for the United States military, and don't work with them because they're into relaxation. Transcendental meditation meditating, like a monk, it's quite quite laughable. We were. Then because they are interested in expedite recovery without drugs. They're interested in their soldiers operators being able to recover restored by ridiculous conditions jet lag mount nourishment in operating time zones. And that's exactly what we're doing. The predictability of new Goma think will always be really probably one of the wonders of this technology. I look at those elements cream stem, the headphone in the eye masses. Have the hell does that do this in you probably think the same thing? It's absolutely amazing. The engineering, the meticulous design of new comas is mind boggling, but the key here is simple. We are coming into your brain body in. We're imposing our will in a nice manner simply to take the foot off the accelerator. And you know, your listeners and everybody else that electoral round the world way of we have to wake up, you can make the argument that stress is the biggest challenge that we face today, whether it's our. Planet with our pets whether it's our family or community. We are suffering the fate of racing towards what end in a when's the last time he went to sleep in new head your to do list. Done was less time you weren't listing in the middle of night, when you got up to urinate, we have to slow down. You have to stop. And at some point, you have to say, wait a second. I need some balance in my life for new calm, you know, thirty minutes is one forty eighth of the day, and it took me as a CEO of this company, over seven most realize, wait a second. If I invest thirty minutes, each day, it repays, we with twelve to fifteen hours of high officiant, focused work now enough. The automatic nervous system. Governs human fear stressing Zion depression, new combs, patent. Listen, closely is systems and methods for balancing, and maintaining the health of the human automatic Nommik nervous system, literally, the key to managing human fierce dressings, I depression over the course of. Ben which you're gonna start noticing. Is that little itty bitty shitty committee in the back of your head that tells you, you're not good enough insecure? You're not gonna do this. You're not gonna do that. It goes away simply by blood flow to the middle in the access all things that are in your reptilian lizard, brain, which is forty million years in development. So think about the difference of forty minute million-year-old reptilian, brain designed for fight or flight and survival versus a four million dollar develop prefrontal cortex challenge. We face this technology comes as listen in running from a sabertooth tiger anymore. So why are you constantly in the fight or flight cortisol moat? That's the power of the technology. So if I could just wanna share with you, some of the people that we work with, with new comb to showcase that stress does not discriminate. Yes. We were with highly disease individuals that have chronic ailment in, you know, when you're when you're diagnosed with cancer, and it stays here, stage four I can't express. But I'm sure everyone listener. Hair has someone in their family, who's had cancer, the fear that the listened from that diagnosis, then combined with the confusion of trying to go through the medical establishment figure, how do I solve this, and what how did I get it? What went wrong? It literally consumes you. And if you can never relax, you can't get restorative sleep. If you can't get restored asleep yourselves, don't clean their toxins? You don't heal your immune system. Gets compromised and you die faster. Literally, you're stressing out to death. It's, it's terrible. It's terrible Ernie. When your body needs to sleep, the most, you can't get so, yes, we come in when I work with stage four cancer. New lot world with the conference of cancer wellness programs on Hippocrates health as to without dramatic, Dr Michael Gallagher. I said, I'm not here to cure your cancer. That'd be hyperbole. But wins the last time you had one minute of peace of mind, when's the last time he felt at ease, when's the last time you had a good night's sleep. So what we do. As we provide the gift of relaxation restoration, recovery in guess what that does banned it allows their immune system to strengthen and the opportunity to fight. So we work with multiple sclerosis Alzheimer's, Parkinson's ale, less addiction, all were doing is we're not coming to cure disease, but every disease out there is Canalis exacerbated by stress and all the symptoms are exacerbated by stress. So imagine if you take stress the equation, you improve quality life period, on the other continuum we work with elite military, literally, helping our soldiers in the field acclimate to tough conditions in recover expedited -ly without drugs. We also work with forty two professional sports teams. Same type of angle allow these kids to relieve lactic acid mation physically, but mentally clean the slate. Mike Ascii the trainer for the Chicago. Blackhawks great quote. He said, we want to players to play intense not tents and it's tough say you're goalie. Give know overtime goal. And it's a six game of the playoffs and Stanley Cup. You're gonna ruminate over that Newcomb allows you to come in said, now you're not going to today's new day of perform better. So we work across the gamut of human condition. So three years ago, thinking to myself, who can we help 'cause they're seven point six billion people's dresses, affecting all of us thought we probably can't help monks so being intellegent curious as a lot of this with monks. So we head out in to Los Angeles. And we've start working monks. So at train them on new goal. I come back out to later fully expected to say, hey, thanks, but no, thanks got thinking Newcombe. And they say we love it. Why would you love new call? 'cause we're human Jim yet. We've meditated for hundred thousand hours. Okay. It is our life. We're good at it. But every time we go to meditate we go through checklists we go through 'isolation. We. Oh through boredom. And what we find with Newcomb. Is it exceleron us into this creative zone that allows us to do our best meditation works? I remember stepping out of that meeting in calling my executive teams and guess what guys were chilling out monks. Okay. It's insane. Everybody has stressed everybody deals with a certain manner couple years ago. Ben a book was authored by Dr Michael Galit's. He's leading energy experts in energy doctors in the world out of California. And he wrote the book on the g the invention in the path of new calm and also the biology of addiction. And so the book is author. I call Tony Robbins. A friend of mine is Tony will you write the forward of this book? So he writes the forward, and I call Craig Marshall yoga among the train the Beatles meditation. Is it would you the preface? How many books up there on technology have a gladiator nuclear reactor in the form of Tony Robbins, writing one, you know, example of how this imposes life and. The other side, a monk whose meditated one hundred thousand hours. That's the dynamics of what technology can do. And we're really just getting started the company seventeen years old. We've been commercialized for nine years, but we're bringing to market this county. Consumer version is going to be more affordable easier to us so that we can create ubiquitous use of new comb and the goal here. Simple Chenab ounce of energy on this planet from negative to positive and relinquished people's fear stressing Zaid that hold them hostage not allow them to achieve the success they want, and they don't know any better. Very few of us are gonna take time and effort to become Yogi masters. Taichi masters meditation masters. This technology is a shortcut, have you guys ever ever done any? Just just back briefly to the science, particularly in the nervous system. Have you looked at at anything else related to pair sympathetic activation that goes beyond HR V, like anything, such as a blood pressure, or I know there's a measurement like a the blood volume pulse, or the measurement of visas, destruction or particular of few, the others, I was curious about was anything related to neuro transmitter measurements, whether or not you've measured what's occurring in terms of either urinary or any other measurement of neurotransmitters before after the use of the new comb? And then finally not to throw too much at you with one question, but I know that the, the actual Vegas nerve. And the Vegas nerve tone can be approximated, or measured by looking at respond. Tori sinus, arrhythmia patterns, or our essay patterns, have you looked into anything else aside from the HR, V response. Particularly when it comes to some of those other things if the absolute so, we will do the research Leon, we are looking at twenty seven discrete biophysical measures using quantitative E, G, E, G respiratory red Mia, neurotransmitter panel testing cortisol before. And after all of it HR V was the most fiscal most powerful and using the most sophisticated mathematical models in the world became the most sensitive accurate. But we have for you listeners if you're interested, we have a significant amount of research compiled in twenty four base document that showcases all the biophysical measure. So, yes, we're improving respiratory sinus rhythm, which, as you know, is related to HR bake. Right. So be today is now the gold standard of measuring human stress response. Historically used to be Gump in it's imagined electoral freezes. So the skin, right? That's the technology ally detector, so yes, we've done all of those measures. It's very simple that the predictable outcome is always the same. I mean, it's, it's a tremendous honor to lead his enterprise to bring to the plan. Something that so pointed to necessary in our time. But the you can imagine the confidence, I have we will or with anybody of your military doctor dodger at Harvard doesn't matter. I. Here's the worst design, whatever you belong to me. Thanks in that document. We also have FM awry, which is finite element method Emory, and it showcases alive. Brain, new goal, which is absolutely fascinating. You can see the stimulation area of the of the mid brain, mostly the make delinea- axis. So we worked with Marin Biggs and one of the world's leading experts on trans cranial director stimulation than he didn't finite element. Method MRI on a live, brain so person using new calm showcasing that the intensity being read as density. You can see the intensity of the middle in the age access the HP access is the mid brain element of our drain owes hypothermic gland, during a cortex. It's access. It's a one way access your found this thermostat of the body, and it regulator sympathetic comparison and you can also see where the brain in the brain stem is where the biggest nerve innovates goes all the way down through visceral organs to your feet, but you can see fully active. Stimulated. So there's a million different ways to look at what this does. And how it does I think one of the key elements to this, and why we have the only Patton in the world when you get stimulation device has been all these stimulation device, whether it's Fisher Wallis Elvis, Tim focus doesn't matter. It is stimulation is neuro feedback. If you look at just a supplement your doing itself, new comas floors, I can see in the landscape is the only technology that combines biochemistry in the form of Gabba and stimulation device to catalyze Gabba so that we slow down your dreams. Guess what when your body is unable to resist. The physics will take hold a manner that you can't get out of early on. I think in two thousand ten I was doing a lecture at the Royal College of physicians in London. And you know, speaking quickly and I speak in accent English accent American English accent, I probably speak to many fifty cent words when I'm doing a neuro science lecture to doctors, and I was losing my audience, and I just stopped, and I spread my arms over my head, and it kinda the Morgan Mindy. Nano nano. And I literally yelled out to the resistance is futile we know or taking your brain. And if you have a heart that works lungs at work in ears at work, the same thing's going to happen to as the other millions of people that abuse new call. It's that predictable. Now, I want to ask you few kind of practical questions about the use of this thing that, that I've been wondering about a few these, you've been kind enough to answer for me. And then a few questions about, for example. If this thing, actually simulates, a sleep cycle, the twenty minute power nap setting on the app, then would you not want to use it prior to night of sleep, or for example, during sleep and instead use at a different time of day, like, for example, if I use this as I'm falling asleep, and go through a full sleep cycles, a house, somehow going to mess up my sleep architecture from using it sate fall asleep faster, safe, I wake up two or three AM, and one easy to fall back asleep is, you don't would never take power nap before the onset of sleep. So we recommend people. You know, if you have a normal bedtime nine ten don't do comb after seven o'clock at night, because the last thing you would wanna do is take a four five hour power nap. What's gonna happen is you're gonna have the most productive evening of your life. And no one to share it with so, yeah, that's absolute now, you're young and you're not in a place of chronic sleep issues, but we do have an older audience a lot of doctors around the country and we have a fifty minute rule. So a lot of our doctors have new comb at their bedside, if they wake up at three in the morning to pay, and then they can't get back to bed and the precipitating over solving world, hunger, whatever's staying on their brain the fifteen minutes, and then they'll just put the Nuku saw Ron. They won't is the cream they're always a stem. They'll use it as an aide to get back to sleep in Bourboule. Fullback asleep. Typically for new com we recommend the best sweet spot for using new comb is between one and four. When your body's natural bio, take a nap. Now us high performing Americans, we don't think about that. We don't listen to her body. What we do we? Go to Starbucks and get a triple shot of Espresso, drink, red bull or five hundred thinking, hey, I'm just gonna run through walls. That's not what you body needs. Listen to your potty, you body actually could really benefit from the twenty minute power nap, which is a quilt into two hours per store to sleep in the middle of day. Now most of the don't get that opportunity. So I'm gonna be in San Diego this week. And I've got five you know, high octane days every day, probably sixteen to eighteen hour workdays. Okay, great. I will get up thirty minutes. Early events vibe good before thirty. I'll go to the bathroom get back in bed. I'll get on new gome. I local that deep because my cortisol levels are the highest in the morning to wake me up, but I will get in my twenty to thirty minutes. New comb now, I wanna make this very clear, you, your body cannot make up sleep debt. Now bio chemistry physics may be able to there's still not enough known in the signs of sleep to really understand sleep architecture. But it seems that through our research that twenty minutes is two our sorta sleep. However, this is not a tool that you would use to sleep less. We have a lot of high performance out there that quickly deductive -ly use the mad. They holy shit. I sleep less and just use this now. That's not true. Visiting twin rows. Hey, you need to sleep. Simple, mathematics, you live to be a hundred years old. You should sleep for thirty three years. That's how important sleep. I'm gonna push back for a second because I don't quite understand. You know, my, my ammo for much of my life is I don't sleep eight to nine hours a night. I instead sleep somewhere in the realm of about seven to seven and a half most nights, and then I take brief nap in the afternoon usually after lunch or often on airplanes, squeezing the nap on the airplane or slow. Slip into my hotel room at a conference and for any of those scenarios. Because it's very convenient. I've simply been opting to use. The twenty minute power nap setting on the new calm, a based on the research. You've shared with me about its simulation of sleep cycles on approximation of some of the same para sympathetic nervous system benefits, it will give you that, that, replicate what you'd be getting during sleep, but also because I feel actually even better than if I take a standard traditional nap and actually fall asleep. So, you know, for someone for someone who's getting like seven seven hours of sleep, and then, like me is kind of replacing that other hour of sleep or supposed to be getting with a quick, you know, twenty thirty minutes max nap in the middle of the day, couldn't I couldn't I still say, well, I'm sleeping less, but still getting the benefits of, in, you know, eight to nine hours of sleep. You can do. In doing exactly what you should do. So what I'm caution people to do is don't sleep for four hours in new comb for our doubts bake the cake in, you know, how people are always looking for shortcuts, you're doing exactly what you should do. The reason that you feel better, when you slip in your hotel and conference do twenty minute power nap when you slip into a nap if you're able to nap during the day, you're going into delta, Newcomb doesn't like going to delta, nukem keeps you in Thane, which remember is the healing zone with maximum oxygenation. So that's how we get that exponential. Use of twenty minutes two hours of sleep because you're not going through the full sleep architecture of delta or your body's restoring. Okay. That, that makes sense. So that's, that's also why then I'm not groggy after I turn it off because I'm not getting into delta because like like you mentioned it works pretty well pre-exercise, and if I actually fall asleep during nap, then get up to exercise my first twenty minutes of the exercise session. I feel like I'm warming up like yesterday. Day. My dad came up to visit, and we wanted to spend some time together. It's been a while since we had a chance to hang out, and he texted me at about two forty five in the afternoon. He said, you know, I'm gonna be there right around four and I actually really wanted to squeeze in my workout session before. I, I hung out with my dad the rest of the evening. So I went upstairs about two fifty turn turn the Newcomb off. Did my twenty minute session then went out to the gym and did my forty minute workout inches squeezed all that into the span of about an hour, but literally walked from the bedroom to the gym and launched right into burpee and, and from what it sounds like you're saying the reason I'm able to do that, and get the benefits of the nap without being so drowsy, outdoors, I got a warm up forever, even to a workout is because I'm not getting into delta sleep with the use of the Newcomb or delta. Right. Okay. You will never you should never get from new comb feeling groggy. And if you do, and some people may it simply means you needed more new call your body's physically exhausted to enact cream that Gabba cream, it's kind of out of your system by that point. So the Gabba crews fascinate your body's going to accept it, a once in, you're gonna excrete the rest. So here's one of the cool things about new Coleman. White, the sleep quality is improved your body relies on Gabba one of the key nutrients received. In fact, it's designed to turn off your brain at night and helping the onset asleep. Most of us are gab deficient, whether summer foods apply or too stressed out. So a new calm during the day, say at one o'clock in the afternoon, there's enough gab left in your brain that hasn't been used up at night when you're buys preparing for sleep. And it's creating melatonin activates serotonin and looking for Gabba. There's plenty of Gabba leftover. That's what helps the onset of sleep improves sleep quality at some point Benue probably gonna notice that you're starting to dream again. Like when you were a kid because over the course of time and retraining, your brain were teaching your brain, body, relax, how to prepare for sleep. But we're also given the, the nutrients of given me new patera Gasset, which is a key. Inhibitory neurotransmitter for sleep most of us with onset asleep issues or wake up in the Milan can't get back to sleep is directly correlated to Gabba deficiency. Okay. Got it. All right. That makes sense. Another question that I wanted to ask you was, I noticed the device itself. The little hand held controller that the electrodes attached to it has the ability, although the instructions that come with the new comb say, you don't do anything just flip it on. Let it go. But, you know, me being the curious inquisitive personnel notice that are also up and down EROs on the device, and that by pushing the up or repeatedly, I could Jack up the level of the. Electrical stimulation and I'm curious if that is a modifiable factor that the user could toil round with do you get any increased efficacy. Or is there any danger to bring thing up level 'cause 'cause you, you, you mentioned to me, I think at one point when we were talking on the phone. Hey, be careful you might get dizzy, yada, yada, yada. But I actually have multiple times use it a pretty high level. And I can't say I notice profound differences between a high level and a low level of cranial, electrical stimulation, but I'm also curious whether or not I'm just like, you know, effing myself I'm gonna forget third grade. Math here at some point. You're not you're gonna laugh 'cause you're definitely intellectually curious in new, probably one of the reasons why we went our latest version has no dials. It's got no screen. It's on or off. We've had people like me. Exa- rule breakers a lot of folk, I did hold lecture tour in Russia and they're just inherently inquisitive, Jack it up to zero point nine or one point zero you can only absorb so much Gabba McKay. So remember this zero point five hurts and is designed to electoral for a cell, all membrane in open up together, sceptre site. So when you Jack up the intensity of the yesterday's, you're not going to see much difference because you're only going to get as much as your body can absorb on the Gabba. However, there are other elements to it. Deadly be's bagel stimulation, we had a gastroenterologist call me up as it. Hey, I jacked up by itself, sitting on his bed till zero point seven was hallucinating. I have no idea what you're doing. Why even do that? We have also had some people that, like point nine or one, experience headache. Now, personally for me. I love to be a Guinea pig as well. I jacked it up to zero point eight and was definitely feeling little woozy, but no. So. Today and event probably for the last six months of you buy new comb. There is no dial is no way to Jacob intensity. But it is there in your device. It is there in thousands of people's devices. It's really just exploratory. There's nothing you can't hurt yourself from it'll just be an experiential thing that you could get dizzy could have a headache. But it's not gonna improve the efficacy too much. Okay. Got another question on the app itself. I ninety nine percent of the time. Used this twenty minute power nap setting just because it's so fricking convenient, and it works for me, but they're also thirty to fifty minute sessions, such as relax, and recovery kind of these mixes of synthesizers, and strings piano, and guitar, and I miss her those a little bit. I really don't get the same affects out of them, but I'm curious for the relax -ation in the recovery tracks. What is the attended purpose of? Those, you're, you're awesome. I'm really enjoying your intellectual curiosity. Nira. You're definitely a high performer, okay? What I would like you to do for the next week or two is us recovery to you're kind of taking a shortcut recovering recovery taking shortcut using the twenty minute power nap and I know why you're using it one convenience twenty minutes, one seventy second of the day as opposed to one forty eighth of the get that you're also using it, because there's a fourteen hurt syncing motor, the MAC vacation physics frequency in that file this different than the new cone files were adding some of the ignite warrior brain in there. So you're getting extra bump of enthusiasm, focus when you get up recovery too. When we went to our son engineer dance leans a world renowned music producer. He's also nice for medical hypnosis programming. Just a brilliant, engineer. I said to him, I want you to make a track for stage four cancer. I want you to make. Track for the highest profile humans that we work with so recovery too is designed for the ultimate in restoration recovery. Now, you're hearing synthesizer hearing by mental sounds, you have no idea the complexity that goes into this. The process is really fascinating, Dr Holly invinci- physics physics Souness will. And there's a mathematical matrix to it. Marketed. There you go. It'd be really annoying to listen to that. So I sent to dance lean a mathematical matrix at, at one minute, twelve seconds. The frequency is eleven herds and pitches. One sixty nine it's all mathematics, then he brings in composers from around the world they compose music. That's congruent with the mathematics at every time signature is literally brain surgery. Because if you build music that has a different frequency from the physics, you're literally, interrupting the ability of new home to basil effective. So it's an incredible architecture. He is an incredible wizard and in music. So the environmental sounds that you hear in the new congress software. You've never heard before. I know this because he's using three D hall phonic microphone and placing it in certain areas like afford Texans zone for the status or a Big Sur at sunrise. So we're putting in all these different elements because we. Have to keep the brain in trained in your brain is so smart early on the first few tracks. We only did about fifteen minutes of music and melody before we move into environmental, because we felt the brain when fatigue, get distracted and bored. So when you're listening to recovery to you're going to hear kind of a Pink Floyd esque type of music, the issue -tations, I should from a guitar player out of India. And then you're gonna hear ocean sounds Kawai a Hawaii, and it's an incredible mix. But that's the strongest restored attract. So I almost every day when I don't have time I the twenty minute power nap, but I want you to try recovery too so recovery in relax tracks, are the most powerful the earlier tracks earlier physics nukem one point. Oh, are the guitar spa, string and piano, those I never use anymore because Newcombe two point always released in two thousand sixteen in physics profoundly better, the try recovery to for a week. Or two. And you're gonna notice a difference. You notice the longevity of that kind of focus in presence in your sleep quality is going to improve using that as opposed to twenty minute Powernet. Okay. Got it. So us recovery too. That's I'm writing that down. That's the one I'll I'll try next on the app. You also briefly mentioned ignite and you sent me access to the ignorant at about a month ago in a slate around, if they'd a little bit, and it's kind of complete up of new calm. It's like since aesthetic nervous system activates on steroid. You've got like Tony Robbins voice in there. You've got all this crazy music is that pretty much. Did you pretty much take the technologies new calm and, and just reverse engineered that to get sympathetic stimulation or what's the idea behind ignite? That's exactly what we did. So the new Gomes's pendant. Okay. But the methods used Dr Holloway to create the physics. Patented and we were very wise when we did the patent we simply said using this type of technology and physics mathematics. We're going to elicit physiological outcome. We didn't define without come was so few years ago, professional soccer team came to us and said, hey, we love new call to open our players cover. They're staying on a pitch longer. Healing from injuries faster. They're not jetlagged. We love it. But can you make something that gets players jacked up to get on the pitch? And I said we can do anything. So it contacted Dr Holloway today this over thinking about doing can you do this, it took about six or seven months. And we got the physics file, which we call ignite warrior brain now, the physics of this is the same intriguing properties is just the outcome is different. So we're starting. You had fifteen heard, which is beta focus in over the course of that twelve minutes and forty eight seconds. We are jacking your brainwave function up to thirty nine Hertz, which is higher consciousness, but really listening dopamine when we say. We are preparing you for battle. We mean and the power of this is mind. Boggling, to me. You don't need the I mass. You don't need the cream. You don't need the stimulation you just need a pair of headphones. And within a few minutes, you notice your fracturing increase, you notice, peripheral vision, increase, you notice blood flow to your Musk's activating, your sensory motor rhythm. Listen dopamine w was if you wanna throw punch of grandma, listen to this file, because it will prepare you to fight. So what we see Ben is most of our users get up in the morning. They use new call to restore and create whatever, you know, jet lag or sleep deficiency. They had they get the restoration they need, then they listen to ignite once or twice through, they stop drinking coffee. They use this as the catalyst, they also use it for the professional athlete. Use it before. And during periods of games and then, and they also use it during a workout. So that's why I was asking earlier. Hey, do use during workout when you use during a workout, you're. Into increasing Durance Andrew strength and its formidable. And it's quantifiable. It's rather mazing. So here's what's cool about new coal. We have this device in new call that's commercial, and you can buy today, and it's going to help resolve stress in sleep quality. Great with drugs. But we also have night, worry brain ignite warrior brain is noncommercial app now we've never commercialized it, and it's all done through in India, and it's a privately, held confidential app, but in the future, we will bring to market. We also have a transcendental meditation file. We have a focus file so rebuilding a whole catalogue in whole portfolio of fizzy, logical outcomes in different tracks, so that you can get up. Hey today on feel they're thinking about gratitude or today. I wanna think about meditation or today. I wanna focus or today. I wanna work hard in using night. That's what we're working on a dig it. Very cool. Well, I, I know we're getting a little long in the tooth and. I wanna make sure that people know where they can get this, you alluded to the price earlier, it's a close to five thousand dollars, so it's on device, but, you know, like, I mentioned, I toy round the ton of these things, I've got the Fisher Wallis circadian. I have the David delight mind. Life pro. I've got the brain tap. I've toyed around with all of them, and I'm not just saying this to blow smoke. Jim nothing works as well as the new calm. And so there's, there's probably reason the price tag is as high as it is. I do have a five hundred dollar discount code on it. That I'll give to those of you listening in it's just Ben five hundred. You can use that over on the Newcomb website. You just go to Ben greenfield thinnest dot com slash new calm, Ben greenfield finished dot com slash and you calm and you'll get five hundred dollars off with the code Ben five hundred for me the way I always think of sleep is a good solid night of sleep for. Me related to my productivity. The next day is worth somewhere in the realm of about twenty bucks. And so, because of that, you know, if I if I'm looking at the price of sleep enhancing, or relaxing, enhancing device, you know, something like this, for example, I would say, okay, so at a at a price point of five thousand dollars, you know, something like this would would likely pay off for me in terms of enhancing sleep over the course of around a around a year. So in, in so I always look at things in terms of investment, my health investment, my sleep, and I'm not trying to just up sell this guy's in turn this into a big commercial, but I do, really, really liked the device and anytime I dig something this much, I like to share with you. Also like to get a discount code for you. So it's been five hundred. You can use over at Ben greenfield fence dot com slash new. Calm. I will also for everything Jim and I have been. Talking about we'll put a link to the show notes or in the show notes and more permission the show notes and the show notes read been greenfield fitness dot com slash new podcast. That's been Greenville, finished dot com slash in you comb podcast. Jim not only am I looking forward immensely to opening up my new calm in my ignite apps and seeing what crazy new tracks, you add in there, because it seems like every time I tune store updates. There's, there's some new for me to check out, but I also want to thank you, not only for creating this device that has been a game changer for me with my hectic travel, schedule and conferencing, schedule. But also, thank you for devoting the time coming on the show today. I just wanna say one thing you get what you pay for. I understand for the other six hundred ninety five dollars a lot of money. We give work with a lot of people with scotteri wealth. I get that, but five invest in your health is worth. You're paying for twenty. Years of research, and development, you're paying for regulatory all that stuff if for those center nine five dollars too much and you live in New York, there's a place called recover. It's thirty if in seventh Nunez's regarding they charged forty five dollars for thirty minutes, new home. They're acceptable what they do. Josh hall enough four thirty two house. He's on sixth avenue. Same thing we seem to see proliferation of these types of places opening up, and it's all about recover. I think there's a mindset ban, where people are starting to understand he can't just push push push push push there has to be recovery involves. So we're seeing proliferation of these types of organizations growing, in recovers in New York for thirty two houses in New York, and I'm sure we're gonna see a proliferation of these at least in California in Texas, and Florida and the east coast smile in the United States, but recovery is becoming a forefront understanding of had a perform, and you're right, invest thirty minutes in a repair you twelve to thirteen hours. Of incredible, high efficiency, I think even more important than that. When I reflect on the man, I was ten years ago, I didn't have the patience. I have today. I didn't have the presence today. I wasn't a better father than I am today. It wasn't a better human being than am today. I had expectation I had its ecurity had all these things that plagued, you know, most of us for most of her life, I don't have that anymore, so I don't suffer that fate anymore. Love the human being that ham, and I can be president. I can help people like Ben reaches out to me, say. What about this? What about that? I love what I do and we're here to change the world. So thank you very much for this paternity bent. I really appreciate it. Awesome. Man. Thanks for coming on off to check out that place recover in New York to knows you guys were at paleo affects as well. You had some, some stations apparently effects in the room and. Yeah, cool dig it. Okay. So show notes Bengals finished dot com slash and you calm podcast if you want to Newcomb for yourself. Go to bend, greenfield finished dot com slash in you calm as a new comb use code Ben five hundred hundred bucks off, Jim. Okay, on the flip side. Man, take care. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben greenfield fitness dot com, along with plenty of other goodies from me, including the highly helpful, Ben recommends page, which is list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion, fat loss performance. Plenty more. Please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this, an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that Nabil's me to keep bringing you this content every single week. So when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes use the promo code, generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

Newcomb Ben cancer FDA sympathetic nervous system Ben greenfield Don Holloway Paris cortisol Jim pool EPA kion Hoshi Whoo
Dr. Matt Cook & Ben Greenfield Get Put In The Hotseat: Favorite Books, Best Anti-Stress Tactics, Pig-Based Nootropics, Best Billboard Advice & Much More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:00 sec | Last month

Dr. Matt Cook & Ben Greenfield Get Put In The Hotseat: Favorite Books, Best Anti-Stress Tactics, Pig-Based Nootropics, Best Billboard Advice & Much More!

"On. This episode of the Ben Greenfield Fitness podcast be happy be nice. Just y'all I promise it'll change your life to to these are all spiritual beings, all those people and you never actually just meet an ordinary person. They're all very like I said, they're spirit wants in everyone's important. Everybody needs some kind of interaction that lifts them up, builds them up. Why are you letting the absence of the ability to be able to step foot into a sterilized treadmill Laden Dumbbell rack equipped health club keep you from staying fit. So then we'll all look back a hundred years from now and go man that was like the greatest thing ever remember before twenty twenty how much everything sucked. Performance attrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more. My name is Ben Greenfield. Welcome to the show. All Right, I had the pleasure today the speaking with multiple time repeat podcast gas. I'm going to keep them secret. This is six appearance on the show. This was a very unique episode though because it was pretty much us. Getting interviewed by my wife and and and someone who works with him who also meet during the episode. Her name is barb and we had a ton of fun with this very informal casual, yet educational Q. and A. Episode recorded at my kitchen table. Also at my kitchen table as we recording this episode was coffee because we're all a fan of coffee we just at Kion. Decoded unique chemical free process that uses pure mountain water called mountain water process. So we had all the original components elements of the flavor of our full on delicious aromatic organic specialty, grade, Mold, free, delicious coffee, but we got the caffeine out of it. So if you'd like to switch to caffeine or I'm sorry to switch a DECAF every once in a while you're boarding caffeine you WanNa do a little caffeine detox. You just want delicious coffee that you can drink anytime of day including say after dinner with little coconut ice cream definitely grab some kion decaf I'm gonNA. Hook. You Up with a twenty percent discount on this new DECAF coffee that is flying off the shelves if any available still use your user coupon code here you go. Bg F Zero Begs you twenty percent off the brand new KION COFFEE AT KION DOT COM get K. I. O. N. Dot Com massive twenty percent off your first order use code BG F two, zero at get kion dot com brand new DECAF is here baby. This podcast is also brought to you by the wonderful organic by Gold Pumpkin Spice, which gives you all the wonderful aromatic flavors of a pumpkin spice Latte. Right. In your own kitchen with no sugar, all the superfood benefits it's got powerful antioxidants as Turkey tail it's got organic tumor. It's got immune-boosting mushrooms like Rishi and it tastes not like a Giant Cup of medicine actually takes a really really good. It's perfect for the upcoming holiday season to satisfy those seasonal cravings just in time for fall my friend can only who has been on this podcast before is committed to all organic super high quality ingredients. Here's a sacrifice on quality with anything. So this organic by Gold Pumpkin spice is going to spice up your fall and put a big smile on your face every time you brew it up. I like to mix mouth little coconut milk. For it yeah, you're missing out baby organic dot com slash. Ben, gets you twenty percent off though. So you don't have to miss out organic by with an I dot com slash Ben Twenty percent off on the Gold Pumpkin. Spice. The that was like my favorites sites on we were actually recording this podcast episode has begun house everybody's date going by the way. Before introduce each of you. Amazing. Yeah. His son is at Red Lights Little crispy near. Halls coming. Matt. Dr, Matthew Cook Welcome to the podcast. It's awesome. What have you done to optimize day thus far appeared to Greenfield cop out. The. Best I woke up and I did the bio charger who between man. Wall standing on the machine. And Then Did red light. And the basic. Called plunge. A yogurt to Yoga retreat routine I can't speak. Now early and we did workout I did how much much peptides that did some other injections? Drake. Several amazing amazing cups of coffee. Did you poop? Because it's a lot of stuff to do without pooping yet I posed three times. This check in tiny. was like. A little bit of an albeit Justin levels a little bit here as we got a little pop it on the Mike. Old Turtle head poking out from all that. You've been doing all morning just let me know and I pressed pause on today's show. So of course, we're here with Dr. Who is come up once again from bio reset medical in San, Jose to join me for yet another rollicking podcast episode, which may be the least scientific episode we've ever recorded, but we are about to be. Put into the hot seat by a couple of hobbies. We also have to she barb of by Reset Medical Barb. How'd you describe yourself? To. People. I'm the person that tries to make sure everything's working in everybody's happy. Whatever that takes over that takes. So so you keep things running down at your your guys regenerative medicine facility in. San Jose. We're actually just when we were GonNa Record this podcast actually when Jessica visited San Jose, we were going to do exactly what you the listener are about to hear in which. Jessica Inbar put matinee in the hot seat with a wide variety of questions but we did not because we decided to do better things particularly it kind of like a miniature retreat getaway plant medicine journey which ran. was. Really Nice. But it resulted in us not being able to podcast together and instead sitting crosslegged lay on the liver employ for eight hours having an amazing conversation, which was also good. So and then we have Jessica. Mother of Twin Boys. Keeper. Of the Greenfield household tonight I hold the TRIARC clean colder of the keys. ME. Baby. How many bio charger sessions have you done this morning I have done. Any laser lights. Now we did all just get in. Would you just inject us with Dude we? Cerebral license. And what's realizing do so it's it's a peptide that has A whole. It's a combination of variety different peptides actually from pig brain. Sustainably harvested big bird's eye eaten alive actually butchered a pig. The size of a brain of a pig, how big not even a quarter cup? Did you know that the size of your brain does not dictate your intelligence though. All is telling you that there's like. A quarter. Of, they did autopsy. Signs brain. A larger, the normal amount of gray matter. So it is possible that size does dictate intelligence to a certain extent but pigs are not stupid animals neither are sheep I used to think she stupid new. Justify grew up around everyone would bow hunting for sheep and Hawaii domesticated sheep or not smart. Wild sheep they're very smart they their own verbiage. Sentinel set up they camouflage themselves better than a frigging elk and they can see common like five hundred yards away they set up in these different formations to escape intelligently as you approach with, I've hunted wild sheep for five days in a row and Ben Successful. Before they're smart back to you I had actually barb saw little traumatized from this button farm. We had sheep. And Sheep goats they were like a cross between a sheep and a goat and like they could jump across. Cross. Creek. Do that and then. which we were super pumped about, and then a lion came down and killed minded. But better still it was dead and so then I was like not going to let that go to waste. So that we are oh. Yes. I cut the head off. I literally roasted the entire had. Cerebral lysine. It was that was the single like I roasted at with herbs and stuff like that all day long. and. Then you know you've had like cheek yeah and basically what you do is you would take the cheek out and then we dip that she in the brain and it was and it was it was roasted and it was. The greatest meal I've ever had. There are certain things that tend to be surprisingly good like when we were down in your house and we took the bone marrow bones and made what's called butter of the gods where I smoked the bone marrow for. About our at about two hundred degrees and then for the last ten minutes, covered it with grass fed butter a little salt and time and Rosemary and then we put those on top of burgers and had bone marrow on top of Burgers. It's kind of like cheek on top of brain. These are these are. These Turkeys and cranberries of the wild animal kingdom nobody's talking about. But anyways back to. Take breaks what's what's cerebral license from pig brain do for us well so so Some people used to take improve. Neurological brain performance I have quite a few people who I've been taking care of that have dimension and stuff like that and people will. Just got a text from somebody that said, my wife is. A Ben enjoying yourself more. She's her memories been a little bit better thinking more clearly means there's A lot of evolving protocols of taken care of people To. Fix bigger problems. The other thing that's Interesting is that I checked it for you in and around where the nerves are where you pulled. Muscle I pulled my muscles Dumont polyps, this morning, and so interesting a lot of times. If you can just calm the nerves down and fix them and and it seems to be really great for nerves I'll use it for hydrogen section. Put it around nerves. and. And so I'm I'm cautiously excited to see how you feel after the podcast I so great but probably because of smoking a pipe at ten am in the morning. There's really good trying to think else. True. And Nicotine and then I made you guys a bone broth smoothie which that's one of my favorite smoothies I use the ancient nutrition bone broth and then I For the liquid used the Kellyn fire bone broth liquids. So has got bone powder and bone broth liquid. And you do that all over ice and then you add what I put in this morning's smoothie was colostrum sea salt stevia cinnamon. And then you blend that all up. Oh, a little bit of ca cal. That's right. Wonderful Wonderful Herb, especially for low morning blood for. A beam. Sorry and. A high actually containing being that everyone's going to be concerned about now. This is the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. Right. Back checking the blended all up and then we put coconut flakes chocolate and some frozen berries, and you just can't choose the topics that you desire. So Good morning between cerebral lysine or workout. All the little contraptions will burn boss movie, and now now we're about to jump. podcast the justice done. Musically made half. A Cup of coffee. Okay. So so here's the deal and I'm GONNA put all the show notes as well as the previous five podcasts episodes I've done with Dr Cook on everything from from from cibo to nerve hydro dissection to Ketamine we've talked about so many things and a link to all those previous podcast episodes to Ben Greenfield, fitness, dot com forward, Slash Matt, and Ben. Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash Matt and Ben Because Today Matt and Ben Speaking about myself in the third person again narcissistic well done we're GonNa get put in the hot seat and what we have done is we have very selectively chosen I mean, stolen eleven, questions, eleven, questions that Tim Ferriss. Actually came up with and used for his book tool of Titans and also tends to ask many of his podcast guests quite frequently when he interviews them. Tim is a friend of mine. So I'm sure he's not going to get to litigious over me stealing some of his questions but we thought we were going to come up with all of our own questions for Jessica and barb to ask Matinee, and then we thought you know Tim's already figured out some of the best questions to get just decent life advice from people and uh so matinee of actually not really review these questions aside from just Him on Tim's website and Texan them to you guys but we are ready to get to get put in the hot seat and so you ladies can just. Fire Away with whatever you'd like to ask for can I say one thing? I. Want say like honestly from literally from the bottom of my heart, thank you to ten Paris because it was it was it was so amazing that when I I found I I I did he was I didn't meet him really personally but. I did my are Casey certification with him. And so then he he was podcasting and so then I I saw him there. He gave a little talk and so then I started listening to is podcast then. Like. Years and years ago, and that was the first time that I basically heard about podcasting what was happening and then I took it all my surgeon friends and we're like, we all started listening to it like we would. Tim's pocket podcast and I feel like it fundamentally changed my life and I I saw there was a way to become self expressed than actual is in love your life. And I Think that he he was like the single person who put me on this path more than anybody also. Thank you. Came if you're listening there you go. That's that's a nice compliment actually took Tim's book four. workweek was was a book that actually. Change a lot of the way around my business realized how much could be. Outsourced I hired my first virtual assistant I began to think more about the things that I do well versus the things that I didn't need to be doing. Mowing my lawn. And that actually changed I've caught. I figure this out I was a kid if there's like Mohawks. Certain things that you don't really have a great passion for doing and use decided I'm not GonNa do this well, then you're not going to be asked to do that task very often the future like loading the dishwasher or washing the car. So yeah, you my brothers that out an early age we did it Kinda Shitty job washing the car when mom and dad asked us to then they would come out and finish the job and they would just fear other things for us to do aside from walk. Out there and watch us do it until we did it the right. Men. Are More likely to do that do something poorly so you don't get asked to do Experience. That I am. One two, maybe three shirts. All right who wants to go with question number one on we get. Out of amount of butane on my pipe torch Matt. Can you reach that that lighter? That's right there by you. I can't without my microphone, but you're you're within distance I can use. I feel a little like a minute alert of the racing here. Is. The. Most hilarious. Plant medicine facilitator. Apparently, it's a very special pipe that is like a limited edition, long, long-stem pipe and He gave me some wonderful organic tobacco smell that. Good. Ethic Dosa. Ghost. But it's delicious. Once question. Number One. I'll let you start. Okay. So Ben, what is the book or books you've given most as a gift and why I would say one of them is a wonderful treaties of both-both, the rational and the irrational decisions that human beings tend to make and how can affect the way we communicate with them. It's called poor. Charlie's almanack written by Charlie Munger, who is Warren Buffett's partner at Berkshire. Hathaway. Book. Just chock full of wisdom about the way that people think. So that one I've gifted multiple times poor Charlie's almanack. And if I could name one other that I think I have probably Given, away quite a bit recently or at least gotten for people quite a bit recently. Gosh there's there's a lot. A lot of them butts. One one that comes mind I'm blanking on the actual title of and so take it to map your neighbor. I'm going to to remember the title of this book because Or that look it up. But why don't you go but I'm going to go with poor Charlie's Almanack for now and then I'll tell you the other book materially but Matt. What's yours? There's this book and it's called the brothers K. and it's a it's it's a story. That's the story Americana of an American family. It's like. References. The Russian. A book by this with a similar title but? It's it's It's the tapestry of an American family that goes through multiple generations and I connected super deep late to add the characters. and. I, think it touches on themes of family and difficulty in challenging transcendence, and it's a Swede and powerful read. That was called the brothers K. Yeah. The Davis K even James Dunkin. Okay. Got It. You know I can't find this this other book that I was thinking of, but I can tell you another one that I tend to recommend to people quite often is a lot of people ask me on my faith and. An author real like. CS Lewis. He hasn't been called Mere Christianity, mere, Christianity, which is just like a basic, really good overview of of hope and Christianity and Jesus, and just this idea that it is possible that despite me getting a lot of flack for this belief that the the planet was created by a giant magical God ferry in the sky and how cool and magical a world that we live in based on that. So I would say mere Christianity and then also a poor Charlie's almanack would be the two books that have gifted. Even, seen that book in our House Mirror Khruschev y'all know poor Charlie's almanack even know this book maybe you'll get one. Now. Just a reads like maybe visual yeah very. Very little alisson. Yeah. I literally read or for Awhile read almost a book every day and have a massive library downstairs and I rarely give just a bookstore he totally honest and truthful I didn't finish a book until probably my mid Thirties. Now. Sheriff people why that is. Because dyslexic and I see reading is an absolute char. We'll see sees words shapes. She's a vision. Amaze out graphic artists, but she sees words shapes. So the word the is not the its shape is not interesting. How how is it for you to read? Now? What's your experience of that? I feel like talking to Barbie other day. Wednesday. Introduced a lot of fats into my diet really helped me quite a bit and then also reading to my children because there's no judgment with your kids. Actually really boosted my confidence in reading especially allowed, and then that carries over into just reading for yourself. So. When you have confidence you're you're not thinking about am I doing this correctly you're actually listening and understanding what the book says. We're for most of my life it was like. Am I reading this correctly are people judging me by the way I read you know you're more concerned about the outward appearance than the actual words and what they mean. And there's like an interesting. Part about people who were dyslexic. Seem to be more successful at least a percentage of them. and. Why. Do you think that? Why do you think that that might be what was your and have you I? It's really interesting to think of you with that background in from cumbersome of our conversations because I think of you as a very successful person. Thank you. I think a lot of is you have to be adaptable because most of the world functions in this certain way of reading in comprehension and whatnot, and you don't, and so you have to figure out how to survive in that situation. So it's very much for me especially with a survivalist mentality. Especially I was in a school that was reader based school surviving was really challenging and you get very creative on how to do that what and you become super adoptable. Bring the thunder. Well then yeah, we was. Accent only funny if you actually see me smoking. What's what's our next question? Before I want to finish. This is I. Love the fact that you named a CS Lewis Book and I just WanNa call that out. He's an amazing theologian, an amazing writer who who from his face and from his understanding wrote for his children to explain to them these complicated concepts and he wrote the chronicles of Narnia, which is a great I have given that Sarah. My oldest sister gave those books to me and it was a huge gift and so look something to by Chelsea I'm she write science-fiction series I've started trilogy. It's amazing. He's a really great book on Morning Like people who've lost. And I can't recall the name of it, but it's come up a couple of times in the last couple of months that has really helped people if they've lost somebody to. Really Swell put all the books in Greenville. Fitness. Dot Com Slash Matt, and Ben Linked to that. That's yes. Louis Book On morning to your your kids. Like I love Narnia with every ounce of my being like an and Azlan all the characters and your kids have a little bit of that five. But being there they're on spiritual magical journey. Like which is just super cool to watch them like going through that like and that series I thought was so good because it starts. With them as in in different stages of being young and why you watch them as they're maturing both spiritually. And then in their physical and? Not, battling to battling. Go from being children to being kings and Queens. You know last night we were saying we're GONNA be in trouble. If the first question we get into were going to be half are into the PODCAST, but we have our. Yes. We should we should make sure we don't rabbit hole too much. Okay. Yeah. I know it's fun to. Converse. All right. What's the next question? Okay. Number two. Then what purchase of one hundred dollars or less has? Positively impacted your life in the last six months or in recent memory. My readers love specifics like brand and models where you found it, etc.. I would say something I use almost every day when I'm walking. It's breath control device that trains you to engage in carbon dioxide retention while you walk and it is it resists your exhale so that you're forced to take these deep long inhales through your nose. And then as you exhale because you're xl is resisted, you retain carbon dioxide. which helps to offset oxygen delivery into muscle tissue helps to increase your nitric oxide consumption or production and leaves you feeling after you've been on a walk while using this thing as though you're in like this deep meditative state because we know now from books like James Stores. Book God breath, and I read about this that carbon dioxide installations now being used for things like PTSD, stress control and while it's often vilified like this acidic waste molecule that's bad for the body it's actually an incredible molecule. It does a lot for you if you can retain especially high levels of carbon dioxide and high levels of oxygen simultaneously, this little device I got it from from a breath where practitioner. And it's called a relax relaxation. Relaxes I have in my family pack over here tiny little thing that hangs around your neck like a necklace and when you're on the walking was putting your mouth and he walks you normally do. But all you're doing is breathing through your nose and taking these long resisted exiles. I. Want to say it's probably like twenty thirty dollar device but I use it all the time when I'm walking and I absolutely love it trains me to do deep. Breathing to retention. So I'M GONNA say my relax ater. Nice. Okay I'M GONNA I'm GonNa, break the rules and I'm GonNa say something they cost three, hundred, sixty, five dollars. But here's the thing. This is in California and so. Two hundred dollars three hundred. We don't have any here in Washington hundred. Dollars. But I think it's probably going to be. So worth it and it's going to save you hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of dollars per year because. I bought the seventh generation detergent. Free. You know chemical. Free. A washing detergent for years and years and years. This thing that cleans your washing machine is on. An ozone generator that goes and before. Water, comes in and then it gets osen aided, and then it goes into your washing machine, and if you've got mold in your clothes are mold than in your. In, anything in your house, you can put it in there and then you wash it on called water without any detergent. It gets a silver clean and there's no small moulder toxins or anything like that. What's it called again? What's it called verbs here three oxygen generator Altri we're getting that. We got lakes was supposed to get here a few weeks ago. The Washington showed up either okay. It's amazing. Okay. So especially, if you're concerned about is mold, do you think a pretty big issue in Washers Matt like how you're an expert in mold remediation and cleaning up in the body? So so big in front loading washing machines and I had it embarrassingly before I really knew about this and three washing machines in a row and like different places that I lived and then I'm mood. That like you guys I moved into that house and I had a Washer and dryer and it had it was full of mold on the inside at. and. So then the first thing before I was I got rid of the front loader. I always tell people to do that and then put in put in top loader and then put the ozone thing in between. That's what. You're. GonNa you'RE GONNA love. Me I'm going to give you your money back. Guarantee on ticket to domestic goddess a whole new level absolutely because what you notice. Is that you've you use ital- three or four days in a row and is still smells perfect like it just came out of the dryer. Yeah. That means you got all the stuff out. Okay and so you I can't wait for that. I'm going to tell you what's happening. Right. So what happens is, is because the towels? I used to have to. Over dry them to get any of that mold small and so the towels that you guys have out sometimes I would notice the ones but the plunge we'll have a little bit of multi. Yes. That's kind of go away perfect could be missing. I can't wait. It's going to be amazing. Okay. I guess I'll let you suggest that one even on some more than one hundred. Rolls. Rebel. All right. Are we ready? Okay. All right. Hey Ben. This, one's about failure. How is a failure? Apparent failures set you up for later success I like that question because as you guys experienced last night, our our family does self examination every evening where we go around and we ask each other what good of it on this day and we'll could have done better this day and like I was saying last night, it forces you to press rewind on. Your Day Review Your Day, which in and of itself is is a wonderful way to just analyze how you lived how how whether or not you wasted your life. So to speak or whether you actually rose the occasion, dot your life's purpose that day but part of it too. When you're asking yourself, what could have done better you're looking at your failures and what you've learned. For your failures there are there are many of course, but I would say. A failure that that set me up for the success. You know the the thing that comes to mind right now and it might be fresh on my mind because I just finished writing an article about this. I'm doing the Sunday articles right now that a little bit more spiritual or or self-improvement based. Is. The fact that I've recognized my propensity to engage in transactional relationships quite a bit. Meaning especially for me as someone who runs a digital company works online. Works with a lot of virtual assistance, even worse my clients and make us via text and text messages and emails and boxers very little. Personal would be called transformative relationships meaning there was a time when Iran gyms personal training studios were hugs and there were handshakes there were high fives and see your clients in the gym. But then you'd also see them you know out at the Friday night party or you'd be with your co workers at Health Club but then also be out to lunch with them during the day or spending time with them in real face to face personable flesh and blood interactions that went beyond just the mirror. Often strict and business like interactions that tend to be what are largely transactional reactions which allow you to treat someone with less human connection and as more of a means to an end. In my case, it's very easy to, for example, shoot off and email and be Kurt business like even somewhat you know, rude, you know for example you know one one example I wrote about in this article that I was writing was all right to my social media manager and just be like. You spelled workout. Wrong. It's two words work plus out. Thanks. Whereas if I was with them and. It's like. They were sitting right across from me and I was looking in the I I would phrase it far differently that'd be nice. That'd be more personable. There might be a compliment sandwich worked in and I would be getting to know them as a person in what would be called the transformational relationship. And what I found myself doing over the past couple of weeks as I've realize this and I've been as I've been reading the article is I have been treating relationships more transformationally thinking of people as true human souls who I may be going on to live with for the rest of eternity not has these passing the these almost like stepping stones for me to know get an article published or to put some money in the bank or you know essentially you know in the article I wrote I described it as a propensity. Tree people like coin-operated monkeys right. Put The coin and they do the dance with their symbols and their hat. You say, thank you. You walk away and that's it. You got what you needed from that person and I think that that realization for me as really helped me begin to connect with people more deep and meaningful level looking people in the eye carrying asking about their day and going beyond just the mere transactional into the the transformational. So that's that's what I would say is a failure, the ability to treat relationships transactions. That I think is leading to a success, which is the ability to treat relationships transformationally. House a good one. That's again that's. What do you? Think that was particularly relevant for what's happening right now in the world. And so I think so much of of era of interaction during shelter in place and just during this sort of limited interaction that we're having with people, things tend to get transactional and I've noticed what I think is happening is that people are flocking more social media because that feels more like social. Yeah. But that's also got a Lotta downside we. Got A, really dictate of dopamine. Thrill. desensitization situation. So but in the same breath I think when you haven't seen people, then you finally get to see them. It's like, oh my gosh, I think it's great. It feels like soulful rather you than what you've been like. The Heart Girl Yeah for sure it does absolutely familiarity breeds contempt. Which is why you and I have such a hard relationship of. All fucking time. Shelter in place is killing me. Shelter in places like you have two choices. I you can stay home with your. Kids. For months or pick your own adventure. I'll take Timur to. Hundred. Number here. What's what's your? What's your? Favorite failure well, so I think I'm going to dovetail on your answer Ben I think that I'm an sort of a fundamentally transformational relationship person. And people will sell you a little bit of bill goods and then often you'll buy it and I'm susceptible I love sales, and so I'm somewhat susceptible to buying in so. Because I wanted to be like an expedition doctor and Kayak and go on big sounds of rock climbing things I went into anesthesia which was the field that has the least transformational. To connect with patients and their asleep. And so I did it that facilitated goal that it was literally like probably the worst thing for me to do from a perspective that. I deeply love people and so then extricating yourself from that is difficult. But then fortunately in the process of doing that I learned literally everything that I needed to learn to do what I do now. And interesting the. What I'm doing fundamentally is having transformation relationships with people who have big problems be that mental emotional, spiritual addiction, autoimmune, lime, cancer, dementia they're dying. Wanting to do peak living, and then it's almost like we're transfer more transformationally relating, and then I'm like healing at the same time in some way that is parallel to them. which is super super amazing. Go through and. I. Think Fundamentally, my pain that I had was that I. Wasn't going to be able to do it like you hope that you're going to be able to do that as a doctor and then I saw it slipping away. And I really thought I might not make it like I might not be able to be who I wanted to be funneling fundamentally believe that like. If my life is like being here, hanging out with you guys doing smoothies and working out I mean it's like I feel like I barely made it but I made it. So Great. That's my next question because I'm like it's so it's nice to be able to pour yourself into people and really you participate with them. But do you feel like sometimes? You have to limit that to appoint otherwise just can't stray from the scripts you can only ask questions. We'll overextending extending yourself or. Emotionally involving yourself so deeply that it's like exhausting. I get I. Think what you're saying is beautiful but I like for myself. I'm one of those people who like invest in a lot of people in D-. Emotionally. And you do have to like limit yourself to a point not to point of being cold but like you can't overextend yourself where you're no longer there for people who like your immediate family or something like that. So the trip, the trip about that one is interesting. So I've been basically working for like. Twelve or fourteen hours a day florence like. Twenty. Years. So my endurance and my ability to do that is really high and yet you're one hundred percent right and I think the trajectory for me is to work like an hour a day less. And then two hours a day three hours a day lassen and pouring more and more of of. Yoga and meditation and sort of. Internal work in two to balance that, and we've always done that and. And it's like I dance but like right now. What happens is my? My energy is basically. But then as soon as I started doing it as soon as I kind of get my vibe which I get sometime around like ten or eleven in the morning, I basically get more energy that goes on. So at ten o'clock, I'm way more energy than I had like noon and basically there's something happens is so inspirational when I start to see people get better that I'm it doesn't it doesn't wear down any more time. Is kind of like what you what you said Ben. I'm so ecstatic this like I have an idea that it's going to be amazing and then when it out that it actually is it's more sec- for me than anything else. Okay good. I can experience on earth. It is interesting being of your office and and seeing you just kind of float from room to room typically will seeing some cheesy country musical. With a big goofy smile on your face. Quite, like reckon. that. You carry from room to room and I could see how that would almost like kind of fuel new still having energy throughout the day just by spreading positive energy and having a bounce back at you from the patients that you're working with. It is kind of a cool experience and that is only all of that. All of that is just something that is just allowing me to walk around and saying goofy country music songs. Dr Exactly. All right. Well, I don't last my other question because we're along. So I'll just. Leave that? 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You're not gonNA find Amazon, because it's a membership base website the prices are dirt cheap. You can get a twelve month membership for under five dollars a month. So I'm going to give you a little discount code here you got to thrive market dot com slash ben subject code just url derive market dot com slash Ben Choose from one month membership to a one year membership get up to twenty dollars in shopping credit at thrive market dot com slash Ben If you could have a gigantic billboard with anything on it metaphorically speaking getting a message out to millions or billions. What would it say an why? It could be a few words or paragraph. Okay. We're on our walk last night along river. Has Already. I kinda thought of something that because I'm sure very few people saw that instagram live. It's still floating around in my head and I still think he's just a great song and a great quote and I think people should listen to this song. I would say normally if we were normal circumstances when they're driving to work in the morning. But maybe when you wake up in the morning before you start interacting with people for the next few days, listen to the song and it is a song by the black eyed peas. It's called be nice and the chorus is basically goes like this totally put this on a billboard. The. Be Nice. y'All. Promise. It'll change your life to to. Never heard that. You have I. Don't think. So maybe you're seeing is. Over do a big shout out to snoop dogg because he's he's things on track to. Great. Don't. So NBC has a show called Song Land and I love and it's especially relevant to Matt night because one of the things are working on this weekend a lot of scenes songwriting because we have a band called rocky roots at Rocky Roots Music Dot. com shot out and an artist came into the Song Land Studios for the show on NBC where Singer songwriters come and present their tunes and the lead singer for the black-eyed peas I forget his name. Oh. Well, I am. Yeah we'll add. He was one of the judges he chose this song and turn it into an actual black-eyed pea song and that's where this came from was the NBC show Song Land. That's open a billboard be. Be, Nice. That's probably Off Promise, it'll change your life to 'em pretty stuck in the nineties. Play for you later on. Tonight okay. Today. How about you matt and we can you give a shout out to that kid that plays. Guitar they played for us yesterday Oh. Yeah. The other kid I was down at a I was done and Mikey dees from the BBC boys. Shout Mikey on in. Malibu hanging out with him and his boys. Schuyler Davis and this cat named Marcus. King. Came by who was recorded. Marcus Marcus Kings from Nashville Oh my gosh. Look on spotify. His are like one of the funniest things was rick was. Rick was listening to Marcus play and the dude rips out guitar licks like Jimi Hendrix. And Rick Rubin Goes Yeah that's big boy guitar playing. For, twenty twenty two year old kids, Marcus. King, Chato he's he's got some good tunes. We should listen to some of those tonight's Burger party that we're doing. We'll put on Marcus King. Can you ask me my question again? Sure if you had a billboard and you wanted to put anything on it and get your message out to millions and billions of people what would it be? I would say. It's GONNA be amazing. But Abed, this is my this is my idea. Spend so crazy with Cova, and so then there's like trying to figure out what's happening and and. Transitioning from the state that were in into the state that were going at often when big pandemics and crazy things happen. All kinds of. Evolution and and science and technology and opportunity to kind of come. and. I think that that's going to happen from Functional Medicine Perspective from a Science Perspective from a wellness perspective and. This is an opportunity for all of us to take our health to deeper and greater level and I've and I've done that for myself and it's been like absolutely the most amazing sort of four months of my clinical practice. And so I'm I'm super pumped and so and there's there's so much fear that in driving around and so I'd like to have billboards all over said it's going to be amazing. and. Start to program that into our consciousness is going to be amazing. That, you're cut fries. Got T shirts mugs. Means, you can buy them. Medical. Today. You made me having to turn justice sow doubt because you. Pretty often. I four t shirt can work, and then some people saw me wearing it and so then they made me cups that say it's going to be amazing. Sounds like really. Giving spiral. Okay okay. So Ben yes. You're a savvy investor what is one of the best or most worthwhile investments you've ever made and that could be investment of money or energy or time Didn't invest ten thousand dollars a start up cannabis enterprise in Canada. A prepared to liquidate at about two and a half million a few months ago and then A. Covert hit in the stock crash. Narrate Alvis. I think I'd get about ten k. out of it so. Many lost. Nobody gain no money lost all on paper I would say one of the best most worthwhile investments that I've ever made was we are at right now I used to come on to this very ten acre plot couple of times came up here and I hunted whitetail deer, and it was just as blank slate piece of land off the side of the road in Spokane Washington. I made the landowner an offer that if I was able to find water was really funny because actually hired what's called a wellwisher who are they walk around with? Interesting. Find exactly. Where water is supposedly passing through the the underground springs and you know he walked around the land with me and he put his foot drill here and we drove them wallow hit water and I told the landowner that I wanted to be able to ease driveway in and if I could get power in from the local municipal power. Even though we eventually added solar so we can be off grid that I would the. So I did about ten acres route, ninety, thousand dollars, which is a pretty good deal and. Then we have spent the past six years just gradually building it into the Greenfield. State, we built a home and then we bill poolhouse we built a guest house. For. chipmunk tree and putting obstacle course said and the goat and the Chicken Barn and. You know the House of course doesn't kickoff income houses depreciate but just having this oasis especially during the past hundred days during. Lockdown being locked down on ten acres of luscious land with vegetables and goats, and chickens, and hiking, and sunshine, and trees and nature and plant forging. I am so happy when I'm at home and I think this is probably one of the best investments I've ever met know so many people under the nomadic don't tie yourself down with the home. There's the guy who I will teach you to be rich our meets at the WHO. writes. You don't Wanna a home just it ties you down. It's a it's a just a chore all the time and You want to be nimble and you want to be mobile I disagree I think. Home is a castle to safe. Haven is an oasis. So I'M GONNA go with this this little piece of land and home in Spokane I think it's the best investment ever made for just overall happiness. It is a magical place and I want to thank you for you to for creating this year and allowing other people. Love to love to share it, we love churn good food and good times that Greenfield. House tennis. So awesome to see like evolving not the you guys didn't have the. Guest House. Yeah. No I mean Jonah. I'll probably. Die here holding hands in bed someday. We Will you know these out plan on moving thirty thirty? Two. Hundred. THAT'S REALIZING PICK BRAIN anti-aging metal at the. Year migrants investment for the most part I just about went to like a meeting to teach or learn or meditate or do yoga as we were. We basically went to meetings. Traveled, three to four weekends a month for the last ten years and now it's harder to do that because we're not trying so to me I'm so grateful that I did that my primary investment has just been in knowledge and education. And Even currently like I'm building this platform that's GonNa. Functional Medicine Education Platform. Basically. That's kind of. Go live in. You know introductory limited in the next month or two. But. So I'm just continuing to double down on on. On. An introspective. Journey of education and. And and learning. That's injury stinks I. Actually. Knew, you're going to say that. Yeah. I. Don't know why. Call Deja Vu. That was weird. Yeah, I mean. Books you cannot be from I mean that's In greenfield houses if ever want to new said or NERF gun or anything like that, they can use their hard earned money to buy that. But books are pretty much no questions asked we will purchase them because book I mean I could have said that book. Library downstairs with hundreds and hundreds of books on religion and philosophy and science and nature and Helt. That also I would say this and kept underpants. Of course, that's the boy's bedroom. But my my book collection I would say is a pretty, pretty decent investment as well. Yeah for sure knowledge wisdom. Yes okay. All, right. Well, onto the next question, what is unusual habit or an absurd thing that you love This is a tricky one. Unusual habit or absurd saying. That I. Love. Weekly Coffee Enema. That's that's that's a real treat. You know. I I don't know if this is an unusual habit or an absurd thing. But you know as as a guy with the background in iron man and obstacle course racing I used to run a lot. When I when I was racing I was still considered like a minimalist runner had run like thirty forty miles a week which ironman is not considered a ton of mileage. But now not a day goes by that I don't walk for a good five to seven miles like out in the sunshine when it's deep dark winter I'll throw on my headlamp and my boots and go walk in the snow. But for the past two years I've adopted a walking habit in which I I take all my phone calls when I'm walking I do a lot of my deep thinking and meditating when I'm walking, I, do like I mentioned earlier my breath work when I'm walking. I used to think that when I see people just walking on the side of the road that was a waste of time why aren't they running or getting fit and now that I've begun walking regularly at ton? So I'd probably take fifteen to twenty thousand steps a day. And I love I, love to walk. It's where I do a lot of my thinking. It's where I make all my important phone calls. It's well listen to audio books that four times speed sometimes because I just find walking absorbed material better and I I. Literally not a day goes by where I. IF I don't go for a walk I feel as though I'm a missing out on part of my day now so I mean I walk ruthlessly every single day I. I don't enjoy my running now consists of me going down check in the mail and running back from the driveway occasionally that's. When we're playing tennis with the boys. Yeah. I would say walking a lot a lot ruthless walking Alex vengeance. Speaking speaking of which I wanNA listen to what I want to hear matchplay but I also have to p like a racehorse. So Mount once you're. GonNa. Take a quick P. You keep all the people in. Your with your response for your absurd thing and I'll be right back and it's All being ruthless dominating. Okay. Ours because you strike me as that. Exactly. Soft hand. The soft hand of Wisdom. So I would say that my. Absurd behaviors that probably almost like him walking almost every minute that I'm not working at or working. For eating. I'm walking around with a guitar on my house, playing along to music playing on the sound system and singing at the top of my lungs. and. That I spend tons and tons of time playing along with people. And so and and I I've gotten to the point where I just kind of picked the guitar up and then I'll figure out the song as and I was having dinner with Barb, the other night and it was amazing because. I hadn't heard chime crime died and you know there's a song, the speed of sound loneliness. Remember that song came on and I just picked it up and I nailed it. which was kind of fun because I hadn't played that song in ten years. and. So the. It's been. It's been super amazing and then interestingly, and this is just a crazy story. Banyan I believe this. But I've been doing hydrogen section where I put fluid and I've actually used three per license that I've also used a bunch of other peptides and a bunch of other products And I basically did. Nerve, Hyder? Dissection. And Hide I her sex should. Decide that all of the muscles underneath my jaw. My terror guides. and. Then nerve to go to my vocal chords. Better now. And as amazing because there's all of these songs said I used to sing that I couldn't sing them right like I couldn't get like that especially like Jackson Browne and Elton John and people whose vocal register. As. Little. And then like I I noticed now. Seeing stars coming to your place now for the probably. Yeah. What what we're doing with that is probably the most drug thing that we're doing everybody has I'm back. About Matt Right now honey. Everybody knows my bladders going to go. All right sorry. Can you matt. Stalling time I was we were praying. You were going to get back up. And? I think that actually. Met was talking about doing these hazardous sections. Of all the muscles that interact with the voice and with his Chakra with self expression and. I've been doing some of those as well, and it's very interesting because that impacts your perception cognition and I see your clarity coming out that as well because an and the fact that music against singing particularly does something different to your brain and during Cova you've done that more because you're not at a restaurant business dinner you're at home with your guitars thing and I'm singing for like. Two or three hours every day because before I was doing entertaining I was doing business entertaining. Seven days a week. And now I'm pretending that I'm a rockstar seven days a week but it's interesting that you say that bar because I feel like when I even look at your sense of. Also with you like. I feel. I don't know if this is covert or everything that we're doing. But I, feel like an order of magnitude more present than I did. Yeah. Six months ago. Yeah. I think. So even with interactions that I have with. The store clerk honestly to me it's like I had especially during over this realization that. These are all spiritual beings, all these people in you never actually just meet in ordinary person. They're all very like the like I said, their spirits wants in everyone's important everybody needs. Some kind of interaction that lifts them up builds them up. And that was total sidetrack but I do being sidetracked. That's good. Keep going on that. There's no, we're not just people that's basically saying we're everyone is this very amazing spiritual being? And everybody needs to feel that encouragement I. Think it's so important. So I agree and I think that's the as even just when you're interacting with people with a mask on you have to make if you make contact I, contact, which is the deepest kind of spiritual contact and the expression must eight. From Yoga that's what that's about like I I see you as a spiritual being I acknowledge myself and you as a spiritual being it's so totally different kind of interaction. Then a transactional interaction of I'm going to read you an email and now dome with you. Yeah. Well, and if when especially since I'm not really crazy about the mass businesspeople arm asked up, it's almost like you have to be overly. Yes to actually be felt again. Amazing it using my eyebrows muscles. Eyebrows love to be able to do that. We can't do. anyways but you have to be overly expressive. And and. Has To be super thoughtful which I think is actually sometimes pretty good. Good thing. anyways. Next fish on. Looking at past over the last five years and just think about what one new belief behavior or habit has most improved your life. Over the past five years. Well look I I. Want to say a regular meditation practice but I feel as though ninety five percent of people would give a reply like that. The meditation has changed their lives when they when they adopted it but specifically the the flavor of meditation and journaling that we've adopted as a family just just over the past you know we we just finished a thirty day gong in which we challenge each other to do five to ten minute meditation as a family. In the morning out on the patio combined with Journal in the morning in the journaling in the morning consists of two questions. Am I grateful for and we're GONNA pray for or help or serve this day. And then in the evening, we gather as a family before bed as you guys join with us doing last night and we do our self examination would good done this day and what could I have done better this day and then finally, what is one way that I lived my life's purpose today Those. Four questions, gratitude service self examination, and purpose when paired with checking in in the morning with the meditation and the breath work. I. Have. I've really really enjoyed that a lot and I feel as though it's been a really nice bookend for the day so much so that I'm actually working on a new journal for for a while, I? Had something called the Christian Gratitude Journal, which is three questions by grateful for who can I pray for help or serve this day and Oh, what truth did I discover in my reading today? And I'm actually I'm going to stop producing the Journal and I'm GonNa Start producing what I call the spiritual disciplines journal, which is the four questions that I've just described. What am I grateful for? WHO CAN I help? On this day and done better and what is one way that I lived on my life's purpose today And I would say that although I'm one of those guys who is always adopting new habits, new routines, new rituals that's one that really comes to mind Sounds. That's amazing. You know. So interesting to go through that with your last night because you know. Super Fun. Light goofing around singing songs and stuff like that, and then we went and played some for the kids and did that and I didn't say anything. But you know you're talking about failures and I was thinking about. How humbling the practice of medicine is on the way up here and then I was meditating on that and then then to. to get up and then go meditate on the porch this morning and to marinate that in with the whole workout that we did and I was like I chose my parents and then my sister called me right before we did this shout out to any cook and she was like you have to buy dinner for mom and dad tonight I was like okay. Service. Super. Cool. Than What you doing with that is just the totally the greatest. How about you? Last five years and I believe new behavior. Or New Habit. Okay. So to go in to a, we know you have an Jackie related or masturbated for a decade so you can't say that. Holding I'm holding it in. Holding it in from Brahmachari. That's not probably one of my main belief systems. That at all. It's interesting because I had a belief system that was much more dogmatic around yoga of like you just have to work your way through your practice. And that you could be pain and I would I would use yoga poses. and to work through things is how I would work through and kind of a fairly sustained where. I might have pan for month or two and worked my way through it. And then I basically just started injecting peptides and stuff and just basically fixing things and not having to do that. And so I guess. My belief system is that. We're going to be able to keep ourselves fundamentally relatively close to. For a super long time by. Harnessing the best tools and techniques and strategies of of what is going to double in quality every two years just like Moore's law and so so then the we are going to look forward to. A golden age of of health and medicine, and so maybe coronavirus ushering this in, and so then we'll all look back a hundred years from now and go men that like the greatest thing ever remember remember before twenty twenty how much everything sucked I wouldn't be surprised. Historical moment and I don't think we're just out of narcissism. For sure. There's just a lot of potential. All right I'm not you boys ready ready. Okay. What advice would you give to a smart driven college student about enter into the real world? What advice should they ignore? Why. Did you go to college? You Idiot V. Nearer to building. So. If if they haven't had gone to college for legitimate reasons such as. They need demonstrable evidence that they have engaged coursework that allows them to do something that may harm someone if they didn't actually. Pass fail such as building a bridge being engineer of being a physician being an astronaut, etc. I certainly do think there are some things that that rigorous demonstrable coursework is necessary for. An I also, of course, believe that if you're going to college for the social. The real generalize education etc.. Travel around the world for a year and you'll get a lot better education than going to college. However, I would say that The advice that I would give. would be To. If at all possible because I still feel as though mentorship and apprenticeship and practical hands on learning. Is under emphasized or sometimes completely neglected in a in a college setting. That my advice would be to for whatever career that you want to embark upon. You find one of the best people that you can who is practicing that craft that skill and you've got a way to shadow them to follow them to learn from them to be mentored by them or in some way, see what they do on a daily basis, and of course, I think that that's an indispensable. Whether or not you're going to college. But let's say that you graduate with a degree in you know Legis-, US something, very simple and realistic like I did say Physical Education, right? Well, I, just went straight into. Operating Gyms and Personal Training Studios working at health clubs win. If I could go back. I would have found one of the best of the best like a Charles pollock win the strength Sensei or a vote. That's a lean kettlebells Keto bell instructor. Yeah Charles was was a friend of yours. Yeah. Rest piece. or or or Pablo or let let's say if the if we're talking about something like You know endurance maybe a a Lance Armstrong or mark Allen or a Dave Scott and just basically. Hound those people their assistance, the people close to them figure out a way to where you can actually go in and follow them and see what they do and learn from the greatest of the great the goats. So to speak a new term that we taught our children last night and what what I would do is find whoever's doing what you want to do in a very good way and. figure out tooth and nail how you can get yourself tucked into the wing of that person and just be a fly on the wall or shadow them for for a good several months just to really get exposed to how what you've learned in a formal setting can be applied in a real world boots on the ground setting and you asked about advice that should be ignored I would say You don't know a lot of advice that college students are being given these days but just general was advice that I see around out there I would say that. Probably. One of the things that I was personally advised to do was to really get my hands dirty get into the business learn what I was doing inside now whether was programming web pages or designing. Scripts or writing newsletters or doing research for clients and I would I'm gonNA use this word again ruthlessly source as much as you can to focus on what Gary? Keller. WHO has a book by the same title, which is excellent would say crushing your one thing right? Don't worry about putting yourself into a situation. We need to learn every single aspect of what it is that your business involves instead just focus on the one thing and like for me now, I don't know how to log into my. Own website I don't know how to fix anything about I. Don't know how to send out a can email to my audience I don't know I don't even know how to do any of that stuff. I have no clue how to do it and there was a time when that would have driven me absolutely nuts because I'm supposed to know to run every aspect of my business and I've largely extracted myself from all of that. So I, focus on what I really really want to read. Right learn teach create. And so I'm living my highest purpose because I'm not trying to do it all. So those are the two main things. Get practical hands on experience from someone who's doing quite well, and then focus on doing what you do best crush that one thing outsource everything else. Get. One. Okay I'M GONNA dovetail. Because I think there's two sort of genres and come you're going to dovetail not piggyback. I was GONNA dovetail to kind of creep up, and then it's going to jump on topic. Thank you back. That's GONNA. Take you back on the second half of. The. Some of the people you talked about like the go it's like you're I think yourself in Tim and and Charles pollock polokwane are people who are fundamentally very self expressed and they expressed and created. Almost like a reality distortion field around them and I think that's what I told I. It's almost like we're in a reality distortion field here where Cova doesn't exist greatest and so that is like on the one hand of one one potential pathway of life, and then this other pathway in life is. More di- tactic more traditional college experience of I have several boxes here and and figure out which one of those boxes you want to be in and for the rest of your life. And I think that there's a hybrid model for the kids out there too, which is to play in any or all of those boxes and try to pick what you're truly passionate about because what I now believe is if you really want to do it, you can do anything. And then. And then living in that getting curated and with all the latest and greatest of in science and art and and a modern perspective on traditional culture and religion, and then in parallel to that then finding these people that are outside of the box finding Ben Finding a finding these these people who are the mavericks who who created. Who who are creating the reality that it's GonNa be all of our future reality. And then marinating that and then and then and then and then take that, and then do something amazing with it that defines your life and changes busy. The the. The potential possibility for all of the people around you. Like that. You totally jumped up on the back of the pig jumped right on the back of his head and writing independent? By the way. The Black Mirrors TV episode about the pig. It was one of the very first I'm not much of a TV. The everybody's gotTa Watch black finally I I said Okay what episode should I watch? A Black Mirror. I believe it's a net series, and so I watched it and it was basically about a guy who it's it's hard to explain but in basic bid basically involves making love to a pig. Into that? Between the tweet brains piggybacking and making love to pigs pigs to be veiling theme in today's episode. I think it's time to move onto the next. We're going. To. oooh rapid fire on the. We've got three questions to go. This is a great question. Okay. Then what are bad recommendations you here in your profession and area of expertise is there's a lot of junk out there. How much time you got I'm. I'm going to limit myself to one. And I would say that it would be that. Exercising is the best way to get fit. When in fact, if you are as I mentioned earlier engaged in low level physical activity all day long lots of walking lots of de-stressing a really nice cold. `Bout in the morning and another cold out in the evening regular sauna practice. And do doing a little bit of manual labor lifting heavy stuff every once in a while I'm playing some sports. Some of the fittest people I know from pure health standpoint who I know are gonna live a long time are not necessarily the people who are. The the two hour long Jim Rats because a lot of those kind of people are inflamed they're sick they're overtrained. For for me personally now, perfect Dave exercise for me is about thirty to forty minutes of some kind of like hard grind like kettle bell or something like that, and then lots of walking a little bit cold little bit heat some kind of sport and if you'd asked me ten years ago, it would have been like go to the gym our two day. You get a long bike ride or lunchtime you know. Hardcore. Log in on the treadmill or on the road or like long swims just exercise exercise exercise, and now I think brief bouts of like some high intensity interval training a little bit of Kettlebells, and then just lots of movement lots of hot lots of cold lots of time in nature I think that's the way to go. So I'm getting especially since I even stepped into a gym for. The past. But like almost one, hundred, ten days I'm realizing how much people associate gyms and health clubs etcetera with fitness when in fact, you don't any of that to not only be healthy but also to be fit and strong, and it still shocks me how many people are like I can't wait for Kobe to can finally get fit because I'm putting on so much weight. Let's the only. Outside. You've got some shoes you got the sunshine, you got miles and miles of roads you can go walking on you have rivers, lakes, you've oceans why are you letting the absence of the ability to be able to step foot into a sterilized treadmill Laden Dumbbell rack equipped health club keep you from staying fit so yeah, it's basically base could be you'd need a gym or health club or form exercise to I. Wish nobody needed like. One hundred and twenty five years old school unless you were an Olympian or gymnasts. Like. No, I look at people like my dad he worked in the field farm and he's in great shape for H and never went to Jim you Matt I'm GonNa Nail it totally, and that's one. I didn't mail Yep I'm going to. My my what I'm GonNa do is I'm going to turn it around and I'm going to let. I'm going to cede my time to Barbara Jessica and that you guys answer this question because. I, WANNA. Hear what you guys have to say. Right. Donating his time. I do not like the advice people give like. If you want to be happy just think cap or just you just make yourself happy like that where you just like manifest lake. Manifest. Is the word or do you know what I mean where it's like? It's like you just it's just mind over emotion the quote that Amac be happy. No matter circumstances no, no, no, no, no. No, it's just more of like you can will yourself? Will yourself into this emotional power based bill? Yeah and I was like there is like I. Guess some truth to that. But I think like you have to really the. Russell through that do the word yes. Do the work you have to deal with the shadow exactly and so when you see I, hate it when I see mems where it's it's like that Kinda threat or you're just gonNA will yourself into some kind of emotion? I don't think that's true and I think that actually a huge amount of pressure to. Be An emotional state maybe you're not ready to be in and you need to go through the work and deal with the demon that inside that is bringing or having that negative emotion in really labeling it in understanding it and confessing it for me as a Christian confessing it, and then turning away like I feel like there's a whole process, it's not just like I'm going to be joyful because I'm GonNa will myself into joy and I'm like no and where you are in that process is exactly Where you're supposed to be because what is the journey and that life is a journey I. Think we're all there's is this expectation of just like put a bunch of positive ambled big believer in affirmations rate because you need to retrain your brain out of different kinds of patterns, and that's what gratitude meditations about journaling and everything else. But the fact is it is always a journey and it's layers and we're complex beings with a lot of history that we take in genetically and through everything that's happened. In pre-verbal states all early deep brain conditioning and you don't unravel that just by thinking that it's you should just be happy. Yeah. Yeah I mean perfect example is the Ben came back from California I had two days where I was just in this major funk and I told him, I was like I, don't really even know why in eventually I was able to label it and then I now can understand it and then I confessed it and then you turn the night turned away from it but it was a whole process it wasn't just like. I'm in a depressed state and now I'm just choosing to be joyful like that. I don't like that I think it's not real and I think it's. It's this. We live in a world where we want instant results and that is not reality in my opinion. Your job and I think that that I see that a lot in the medical practice. Because we deal with a lot of people who have had chronic conditions chronic pain chronic illness, lyme disease post. Cova. What all the things that. Have happened in people's life and and there's a guilt associated with. When when they're asked how you doing, they wanna say on doing great but you can see they're really not doing great and this is okay to like share that with people because it's how you process and you start and you get through that sort of imposter syndrome because we've all been programmed to just be. Always pretend as somebody who grew up with what was called chronic illness as diabetic and as a double organ transplant you I've you this as just chronic health and everybody's dealing with stuff but I've really liked to share that with people because it makes it gives a richness to their ability to be like, oh yea I got stuff to everybody. Actually and all legit and. Know that it's there because a lot of people don't even want to acknowledge. Like, yes, I'm dealing with depression like I need to I'm not sure why I'm going to work you know and then actually run through the process where or yes I had this chronic illness. I don't really like to talk about it or even nema or anything like that. It just kind of want you give me the shot and just deal with it. You know it's like nobody wants to actually go through the process. Well, there's accountability associated with that too and I think one of the things that we've lost in our culture in this. particularly in the influence or culture and the canceled culture everything moves. So quickly that. The ability to not judge and not particularly nudges yourself and be wherever you are and then continuing to move along that processes. Is Something that we of lost as we got into this very transactional in quick moving media culture and you know maybe part of what's happening now is we're having a chance to. Back off from that a little bit. Yeah? Yeah. Good ones could one CAJAL? Nice guys get so much rapid fire. Thank you for helping me. Sir. Girls League I liked doc. Yes I wanted to. Okay. So are we bypassing you met or you come back to you know I, see it seated. Echo what you said because for me, I felt like, I couldn't say anything ever for almost all my life. So it just kind of holding that in so I I realized how you felt because I I was just if I felt bad I would just hold it in and I would wonder if would go away I was I felt like I would wonder for like Months or something like that, and now if something happens, I just say like our border Blah and it never seems to last more than like ten minutes because I can just process through it and so I think that that's Amazing thing for you that you said. You get the next one. In the last five years what have you become better at saying no to. Invitations. Distractions. What new realizations have held I actually, this is fresh in my mind because I just got invited down to compete in this kind of like hardcore masochistic manly man event in Texas was shooting and swimming and hauling heavy loads and I am still struggling with the transition from being an athlete into being what I know is kind of my bigger calling in terms of impact and fulfillment that is being a mentor being spiritual leader of being a motivator being someone who doesn't necessarily inspire people by going out onto the field of battle and competing, which let's face it on going to be doing anyways when I'm eighty and Mike Celebration to a body that will feel like eighty is only going to the vastly increased by my participation in these type of events have been doing for the past twenty years now by densify myself with and. I've got invited to so many swim run competitions and random lake screwed up versions of triathlons, an obstacle course races and heavy man lifting strongman legit all this stuff and I have had to learn that most of the time my polling towards a lot of those activities is based on ego based on the fact that I've identified myself as an athlete for so long that it was really hard for me for a long time just say no can't can't make that and like this this last event. I look at it. It look at all the events that they're going to be doing like, Oh, I could totally win this like totally and up and I'm like but you know what? That's two days of travel flight Texas, two days of sitting around shooting the Shit with a bunch of guys and lifting stuff exercising not really necessarily creating meaningful shit for people or doing what I know is going to be my true calling or even being around a to raise up my boys or be with them or take them out of the wilderness or down to the river out in the forest, and so I've had to begin to learn to say no to. Events that I get invited to that. I'm realizing are more simply things on Pepsi do feel my ego versus things that are going to help me to fulfill my impact on who Totally resonate. Awesome. So hang hanging up the athlete identity and replacing it with the man mentor leader Father King took me two years to actually fully. Yeah. Give into that. Because it was a huge part of my identity as well. How do you feel inspiration trump soho how do I feel about it? I, feel like I've already proved myself and I don't need to prove myself any. That's basically it. In a very simplified version that took me two years to get to that L. that was that was quick though don't get there. Matt for me. It's a little similar were saying no to a lot of travel now and I'm trying to say no to almost anything other than like exercise. Meditation Yoga Movement Mobility Medicine and just during that and I feel like we're going to. A? That investments probably going to do more towards improving what we can do for other people. So saying no to. To travel and being on the road and saying, yes, to sort of this, this hour version of that introspection is It's I'm I'm incredibly excited about. Cool. That's awesome. Okay. Yes. I agree with a not travel. Amazing. It has been amazing have. Great. So much better. I used to come home and it would be it'd be interesting 'cause a lot of times what I would do I would I would work. Especially, in the older days I would work and fly me like baseball team but take a red eye Thursday night and then work and it was interesting. and. So then I would. Basically, just kind of stay up all night Thursday night and then work all the way until Sunday night or if we do that and go to medical conferences and stuff like that. and. and. So come home just dying and a lot of the stuff that I learned was just I would come home and inject myself within a and stuff like that, and then next thing you know we could almost make it like it didn't happen and it'd be almost perfect. But that was like we were a little road where he And And so then realizing the possibility of doing. That were were all way more connected than ever. and. More sustainable. Realized that we had a lot of shortcuts and biohacking grade and do a little nicotine do. Do a little peptides but what you really need is. A you need to be grounded and you need to be connected to the source and taking care of yourself and taking care of the people connected to your people. Your community. Yeah. Okay question a last final grand finale. When you feel overwhelmed or? Lost Your focus temporarily what do you do with? Helpful what questions do you ask yourself? This is hard for me. Against sound like an asshole reply I don't really lose my focus. Barely ever of never had a problem. Being focused I would say about the only time when I lose focus if I over stimulate my body. Too much caffeine or too much nicotine or something that just kinda gets a little jittery and even then if I take a few deep centering Brett's. Through the nose out through the mouth just like we do before dinner each night just activate the Perez empathetic nervous system. It brings me right back into focus very quickly. And even when I wake up in the morning and I've got like twenty different things to do. All stop read the kitchen table and I'll stand and look that window. Like five thirty am on like what which thing do I start with? I'll just take like three Dean censoring breasts. And I've I've always even as a kid. been able to focus in the middle of complete chaos on a book or a project or task so I think some of it might be nature. And just built in to me is my personality and just being a block things out but I would say you know as silly as it may seem. I'm I'M GONNA. Roll with what I actually do, and that's deep centering breaths that brings me right back into focus. So I wish I had sexy reply, but that's really all I do. Then that's the perfect reply because I think that the main reason why people lose focus and it can speak for myself and just kind of having watched other people is underlying anxiety. Right, whatever that is, it could be physical kind of inflammation inflammatory situation. It could be emotional exactly about things that have happened and mental are just reflecting the general anxiety out of the society right now but your breath. So related to the emotional and mental body and just letting yourself do that, and that goes back to all the old spiritual practices right? You're quiet with your breath and. So you know we, it's a simple thing but we forget how powerful that is just being able to do that, and I've noticed that because I used to have a cluster of really bad claustrophobia which I've gotten rid of but the even went have that anxiety attack like stuck on an airplane in the middle seat I would be like okay I. Know Choice of debris that's all I got, and then I would get through it, right? Yeah. Because you always have your breath. Yeah. I developed that when I used to run track and field and cross country. There is an anxiety when you're on the track And controlling your breath that I mean that can make or break your your run or your race in your breath is erotic and out of control and full of anxiety. You're generally going to take. You how to learn how to like just totally. Like settle yourself in the midst of something. Really hard. That's yeah. That's a great one. What about you Matt Scott? So. This one. This one kicks. A dove tail, and then we're GONNA. Sneak. Up. On the Gravel. Refer the tail and then they climbed to detail. Back, and that's basically what I'm actually GonNa do with this answer. which is awesome. Missing. So This is an. Interesting one for people that are like practitioners people out there and was I only started to be able to do this basically in the last six to twelve months. and. What would happen is and what happened I take care of a lot of people with PTSD. Everything, from sexual trauma to a lot of war and crazy stuff and. All be in some Sean. Live conversation feels kind of like this that everything is great and then all of a sudden like the cataclysmic. That will come out and then when. It's it's somewhat overwhelming and distracting and hard to deal with, and then what I noticed is that there would be like I would feel like I wanted to cry. And I realized that I had for most of my life whenever I felt that way I felt I wasn't safe and then I would just shut down. and. So then I think that in a lot of those interactions, I would have just shut down and so then time would go and then I would like come back into my body. And then for this last year, basically what I'll do is I'll just with people and I'll look at them and I'll Brie. And often I'll feel like I wanna cry often even felt like they're wannacry keep breathing and then I'll talk to him like this. And I'll feel the emotion inside. And often it's like real intense but then what happens is Now that we're talking and I'll tell them that I'm feeling really emotional also. And then I'll feel certif- feel that emotion move within May and then then basically at that point, I'll always come up with like an amazing. Idea that's kind of either funny or whimsical or thoughtful, and then that then now then we'll start kind of naturally engaging in that. And then next thing I know. We were in this overwhelming difficult place, and now all of a sudden everybody's laughing is kind of funny and so then being able to kind of be be awake and aware and connected in that space is maybe my favorite thing because that emotion when it comes it so overwhelming and yet then once you can kind of process that and deal with it. Then I I'm left with such an extraordinary sense of hope and optimism about about life that we can that these horrible things can happen and yet we that we can transcend. And he'll yeah. while. We covered a lot of territory of course of eleven questions these. Of course for those who will stand if you go to Ben, Greenfield fitness, dot com slash Matt and Ben. Andy and Jessica. Guys, you guys have something. Just went away and you guys have a final thoughts. I feel like I've contributed I'm good. I'm satisfied. Yeah I feel I feel very complete with the interaction because I feel like that we. All brought different things but came back to the breath and came back to community in came back to connection and Joy. And appreciation celebration of life or if you guys are listening and you do have your own thoughts, comments, questions, feedback of you want to reply with your own replies, which would be great. If you have your own applies to any of these eleven questions go to Ben grew business dot com slash Matt and Ben Leave Your questions leave your comments, leave your feedback all linked to all the previous podcast episodes of done with Dr Cook which are a little more medical and science. He based this one was a little more kind of lifestyle adviced playful based and. Leave your comments over there because we love to read them, we love your feedback and. In the in the meantime, I will also put links to everything. We talked about our favorite books are lovely toys and everything that we discussed. So that's all again Ben Griego fitness, dot com slash Matt, and Ben. So Matt and Barb. Thank you so much for for coming all the way up from San Jose John. Pat We're going to have an amazing hike today. We're GONNA have some people over make burgers do sauna do ice will have a Wonderful. Evening we're GONNA. Make it hard to leave. Due In the meantime, those all of you listening in have a magical week. We hope that this has been helpful to you. That's why we do this to serve you to make your life better and to give us an excuse to drink two extra cups of coffee sitting around the kitchen table. So Hey, man. Ben Greenfield. Barb and Jessica signing out from. Ben. Group fitness. Dot. com have an amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show, you can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned or and Ben Greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful Ben Recommends Page, which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormones sleep digestion, fat loss performance plenty more. Please also know that all the links. All the Promo codes that I mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that enables me to keep bringing you this content every single week. 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KetoFasting: The Dark Side of Fasting & Ketosis (+How To Use Cyclic Ketosis To Fix The Issues)

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:16:12 hr | 1 year ago

KetoFasting: The Dark Side of Fasting & Ketosis (+How To Use Cyclic Ketosis To Fix The Issues)

"The. Your hunger cravings are basically non-existent. And because normally you're only twice a day. Anyway, maybe some snacks in between. If you're if you're only eating for six hours. So you you like you're only skipping one meal. It's about the easiest sliding off a law. You know, it's just it's just crazy simple. Solution for that is the eats carbohydrates like a fruit or something you would think your blood sugar would rise, but actually goes down because you raise your insulin levels. I have a master's degree in physiology bio mechanics and human nutrition, I've spent the past two decades competing in some of the most masochistic events on the planet from seal fit Cuco, sparred negoti in the world's toughest mudder to thirteen ironman triathlons. Brutal bow hunts adventure races. Spearfishing plant foraging, free, diving bodybuilding and beyond. I combine this intense time in the trenches with a blend of ancestral, wisdom and modern science searched the globe for the world's top experts and performance that loss recovery hormones, brain beauty and Braun to deliver. You this podcast everything you need to know to live in adventures joyful and fulfilling life, my name is Ben greenfield enjoy the ride. Hey, if I sound like I'm talking funny. It's because I'm getting my teeth done. I got these porcelain veneers on my teeth right now. And I feel come talk over bike. I'm getting used to getting used to my new teeth. But sometimes Sam will come token booth on not Washington redneck while Emma, Washington redneck, I'm just a bona fide Washington redneck with amazing teeth over by now, anyways, I'm working on that this podcast day with my friend. 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It's got over eleven hundred peer reviewed studies showing therapeutic potential for over a hundred and seventy different disease models at has selective antioxidant behavior, meaning you can drink this stuff after workout the shutdown inflammation without inhibiting your ability to build new muscle fibers or engage in might Okondo biogenesis tiger enrich water and their sponsor of today's episode. The the version I use the tablets and the water generator. I use it's called Trucy T R U S. I well, you get thirty percent off of their tablets if you enter code Ben at checkout when he go to Trucy H, two dot com slash Ben. It's a mouthful T R U S I H, two dot com slash Ben. That gives you thirty percent off of their hydrogen, tablets. You can also over on that website at Trucy. To dot com slash Ben. Check out the actual water generator that I use alleged drink water and even inhale hydrogen rich water, one of the healthier things that you can inhale as a matter of fact, so true C H, two dot com slash Ben. Enter code, Ben at checkout. Hey, folks, as promised he's back, my friend, multiple time podcast guest. The guy who thinks way outside the box who is constantly sending me these things that I never would have discovered on my own probably one of the guys who who reads more research studies than anyone I know and always seems to be discovering some new cutting edge way to enhance human health and longevity. I I like that he also kind of mixes as I like to do a lot of newfangled technology in in bio hacks with a lot of kind of ancestor wisdom and many of these principles that go far back in time, including what we're going to explore today, which is the principle of Kita genyk eating meal planning timing meals for everything from from managing chronic disease to promoting weight loss to optimizing health. His his new book Kito fast. Just as usually happens when I get a book on the Kito genyk diet, I expected to possibly be just yet another book on how to put butter in your coffee. But this one was was really good. I I it's not even that long of a book. It's it's only about one hundred fifty pages long. But man, I think I have over thirty pages I tend to fold over pages and highlight in the book looks like it's been Helen back because I think thirty pages are folded over. So my guest today is Dr Joseph McCulloch, he's been on the show before talking about all sorts of different topics. But today, we're gonna take deep dive into fasting the dark side of fastening toasts, the dark side of ketosis psycho ketosis and a whole lot more that I discovered within the pages of his brand new book Kito fast Kito fast step by step guide at timing your Kita genyk meals, Joe will come back to the show, man. Well. Thanks for having me, Ben. And before we again, I want to personally thank you for inspiring me what four or five years ago when we when you first interviewed me, and I had no idea who you were. But said boy, you knew really knew some information. You know, you you are rea- catalyst to help up my own game. And you know, you reading three hundred books year as I couldn't come close to I cannot compete with that level of book reading the Jew. So what I can compete though is the studies in I've got a super RSS feed. Now that I'm able to read about two thousand studies not just the abstracts, but the full study. So I like that better than books actually because it's just it helps me up my game and really get down into the science. Yeah. You don't wanna share that super tactic? With anyone do your your special website for research studies? Well, you could use it's basically an RSS feed. So Google reader used to be you build Bill probably do with that. But now at that's out of existence so feed liaise taken over. So he can just Sturge your turn. So I have a different one. That's in beta right now. So people can't get access to it. And it allows me I've searched probably between seventy and eighty terms every day seamlessly just comes into this app. And I get ten fifteen. Studies a day. So it's really great. What's the one? With some beta are you allowed to share? It's called metadata org meta dot org. That's the one that you said to me that you have to actually like apply to get access to. Okay, I've had it for like the last three or four months, and it's been it was the best Christmas present ever got. It was. It's absolutely amazing. It's changed my life. Yeah. I'll put a link to the show notes, by the way, everything that I talk about including linked to Joe's new book, you can get over Ben greenfield, fitness dot com slash Kito fast. Kito fast is where the show notes are out. You you begin early in the book, and I don't want to spend too much time on this. But I think it is important for people to understand how how important fasting is from from a therapeutic standpoint and from a from a traditional and historical standpoint. I mean, just about every religion on the face of the planet and many cultures have this history of fasting. And you have some very interesting explanations in the book of everything from Judaism to Christianity is. Slum what what were some of the biggest takeaways for you? In terms of researching this book and the elements of fasting in introducing cultures. Well was interesting because I initially started to our plan on writing this book as a way to optimize multiple five day or multiple day or five day water fasting. And I certainly don't have the clinical experience in that. So I reached out to the clinician in the United in the North America that the most which is Elon gold hammer who's the medical director of the north clinic in the water fast over sixteen thousand patients from anywhere to five to forty days. So. That's really his passionate. I was gonna call. Right. The book with him. He was gracious enough to compile that history. So I didn't really go into the details on that as much, but it's it is pretty brilliantly displayed. In it's of interest that you know, most historically most religions integrated is part of the regular practices. So I think that speaks to the value in the wisdom of that. How could a practice perpetuate if you know all these ancient religious cultures. Historically am today. Didn't find value in it? It would it would have died a long time ago. Yeah. And it's there's a there's a lot of ritualistic fasting a lot of cleansing and a lot of use. Well, while there's this term therapeutic fasten that comes up over and over again. And I was curious if you could define that, you know, there's that quote from Benjamin Franklin that you have in the book about how fasting is the greatest remedy the physician within I believe that that was either para Chelsea's or actually Benjamin Franklin was the best of all medicines is resting and fasting, and it kind of gives us therapeutic fasting. But can you get into into this idea of therapeutic fasting, and what exactly it is? Well, it's using dietary or calorie restriction dietary intervention to activate very powerful metabolic practice up processes to catalyze the healing process. Most of these processes in molecular biology, wasn't known of course, when it was first started many of them just been covered just in the last decade or so and really supports a scientifically the value of this intervention. So it's it's really a powerful strategy in before. I wrote the book I was I was so inspired in over thirty years of clinical practice. I never seen a more powerful intervention than multiple day water fasting. But then I began to realize that there are some practical cop -cations of it because we live in the twenty th century. We'll get into that a bit. But I was really surprised because I think we we needed to to modify we not meet new to need to modify that but getting back some of those quotes. I know you're going to the parasols clinic and a few months, actually, and Switzerland. Yeah. We've got two weeks there. Yeah. He's a fifteenth century position. And his quote was fasting is the greatest remedy the physician within. So that's a really powerful endorsement and in the United States how it actually didn't become popular until like the eighteen hundreds with the natural hygiene movement. But then it became even more popular when Herbert Shelton popular isn't about nineteen eleven and it's it's there are many clinicians who use it not a large numbers. But Jason fun would be the greatest example. I've got a quote from him in the book, which is really intriguing which is you describes fascinates the oldest dietary adventure intervention in the world is not just the latest and greatest, but the tried and true and. In what I add to that is it's cheaper than free. So you save money when you do this, and you also improve the quality of life, and you radically decrease your risk of crocked Jenner disease in in a in the book, you talk about this guy, you mentioned earlier Alan gold hammer, and how you learned a lot about the history of fasting from him. And he has this this clinic in northern California. Is he still practicing that clinic? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Okay. So so that's called the true north health healthzette north lick their they have the largest experience of multi-day water fasting. If any clinic what kind of stuff do they do their other than water fasting? That's it. Oh, really? That's all they do. That's that. Seems that seems like something you could do on your own. Well, they typically treat very sick individuals. So as a result that have have to be pretty carefully monitored and to make sure that they don't have any complications. And interestingly when you are doing this type of water fast. It's wise not to exert yourself too much. And you know, you people like you and me would you know, kind of door on daily business and think that's why strategy, but you're redirecting energy in your body away from a detoxification systems in in deck that can be problematic. Okay. Got it. So so at that clinic, and I'll put a link to that clinic true north health center in the show notes. They're not doing like Animas or exercise or any other treatments. You're just showing up getting an overseen water Gasol. Yeah. And they feed you, of course. So that's well like feed you when you come off the reef eat, obviously there are giving you water. And and monitoring your progress in treating any Simpson Jamaica valid, but interestingly the one of the downsides of the water fasting is that you do have the symptoms. I think most of these symptoms are related to the fact of the your inability to optimally talks by has largely result of our exposure talks. Yeah, we're gonna get into the kind of dark side of water Fasching later. But I think it's it's it's a very inspiring part of the book offer, those you read it as you go through all these different religions and the deep history of fasting. I've talked on the podcast before how you know. My dad will show up for for a family thanksgiving meal. And then essentially, he's he's doing he's a orthodox religion eastern orthodox, and he's doing pretty much, you know, no meat, no dairy. I think you might have a limited amount of fish very little protein kind of an intense fasting protocol all the way up until Christmas. And it's almost like this this. Seasonal detox. But I think it's also one of those things where when it's tied to religion. And it's very almost liturgical. It becomes something completely different than say. Like, you know, kind of like the fitness movement these days and the health longevity movement it's built around protocols like intermittent fasting or weekly twenty four hour fast. Or, you know, a an alternate day fast or something like that. But but none of it or very little of it is tied to religion. I think that's where it becomes very powerful. And I have all these books that I'm going through right now on the spiritual disciplines, right? Silence and solitude and meditation prayer worship and a big part of every single book is fasting. I mean, you know, so many people do the do the Nutro picks and the neuro feedback for their brain. And you know, hoist the kettlebells and the Hex bar for their body. But their their spirit is kind of shriveled up inside them, and it sounds strange to Thai food to the soul. But it's one of the ways to actually care. Care for your spirit, this idea of fasting. I mean, especially if you're if you're combining it with things like meditation or solitude or like deep amounts of time spent studying which you have time to do because you're not preparing meals. I mean, it's a very very powerful remedy. Yeah. It's something that I strongly believe everyone would benefit from integrating their lifestyle it in a monitored way, not monitored. But a met metered way. So yeah. So it's done carefully. And you don't have any side effects. All right. Let's delve into the science. I've talked about a Tofte g on the show before I think people are familiar with the idea of clearing out dysfunctional or diseased cell components as being kind of like what tough G is. But you go step further, and you actually define fasting as a free stem cell, transplant stem cells are big topic in the industry these days. So can you go into the science of stem cell regeneration fasting and how does the tide? Oh, absolutely. But before I do that. Because I want to go into a little bit about topic to 'cause I go. Studied it because the extension of my reading these studies is not just writing this book. I'm in the next one on 'em f. But really again, you're in his brain for this is to write a book on light longevity, and it's probably gonna be three or four books because hundreds of pages now with thousands of references. So as a result of that on top is a big part of it. But but both of our passions are to live as long healthiest. We can. And that's why I wrote the book fat for fuel. And then this book, which I think are foundational basics. You've got to get these activate these systems correctly. If you have any hope of living living well beyond one twenty because you've got to get the basics. Right. And then in the next basic is going to be on AM, but that's not for this discussion. But before we discuss topic. Gee, let's review what fasting is different. They're different varieties. Intermittent fasting is sort of the foundational basic of what you do in at least in my view is fast because that that will. Get you your metabolic flexibility turned on in your ability to burn fat as primary fuel and typically it's a minimum of twelve hours probably closer to fourteen if you're adding less if you're eating not restricted at least fourteen hours, it's probably not gonna get you some of the benefits. And I think that depends if not derail you too much. But I think it depends on physical activity as well. If you're if you're up regulating amp K pathways, and especially if you're an athlete or an exercise enthusiasts. I've found that a lot of folks will do pretty well on a twelve hour fast, especially very active person. And if they're exercising in that twelve intermittent fast. I think and I haven't seen a lot of data on this. But you up regulate those amp K pathways, which I love for you to define. Oh, yeah. If you combine exercise with shorter intermittent fast like a twelve hour. I don't think you need to go on a guilt trip. If you're like an exercise enthusiasts just doing a twelve hour fast while you're an unusual category in your competitive athletes, still so that's a whole different ballgame. You're right. There isn't a lot of research on that most of the research of courses done on animals, and they don't exercise in the same way in the ones that done at humans. They're really very few. Researchers are examining competitive athletes. So there's not a lot of literature on that. But to finish the a analogy so Sachin panda who who who you know? I think you've intervened before just magnificent researcher out of the Salk institute. He did. He did serve his founded less than ten percent of the people restrict their food to less than twelve hours a day. So ninety percent or not doing it ninety percent of not even doing twelve and I think for knock competitive athlete fourteen to sixteen hours a sweet spot. So unless you're exercising. Ben like you've been the then. You know, my recommendation is to strive for fourteen to sixteen hour. Or even sixteen to eighteen hour. Fourteen minimum IBM for athlete, but sixteen dates by the sweets, Jason Fung agrees with the window from from my understanding. That's not just that's us theory. That's just what you think. But they've actually done research on on Tofte g mechanisms actually being activated far more significantly. Once you pass a bout, the sixteen hour, Mark. Yes. But I still wanna finish this now because so that they get that fourteen to sixteen hours or sixteen eighteen hours, but you're still not going to get maximal oxidation of top saly. Lease in my experience. I think you need to go more. And that's I think where you get the benefits of the multi day water passing or the fasting mimicking diet, which was developed I've author Longo and probably is one of the most prolific researchers in this area and. So I, but I don't think you have to go that extensively. I think you can do a hybrid of the two models and actually get most the benefits not have any virtually none of the side effects and really maximize all these powerful metabolic processes. Okay. So what do you call it a free stem cell transplant and how does this to amp K pathways? Okay. We'll get to them K. But let's what is tough Aji for this. Do a simple reviews. Top aji. There's three types. There's micro toffee. Macro Taiji chaperone media atop G and essentially tar orbits damage in defective cellular parts, not cells that wholesales would be toasts. But these defective parts are targeted in some way. They're marked. And then they're shuttled the license OEMs where the license OEMs. Have the digestive enzymes in there, and they're able to an actually have any ADP oxidise, which them create superoxide superoxide combines nitric oxide firms parents nitrite and just destroys e cellular parts and it breaks down to their constituent elements, which are then recycled for the for the repair and regeneration. So that's top Aji. And that's what you activate. When you do. I think this more extended fast what I call Kito fast. But you know, there's other ways to do that with long those of festive force the extent multi water fasting, which I don't recommend. So the free stem cell tramps plant is really an act sort of an artifact of what happens when you do these activities, and it doesn't occur during the topic. Phase it occurs in the regeneration phase. And it's this is probably the best strategy to. Rebuild your health because you need to remove the damage in defective materials in your body's the proteins in the enzymes that just aren't worth mighty conjure that aren't even working anymore in just clogging the systems in many cases, creating inflammatory cytokines that disruptor physiology. So getting rid of them as one, but then the next step is that magical partisan the reef feed when you activate these stem cells in especially if you're combining it with a really good aggressive strength training program than because one of the benefits that additional benefits it occurs during the vast phases that your growth hormone increases like three hundred percent into saying, whoa. That doesn't make sense because of growth hormones than Jeff is up, and that would would actually inhibit autopsy. But what happens is the growth hormone receptors in your liver become relatively insensitive. So they actually the doubles one levels, rob. And you're able to get those benefits and you get it's just like you've taken growth hormone injection, though, you. Get the benefit especially combined right after and you'll see them when I discuss the further. I I recommend doing this twice a week. So you get these awesome benefits twice a week. And so so you're saying you're saying how long twice a week. Well, we'll go into the details later but forty basically a forty two hour fast on anywhere from three to five hundred calories. Okay. Son, your lean body mass. So that would be almost like an alternate. Well, we'll we'll it's Kito fast protocol. Yeah. Well, we'll get into that now intestinal stem cell function. Because I know a lot of people will will fast to to be able to heal the gut. You have some very interesting rodent studies. You talk about in the book, can you get into into what happens especially to like intestinal stem cell function. Yeah. Interested improve that to the no surprise because he had this in called the the leaky gut which is a real symptom and so fan when you do this type of fasting. I think this the extended fast not just the intermittent fasting. It helps reduces the government ability by stimulating these Branka pathways enhancing, the integrity of your gut lining, which is of course, really important for improving your overall health. I think one of the major takeaways I have underlined the book is that one single fast improved intestinal stem cell function in mice who actually switched the stem cells in their gut switch from utilizing carbs to utilizing fat, and they actually saw this complete regeneration of the gut just from a fasting protocol. It's kind of funny because so many people will do whatever glued mean bone broth Colostrum autoimmune diet and eighteen different supplements to heal their gut yet just not try say not eating food as you've just alluded. To several times a week. Yeah. And it's interesting to get some of the supplements. But there are certain supplements that really highlight this in the book that much, but there are supplements. And I learned from Bob Miller who is at our mastermind event in Park City last year with so he helped me understand that there are certain supplements that will actually inhibit off topic g so these are some as you do not wanna take when you're doing some type of fasting protocol and Colostrum is one of them. As is methyl full aid has his b twelve these will actually slowed on us slowdown atop. But she's so it's understanding when to cycle in and out of these not only food, but the nutrients in the supplements that you might be using. And by the way, I don't think we yet defined amp k the dentist phosphate protein kinase. But but define amp K because it plays a pretty integral role when it comes to maintaining healthy Tofte g and I know. There are certain supplements you use to to regulate amp K and Tofte g. So I if I am K, and then get into the things that you did discover in writing this book that enhance kind of the fasting process because fasting increases amp K, but you can kind of put things in your body at the same time to upgrade the fast. Yeah, increases AMP K and fasting also increases entity plus by about thirty percent, which is another good benefit. But amp K is your friend is the higher the better. But just like this like inhibiting MTR is your friend also. But you don't wanna do it all the time. You do not want elevated ABC that means you'd be starvation mode, but it's a nutrient sensor, and the AM p is is pretty similar ATP. So that's at Denison model phosphate is core of it. And the k means it's kinda so it's it's actually an enzyme that attach is a phosphate to the AMP to convert it to ATP and. It is low when ATP slow whites nutrient sensor, and it goes up, and it's very good thing when it goes up because that means it's going to activate topically so things that in inhibit or lower and PK will inhibit topic because that's one of the primary signals. So it put your body into a repair mode and in the primary issue of. Is that a catalyze the inhibition of 'em Tor the mechanistic target of rapamycin, which is a powerful signaling pathway that is really used for Anabel isn't were building your body. I mean you need 'em tour. But if it's an, but if it's activated all the time, you're going to have major problems. So it's a cycling in and out of 'em PK an MTR there's somewhat like a seesaw so in AM picot amputee as high end towards low interest high mpc as low so you wanna cycle that that seesaw in and out regularly throughout the week. At least that's my view of obtaining, some of the highest benefits from this process right in and when it comes to amp K, you know, kind kind of the the beautiful scenario here for for a might Okondo biogenesis. I think especially, you know, a lot of people listening in they're trying to find that sweet spot for for exercise and for fitness. But if you combine fasting with the other thing that can up regulate amp k which is. Brief spurts of high intensity interval training. You can mimic, you know, especially if you're on a robot athlete because this is something I used to talk about a lot when I was doing triathlon. Doing kind of like this minimalist ironman triathlon protocol is I found that that very short high intensity interval training sessions, especially in slightly calorie depleted state could could give me the same aerobic benefits as the longer, you know, like ninety minutes suffer fest pound the pavement run sessions or or the very long bike rides. And I'm not saying you don't need to put in the hard work. Like, I don't want to be one of those you know, bio hackers stance on a vibration platform for for five minutes to get a six pack ads. But what I am saying is that you you you can use fasting in high intensity interval training as you've alluded to especially after your feed like a brief spurt of of resistance training to get the growth hormone release and the amp K, and the might Okondo biogenesis when you start to we've all of this stuff together. It creates a really beautiful scenario. So for fitness as well. Fitness and optimal help I really think it's a recipe for massively in radically accelerating your ability to achieve optimal health. Now. What are the different nutrients and supplements? Because I mean, you even even sent me, and I know this is part of your next book. So I don't necessarily want to want to force you to reveal all the secrets in your next book on jeopardy, but. Yeah. You send me the recipe for an autonomous G T that you were drinking that I've even mentioned on on other shows. And I think that's a perfect example of how yet. Yes, I bought all the ingredients. It's in glass Mason jar up in my pantry and of been using it every day, I actually quit using nicotinamide right beside which I was taking a supplement and began to use that T instead because it has a lot of these any D precursors in it that you talked about. But can you get into that? As kind of an example of the different things are found up. Regulate amp K sure before we do that. Let me mention one of the things that decreases app K and that is present in eighty percent of the population. What do you think that is? Well, I would say excess calories, but but that's obvious insulin resistance, insulin resistance. Normally, it's it's a actual medicine acknowledges that thirty percent of population has diabetes, which of course, is maximum resistance, but type two diabetes. But if you do more sensitive tests that was described by Joseph craft, and he wrote a book about this where you do oral glucose tolerance tests sequentially measure your glucose and insulin levels after the glucose challenge. And then you might you graph that and you look at the graphs tables in his book, you can figure it out. But if you do that more Senate pets eighty percent of the population syncing resistance in when your insulin resistant. You're amp K is inhibited. It goes down. So you've gotta do the basics. First you've got to get rid of insulin resistance. No magic atop itchy tea or supplement is going to counter act that is the fundamental foundational basic. That you need. Okay. Got it. And by the way, and most of your listeners are doing the already, but I just I just want to reinforce the obvious and just a quick rabbit hole. I think a lot of people because because there's a lot of talk going on out there before return to these nutrients for for a tougher G T. There's a lot of talk going on out there about insulin resistance induced by Kito Genesis due to the fact that on a on an oral glucose tolerance test after one has has limited carbohydrates. They appear to have insulin insensitivity in response to a bolles of glucose, it's my understanding that that's related to Kito service or fasting causing down regulation of glue foreign glue five transporters, so that it appears that because you're foreign Glueck five are down. Regulated glucose isn't getting into muscles or liver quite as well. But what you would see after a few days of say carbohydrate repeating would be an apple. Nation of those receptors. So it's not true insulin. It's seventy that result of fasting or Kito says even though it might appear. So if you're just doing a glucose tolerance test glue gun is a hormone that also interacts with that. As does the insulin resistance again or actually maximum insulin sensitivity because when you restrict your carbohydrates, and especially in fasting mode, your insulin levels can get so low that your glycogen levels that actually it's too low to stimulate the Liber to make glucose, so you actually get a re it doesn't it doesn't Hibbitt act us a stimulant. So the actually you need so your glucose levels start to rise gluconeogenesis just because your insulin levels, insulin levels are so darn low. An interestingly if you the solution for that is to eat some carbohydrates like a fruit or something, and it will be Slocum was pure healthy carbs, and you would think your blood sugar would rise, but actually goes down because you raise your insulin levels. Okay. So nutrients for Tofte, gee, what what kind of things have you discovered work. There's a lot of them. Most of them. Can we got times? Yeah. Like burgling brings a good one. You don't wanna take Burberry and everyday, but 'boring is good e c g c from green tea is another good one. But what I what I think is even better I've found these apples from Europe wild crafted apples with. Nope. That are Ganic and they're they're picked green. And they're these ancient apples are full of these itchy g see like compounds and that probably have higher concentrate, they do have higher concentrations ingred tea. So is the whole apple and these wild apples. Anyway, just do because I know you have a little bit of a fruit orchard, are you growing? These are you purchasing. No, I am port them from Europe. It's not a bailable commercially. And and some of most of the Pali the polyphenols are really bitter. Bourbon would be a classic example. I would challenge virtually anyone to have. A teaspoon of Burberry. Not just a core. Sixteenth of teaspoon. So darned bidder. Equally bitter is pomegranate peel, not pomegranate, pomegranate peel polyphenyls, sometimes referred into PP pump grant appeal extracts, but you can get the pomegranate peel powder, and there's no there's no capsules like that. But the do sell the powder, and you can put him in capsules yourself, and that is loaded with Alagic acid in these alleged tannin's, which may be which most likely are even more powerful. And they're the active form of that is actually created when you swallow them in their metabolising, your gut to these other chemical compounds called euro Lipton's your ear. You're listen that that's that's actually an anti ageing compound. I don't know if I've ever told you this, but the probiotic that I use the probiotic made by seed that's a few different probiotic strains mixed with pomegranate at extract. So that you get that you're. In a release upon consumption of the pomegranate, abstract. So so I take it as part of my probiotic. Yeah. Yeah. It's a big thing. And I wanna thank you too. I was excited when I first found out about this. And then you referred me to a podcast of these guys from New Zealand. I believe they're netra pass and the really headed our. Yeah. Those those are the guys from from ATP science. They did a race is a great podcast specifically on pomegranate, and all of the cool elements of the entire pomegranate fruit eaten whole, meaning literally like peeling in dehydrating the peel and powder in that eating the CG juice, not just buying the palm pomegranate juice from the store. But the the magic of the whole pomegranate all hunt down that podcast. And it was a good one. I listen to those guys regularly now, they're pretty good. Yeah. So this t- that you make fill me in on the ingredients of that. Well, one of the ways that you activate a topic. Jeez. You make. Sure that you don't have a lot of acetate Quinn's I made because when you when you increase Esotique coenzyme, a you inhibit topic. That's just fact and interestingly counter-intuitively one you're fasting. And you want activate atop issue is not a tot, even though your body makes tones this is not a time where you wanna take. External key tones exogenous does not a good idea because it breaks down to beauty eight and Buterere actually increases Cohen coenzyme, which will inhibit on top Aji. So there's a time place for everything, but taking Kitone esters or or salts is not a good idea when your fasting really because a lot of people will use exogenous key tones as a way to stave off appetite cravings while they're in a fast state. You're saying even though that that might save off appetite cravings, it reduces toffee. What would you rather do? And they advertise cravings. We'll we'll talk about that event. But they typically disappear almost everyone. If you're doing this thing, right? But why would you want in hit up top that to me that's one of the primary? The benefits of doing this fast is is activating topically because virtually hardly anyone's doing ninety percent of the people are eating more than twelve hours as ninety percent in. This is a small fraction of people who understand this NRA plein. It got it. Okay. So the tougher GT atop its each E T another one I use this camel mile t- organic why because it's really high EPA Jenin, which is a flav own and that will inhibit. It inhibits what was the pathway on that one? I think it's a D knows N Q. Oh, no, that's Pontiac was in Kiel one I've actually forgotten. What if it's no inhibits CD CD thirty eight which is an echo enzyme that consumes NASD. Okay. So so it's consuming eighty plus. Oh, so that way to actually increase any h but is consumption of camomile powder. Not any D H D. Plus it would increase at the EPA Jenin it or income because in him it inhibits the echo enzymes, a CD thirty eight echo enzymes that would inhibit in a d not inhibit us for us. Yeah. Probably the second largest consumer entity in your body. Maybe the hopefully, it's the first because the largest consumer in most people is part paalea DP rivals preliminaries because it's a DD DNA repair. Matrix enzyme. That's essential repair DNA breaks, and it's activated. When you're supposed even the frequency. So if you if you've got that under control, then you're not activating parked too much. And then probably see thirty eight becomes more of an issue. Yeah. And you also told me you put this hydroxy citrate and Garcia compound in there. Yeah. Like, a power lowers coenzyme A or that. Actually, it's the hydroxy citric acid that lowers coenzyme which would up regulate toffee. Yes. Yeah. It's just like it's hidden Pearl that virtually no one knows I discovered reading one of these journals. Yeah. This is what it does. I mean, it's it's been commercially used extensively for weight loss. But it to me it's an autopsy activator profoundly effective one. If you're doing it the right wing doesn't work if you just throw swallow some and you're eating regular meal, you've got it integrated into the proper fasting protocol. Now, you actually make this stuff. So you blend powder. Arco bark t- hydroxy trait. Our cine powder care, Seton powder, glycemic Morton and camomile. So cares. It in I I get slapped on the wrist for my pronunciation of that a lot. And then so all of these are up regulating, tough Aji or increasing any D or both. But then you're also sweetening it you turned me onto this fabulous sweetener. Yeah. Tell the total listeners. This is the best Weiner I've ever encountered it blows everything out of the water. It's made by conto. I believe LA Cayenne te'o. And it's called monk fruit sweetener. Or lo Han, and it's the owned fortune promise really hard to find Kazan obscure website called Amazon. But you gotta be careful because they go out of stock of lot. So I usually have two or three bottles all the time in case they go to stock. But it's it's the flavor. It's just as Magnus flavor in Asian. It just makes anything taste good. But that's the tea in addition to the I use a t to swallow all these other supplements like the Burberry, curcumin, the pomegranate appeal polyphenyls, apple peel polyphenyls or the apple of poll wild. Apple polyphenyls Rivera trawl, co Q ten interesting Toca trials are another ones that do it. So I take those at night rather than the morning do drink this. What? Ono nitric it cold, actually because I live in Florida. Yeah. Yeah. But, but but most of this stuff is also pretty well. Do you put it into the smoothie, I wonder? Yeah. I put into lender because some just had some this morning. I didn't put in a blender because I was in a rush and the pipe dissolve the power, you can kind of choke on it. So. Yeah. Really? Well. Yeah. I put I mixed it all in a Mason glass jar. And actually what I did it a few days ago was I made ice cream out of it. I just took all the power put it in with with ca cow and six eg yokes can of coconut milk. A little bit a little bit of collagen for the joints at Elektra sweetener in that. And then let me think of what else I had in their those are the biggies, and then I blended that and then put it in the freezer in a stainless steel bowl. So I've got it as almost like this Kito genyk ice cream. I can have after dinner at night. But it's got all the powders in it. So I've I've turned your t in the ice cream, but it tastes pretty good. Leave it to bend improve it. So you're really healthy. And I don't think you have many symptoms of any disease. But have you noticed any difference from doing this recently? No. But I haven't gone in front of labs recently either. And I I haven't retested my telomeres, so so I can't say I haven't quantified lately I've been too busy. Well, Hello during this episode. You might hear my good friend. Dr Joseph McCulloch, an ice talking about infra-red and saunas will the sauna. I use is made by clear light. There sponsor of today's show. What I like about them. Is there a they're low EMF's on they? Use 'em shielding a lifetime warranty. I have their big sanctuary model in my basement. So I can go in there and do yoga and all my crap. I can also read magazines read books in their keep my cell phone out of there. I wanna microwave myself and my sauna, but a saunas have been shown to a lot of the things you discover in today's podcast up so wonderful for the talks vacation aspect, you're gonna get while you're trying something out like Kito cicis or the Kito fast protocol that we discuss better yet. You get five hundred dollars off the regular price of any sauna from clear lights on us and a free gift with your purchase. You just go to heal with heat dot com and use code Ben greenfield, that's he'll with heat dot com. Use code Ben greenfield, we'll save you five hundred bucks chunk of change off of one of these high quality beautiful infrared saunas from clear light this podcast is also brought to you by alcohol. It's actually brought to you by fit vine wines. All. All of their wines have less than point zero nine grams of sugar that's ninety percent less sugar than the average wine only one hundred nineteen calories in glass only three point nine grams of carbohydrates, and they offer these rich flavor profiles with about thirteen and a half to fourteen percent alcohol or so they've got a cab. They've got a Pino. They got a Sarah have appeal. Griego sauvignon block a wonderful Roseanne. I like their per second. I'm not a big white wine guy, but they're bubbly per second is kind of fun in and great for parties. It's all guilt free, though, it's all guilt free. 'cause it's organic it's biodynamic. It's micro filtered at doesn't have all the toxins and preservatives in it. And better yet. You get ten percent off anything from fit vine wine. You just go to fit vine wine dot com and use greenfield ten to save ten percent off when you go to fit vine wine dot com that's fit vine. Dot com. Use code greenfield one zero for ten percent off. Before we get into some of the dark side of fasting. You talking about the dark side of water fasting and the dark side of fasting in general in the book, one of the thing that I want to comment on that that I thought was interesting, and that I know, you know, a little bit about is this idea of hydrogen peroxide in the body why then that should be something we should care about. And how key tones could potentially protect the brain from excess. Peroxides produced by Brookside. All right. Well, not everyone listening this had the opportunity to attend some biochemistry courses. So let me condense a bow chemistry into a few paragraphs were. So ultimately, the food you eat, especially the fats and the carbs are uses fuel sources in the protein, maybe you can use before but typically broken down to its constituent amino acids, so you can remake proteins and enzymes that your body needs. But after you e fats and carbs, which are the primary fuels broken down by enzymes in your stomach to their basic. Parts, which is prior vague for carbs in pre Freddie asses for fats, and these parts are then shuttled to your cells. And then you're might contry uses them for energy with oxygen burns them. And ultimately, these fats and carbs are converted to electrons with the the whole electron transport chain dozen the might Qendra and these electrons are passed through molecules called Sida crumbs, and they resulted ultimately generation of ATP. Now, what's not obvious that these electrons broken down from the food require a final resting place or accept her? And that is the role that oxygen serves. So ultimately, it receives these electrons from the food that your digestion the form of hydrogen, which is ideally converted to water now, the carbon the foods, you have consumes converted to carbon dioxide, which is the waste that you breathe would breathe out. Obviously. Now, the key point. Here is the conversion of the food. You eat that your body uses to make ATP is not a hundred percent officiant. If your metabolic Bal. Quickly healthy like most of the people listen to and you certainly are is probably somewhere between ninety five to ninety seven percent. But if you're metabolic unflexible like over eighty five percent of people in the country are then you can burn much fat for fuel. When you do that your third you're going to generate thirty to forty percent more reactive oxygen species of which hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are the two primary ones with inside the mitochondria. And then they leak out they leak on a quasi and that that's the pollution that you get from these electrons leaking out in not converting in to the ultimate benficial in which is water. Now that when you're healthy, the superoxide, peroxide are not necessarily bad yester- free radicals. But there biologically important free radicals at actually regulate your biology as long as they're in the right concentration. Your golden is only when they become high that they become problematic and the answer certainly is not to take antioxidants to lower these. Answer is to to address the fundamental problems caused the aberration levels. Interesting. Okay. So key tones are gonna protect your brain cells that are exposed to these oxidative stress. There's like hydrogen peroxide, which you're gonna find quite common in the brains of people with with nerdy Jenner diseases, like Alzheimer's or park, for example in cake, and they do it because they're H Dak inhibitors one. So they let Rakkli lower inflammation. And they also increase a molecule that your wealth with. But it's it many people are not as called any age. It's the ends. It's the coenzyme cousin of eighty plus and probably just every bit as important. And if you if you increase your any plus levels, you'll get this because there's another kind engine many decay which adds a phosphate to any d to turn any any and then reduce it to any DP. But why is it so important you need it for just about every? In your body. Minted the, but primarily to make your cholesterol, your fatty acids in your steroids. I mean, it's the rate limiting of factor Profeta, synthesis. But also, it is the reservoir of electrons is what your body uses to recharge your antioxidants, the ultimate internal antioxidant. So key tones increase NA DP, h so this would be something that folks could use as a strategy in addition to doing something like consuming this this autopsy or an alternative to doing something like any injections, for example. Well, I wouldn't combine it with fasting. It has its purpose place on one that you and I could use and many listeners can use all the time. And that's when you're flying. That's when you dance when you're going to benefit from these things as a key tunes. That's what I would use exogenous Kitone big time. That's right. I remember this this tip, and I started to travel with little jot gloss of it of. It was the H VM key tones was the ones that I was using because they travel pretty well and any carry on Kitone aids. But they're the same. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So so water fasting. I wanna start there because you mention in the book, and this kind of intrigue me that before writing the book, you thought water fasting was the most powerful metabolic intervention you've ever encountered in four decades of clinical practice, then he changed your mind. Why? That's a great question because I was initially advising in by. Walter Longo and Brian wall that that probably wasn't the best idea what for two different reasons Longo primarily for compliance. But I think that might be related to his very thick Italian accent in his inability communicate effectively with patients, but Brian wall for another reason, not only compliance, but also it metabolic is not optimal. And it largely is a result of the fact that we live in the twenty th century, and we have the export massively increased exposure to the people who were fasting for thousands of years that didn't have and that is to these toxins that are produced chemically in industrially and most all of these talks is certainly not all of them. But the vast majority of them are fat soluble and because of that they're stored in your fat. And when you are water fasting for a long time, you will release in liberate, these toxins and most people have impaired detox systems, and as a result of that they're going to cost side effects in the symptoms that most people happen. They do extended multiple day water fast. Okay. Got it. So break down a little bit. Now. There's there's three days right phase one is when you convert your body converts that fat able to water spout. That's not a problem. You don't need improve that cause your body does it automatically. But most people have problem with phase two. And that's where you attach these molecules to the toxin like a method group sell for Esotique group, amino acid glycemic or glue Zeile. So and that allows you to the makes them much less reactive easier to excrete so that you can limit. They eliminate them effectively the body, but you also need some food specifically amino acids in proteins to fuel this process. And if you don't don't have any you're going to have side effects, which is what the primary so there's two primaries. I don't recommend one is because of the compliance which I think is a real issue for most people, you know, the vast majority will not do it. But then secondary, I think it's going to hurt you potentially more than help you. Okay. So essentially, even as little as five days, you can overwhelm your detects vacations because we're living in this post industrial era where we kind of have this unnatural environment were exposed to a lot of toxins. You could you could perhaps the radically argue that if you live on a pristine Himalayan mountain top never travel, you could probably get away with water fast and not have to worry about some of the detox vacation reactions. Absolutely, okay. Sure. There's people in the world who are who don't have heavy burdens of that. And it wouldn't be an issue. But otherwise you. Reef feeds to to to make sure that you have what you need to enhance these detox pathways. Yes. Well, here's the other massive thing too. If you're going to do a multi water fast or even a fasting mimicking died. According to Longos instructions, which is pretty expensive is three hundred dollars for five days. So you're going to probably even heat as sick people doesn't recommend aboard once a once a month. So but probably once a quarter for most people. So you're only going to be getting the benefits of this activity for you know, twenty thirty times a year. Whereas if you do the Kito fasting describing will discuss in more detail in a moment, you can get more than a hundred times a year. So collectively you're going to get far more benefit by doing it more frequently so you may not get as much detoxification topic g benefits, but because you're doing it more frequently collectively will be it will be a more a more effective. Okay. Now, you also talk about the dark side of fasting in. General's matter of fact, you have an entire chapter devoted to the dark side of fasting. A why did you devoted entire chapter to the dark side of fasting even beyond just water fest for the reasons I just mentioned primarily because of the detoxification impairment because your body needs some fuel primarily protein in. I've noticed personally that I've been able to increase my lean muscle mass by having protein during the the partial fasting days that so and we'll discuss what that means in a bit. But the other primary one is compliance people just won't do it. I mean, I mean they've got to be on their death. But even then they still won't consider. Yeah. I mean, I on a lot of my fasting days. And I get lots of questions about this. I use a meal acids, and even though those are, you know, they're mildly anabolic. That's what I use as my protein source if I'm doing an extended fast in. Gust here because I think that's a great strategy. But I think you even improve it further because the last thing you wanna do when you're seeking to apt activate on top eighty is to give yourself branch chain amino acids, which will stimulate tour will yo because the BCA's have losing in them. But if you balance that out with the other, that's why use essential amino, not not branched chains. Yeah. But they're still some so you have to look the total. So I think that's great. So what does that mean? That means you could eat vegetarian protein have very low brench chains, but you wouldn't eat meat. Clearly don't wanna eat meat protein. When you're in a partial fast because you're going to act topic. And I don't know this. I mean, I've got your ends of your protein powder. I haven't looked at the concentration of the branch chains in there. But you wanna make sure they're low is the key. Branched chains. And then it it's all it's all the based. Yeah. And the other one you can use his is bone broth or collagen protein, which has virtually no Fasching me to asses. And even though he might have twenty thirty grams of it. You are not going to activate 'em tour at all. Yeah. So so you could essentially do a fast when let's say like a like an extended fast for for multiple days or forty plus hours or something like that. And not have to risk. A lot of these details of occasions side effects by using like bone broth vegan approaching these were. Interesting. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And then you're. Your hunger cravings are basically non-existent because normally only twice a day. Anyway, maybe some snacks in between. If you're only eating for six hours. So you like you're only skipping one meal. It's about the easiest sliding off a law. You know, it's just it's just crazy simple. And there's like no harsh mental hardship one other kind of dark side. You talk about is just Kito sus in general the drawbacks of long-term Kito sus. What are the drawbacks too long long-term ketosis? Well, it's a very it's like anything like if you overdo it. You're gonna have a problem. So long term Tikos means that you're you're really doing very significant calorie restriction to get there. So the problems with that a special woman that you can impair develop some resistance to your thyroid hormone receptor, so. Thyroid impairment, which is probably one of the biggest ones, but it just stops working as well. You just you weren't designed to do that. And you could basically go into start switch from the fast into starvation mode, which typically at least a classically is defined as something longer than a few weeks. But I think you're still going to really not optimize your rejuvenation strategies with a lot of people will like like, folks, like, you know, the the Kito gains website are, of course, making popular the notion that Akita genyk diet could support muscle growth or muscle gain. Yeah. Presence of heavy lifting, but that's still not long-term Kito sus. And from what I understand long-term Kito says is actually Societa with with excess cata Bal ISM if there are no refunds present. In addition to the thyroid issues that you mentioned and what I personally experienced because I combine twelve months of strict Kito sus because I did. Volk study at uconn, and and you know, eighty to ninety percent fat based going into that I experienced pretty severe endocrine disruption as well. I got nearly Hypo Nadal combining long turnkey toes with no cyclic reef feeds with with a high mounts of physical activity. Yeah. That's because fasting crimes your body from proven does by removing the damage parse through top achieve. But did you just mentioned it's the reef feeds that are the is really the magic of fasting is the reef and that the opportunity to rebuild loose cells and tissues, largely as a result the stem cell activation. But give yourself the nutrients and the metabolic activation through strength training exercises to 'cause at repair regeneration, Bridget regeneration in and basically anabolic growth so define for me Kito fasting, and how this concept of psycho. Ketosis works in address. The issues we talked about. Okay. The first is I mentioned earlier is that you want to be metabolically flexible. You cannot do Kito fastening or partial at least in my belief unless you're metabolic flexible. So if you do four weeks of eating between only six and eight hours a day. I personally do six hours all the time is very rare wherever violate that that window six hours. If you do it for four weeks, you will invariably I mean, there are probably some people won't be, but probably not in listening to your podcast. So if you do that for four weeks, you will be metabolic flex one. Then you can start key to vast. So what does your only gonna have one? So basically, you would not eat for eighteen hours. So say that window is from nine to three. So you haven't eaten for eighteen hours three o'clock in the afternoon. Nine o'clock the next morning. What you're what are you gonna do that that you're gonna one meal that one meal is somewhere between three and five hundred calories in the way, you figure out the number of Cal? Is based on your lean body mass, and you multiply that by three point five. So it's not a rigid science. So you know, you just wanna have enough calories. So what are those calories? Well, this I learned this by trial and error. It's most of the calories is our protein. You wanna definitely restrict your carbon hydrates under ten ten grams. Ideally, certainly under twenty, but if you can get under ten and defend under ten or twenty grams in the rest of it are these proteins that this we mentioned earlier don't wanna have any branch chains, or at least minimally minimal branch chains. I mean, if you have a few grams not gonna be big deal, but you really want to keep them minimize, and you can have things like bone broth college of vegan proteins and also. You're you're essential minnows, if they're low and branched chains and for people who are looking at labels of supplements and things like that the branch change would be loosing. That's the particular villain in very high amounts. Yeah. And then my solution in valley are the other two failing is something about chemistry people. Yeah. So so yeah. Those three of the branch chain. So they are beneficial. So Wendy have those you have on the reveal the next day. That's when you go wild with the branched chains, it's not the as or evil. There's a time and place for all of them and that and they certainly actually Jimmy taken when you're in Cato pass. So and that's the key. So then you also want to be careful that you're not taking some of mentioned earlier like you're Colostrum Kitone supplements b twelve or mill Foley because that's going to activate 'em Tor. And that's the last thing you wanna do. Well that fade I'm tour. When you're trying to activate compassi because your member their seat. There's a balance because you're gonna increase your going decrease AMP k which will will activate them tour. Okay. Got it. So so essentially the steps here would be incorporate time restricted feeding. Yes. And in your book, and and I know we mentioned if you're exercising this may decrease a little bit. But it's about sixteen to eighteen hours per day. And then you recommend to stop eating three hours prior to bedtime least handing a coffee. I personally do my six hours before. But you know, I I'm not married, and I have no social life. So to do that. Yeah. I was going to say we have our family dinner, eight thirty PM. So that's that's tough. But then you also have the the in addition the intermittent fasting nodding for three hours before bedtime. You simply incorporate the cyclic approach where your your going Kito genyk for for how many days in a row before you do a refitted. The restricted six eight are eating window. Is it depends twice a week. I'll do do the partial faster Kito fast. So I'll I'll do Akito fastened eat for two days than do another defendant eat for three days so get a in a week and the Kito fast as you're you're defining as of sixteen hour, eight hour fast days, no Akito fast days, when you're only had a three to three to five hundred calorie meal when okay got it. So every single they you're doing the intermittent fast. And then yes on a couple of days of the week. You're doing the three hundred five hundred calorie where you're limiting the amount of animal, proteins, Colostrum, etc. Now, this is different than fasting mimicking diet, which doesn't consecutively I think there's benefit to break it up and then too. So your beer fasting and actually in in long those approach he gives you a thousand calories on day one and then seven hundred fifty calories unday two three and four and five. So I'm saying go lower after an eighteen hour fast. You're in what I do every time. I do this. I will not lose any way when I'm doing sixteen to eighteen hour or eighteen hour intermittent fast. Just don't lose weight is swimming a medium regular calories. But the moment I go do the Kito fast. I'll lose four five pounds and actually losing less now that I've integrated approach increase the protein backup to make the primary constituent of calories. Okay. So if you're getting hungry during this, do you have specific strategies that you use or supplements that you use to manage any type of hunger appetite cravings? That's a great question. But it's. Most people who are metabolic the flexible at their gauging, the strategy will not be hungry. I I would say the vast vast majority probably ninety ninety five percent if your men not metaphorically flexible, and you're making the transition, then it's going to be problems for sure no question about it. But so traditionally in the window where you're trying to become at about flexible, you can use things like coconut oil or oil, even better control ick acid eight or even Kitone supplements because they will convert to energy real quickly and give you energy. But I don't recommend that during this time largely because you're not gonna be hungry. But if you want something your mouth what I do. I've got I grow over thousand maybe two thousand aloe plants it's one of the plant was elect to eat. So I'll usually go through two or three leaves a day, and I'll just suck out some Allah gel, and that's more than disaster by any mouth cravings revealed really use Allah, Joe, well, but for fresh from the plants you can you can buy aloe gel. Well, like like on Amazon comparible, there's a lot of ingredients to preservatives, in in the way, they're raise really careful just so much. I mean, you almost have to live in sub tropical place to grow Al outside. Like, I do, but it's ideally is best fresh. What about any of these resistant starches? Keisha, fiber, Cillian Hoskin like that. You could do them have to be careful because there's so many people have CBO Smalto ball overgrowth in those will actually feed that if you don't have if you're copying. You don't have that he'd been tested for it or especially if you've looked at it metabolic with the urine Ganic acid test. Then I think you're probably fine. But I wouldn't use them liberally for everyone because there's so many people have CBO. Yeah. On night, my old standbys, I chomp on a piece of nicotine gum and have some sparkling water that that for me much larger want sparklers great. Yeah. You can't use much nicotine gums, you want that stuff can be highly addictive. But man. If you're if you're craving a meal you pop a piece of that. And I've got this Lucy stuff it's pretty low in artificial compounds. Just it works like gangbusters for that. Oh, so you are also a fan of sauna and supporting the fasting protocol with sauna. I I love to hear you geek out on your sauna setup. So can you can you inform me what you're selling set up looks like and also some of your do's and don'ts of using the sauna 'cause you have a whole section of the book devoted this as well. I think it's really important. And I think one of the experts in is a I met him it the last bullet proof event in two thousand seventeen I believe Brian Richards who has the sauna space company, he's the founder of that. And I fully believe that the near for its onto that he was promoting was not that good. And I was going to respectfully dialogue with him at that event in and he wound up changing my mind because he's really knowledgeable. In fact, they didn't interview with him on my site is really the best concise pieces of information about the whole topic. Because it does get deep into the science. But essentially, I believe near-infrared is the best light Brian's promoting and you can make them inexpensively yourself. When he sells at least wanted CMF free is eight thousand dollars or so, and you don't have to go to that level. And is certainly inconvenient. It's like a small tent. It's not like this. Oughta you have. But the beautiful thing about there's no EMS, and it is truly indeed full spectrum other some Fard Fritz claimed the full spectrum songs, but they don't you just cannot do with ceramic panel is not possible. So you need like a bulb a lightbulb, these incandescent light bulbs there or heap. He'd lamps essentially that produced the full spectrum of infrared and need a lot of people don't realize forty percent of the energy that comes from the sun is is infrared forty percent. So there's probably it's probably good likelihood that there's some benefit to regular infrared exposure. And the other beautiful thing about near infrared. Unlike far is at a heat, you up pretty instantly. So when I had a far from so, and I was using you'd have to pre the sauna for like thirty minutes for you get in otherwise, you're just gonna sit there and be cold, but near red you turn the thing on. You're like warm within a minute. And you're sweating like within five is pretty crazy because you know, a lot of the far for sound is claimed that the the rays penetrate, your body deeply, but they don't far for only penetrates a few millimeters. The neared for does go into like five six centimeters review, or they also the near red is unique wavelength that's the motto to release nitric oxide stimulation of ATP production. Yes, sixty is one that does it. And then the other one is route eight fifty mean, there's probably ten to thirty each side of that that that does it. But that's the normal range that's quoted, but you could also I think as you talk about in the book, you could just use like Teflon free heat lamp to kind of build your own near IRS on because. Yeah. And there's a Lawrence Wilson of who wrote the book some I forget this specific movement. And but it's just on a therapy, forty station healing is. So he goes through instructions how to make your own now, it's not going to be ideal. But you can definitely do it for a few hundred bucks because you got be care. Fel materials because when you're heating them up if they're going to out guess, some toxic chemicals are plasticizers is not a good idea. So you, you know, if you're diligent, though, you can you know wise, do your research, you can probably could struck something that's a little better and still safe to use. So, but that's something I do everyday personally that I'm home yet. Do you use any type of any any type of compounds prior to a sauna like, I know one popular one, I think Lawrence Wilson made this one popular is niacin, for example to increase, blood flow, and and sweat. Yeah. There's a low number protocols at us as the the the primary one that stimulated what I think was Wilson. I think in key. He he copied from Hubbard that the mistress talent is a scientologist. I think. So Hubbard promoted that large doses up to five grams. And I think that's I did that for a while when I didn't understand things, and I hope with Bob Miller, and he helped me understand that niacin has some downsides to high doses. Particularly and that it's a mental consumer. So it'll suck up your method groups, which is one of the reasons why you get the flush because it's a histamine. Okay. Interesting. So so if you're poor meth later, you've methylation issues from genetic standpoint, you'd actually want to be very careful with niacin. In fact, the people who who flush like fifty milligrams and nice and are probably the ones we have MTA Trump our defects. So the biggest takeaway here, if you're gonna do some type of Kito fasting protocol one enhanced that he talks vocation process, and you wanna get the most bang for the buck out of a sauna protocol. You should ideally choose low EMF and as much near infrared as you can get. Yeah. That's that's the key. And I do about thirty minutes. And then, you know, you want to combine a little Coulter. Genesis I I'm not as brave as you are and have a thirty degree or thirty five degree ice tub out my backyard, but I've got a pool that typically at least in the winters down somewhere between the high fifties to sixties which I find comfortable sounds low. Low below. Hi. Yeah. But well below fifties edges. I'm not going to do it. It's just I just you know, life's too short. And I think you get the benefits. Ray Cronin said a lot of research on tumor Genesis. And he told me personally that sixty seven's probably sweet spot if you do like for fifteen or twenty minutes, he told me fifty five that bastard. I think he told me that he didn't like you sit on five, pumpkin. Interesting. Okay. So the book is called Kito fast. I think about the time that this podcast goes live. You should be able to grab this off Amazon and ordered if it's not lie, and I'm gonna put a link to everything we talked about to even the ingredients to Joe's automa- GT. I'll put a link to also to even like the clinics. We talked about like perr Chelsea's for north south center. His his little trick website for research studies. I took a lot of notes while linked to all of this in the show notes for you. There's no reason not to get this book. It's it's short, but but chock full of their stuff we didn't even get to. And I think folks really going to get a lot out of this one. And I'm actually looking forward to your book online jetty to Joe. So I may have to have. For a few years. But yeah. Okay. So it's like a sounds like piece of deep work anyways. Your book will be mine on that one yet. Yeah. My book. Well, my book isn't just on jeopardy. But there's a there's several pretty hefty chapters on it and that book that comes out in January. So I'll if you subscribe to a newsletter you'll find out when that comes out the the show notes for this episode. You just heard are going to be at Ben greenfield finished dot com slash Kito fast. That's been greenfield finished dot com slash Kito. Fast and grab the book to give it a read as usual. Joe? You're chock full of information. And appreciate you coming on the show today and sharing this with us. Yeah. Likewise, thanks for the community to share this in hope it really provides magnificent benefits. Some such a simple strategy. Really? You don't have to spend virtually anything for you, actually saving money because you're less food. Yeah. Are cool. Are folks I'm Ben greenfield along with Dr Joseph McCulloch, sign out from Ben greenfield, fitness dot com. I have an amazing. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben greenfield, fitness dot com, along with plenty of other goodies from me, including the highly helpful Ben recommends page which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion, fat loss performance, plenty more, please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that Nabil's me to keep bringing you this content every single week. So when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes use the promo code of generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

Ben greenfield United States apple growth hormone Burberry Dr Joseph McCulloch kion Walter Longo Joe Jason Fung Trucy ketosis Cuco Washington Braun
The Official Edgy, Explicit & Epic Podcast With Me & The MindPump Crew: Longevity, Religion, Parenting, Biohacking, The Joe Rogan Debates, Snake Oil, Pseudoscience & Beyond.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

2:33:06 hr | 2 years ago

The Official Edgy, Explicit & Epic Podcast With Me & The MindPump Crew: Longevity, Religion, Parenting, Biohacking, The Joe Rogan Debates, Snake Oil, Pseudoscience & Beyond.

"Oh, Hello, ladies and germs. Why do they call them ladies and germs? How come the ladies' get to get called? Ladies and gentlemen have to get called germs. I don't know. Actually, I kind of know there is a comic who coined the term. His name was Milton Berle. I know nothing past that and why he decided to call gentlemen germs, but that was his traditional greeting this comedian. So anyways, as your fun fact for the day, hey, this is Ben, greenfield, and I am very stoked to release today's podcast. Why am I stoked? And why am I talking like a surfer because I was able to sit down for a believe it was over two and a half hours with my buddies down in San Jose at the mind pump studios, and we turned out a pretty epic podcast for you that your about to have the pleasure of listening to. I will warn you that because it's a bunch of Bros. hanging out, we curse. We talk about drugs. We talk about sex. This one might be an ear muster, the kids episode, or if you're like me at least. Stay if your kids listen to explain things to them so that they understand what's going on type of road. It's probably not something your kids are going to be super interested in anyways because I don't know how interested kids are and things like THC and Silla Sivan LSD and life Lhasa Fay's and where we're gonna go when we die and all the crazy stuff that we talk about on today show. So enjoy and I am going to put all the show notes because they are hefty. All the show notes for you for today's episode are going to be over at Ben greenfield fitness dot com. Slash mind pump four. That's been greenfield fitness dot com. Slash mind pump the number four because this is I believe, the fourth episode that I recorded with these cats. In addition to that, these guys create some amazing training programs are all buffing an amazing shape, and I will put a link to all of their training programs as well in the show notes, they call them maps maps. So anyways, you're gonna love. This one. And before we jump into today's show, one of the things that I wanted to mention that I don't talk about very much in the introduction to my show, but that I think is worth checking out and having a box of in your pantry is this this extract was designed by a friend of mine. A Chinese or biologist in Portland is names. Roger drummer. He has managed to figure out how to take herbs and extract them to an incredibly high potency. Something we actually talk about on today's show this idea of taking herbs and concentrating them and win. That's good. And when that's bad. So anyways, what Roger does is he takes these non GMO non irradiated were called wild crafted. Herbs means meaning. These are herbs that are grown in the wilderness and their natural state harvested in their native environment. Meaning is wandering onto the forest in the jungles or the, I guess, Portland, it's more like the rainforests and collecting onto these things. He. Some really good distributors in Asia's. Well, he works with and he puts pretty much a blend of some of the most powerful herbs or what they call tonics in one tiny, very powerful packet called Tian SHI. So there is everything from anti-aging herbs, like Ashwell Gonda to blood flow to the brain supporting herbs like like EPA, medium and Hooper Zine. He has something called l. Busia flower in there which is also known as the happiness flower, very much like the Saint. John's wart that we talk about on today's show, you can view the full list of ingredients that they've managed to squeeze into this Tian SHI stuff over at a get kion dot com because I actually carry and in sell his particular blend. It's one of those things that I think is very handy to have on hand. Anytime you need to say, brighten your mind, which is actually exactly what's written on the on the front cover of the box. So it's called Tian cheat. Chinese adapted genyk, herb complex in grabbing over at kion get k. i. o. n. dot com. And this stuff is called Tian. She sounds more sophisticated if you say it like an Asian. Okay. This podcast is also brought to you by another company that makes them pretty interesting blends one in particular that I really like they, they make this stuff called a gold. It is to Merick, but it's blended. This tumor is blended with smooth coconut milk with cinnamon with ginger lemon balm. The reshi mushroom extract, which is incredibly relaxing. And what I like to do at night is a heat up some water, and I pour the water over a couple scoops of this stuff, and I actually put a little bit of CBD in there. I have some CBD coconut oil. I have some CBD drops, but I put the CD in there and I blended all up with either Allante for author, you'll have to blend. It makes us pretty well with a spoon or fork, but I like to really mix it and get like that frothy nece. So I mixed this up there. I think that you I'm sitting around the dinner table after dinner, hanging out with the family or when I'm playing guitar for my kids up in the bedroom, and it's great as a nighttime relaxing beverage. So it's called gold. You get a twenty percent discount on it or any of the other really cool little green and red blends. They make over at organic by if you just go to organic by dot com. That's our gamified with an eye, organic dot com. Use code greenfield, and that will save you two windy percent off of anything from organic by so enjoy. Let's go talk to mind pump and remember all the show notes for everything that you are about to hear are over at Ben greenfield fitness dot com. Slash mind pump four. It's been greenfield Dennis dot com. Slash mind pump the number four. In this episode of the Denver could finish show. What I've decided to do is provide people with what they need to almost like satisfy this whole maslow's hierarchy of needs or the things that I know are really big pain points for people. Sometimes all thumb through that book before I head off on a trip where I know I'm going to have beautiful women thrown at me and I'm getting a, I'm going to be in that situation where all of a sudden that temporary gratification seem super, super interesting, and really fun compared to leaving legacy and love. It greenfield dies. To Jerry endorsed butts me Woodham when I'm only human left guest. Oh. Alive, spend thirty thousand dollars a month on his longevity killed by his goat. He's an expert in human performance Nutricia. Voted America's top personal trainer. One of the Globes, most influential people, health and fitness. His show provides you with everything. You need to optimize physical and mental performance. He is Ben greenfield power. Balance, whatever it is. All of us studies done. Xiaomi greatest deceit. All the information you need one books right here right now on the Ben greenfield fitness podcast. They, they got a bunch of shit going on right now because of the pollution that's happening from all these nicotine vapor pins and stuff. It's it's getting out of control unlike the amount of kids that are all. Yeah, I mean, and those things are just chock full, propylene glycol most of them. So I've got reservations about those. Crazy, right. Yeah, I saw so huge in these your hyper concentrated amounts of THC in some of those vape pens. I mean, way more notes. I mean, I have a cousin who actually produces for the pins and it's they, he produces clear and clear as ninety. Nine point, nine percent pure. So the THC levels are just in fucking and saints. Almost one hundred THC just last you. I mean, I'm I'm all about better living through science. But once you get to the point where you're isolating unnaturally high level of an extra, it's just like essential oils. I mean, a lot of those can be bad for you, right? If you're if you're consuming the equivalent of like twenty two Merck routes from a few drops of tumor essential oil, which is essentially what that is. I mean that that's a lot of tumor. Yeah. Well, that's that's. That's what we do right? We, we find a little bit of science at support, something costs, a truly. You know or that positive benefits, and then we abuse the fuck out. It's hard to it's hard to overdose on an individual compound when you take it in its natural form, very easy to do when you extract like try to eat too much enough food to have too much vitamin a run your system or bark. Yeah, even in the world of of Nutro picks it like like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, right? And Saint. John's wart is a perfect example of very good natural antidepressant in a river in turn, and I actually harvested a bunch of Saint John's Warren, do we really, we concentrated a find it net naturally growing. It's a beautiful little yellow flower with a little bit of oil in the bud, and you can harvest as very easy to to pick very easy to identify you just put it in vodka for four weeks and then you strain it you, you can do. They. We did like a mortar and pestle beforehand with the flower in the bud and leaf, you put it into the vodka, and then you strain that. And that goes into a little dropper bottle that works as an SSI. RI shut. What I mean you you would you would have to eat enough Saint John's wart the fiber and and all the natural plant defense mechanisms and all the little things in there. It would actually give you a tummy ache if you were to to eat, get sick from eating too much plant material before you're right. So there's like a natural built in stop mechanism. It's a lot of I find that fascinating even things is like sugar. I mean, could you imagine someone trying to to your sewing. Never shoot on sugar cane right. One soda, one sodas, like eight feet of sugarcane. It's like my Josh tire. Get through like it, you know, a tiny little chunk of sugarcane, which is the equivalent of like half a teaspoon sugar, or you find Honey, which is pretty concentrated form, but you have to get through bees. Yeah. A tree. Messy sticky. It's a little bit different. We came in, I always find that dose corn syrup. Don't you guys find that crazy fascinating though. The that the how I it's all been put on the earth as it is. And then now as we've manipulated and changed now we have all this disease and stuff. The two beliefs are you have the creationism? Yeah. Yeah. The creationist beliefs which is you know, God put them on earth that way. Then you have the evolutionary, you know, belief, which is we evolved co evolves with all these compounds in plants and stuff, and so it just works better that way because that's how we revolve or both. Right? But right, it's an art and a science though, because a lot of these things that we're talking about, like, say, isolating process sugar from sugarcane or some other Sweden are, and then concentrating that we know that that that produces insulin insensitivity and and oxidation with the high blood glucose in the bloodstream and and all these side effects. But there are other compounds that you concentrate and we get. A great deal of benefit. Right? It was like the Saint John's wart thing, right? Like I'd love to have a really good s. SRI dopamine and serotonin precursor I could have around, but I'm not gonna keep a bunch of bushels of Saint John's wart my pantry. So you know, some as good and some isn't. There's the ways that we used to concentrate. Things were different though, like if you were you would make a tincture or and it's just not the same as when you go into laboratory extract it and it just an a whole 'nother level. I mean, they can. They can reach concentrations with in laboratories that would would be virtually impossible e with old metal. Have you guys ever done like synthetic five AM t, no. I mean, you know, you have you go to the Sonoran desert and hunt down a toad and catch it and isolate everything or lick the toad or whoever you're going to get that extract. Or I mean, you can order for pennies on the dollar from a website. Like like listener g, you know, five PM t- that synthetically created that's incredibly concentrated. And that's essentially the same molecule. Is that the that's a powerful psychedelic, right? It is now in in form when it's in that concentrated, there's a talk city issues, right? People can die from animals really long time. Really? Yeah. There's a lot of DM derivatives and if you were to inhaled EMT typically the responsible way to do it and I and I'm not. I'm not. I'm not a shaman, believe it or not. But from from what I understand and what I've experienced, what you do is you take Wasco and then leading into the the d. m. t. already kind of prime the punts in terms of prime the pumps in terms of the the m a o, a inhibitors that the Iowa is giving you. And then when you take an innovation of DM t. when he took a hit of DM t, you know, hits you really quickly and, and you're in your happy place for ten to fifteen minutes, and then you know trips over and you know, you're still still kind of kind of journeying for a little while afterwards. But like something like five AM t- that hits you and stays with you for God knows how long depending on on how much you took and help your it was. It's funny I was just on. I was on online the other day, and there was this video of this kid who was smoking synthetic THC synthetic can avenue. It's actually sell these. They call them like spice or something like that. And this kid was he took like two hits. He do. He had a gravity Bong which I haven't seen in years. Have you seen you seen those? Right? And he's. Took like two big hits off of that thing, and he lost his mind like it was. It was a scary thing to watch. Poor guy, really, really freaking out and probably didn't end up very well. And there's been deaths associated with these synthetic avenue leads you try doing that with cannabis in its natural form. You can't. You can't kill yourself. You could try and people have tried smoked much. Sure. Yeah. I mean, I take CBD now. CBD is just one of my favorite molecules and and I'm I'm not that into see like I use THC maybe two or three times a week or CBD. I mean, I also take a good fifty to sixty milligrams before bed and sleep like, that's actually my my sleep combo is I think we got, we got introduced you to Ned. Then we just actually hooked up as I sponsor ship with them. Really, really like that company. They do full spectrum hemp extracts. But you know with because you're seeing that a lot now in the market right CBD's become the thorn has a new hip extract. And I actually have to be careful because it because I talked about CBD and you guys know how it works in the podcasting industry. Talk about something. And everybody comes out of the woodwork. Right? But, you know, full disclosure, I, you know, I, I do some advising with thorn and help them with their supplement development. And so I have, you know, basically financial ties to thorn is one of their affiliates and their advisers. Same thing with this other company called bio CBD out of California. You know, I, I helped them with their formulas. I'm an investor in their company, you know they. So here's the thing with the market. Now with CBD just read a report with his independent researchers who went and tested a lot of these hemp extracts and what they found was many of them had very little adenoids at all. And what they'll say in the bottle is like pure hemp, extract. Some of the companies will have some. That's what we like Ned was because they actually will list the concentrations of the different can avenue and you want what you do. You do want a total plant extract, although CB's the one that we know now provides all these benefits, it actually works better when it's when there's other avenue, its present and they're finding now, some of these other avenues are very fat. Fascinating. Like CBC Canada, chromium I think is the name has been shown to grow new brain cells. It's actually been show in animals and animals. Very, very fascinating stuff placenta. So similar to like a Silla Sivan or a lion's mane or any of these other neurogenesis based comments? You know, I'm not. I don't know if they work in the same way because I know that those are all trip to mean based molecules in, but I did some studies with some cats and that's what they found. So there's no human studies really space, smart cat. No, it's it's really it's really, really fascinating stuff. The thing about CD that really fascinates me is because we've only identified to canal receptors, right? The CB one and CB to right one is much more prevalent in your the peripherally in the other one is much more prevalent in the brain. Yes, CBD doesn't attach either one, right? Doesn't attached to either one of them Alistair modulator of those two different. That's the theory, right? And I guess it helps you use your own Endo cabin, what's better? This is why I like that. Here's a, here's something a lot of people aren't talking about because cannabis so popular. Now you use a lot of cannabis or cabinets or teach see in particular that really locked down in hammer onto the CB one and receptor like anything. If you use a lot of it, those receptors down regulate and because your body creates its own Endo canal, you could be getting your body to produce less of its own canal and being start to create kind of this this cycle where you're now you're. Body produces lasts. You have lower receptors. Now you have to use more THC to get the same effect or even just to keep yourself, you know, normal right CBD doesn't do that. In fact, there is some evidence to suggest that actually may up regulate cab annoyed the can have receptors. So really, really fascinating, but I do, I do want to. I'm very careful because now what we're seeing in our space, especially like the muscle building space, this fucking CB protein CD pre pre workouts. They're on every I've gotten, I actually have back home. I got a bunch of packets. I forget what company so to it was like CBD's caffeine. It's like a pick me up. I've always found my own personal response to CBD to to be that it settles me down. I don't like to take it before workout because it it's decreases stress to the point where I just, you know, I'm a little bit too easy going. You know that now this is also a lot of ultra runners and Trower beating because he just you put on your depot wanted to run. Yeah, or you how sensitive art because I see you whenever whenever we hang out, which I love hanging out with you buy everytime we hang out, I'll see you drinking, you know, coffee or caffeine. You seem to have a pretty high tolerance for stimulants. Yeah. Would you say you do? Well, I grew up on for Espresso. Okay. My dad was a gourmet coffee roaster and I and repaired Espresso machines. My parents were not too clued into nutrition to biochemistry or to healthy eating in general, meaning that for exa-. Sample, I would consume the equivalent of almost a gallon of what you know, the big plastic gallon jugs they give from the grocery store, two percent milk, just crappy commercial cow's milk. And every night I will go to bed with a stomach ache and my parents thought I just had a really bad case of the stomach flu all the time. -biotics and and and and medications. And I go to the doctor in in, you know, it turns out later on, I found that I have a pretty severe lactose intolerant. I love you mom, dad, but you'd think back then the same thing with coffee, right? Like I, I would easily do like six, seven shots of Espresso when I was twelve years old. Oh shit thrown now. Granted and just reading actually related to the Beedi NF thing. I wanna I wanna come back to that because there's there's kind of an interesting genetic factor here, but I am a very fast coffee oxidizer. Okay. She netted in, I'm slow. I'm a very slow caffeine. New means to put it in. That's good. That's true. I process of slowly. So for me, caffeine can be edgy. And so when I combine it with CB best combination of all time, get the elevation from the caffeine. I don't get the edginess and CBD or avenue. It's also changed how the liver actually metabolize caffeine and I'm not quite sure I read an article. I mean, I don't remember exactly what the article said, but it said that there may be some benefit to combine the two for some people. I think I'm one of those people. It's one of the best combinations l. l. thea Nin. Milligrams of l. theme tolsey and a straggles are two compounds that forcing Matic is blending with their instance. Coffee blend now Leveque open and same thing. You drink that coffee and you get just this, this kind of kind of stabilize non jittery energy from the coffee, but it lasts longer. So yeah, CNN stragglers Tulsi I have not tried CBD and caffeine. I love it. You can also do grapefruit, seed extract what's that compound in their name. It's an i. a. g. something like that. Anyway, it's it's great food seed extract. Well actually slow down the the rate at which you get rid of caffeine. So for someone like you if you want it to last longer stronger. Yeah, take great food about great. That's what people tell you don't take grapefruit juice with with medication. Yes, it'll it'll get the blood concentration too high, right? You. I think. Yeah, exactly. Medications can do damage if you take him with grapefruit. Now you were talking about coffee. I see. You're just gonna pull that out Coffey right here in front of me. So. Put that next to the THC. Let's so just talked about that. Let's talk about your supplement company for a second. Not because I'm trying to plug anything, but I'm very curious how well it's doing what is the process of starting a supplement company and getting that going? Because I've always, I've always been curious about that. I've always been curious about, oh, you know, maybe I wanna put some together, but it feels like such a monster. Well, I is it a monster. Was it just a big, massive endeavour to get going with that? I want to reply to that question, but I want to close one loop if I may do it. And that's that part about beady NF because I mentioned genetic testing, and I recently found this out that twenty three and me doesn't actually test for all the snaps and actually test for pretty small amount of them. And so I, I got tested up in Canada, and I tested both of my my twin ten year old boys too. And we got all of our data back and it turns out that all three of us guys produce very low levels of endogenous beady NF we possess a gene that makes us lower in that mirror. Grow for the brain. Interesting. And so now my kids are drinking lion's mane t for school. They're doing the infrared sauna three times a week because sawn is another way to increase median f- they're not fasting because I don't think fasting is all that great for no highly metaphor. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Wait for the social workers to show up, but, but you know, I'm I'm doing a lot more attention to to fasting and some amounts of calorie restricted or some of the side effects or potential negative. Having low levels of indulgence. Bedia NF is at risk of dementia and later in life, yeah, risk of dementia and Alzheimer's earlier in life. Just not having your cognitive performances highs. You would want to me. We found all. So we did that. You're not as smart as you could be get the fuck out of here. Well, no. Oh shit, long-term. It could come back in and I found out a few other interesting things to like we, none of us. Boys possessed the gene that allows you to produce vitamin d in response to sunlight. Oh shit. I get a ton of sun. You know, even when I was in ironman triathlon be on the sun for like eight hours a day. And now I take my shirt off and I go outside and you know, I'm in my backyard naked. A lot of the time I get a lot of sun and I gotta drive it and and obviously I'm getting all the circadian. Rhythm benefits in the near and far infrared benefits. But it turns out that there's a reason that despite me doing that, my vitamin d levels went tests are always like thirty to fifty max, right? And you'd expect my levels to be like at least fifty to seventy or eighty. And so now same thing, my kids are supplementing with vitamin d. I'm taking a vitamin d vitamin k blend in so the this thing about genetics, I, it's just like a fascination of mine of late because I've got this fifty page report that I'm going through that highlighting all these things I didn't even know about my body and also my kids I, it's it's kind of fun to be able to see how I can help my kids to live a better life to be smarter or to detox better or to have higher levels of vitamin d for their bones or their teeth. Now, do you ever think to yourself because sometimes I wonder, right. So let's say you will use the example of the Bedia enough, right? You naturally have low endogenous levels of beating NF. But what if there's this genetic variants that goes along. With it that we don't know to test for where your your body is adapted or at least knows how to use the low levels optimally, an increasing it beyond that may be detrimental. You know what I'm saying? What if there's something like that? Because it start to get brain cells coming on my ears. You know to smart, I think you're saying, yeah, yeah, I wonder what if it would be a steep cliff, you get brilliant inches dives off. Would you rather that, or would you rather be like the average IQ for your entire life? Oh, we'll be worse being brilliant and then a steep fall off or like average IQ your whole life. That's actually my concern too, and and I realize I'm leading knowing your question, we'll get. We'll get when we were talking about the up regulation of CB one or CB two receptors or desensitization in response to heavy THC use the same thing scares me when it comes to you. What seems to be the darling of the fitness or the health industry right now? And that's specifically like either synthetic smart drugs or psychedelics? Yeah, right. Same thing at this huge flooding of the synoptic cleft with with dopamine and serotonin, and depending on the supplement, a lot of these ladies amp Qian's like Rhode Island that people are using nor up and Ephron, and you see an increasing need. Need for a lot of these neurotransmitters increased sensitivity a need for for increasingly higher dosages in like I got on the like the psychedelic span way in for for a while. Like I was doing, like every three days does with suicide and and doing like the weekly microdosing LSD and I'm, I'm a lot less, I guess, infatuated with those compounds. Now just based on my hunch that it can create some pretty significant, specifically dopamine insensitivity, right? If you have an incentive dopamine and you're not feeling good when you have sex or when you eat a chocolate bar, or you know anything else that you might just need more and more of to feel good. That's kind of a serious issue. I think we have. We have a tendency people, humans in general, have a tendency to find something powerful and fascinating, and then abuse the shit out of what we do. And I think that's what's happening right now with a lot of these. That's how we also naturally evolved and we need that though. Don't you think it's necessary for swing? The wind, we survive. The tribe is starving, and, oh, hey, there's Honey in the tree. Let's eat. As you said Richards, we can falcon show. It tastes good. It because you know who knows what we might see Honey again. And now we live where you can go buy giant Mason jars full of Honey at whole foods and eat as much as you want. And all of a sudden, there's there's kind of this, this ancestral backfiring mechanism. I think that's so back to back to what was that like getting it started, and then I wanna know source it and all that go into detail your decision making with and how well is it doing now because you've had it now for you? You went live with how long ago it wasn't that long ago. Right? Oh, it's eight months almost a year. It's coming up on almost a year. We launched with several several flagship products, right? So we had a Colostrum for the guts oregano for the immune system a something called flex, which is this this joint support compound that just got you know everything in it that you'd need for him tart, cherry, and ginger into Moroccan you. One of those. Shotgun formulas for the joints skin serum. And frankly, a lot of compounds that I had already either private labeled or worked with other companies to create for me and was selling under greenfield fitness systems. And a few years ago, I made the decision that rather than having my name tied to accompany and having a company rely upon me as the face in name. You know, despite me still being one of one of the prime kinda kinda faces and names for kion. I didn't necessarily want to be burdened with the idea of my entire company being dependent upon me being depend on keep man that whole I if I get hit by a bus type of them serious foresight because it takes a little bit of yet to have a pretty healthy comfortable ego because the opposite tends to happen. People wanna be face of every right. I don't have a deep desire at least when when we talk about the supplements industry to be like the Tony Robbins or the Tim Ferriss or somebody who, who knows you based on your name versus knows you based on your. Your product and your brand as an author. You know, my dream is to continue to be known for for my nonfiction books, and my goal by the time I'm fifty is to have a best selling five part fiction, fantasy fiction series and for those type of things. I absolutely want people to know my name I wanted to see new book came out by Ben, greenfield go, go buy this book, but with kion I couldn't care less. If you're in full know whether or not I'm the on the CEO or the founder, or you know, my my role right now there is I am behind the scenes developing formulations so, and and that's what I love to do. So we have our formulator 's who we work with, who go out and find the raw ingredients, you know the best ingredients or the ingredients that we want to put into a compound. And then those are produced. They're manufactured and see GNP facility over private labeling or white labeling certain supplements from companies or even having them modify those before they send them to us or partner with. He's like thorn, you know, because I have a lot of athletes have follow me, and I want something that is either NSF certified or TGI certified or is super duper clean. That's very expensive for me to do. Let's say the Colostrum I get from a small goat farm in western Washington. You know, it's wonderful grass-fed grasp finished organic goats, and the product is amazing, but that's a very spendy process for me to NSF certified. So I'd I'd rather have some options and show up in their drug tests and. All right. So we've partnered with if you if you buy a product from Thorne and you look at the label of any of the products I've partnered with them on in a lot of people don't realize this. You see a key on logo on on all the thorns supplements and that's because I've chosen to partner with them for some of the things I, I want to have an SF for TGI certified. So how long of a process wasn't getting in your own brand together? And then finally being we'll launch it that take awhile. Can I ask you about two and a half years. Oh, okay. Star. I mean, in terms of me making that decision and then developing the logo. I mean, internally, we follow a certain like a book called traction that where we have where we use their document, they also have a wonderful book called rocket fuel ecosystems. Yes, ecosystems, we follow their entire formula for a few reasons. I, my operations manager is he would be considered the like the execute or in the whole, like rocket fuel type of relationship. Whereas I'm the, I'm the visionary, right? Like I say, I want this to happen or, hey, you know, these are the last eight books I read on mytalk Qendra and this is currently what we're in the middle of I want to create a full formula. That's got p. q. q. derived coenzyme q ten, magnesium full vitamin b, complex if we can afford it. And if it makes sense in the settlement, if the price point is right, can we put nicotinamide riboside in there? And I go through everything that I want in the ultimate seldom and many times. I'm scratching my own etch. I'm like, I want this supplements. So I can take it in the morning. There's gotta be at least a thousand other people who use something like this. And then he goes to our team, and you know, works with the formulator works with the manufacturer's works with our our team who runs the warehousing facility in Salt Lake. And then we've got a whole marketing team. Now we have a social media team. We have a customer support, it's a monster, and most the, the lion share routine is based out of boulder, right? So we have a brick and mortar offices in boulder, and then we do a ton of our work on on. Excuse me, slack is the I the, the two main apps that I used to run. The team is slack and vox or just because vox or allows you to very high bandwidth audio communication and play at two to four times speeds the same way. So coach nine people who I just help out with their health, their sleep, their hurry, very ability, their diet, their training. So I still do some personal training online and for these people use these Vauxhall. Right. So anytime my clients talk to me, it's on boxer, what's the, what's your your most popular product? And is it? Is it. That's got a pretty good response now, or you're right now, the bar I mean, and that was the shit don't last long in here? Yeah, I keep them so I quit buying count ebbs. I keep the bar in the freezer and my favorite things, a frozen kion bar. I'll eat that as dessert after lunch. I like to sprinkle it on top of halo top ice cream for like a like a desert in the evening, you sprinkle on some cinnamon roll or some chocolate peanut butter, copper oatmeal. Cookie flavored hail atop and it's just his bomb, so you? Yeah. What I wanted to do was make make a real food bar that wasn't Kito genyk and that wasn't like some greasy. Oily thing that you pull out of a wrapper, but that instead just tasted like real food almost like a healthy trail mix in a in a bar form speaking. Akita, genyk. I have a question for you because another big trend that we're seeing in fitness, and we call this a while ago as executives his key tones and everything. Everything's got key tones. And we were talking to Ralph wolf awhile ago and he brought it. He posed some pretty interesting questions, and he said, you know, we don't really know what the effects on the body are long-term. When you have the presence of heat tones with. You know, full glycogen stores because that doesn't really happen at does in nature unless you're diabetic. Oh, no. Maybe. The ancestors, organ meats, liver liver has extremely high and dodges levels of beta hydroxybutyrate if you can see him organ meats a lot of times. Yeah, you have, you know, or is it the same. Meet and so that as high as like when you would supplement with like seven grams of eight hundred is at the same is what the what the levels would be. Okay. But you know, you take another scenario. You're in a fasted state. You're hunting your your endogenous Kito levels or high. You know your your ancient man who's looking at your Kitone p strip right here. Towns. Have your breath Kitone monitor out there just to make sure you're one billable or above because otherwise you're not gonna go out on your hunt and and then you come across a kill, you know an animal and you're, you're gonna, you know, eat a bunch of protein. You're gonna stop and get the Honey out of the tree, right, and need a bunch of Honey and automatically by shoving all those nutrients in your body. You're, you're putting glucose on top of relatively high amounts of endogenous key tones and I, I don't see that it that it flies in the face of okay and mechanism in. Furthermore, when you look at something, especially like a Kitone Esther and to a lesser extent to Kitone salt there, some some really cool things at those things due to like the NF cabbie pathway in terms of mitigating inflammation, they act on on the mitochondria membrane to enhance the function of the electron supplement vans that what you're doing now. So one one of the products that I was interested in developing and if you guys want more of kind of like the the opening KOMO on key on this, this is related to that because I'm not going to develop this. Now. I don't think wh- was I wanted to do a kind of like a Kitone supplement that was a complete Kitone meal, but that also included amino acids, your full vitamin complex Kitone salts, and you know some type of flavoring a little bit of protein and a little bit of MCAT oil. So just basically a powder, that'd be everything that you'd need like a like a full meal with all your vitamins and nutrients and everything in a in a Kito form. But what I've decided to do with kion is to quit going after all these long tail concepts and to instead provide people with what they need to almost like satisfy this whole maslow's hierarchy of needs or the things that I know are really big pain points for people. What would those be sleep. Moan, balance, basics, longevity, your joints, right? We've got five or six different needs that we are creating flagship formulas for, you know, like that longevity formula began to describe which you know longevity is almost synonymous with with Mike Okon drills, right? And so that's where I'm steering kion now is towards formulas that allow someone to say, open their cupboard, and you've got six different supplements, and that's it. You're not going to the four corners of the planet to fill in the gaps with this and that. And you know, a gut is another one that we're working now is this is this because of the market response and market research and finding that, okay, if I make the super specific insane supplement, you know, I'm really limiting myself to a very, very small. Exactly. You have to create you were thinking too much about yourself because you. Yeah, exactly. You have to create a high number of skews, right? And have like a hundred skews that you're selling a pretty decent amount of or you need to have a huge following in that one tiny specific sector that you're starting to target. Like, say, a key tone meal. So I instead want to how like my dream would be you go to Cheonan and there's, there's there's only like seven or eight skews that's an like there. There's not this huge shopping bagfuls up. We've learned that lesson with our podcast were sometimes we get really deep in the weeds because that's what we want to talk about because we've been doing this for so long, and then we'll do an episode that's like had to work your hamstrings in the best way possible. And just people download. I sips and Sharat light crimson we forget about that. Totally. Yeah. I mean, I, I mean, you know, elephant in the room talking about book just before this, right? And it was like, you know, we, we're, we're making fun of it, but we were kind of kind of. Yeah. Criti- oh, you know, don't snack too much to elevate your metabolism because that's a myth, you know or it turns out that saturated fats might not be bad for you. You know, we're kind of laugh. I hunt is so basic, but honestly that that's what a lot of people want to hear or need to here. Yeah, or need to hear haven't been exposed. If your goal. Now on the flip side though, ironically, I'm writing a book right now and it it's on, you know, these really cutting edge concepts in terms of longevity and biohacking and energy medicine. You all these things that would be considered pretty far out far fetched woo, you know, biohacking stuff that's going to be. It's going to be a big, excuse me, five hundred page Nate and a half by eleven hardcover style Costco book with a sixty dollar price point. I mean, it's not something that the masses are going to talk about in your magazine article that you just recently did with the outdoor magazine. Or something like that. I'll outside outside a big diff- I dunno. Well, there is always defended them. What did I talk about in that? I, I don't remember. I remember your pretty face on the cover. So, yeah. Fun photo. Shoot. It took me to this loft in in in LA near Culver city, and they had like you walk into this loft and they literally have a whole room. This is your studio for people listening. This is a big studio. You know how many was this? Like five hundred square feet and play. Maybe a little bit more than that. Six hundred. Yeah. And and it's just like like stocked with like all these, these hangers with clothing, like like literally six thousand bucks worth of clothing in this room, and then you walk into another room and his camera equipment and other room, and they've got camera equipment set up there. I mean, they, they just plan as photo shoot out to the tea and they've got you, you know, wardrobe and haircut ING and different lotions on your tips. I mean, they go to Dan, did you steal them. I'm sure at your handsome, and then they finished up with almost an hour of shooting in the cold tank like that. The front cover photo of outside magazine is, is me with my face and ice while I was laying in an ice tub and they would take a bunch of photos. I get up driving stuff off like okay round to and to do some different photos, different angle, you know, they gotta, they gotta quit shooting and go through all the photos to see if they've got the shadows and the angle and the clarity that they wanted to three back in the ice tub. It was. It was quite the process and it was real ice torture. It was. It was a real ass ice tub fake ice. Fake waits for, you know, and then they put dry ice in it too, so that you get like the smoke coming. Oh, yeah. It's clever. I don't wanna leave the the key on talk because I, I actually how much show the backside will you share? I mean, you've already alluded to using EOS, but what about like what you will you share with us? Kind of like how much how much it takes to even start something that big like how much capital did you need and partnership and runway time to actually turn it into where it's green like, and is it? Is it green yet? And I just took on one hundred k. from a friend of mine, I invest in a lot of different health and fitness companies. Like I mentioned that CBD company, you know, I've invested in in some bone broth companies. I've, I've, you know, my my my portfolio is is kind of growing in terms of like fitness and nutrition and supplement companies. And I haven't an LLC that I co run with another guy who's like my investment partner and he's got more cash than I do. So a lot of times in in some of these investments, he'll bring cash to the table and I'll bring more of my influence or an. Affiliates Djabel and usually I'll put in for an investment like ten to twenty k. and so we partner up, we invest in a company and then I do my best to ensure that that company really does a good job. I do vising for the company to make sure that that that you know the the CEO's getting their questions answered, or I'm able to help them fill in holes in the market, stuff like that. But this guy who are run this with, he wanted to invest in Cheonan and he's also on the board of kion. I've got five people on the board of kion who are, you know, they're, they're smart and savvy in the business world. They've built bid companies, they the, they're, they're Savia at raising money, those type of things. So one hundred thousands, how much I've taken on. But that was just in the past few months. And that was primarily for the bar, like with the bar was just so popular. We had to get more bars in stock and and just didn't have the amount of cash flow necessary to buy enough raw ingredients and product right. Make that happen. So that's all we've taken everything else I personally financed. I mean, I literally. Financed everything myself. And are you, are you in the green, or are you still working back to be even from what you've invested in it? We are in the green. Nice. Great. Yeah, we are from from what my CFO told me about this. This was when we were about nine months in we were at the same growth curve of what he sees in companies that have been around for three years. So I think a big part of that was I just kind of had a platform. It's not like we were traditional startup, right? I had a bit, you know, I have a hundred thousand people on my Email list, and we have a lot of podcast downloads, and and so going into the launch of kion we had pretty good traction to start with. And then frankly, you know, and this is what I tell a lot of people in in the fitness industry who are just getting started, you know, fledgling personal trainers or people who wanna start a supplements company, or people want to be like a nutritionist, author, whatever relationship capital is huge. I mean business that's old business knowledge ever going out. You know, like the book never eat alone by Keith for Ozzy, right. Going out to conferences boots on the ground, flesh and blood interaction talking to people in the back hallways, a having a glass of wine at the bar and really almost just like working the industry in terms of relationships and in terms of rolodexes and probably half my Rolodex is, you know, hey, which which bar we're gonna go to after this, let's meet up. Oh, hey, what's your number? You know? And you put the number in the phone, but then maybe month later actually doing business, you know, you not drinking and not not. I don't want sound like a lush. He has no me. That's how we met though. We have the first time I think we hung up over a Moscow mule. Exactly, but it's friendship capital out of people think it's like cold call emails and now virtual masterminds or asking people for favors right away. You've got to build that relationship for right, exactly. You want it. You want to go throw down a good workout with somebody at the gym or or go out to the bar after a conference or just like, you know, skip a bunch of talks when you're not a. Coming out in the hallway and sit back, but that's a big part of key onto is I literally have a spreadsheet that that's essentially like a virtual Rolodex with the names over three hundred influencers, most of whom you'd probably be familiar with their names in the fitness industry, but it's their number. They're addressed to receive free product, their their phone number. So if my COO emails me and tells me, hey, you should text so and so and let them know if they want to send out a quick tweet about this bar launch show, so that kind of relationship capital is huge. It's it's how you grow exponentially with that part hard for you. It was that easy for you that that part of the business just knowing you, I think you're a personal individual, but knowing how you grew up and we've hung out so many times, you know, you were gro. You do a lot of things. I hit them socially awkward. Say it bro. I've already admitted. I don't think you are. But then again, I may be so who knows? But, but was that a hard part for you, or is that something you had to develop it? Was that easy? It is not hard for me to talk people. It's harder for me to ask for favors. So I'm like, I don't like to feel like people something and, and frankly you do. I mean, I've I call in a favor for somebody then I, I know that that down the road, you know, I'm gonna be the the way you know the the industry terms like mailing out for them, or, you know, returning the favor by featuring something they, they send me in a in a tweet or there's. There's some of that that goes around now. Now granted for people listening in who thinks that this is all just folks buying each other often bribing. That's not what we're talking about. Now we're talking about is products that are amazing that you like and you getting the word out to people about high quality, you know, ethical products but using other people's channels to do so because you're friends with those other people because you've made. Smart business moves to develop relations. Here's the bottom line. If you're if you're Ben, greenfield, people are probably throwing ideas at you all the time every day all the time. And at that point when you're getting that much stuff thrown at, you just don't listen. You don't listen to anybody, so make you relationships becomes important because someone gets to know you. They like you and then they'll listen. Okay. Well, let me here. We have to say at that point now you still have to have a good idea. You still have to have a good product person still has to believe in what you're doing for them to, you know, want to connect and promote your thing, but that relationship is what opens the door. And if you don't open the door, then especially with influencers, good luck. They're not gonna listen to which by the way I'm gonna put you majorly on the spot because yes, brianna told me remember to ask us and we're talking about kion for the event. We want to be able to have cups of coffee being brewed the entire John hod heart event and Tahoe. Yes. So if you could be the coffee that is supplied to all the all the podcasters that will be podcasting, would love that. Yes, absolutely. I would love that too. And of course, the way I run my businesses. Is I then say, I don't know. Here's my partners. I will ruthlessly guard my time and. I respect that you guys do a good job at this to, for example, when we wanted to schedule this podcast that we're recording right now, you know, I texted you guys and told you I was going to be in in San Jose, etcetera. Say wanna you wanna sit down and doing episode, but I think I got maybe like one text back from you guys and and you know, after texting, all three of you and it was something like yet, Catrine we'll be in touch with or something like that. And then I pretty much don't hear anything for for, but but then I do the same thing on my end. Right? So I have an assistant, I executive assistant in penny on my end and she just sends me the excel spreadsheet two days before I fly out and say, and I look, I was like, oh, okay. I have a podcast with mine pump on on Friday to thirty. And honestly, some people think that it that that would be stressful to kind of like be in the dark about what's going on behind the scenes with your way, less trust with your own schedule. But, oh my gosh, like even even having something as simple as a virtual assistant in the. In the Philippines, which which was the first said, I put a Craigslist on really nila Philippines Craigslist ad back when I was I was trying to write and create my first ever triathlon product, right? And I, I needed this excel spreadsheet created. How old are you all this would have been ten years ago, so I was twenty seven and I wanted a list of all the different triathlon clubs and triathlon coaches in the USA along with the Email addresses and phone numbers so that I could Email them and offer them affiliate percentages of any sales that they generated from the triathlon training product that I created. But I knew that would be incredibly laborious for me, and I'm trying to write out these workouts and training plans and period is everything. I've tried to do what I do best and what I do best is not research people's contact information and then know like one by one insert the first name and send out the E mail to them and all. So I hired this times better spend their places higher this Galvin Philippines to do it, and you know, and since then you over the past ten years, I liberate washed and repeated based on Garry Keller's book junior for free on Amazon, you one thing you want to crush it at your one thing. And if there's any one thing that you also want to crush it at that you're not good at you find an amazing person. You hire them, you add them to your team and you have them crush at their one thing and you rinse wash and repeat that and that that's how I've built my entire competency to your point of the relationships. I mean, we have somebody I saw this opportunity in the podcast space. When we, I really started taking on sponsors because we're just now starting to see this flux of companies that are coming into the podcast base and starting like big companies dropping money now podcast, and they really don't understand how it works. No one has any really good systems back and forth. So we actually have a position. This is what Rachel does for our company. And that's all she does is managed these relationships and we're making it so much easier for. Sponsors and on top of that, she's she's coached by us or by me to touch these all these sponsorships on a regular basis to let them know what's going on with their company and making sure that anything that they need or if they are rolling out something new with their business that we're being informed so that we can communicate. And I just didn't see a lot of people do that. And because of that, we're like one of the highest performing podcast for every one of our sponsors because we go that extra mile. And so that really pays off that that that that understanding how important that relationship is in all aspects of the business. You know what you need to do next though is get like asked cheek implants and start your own separate Instagram account where it's pretty much you with with the featured sponsored. Inva- Keeney by the edge of the pool. That's if you're a guy, do. Do the implant, staff, implants, people don't realize how much those Instagram girls make like just feature a product. I mean, do like five to ten of them one time. Oh, yeah. You know what, though they have to have so many to make that big of an. That's not a sustainable business model. I tell people this all the time, like if you're chasing likes and followers in hopes that you're going to build a business and you and you're chasing that so hard, you don't even really have a great product or you're not providing them a lot of value to someone's life even if you do cash out because you get to two million and then you start flipping t shirts or trying to percent commission on supplements. And the question becomes, what are you gonna be proud of. Right. And and. So Ryan holiday author of egos the enemy. As this other book, he followed it up with an embarrassed tools away yet. No, not obstacle is the way another book about writing a really good book like riding your classic riding your masterpiece writing, something you'd be proud of. I forget it may maybe they must be as newest one it that his newest one, it's a Ryan holiday, maybe Ryan holy article, but I coulda sworn, it's it's an actual. I was only familiar with us goes way e egos. The NFL we'll we'll, we'll find out. Stephen press filled has has some very similar ideas. You know, in his books like the the war of art, you know about creating a masterpiece of that you're going to be really proud of you for me. This is my one hundred percent focus on this book. I'm working on right now. I've turned down publishers. I've turned down agents, people who wants to get this thing too big, New York publishing houses because I know that the kind of huge life changing last book you'll ever need for health kind of book that I want to write is something that you know, like. Earlier it is is not going to be like that popular book that that that's going to be potentially something you see an airport bookstores, but I want to create something not only with kion, but also with my books that I can stand by and be very proud of. And if you build your entire business around some Instagram account where you're featuring products and getting paid five k. for you know, whatever a, that's it's difficult to be proud of that as a life changing business and be, what are you gonna do when you're, you know, seventy years old and wrinkled. I don't think. I also don't think it's going to last very long. I don't think it's going to be. I think it's popular right now because it's so fresh and so new and it works. Oh, perennial cellar. Yes. Sorry, Adam, no, no, good. I I wanted to know what it was anyone's seller. Two thousand seventeen. That's it's a newer one. There's also a big. There's also a massive, massive risk in terms of your own sanity when you so strongly identify with your appearance and how you look and how sexy you are. Because at some point that's going to change at some point you're going to age like you said, and I know you make the joke. What do you do in your seventy? You'll, here's all the evidence you need look at. Look at all these celebrities who are reaching their forties, fifties, and sixties the amount of plastic surgery and the boat talks and the drug abuse and things that start to happen because you identify so strongly with your appearance and people love you for it, but then it goes away and then what who are you? What are you? Is it very scary place to be the fastest triathlete on the face of the planet is going to have joint degradation. Some point swimsuit illustrated. Cover model is is going to according to pop culture standards. Probably look like shit when she's eighty five, at least with the clothes off and even the even the CEO who's ultra successful, which is kind of a different form of almo- almost like a, you know, a potentially shallow thing that you could put too much trust in a, you know, eventually that money's gonna be gone and they're going to be laying on their bed, you know, or that money isn't going to be as important. And so I think even deeper than this even deeper than building a business is just you yourself right building you rather than just focusing on the body or just folks him biohacking the brain actually focusing now in in defensive and defensive people, though that haven't reached the level of success that you're at right now. Much of them are in a different state right now where they're its survival still to to make a level of income just to get by in this world into to make it in a Bill to eat and do whatever they need to do. Like. When you've got you see very few people on their death bed saying, I'd I wish I'd made more money with. They never say, have more time with family. I wish I had slowed down to smell the roses. I wish I had, you know, you hear people talking about like meditation and visualization. All these things that we never remember to do until we slow down and those are the things that you were not doing later on in life, and those are all the spiritual practices. Right? What? What are the spiritual practices? Fasting gratitude, meditation, belief in a higher power, some kind of of devotional reading or something that betters your soul, your spirit, the website, the art of manliness it, which is a great website. They have a shout out to Brett McKay who runs that website. They have a really good series on the spiritual disciplines and I, it's an many of them revolve around some form of upstanding abstinence in some things. So whether news. Very stoic. That's right. Either you upstanding from food or from sex or from electron from something. You find that there's a lot of a lot of growth because whatever you have trouble abstaining from is probably something you're using to distract yourself with. Right. And so there's a lot. There's a lot that comes from that, and then we look at at the actual affect that that does have biologically, right, we know that we don't have to kick this horse to death, but you know, fasting has a profound impact on might have condo health and on longevity and on that media and f that we were talking about earlier, we know that meditation decreases plasma and salivary cortisol and also can increase beady and f- you know, a gratitude practice lowers blood pressure and reduces hospital visits. I mean, it's it's amazing how much of this stuff has biological crossover for people who actually are still mostly interested in their body and their health and maybe aren't even that interested in in their spirits still has an impact. I was talking to to somebody who. I know who's in the fitness space, very much into fitness, understands upstanding staining from certain foods to maintain their health and fitness and odd stuff. But then they also have this opposite belief that or what seems to be in my view opposite where, oh, you know, I'm here to enjoy things. So I'm just going to sleep with as many people as I can and I'm going to do all these different things. And I, it was funny to me that they couldn't. They didn't see that they were opposing. So I told him, I said, you know, I think you might find more meaning if you obstain from so much of that. He's like, no, we're supposed to be here to enjoy things, and we're just we're monkeys were pleasure monkeys. Also, whatever I said, listen, I said, it's no different SS, no different than why you abstain from processed food. You do that because you notice it's better for your health and you obviously get more benefit worth more than the immediate pleasure of eating the hyper delayed gratification. That's we talked about this a little bit on our last up. We did Well, Chris, Ryan sex at dawn thing. Yeah. And I mean, it is fucking. Hard to do that. I walked through the lobby of rosewood sandhill last night. You know, Thurs Thursday night, a bunch of rich stockbrokers hanging out in there. Beautiful women everywhere. Right? And I'm walking through after dinner, eight thirty. And you know, I'm gorgeous. I'm dressed to nine gorgeous. I've got my got my flown on my hair slicked back. I'm not wearing my blue light blocking. Felix I walked out within about ten minutes with one or two beautiful women on my arms. And in when I'm in that situation, I'm walking through that lobby. It is fucking hard for me, and I have to remind myself that what I have decided the option that I have chosen is to build an amazing family to raise two young boys who are going to grow up to make this world better place to have a legacy that I create that I know could get really fucked up if I'm sleeping around and and if and if I've got, you know, whatever, you know, jealousy and and my, my wife is all of a sudden embittered and feels belittled and betrayed like, there's a ton that you throw out the window for that temporary pleasure and and you know it, it feels good. Don't get me wrong. I mean that that kinda shit is a lot of fun. But you know, I to to bring this down to even more just just like more specific Thompson for people. I have a book. On my bed stand and it's amazing, and it's it's one of the most incredible ways for me to continually remind myself about the importance in the magic of love and legacy and fidelity. And it's this book that is it's thick. It's like five hundred pages long. It's all the love letters between Winston Churchill and his wife. Oh, they wrote themselves letters almost every day and Winston traveled at ton, and his wife was really busy too, and they didn't see each other a lot and they were on the road a lot. You know, like the kind of like the modern traveling, salesman kind of things up to a politician in order and in a in a warrior, and he would write these beautiful love letters to his wife, and she would write letters back and and you see pictures of them holding. Has you power couple changed the world, amazing legacy, amazing family and children that they created, but they were true to each other, right? And and for me to just be at home and sometimes all thumb through that book before I head off on a trip where I know I'm going to have beautiful. Thrown at me and I'm gonna. I'm gonna be in that situation where all of a sudden that that temporary gratification seem super, super interesting and really fun compared to leaving legacy and love. And I think I think a lot of people, you know, they think the only consequences that occur from and we're, we're focusing on, you know, sleeping around, but this this is for anything. This is for anything in life that you, you know, becomes excessive. We think that we know some people may think the consequences are. My wife is going to find out, and I'm going to get divorced. Therefore I'm not going to do this. That's not the only consequence, even if you didn't have those kinds of consequences. There is a lot of growth that comes from understanding how to abstain from. You know, in indulging in all these types of senses, it's what's it's what makes us human. It's why we're not animals in, you know, we talk about the gift of consciousness. Well, you know, part of the gift of consciousness is knowing you know to now. Not do those things or at least knowing that there's benefit to not doing those things and like fasting. There's this in, I'll use the word spiritual for lack of a better term. There's there's a lot of return from that kind of stuff doesn't make it easy. In fact, the fact that it's hard is one of the reasons why you get so much out of it because if it was easy than it would, it probably wouldn't get much out of it, which we. Oh, sorry, one quick. They were. Here's what our friend, Aubrey. Marcus, who disagree with about ninety, nine percent of what I just said, says about food though, you know it's temporary, mouth pleasure, right? You're you're, you're getting temporary mouth pleasure. But the long term is, you know, whole bunch of ATP available to the mitochondria. So you get free radical leakage and you know, increase longevity and oxidation all these things that come along with, you know, punishing the pint of Ben and Jerry's, not halo top. Sorry, I interrupted, you know, no, I already forgot my thought because now you've got me thinking about what, how Aubrey would disagree with half of what we're saying. When I have something I want to ask you this was more related to I know a lot of your your morals probably come back from from the bible. Right? I believe that it sounds like a lot of what you talk about and I'm really curious with someone at your level of intelligence when you when you learn something new about science, do tend to go backtrack into the bible, or do you read something in the bible and then try and look for scientific stuff to support some of the lessons in it? That's it. That's tricky. I mean. I'll give you an example. Let's jump in going to interrupt today's show to talk about something that I was just in this morning, sweating. Azoff I, I am. I would say addicted in a healthy way to sweating a lot in my sauna nearly every morning that I'm at home, it's almost like I, I travel a lot. I was explaining this to somebody the other day. I travel a lot. I get exposed to jet fuel and brake dust and fumes in medals one. I'm outside of my pristine little personal home environment. I've I get toxic side, so my whole Reitox detox protocols when I get home, that's my sanctuary to detox my body and literally the sauna that I use his called a sanctuary. It's one of the best ways to sweat out medals to sweat out toxins. Your skin is your largest detoxification Oregon. But you know, for example, I'm training for for the Lake Tahoe world championship. Right now in in Tahoe places, and it's a great way to build new red blood cells. It's a great way to maintain muscle when you can't train to increase cellular resilience by increasing the amount of heat shock protein that you produce. There are so many benefits to infrared sauna, but many infrared saunas fricking microwave your body and exposure to a lot of dirty 'electricity. These saunas made by clear light do not. Furthermore, they're very big, at least if you get the big sanctuary model like I have so I can foam roll, do yoga, meditate, swing, kettlebells, you name it all inside the sauna. So you get five hundred bucks off of the same sauna that I have and a gift special gift with the purchase. If you go to heal with heat dot com, just like it sounds, I don't need to spell that for you. Heal with heat dot com and use code Ben. That'll get you five hundred dollars off the regular price of the song of giving gift with the purchase. These things come ready to build. I assembled it with my twin boys. In about an hour and a half, super easy. It's called clear light. You go to heal with heat dot com. Use five hundred dollar discount code Ben. This podcast is also brought to you by something called new man revolution since you're listening to a bunch of stinky dudes right now sit around and talk. This is probably right up your alley fellas. My wife actually uses all the new man stuff that they sent to my house to try before. I agreed to Tatham sponsor this show. What they do is they take things like shave butter and shampoo and body wash the infused them with essential oils, experiment and eucalyptus cedar wood tea tree, peppermint. They're completely free of chemicals and toxins. They use a coconut based cleanser in all of their products which were originally made for men. But women, like I mentioned, including my wife have been known to use them. And the founders are air force pilots and combat veterans who actually give a portion of their profits to fight issues. Like to stick to a cancer and his support first responder training to support veterans returning home who are battling with PTSD. So you get to smell really bad ass and sexy and clean while at the same time, supporting our country and the people who have served so hard to to protect our country. So nothing is more bad ass than that. Did. I just say bad ass twice. I did so head over to new man revolution dot com and use code Ben to get fifteen percent off your first order. Or if you're feeling especially bold, you can subscribe to their club. You get twenty five percents off your order. If you do that code for that is Ben club Newman revolution dot com. I will repeat those discount codes for you over in the show notes, go to Ben Greenville fitness dot com. Slash mind pump four. That's been greenfield finished dot com. Slash mind pump the number four and all through the link to Newman revolution in the discount codes in there as well. Really great way to clean your body. Let's get back to the show. I'll give you an example, and it might not be a. A great example, but I'm gonna give it. You see, one of the very first things created in the bible was light, right? Like light is a big one light is super important. It was like one like it wasn't trees that were made. I, it wasn't like dirt. That was made I. It wasn't even a human being. That was made I, it was light, right? And then we turn around and we look at the human body and we've always thought that the primary way with which cells communicate is neuro transmitters or hormones or the propagation of Nur transmission across the mile unsheathes. And it turns out that the primary way with which cells communicate is bio photonic signaling, right? We are literally light machines that that's how ourselves actually communicate. It's also body. Our body responds profoundly as you guys know, you gotta talk to the folks at ju, you know, infrared light in near-infrared light and farm red light in the fact that that has on the aqueous matrix around the cells. The effect that that has on on the body which is basically one big human battery. Well, when I see that. Of signaling. I look at the bible and I see like one of the first things made was light. It just basically makes me think, well on the totem pole of what I should really prioritize from a health standpoint. I should probably be thinking really damn hard about the light in my home in the light in my office and the light that I surround myself with on traveling, and you know whether or not those blue light blocking glasses on replaced all the lighting in my home with clear incandescent and red, incandescent, and you know, created the perfect lighting scenario there and get out in the sunlight. Every day I Don, I realized that doesn't directly into your question, but in many cases, they'll find something interesting and then almost like wonder in the bible or that's backed up. Then there's the, there's the nutrition piece to where there's a reason. I'm not paleo, you look at the bible, there's like Honey and milk, bread and all these things that are either vilified in our modern dogmatic, you know, calorie restriction, no fruit toast type a type of environment. You know, things that are kicked under the bus, but. But you know, we see these type of things in the bible, right? Like when you're when you're rich and you're wealthy and you're crushing it in life and you're spiritually sound in the bible, you're surrounded by Honey, bread and milk and dancing virgins. But yeah, it's it's very interesting how I think to a certain extent, and then coming full circle to the the where we started with cannabis and and and plants and Saint. John's war was the very first job that humans had in the bible there Gardiner's right? The very, very first man Adam. He was called to guard in the earn until the earth and take all those plants and all those trees. And it says everything was good. Yeah, right. It's like we'd is not bad and Saint John's wart is not bad and suicide and mushrooms or not bad. You know, all of these things were created for our enjoyment and for us to actually learn how to garden and how to potentially make extracts of antiques tres of and. And so, yeah, I think there's a lot that we can learn from that. Here's my, here's my Adam's trying to open their became carpenter in the moxie Smits t. h. o. are you kidding me? It's it's worth it. Once you get in here, here's a few things about those. Those THC mentioned you try to open, is it worth it because they put like Jean co below, but can you help me get scissors or something over and sang and all sorts of little herbs in with the THC, but because their package so much like that, you can't smell them if you're traveling with them. You know, like a super vacuum sealed bag without my daughter, they five hundred grams and also my kids going to open that ten and think it's all toyed cost three and that's right. You know, that's that's the, that's the biggest. This gives my my my take on the whole like science and the bible or spirituality is that there's, you know, there's there's objective scientific truth, and I think there's there's spiritual truth and I and I think they're just two different tools and you try to put them together. I think all those tools help explain life and help us move in an election. We had science. That's where that was. Science was science. Was science science, I think I think it was spirituality. I think science has its own thing, does a very good job of what it's supposed to do, but here's a great example. I'll give you a good example. So when you when people say we should just only have science and have, no, don't worry about objective, you know, like a moral code or don't have spirituality. You can't do that because science itself eliminates that scientists is only cause and effect. There is no. Is this right? Is this wrong? So you need both of them. It's just if scientists ruled the world and it was just a bunch of atheist scientists who didn't have any moral belief for anything based on anything that they learn, they would do a lot of tests into a lot of shit just because they could because that's what science tells you to do. There wouldn't be a was no need for moral wouldn't be like, hey, I'm gonna clone a bunch of humans. There wouldn't be someone saying, but should we, you know what I mean? I don't know if we should just do it right. You know, have some kind of built in inherent morality that I think that sometimes science denies, but I do think that all of us kind of know what's good and what's bad. Like despite science potentially arguing that, you know, we're all just here to survive on a giant rock floating through space to either you know, th. Vuk or survivor see who can live the longest time. I think that there's a, there's a little bit of a built in inherent morality that lends some amount of stability to culture. And I actually I came across this. I think it's the teachings of Aristotle in which he goes into like like a built in inherent morality. You know, one of these one of these old philosopher dudes. I don't remember I, I went to a classical Christian college for my first two years at university of Idaho. I was dually enrolled in a college called new Saint Andrews wonderful institution down in Moscow, Idaho for a liberal arts education. I got kicked out for breaking the code of conduct. Would you do multiple times pretty much everything that I could do to break. I mean, will you intentionally trying to get kicked out? I, you know what? I was a home school kid k. through twelve and once I got cut loosened into college, I had committed every sin I could commit, you know? Oh really? Yeah. I went off the deep end in college. Until I met my wife will Shilton. I aim at my wife and be decided I wanna be a doctor knows of the two things that straighten me out. But yeah, but, but for those first couple of years, I did go to this college. I learned a lot. And one of the things that you read are a bunch of these. What are we talking about? Like upside down, cake stands and run around naked? Like, what are you doing? We're talking about, you know, go like getting drunk frequently, Tom sleeping around a lot. I didn't use a lot of drugs aside from alcohol, so so that was an issue for me. Frankly, I got. I got into drugs in those gummy out of alcohol, so normal, normal college kid stuff just not at a bible college. Kids stop with very quickly get you kicked out of a bible college as my mom said, who also went to a bible college can't have holes in the knees of your swimsuit ladies. So. And you know nothing gets that calling wonderful. And frankly, I think you know, if you want to be a lawyer, an author, I think a liberal arts education is is great, but I didn't do well at that school because I was I was not living very upright life at the time. But one of the things that I learned that school was that human beings do have and and philosophers and and you know, teachers have have kind of built this into a lot of religious systems for a long period time. We had like this inherent built in morality. So Ben, tell me when you're when you're hanging out with Aubrey and you guys couldn't have more polar opposite ideas when we were talking about before, do you just bite your tongue or do you guys go back and have like a debate about it? Let me just if we appreciate each other from whatever, honestly, Aubrey, and I've never talked about open relationships or. Oh, really? I've I've hung out with him and to we knew several times. Sorry, Whitney. I hung out with him and Whitney a lot. We've on hunting for a week together, you know, in Hawaii or together down Texas multiple times. Yeah. And you know, we've got another hunting trip coming up with a group of us, you know, again down Hawaii and know we hang out a lot, but it's never something we've really even talked about. I mean, maybe part of it is it is. It's pretty obvious with me as you know, a father and extroverted as a devoted husband that you know, it's just kind of not really something that that is is on the table for me. But now we've never really had a discussion probably like a mutual Renault kind of a boring answer, but we never really know. No, I actually figured that it would come on. Imagine that because you have done multiple trips. I thought for sure you'd be putting opportunities like that and maybe having to have a discussion. You never know. Like I thought for sure you guys have at least discussed it like parties. We weren't invited to those things. Not invite you to a party. Crazy parties. Yeah. So all so you when you did Texas that you'd be in the area, it's because you have clients that you travel to and work with. And these are. I guess executives like, you know, people who really want to work with band, greenfield, what kinds of things do people hire you for? Because I can assume you don't have to say anything on air, but I'm assuming you're don't cost would a personal trainer overcharge you probably a very, very high fee, especially because you're flying from Washington to San Jose to work with someone or wherever. What are the, what are they hiring? You forget you just do as quotes for an hour. I know that's usually learn how to make scrambled eggs. It's a big one protein for breakfast did a lot of bench pressing on the chest tickles, sometimes bench pressing form and then how to sit in a sauna properly proper. Hold on a posture. No. Typically there are especially among wealthy high achieving hard-charging executives. Some pretty serious built in issues with specifically sleep, how to exercise and keep yourself in shape for things like golf or tennis without actually stripping away time for your business or in some cases, your family or other hobbies, alcohol, mitigate like, like, how? How do I? How do I go out to all these, you know, dinners and meetings and and mitigate the damaging effects that alcohol might have I in and a lot of times folks, I wanna pick my brain about what I do in those types of scenarios. Blood and bio work or biomarker interpretation is a big one. A lot of these folks are willing to or have already paid the money for a complete blood panel, gut panel. Some type of urinary hormone analysis salivary genetic, Annette. Alice's telomere evaluation, and they've already either started down the self quantification road or very interested in it. And they want somebody other than they're kind of like ho- home western medical trained physician who's gonna tell them all your cholesterol's high, get on Staten to actually go through their blood work in their biomarkers with them, not only help them interpret those, but help them set up a customized diet and cell phone plan. So what I do for all these clients is I sit down every week to every two weeks typically on a Saturday, and I write out every workout they're going to be doing. They upload their travel. They upload where they're flying and win. I program out everything they're supposed to be doing from an exercise standpoint. They pay me a monthly fee to do that. They all have an Instagram account. That's a private Instagram account that they share with me where they take photographs of everything that aid and same thing on the weekends. I go through all their food. I leave comments. I adjust anything that needs to be adjusted. I have a meal plan that I delivered to them. That's not I. It's not a very strict meal plan. I, it's basically like, okay. It was played used to optimize their knees, your blood, your by cure your breakfast options. Here you lunch options for your dinner options for home for travel. A lot of them have chefs, a lot of them have nutritionist. So these are the type of things that they share with their chef or their nutritionist, so that they can be eating according to their genetics, their blood there, biomarkers at cetera. And then most of them either wear something like the or a ring or you some other self quantification of ice. Some of them use an apple watch. You know, most of the time I, I, I go through air light, water, electricity. If I'm visiting their home, we do a full walk through their home environment. And by the time we've done that most of them aren't using these. These WI fi enabled self quantification devices like the apple watch, but some of them still have some of these, some of these older devices, but either way, whatever they're using to collect sleep and heart rate variability. I also analyze that each week and track how their sleep in the hurry variability is corresponding to nutrition to supplements, which I also set up customized and then exercise. So I'm a centrally acting as as the CEO of their health. And I'm either coaching people like that, or I'm doing one on one all cart consultations. Whereas just I'm not going to have you as my month to month coach Ben, but you're gonna work with me for, you know, sixty minutes or ninety minutes. I'm gonna, fly, have lunch with you and just pick your brain for the fall that up to because he also do consulting with like professional teams in the NBA heat that you went in and kind of went through their facility and set them up, right? Yes, it was what we did with the Miami Heat, for example, was we began to inspect the most variables. I just alluded to like, what's the airline? And we know that indoor Jim pollution. There was actually studied that just came out that showed the amount of cognitive impairment that occurs from air pollution. How much would it say remember? It's significant. I don't know the percentages, but it's significant. And so we've got these, these air filters, e- molecule, air filter, set up in different corners of the gym. Same thing with light, right? Like we're going with the more biologically friendly light, frankly, incandescent lighting and these old school. Clear incandescent bulbs on option for facility like that, but there's a company called Walla that does more of like a biologically friendly LED very similar to lighting science. And even though LED creates a lot of flicker which can be disruptive to the retina and Ken deleteriously affect circadian rhythm. If the lighting is pretty high off the ground, you know, like your guys studios are pretty high ceiling. We're not talking about like a bedside lamp. That's right in your face LED is not as big issue. It's like a wifi router, right? Like the damage that it causes exponentially decreased based on your distance from the routers, the worst place on the planet to have your router is in your bedroom for a team like that. We don't want WI fi routers in the gym, same thing with the water, right? Like we get rid of the water fountain where they're getting whatever, you know, fluoride and chlorine that the Miami municipal water hasn't it. And instead they're drinking what? What they're doing, their facilities hydrogen-rich water, which is a pretty potent anti inflammatory and an antioxidant water. You can go to the molecular high. Hydrogen foundation look at some of the research on that, and then electric city, you know, customization of nutrition and diet based on bloodwork biomarkers. So a lot of the things that go above what there are a lot of strength conditioning coaches out there who are miles ahead of me as far as their knowledge of of what's happening. Modern high speed video. I used to. I used to run a physiology lab and a bio mechanics lab where we'd surround triathletes running on a treadmill or riding their bike with high speed video cameras, and do gait analysis or fit. But now I mean, you forgotten step into a pod and you do a squat. And then you do an overhead and and rather than a trainer, putting it through an FM s. like the actual machine is doing, oh, I mean some of this technologies. Facilities like this, I was unaware that even existed well, but what I'm doing is going in and looking at all those little variables that are going to affect a player's can interpret long term career health, career cetera, and and attempting to make those tiny micro adjustments that take a team from good to great or take a player's career from ten years to twelve years, how how did that relationship heaven. It's a good question is I know Aubry was connected to the heat at one point was I don't REM. I think their coach listens to my podcasts happens a lot. Someone listens to your podcast, and then they try to get a hold of you and sometimes I'll get taxonomy, know how somebody got my number and there's there's some some texts I've gotten like getting news is a joke and a lotta times they've discovered your podcast and they're getting a hold of you and asking you something, or do you find that the these events support ticket on your website? Do you find that these executives and stuff you work with higher you because they want to perform better to out compete their competition or the hiring you because they're having health problems and issues? Like is it a phone call like, oh, it's because they can't get an erection. They can't sleep. And I'll really like they feel like crap after these, these multiple wind-fueled dinners and they, they travel to to Tokyo or to Miami to to do business. And they feel like shit doing. Their meetings during the day because they're jet lagged, and they don't know what to do to manage gen leg. My fly home, and they feel like shit when they're with their family because again, they're jet lag coming back to the west coast, all those pain points like the frankly, I mean as simple as a sounds, just wanna feel good. Let's talk about some stuff that you really well known for, which is figuring out how to mitigate the negative effects of things that may happen when you're traveling, for example, what's what's great strategy to mitigate jetlag if I'm a business person, I travel and I want to reduce the amount of time my body takes to get used to a new time zone or whatever. What are some strategies that I can do. The circadian rhythm are natural twenty four hour biological clock response to three primary circadian cues, light movement and food, right? So those are the three lowest hanging fruits when it comes to keeping your body on a regular clock when you travel. So what does this mean? It means that you get exposed to the natural light in wherever whatever the places that you've traveled to on that clock as quickly as possible, meaning of the sun's up being the light, not when you step off that plane. If it's night you've got, you're not, you're blue light blocking glasses, but you're really like your red amber glasses, like from from raw or from true dark from one of these companies as a really good blue light-blocking glass, you walk in your hotel room and and you pull out like these LED light-blocking stickers, and you put them over the TV and the router and anything else as blinking light, Christmas lights in the hotel room. And then as soon as it's light where you happen to be, you get yourself into as much sunlight as possible. And if you can't step outside of your. Hotel room and get out in in the morning, sunshine of gopher. Quick walk to make your morning calls, whatever you know when you're when you're on the west coast back to the east coast, whatever the scenario is you get as much sunlight as possible. And if you can't get outside because you wake up at seven AM and you go straight in at seven, thirty eight AM meeting, you've got the human charger, you know, when your ears and you've got something like the retailer glasses on your eyes, and you're using light as much as possible to re regulate your circadian rhythm, and you're doing the same thing when you come back home lights, one food is another the, the more you eat on an airplane, the more out of whack. Your circadian rhythm is going to be she show well on the airplane. We talked about Kito nesters really pro anti inflammatory, the NF cabbie pathways. One of the inflammatory pathways tends to be most affected by by flight by being off and away from the planet earth and all the oxidation, solar radiation at cetera. Two of the best ways to affect that type of inflammation are Kito service and or Kitone esters, meaning that it's best to faster eat minute. Only when you travel and then soul for rich antioxidants. So having a a lot of your first meal, when you get to where you're going when you are gonna eat, which we'll get to the second is Christopher vegetables, broccoli, cauliflower, if you don't have CBO or something like that can handle garlic onions, you know, a lot of these sulphur vegetables or sulfur based antioxidants and Kitone esters act similarly. So that be the next thing is you want to be sure you're not stuffing face on the airplane and what what I do is typically I'll have like some LG like some of these little spiraling aarc Lorella tablets. This would be for longer flight right now for like a two hour gig. But like like overseas your something that that's a relatively slow release, fuel like macadamia nuts, a liquid or powder base, Kito Nestor like a, you know, one of the one Kito prime meal packets or one of one of the human little bottles of Kitone Esther, something's gonna keep key tones elevated, and then a lot of gum, a lot of stevia. A lot of these little effervescing electrolyte tablets, things I can put into water. Kind of keep my appetite satiated so so fast when you travel than when you get where you're going, whatever time you get there, you wait until that places first regular mealtime to eat because it tells you tells your body, it's time to get when I arrived in my flight lands in Tokyo at ten AM. I might be just right at you. My arm off from having eaten very little on that nine hour flight Seattle the Tokyo, but I'm still going to wait until about twelve thirty to eat in Tokyo. So I get on that regular mealtime. Oh, so you wait until breakfast, lunch or dinner? Yeah, you wait for breakfast. Same thing. If you land at two AM like and until you get into your hotel room and you're starving open that minibar and there's a dark chocolate enough you, you go to you and you take your CBD and and I think a lot of melatonin wanna travel as well because a really good way to reset the circadian rhythm. It is also an anti inflammatory, a really good anti-inflammatory. You go to bed and then you, you don't fast. You don't skip breakfast. A lot of people on this intermittent fasting bandwagon when they travel like it screws up your circadian rhythms, skip breakfast. So. So one of the things I'll do all actually go out of my way to eat a nice, big, good breakfast, especially when I travel internationally to realize that circadian rhythm. And then the last one is movement, right? So regularly timed movement, whether you're you're getting home or whether you've traveled to a certain location is important. So what I mean by that if you exercise in the morning at seven pm at home, get up at seven and a workout when you've gotten to where you're going time afternoon yet at that time, wherever you happen to be, you wanna use movement to begin to get your circadian rhythm into the same alignment that it was back home. There are other things to the help you hot cold. Thermo Genesis, you know, like doing the sauna and the cold pool before I was waiting for you to say that because you've told me before you, you know a lot of times you'll look for an infrared saunas and as you get into a place, not even just inference on what I'll do is I'll look for the two things I look for when again, to a hotel. I look for the nearest well, three things really look for the nearest gym, and it's a big bonus. If it's got us on. Pool because water and heat are two things that really help a lot with jet lag. They help with the blood flow. They helped with the motto Qendra, which are drastically affected again by the elevator in the solar radiation, and in the cold is very helpful to shutting down inflammation. If the other thing I look for is a park, right? Any any patch of green near whatever hotel I've traveled to because the park allies you get out, get the sunshine. It allows you typically get into your bare feet, which a lot of times you can't do in the concrete, and that allows you to to get the grounding in the earth effect that can decrease jetlag and you know, if you know of of a park near your hotel, if your hotel has a crappy Jim, you all of a sudden 'cause I always travel with the resistance band and a suspension trainer. I have a place where I can go to train, make my own outdoor gym. And then the last thing, if the gym doesn't have the sauna or the pool, all search for a local spa or local Sonya, you're like Bagna five in Seattle or air spa in New York City or one of these places that has some really good heat cold so I can put on my. Underwater MP three player and going chill in the sauna, and then go to the coup pool and and go back and forth for awhile. Have you ever put this together and like what you just said to us in a easy to read blog or article, or guide or something. The reason why I ask is because so many people travel for work so much and they don't realize how much jetlag negatively affects the performance. And of course the long-term, their performance at work on the pocket book and all that stuff, and then their health like something like that because I know I have, I have family Italy, so we traveled Italy. It would always take me like three or four days to adjust, and it's fucking horrible. I couldn't imagine going somewhere and then like you got a meeting tomorrow and you've got to perform, or you know, whatever. I try to funding wrath LAN running around tapped into a lot of this. Like, oh shit, I got a race on feel for for ten hours on Saturday, like deep in the pain cave. What can I do to feel good within two days when I'm in Thailand or Japan, Iron man. So chance your question a, there's a few resources. A, I have a small section of my book beyond training that has a jet lag and sleep management section. Good. It be on my website. I have an article I wrote that's even more updated than that about six months ago called the last resource you'll ever need to get better. Sleep does just on my website number three or c, did I start off with an. THC might be kicking in. Okay. So a b three is that I have a document. So a lot of my clients that I work with, I just have shared Google docs and anytime I come across something interesting to add to that doc, I just at it. So they by jetlag tips cheat sheet and they'll just delve into that. And then you know, speaker the double aubrey's book own the day. There's a lot in that on on jet lag, measurement to Aubrey Knight, talked a lot when he was writing that book about what to include in those sections. So that's a, that's a good guys. Well, talking about cool stuff. I know when you and I were texting each other a little bit. Before you came here, I asked you what you wanted to talk about, and you said right now you're getting your really, really into anti-aging and lunge Eddie and halo top ice cream? Yeah. Hilltop rock into the Oris. These pants. Well, these pants are Ori. Yes. How you like a love, aren't they great at that? We, we love them, man. I have a lot of the Ori now. They're actually one of my podcasts sponsors no way. Even if they weren't a sponsor, I'd wear their clothing because it it's, it feels good and it's like Lululemon for dunes. Yes. I don't know. Fiori likes me to say that, but it's like Lululemon dudes. And then I'm wearing my special trampoline jumpy socks because I take the big trampoline park just got built by our house. Then why are you wearing them here? Sometimes you never encounter a trampoline, but they're actually really comfortable socks, and then I'm wearing Paul checks underwear. His underway prewar. House. He had these bamboo underwear is like, these are a little think they were a little small exhibit big athletic and I. Tiny, but so he gave me 'cause underway him, hey, gave me a special bam, bamboo underwear, and I love them. They're super comfortable somewhere in Paul checks underwear now, like new underwear like his actually like used underwear. In a universe shirt. This German guy gave me who's developing a clothing company to block m. f. it gave me pants that block him f and assure. So what I'll do after we podcast before I get on the flight back home, we'll give you Paul checks underwear. No. On my my German m. f. blocking pens is what travel with even have a clip at the bottom that you can attach to your Uber cars, like anything metal in the car, or even in the airplane when you land to ground or earth right when you land without evening to get outside barefoot, the shirt blocks m. f. the pants block m. f. m. s. blocking underwear, but probably won't show. I'll just keep Paul checks lucky unaware on for the flight because not a super long understand Howard is how important it is for us to keep you alive to one hundred and fifty years. At least you know that right. Look like an idiot. It greenfield dies. To endorse goats butts me when I'm only human left, throw. Alive, spend thirty thousand dollars a month on his longevity filled by his goat. Longevity, talk show jevon. Is there anything new or interesting or fascinating that you've just learning now about, you know, extending life span. I, I would say that. We do know about all the overlap between all the blue zones. I think a lot of people are aware of right now. It's no smoking high amount of wild plant and take which act as a hormone stressor to the body high game intake, not I think because there's anything magical about beans and leggings, but they're eating a low glycemic index carbohydrates. Rather than processed starch and sugar large amounts of outdoor physical activity, low level, outdoor physical activity on exercising, but just moving nor gardening, hunting, gathering, whatever. And then a lot of time spent with family social relationships, you know, family dinners, that type of stuff. So we know a lot of these tried and true things as far as some of the more interesting things I haven't talked about yet, you know, such as Kitone esters and fasting there are, there are calorie restriction medics. That are very interesting. That's interesting that trigger the same type of pathways that so the way that it works resume ritual, if you ever is virtual is one rodeo is another stragglers may possibly act. You know, there's this company making this thing called ta sixty five, which may act as a calorie restriction Mimetic, but it may also be acting. Being as just like a model condo support compound, stimulate like sell program death and sell Tofte g or no, the way that it works is very. So when you look at at cold, Thermo Genesis very simple example, we know that cold Thermo Genesis up regulate something called uncoupling proteins. So uncoupling proteins would be what you'd find a higher amount of in Brown adipose tissue. When you get exposed to cold, you get a conversion of white fat into metabolic reactive, Brown, fat, witch, rather than taking calories and oxygen to produce ATP instead produces heat. Now, why is that important? Well, because when we look at the electron transport chain in the motto Qendra, we know that once you have a certain amount of ATP an ATP is no longer being depleted. What happens is there's almost like a backup in the electron transport chain, and free radicals begin to leak. Out of the membrane as electrons build up in the chain because they no longer need to be used for conversion into ATP because ATP stores are full. Now that doesn't mean free radicals are bad because free radical serve as signaling molecules to tell all of the mitochondria within the cell, whether or not they need to down regulate or up regulate how much ATP or how much energy they're producing. So it's a very good way to of for your body to be able to keep track of its metabolic rate. Interesting. But what happens is if you've got too much ATP around too many free radicals build up too many spill into the body, and this is why fasting has such a profound effect for to a certain extent because you deeply ATP and by deep leading ATP, you have the ability of the electrons to move through the transport chain without getting backed up and having free radical spillage back into the inner cellular membrane. And does this mean that then interpreter in your. Does this mean then that supplementing with with creating and just injury, Matt, increasing, ATP stores and keeping them high all the time could potentially have a negative effect from from from that Tim plus you much of that could now at the same time, we know that ATP is a healthy cellular energy compound. And and Furthermore, the more ATP that you can get without a large amount of calories and a large amount of digestive distress. And some of the oxidation that occurs from breakdown of proteins and carbs and fats as good. This is why some of the best nutrients for longevity from ATP standpoint are creating Indira Bose because derive boasts is a very low glycemic index sugar that rapidly restores ATP availability in motto, Qendra without excessively, producing ATP interest as far as on the other end kind of draining ATP levels or at least causing calories to produce less ATP and to instead produce something like, say, heat, we know that Brown fat does a very good job at that because. There's a higher amount of these uncoupling proteins that essentially uncouple the little transporter that causes ATP to be produced by a cell and instead simply 'cause heat to be produced by. And so some of these things actually increase UC p. and they act is calorie restriction Mimetic. That's what a calorie restriction Mimetic is. It's it's basically another. Someone's going to sell them as fat-burner. On the. So we're, we're talking about things like like a like rodeo. One interesting thing is sea urchins sea urchins actually have a very high amount of the molecules that increase your availability of the or the or the up regulation of these UC Ps, you know, and there's, there's some people out there like Dr Jack crews who who kind of gets painted with a, you know, in in a poor light sometimes because he's a little bit controversial and and relatively dogmatic. But he believes that most humans grew up or or humans originated on in in coastal areas where he had a high availability of shellfish DHA sunlight, and really mineral rich water. And so by getting a lot of these things in our diet were actually enhancing our health from very ancestoral standpoint. And he could say these, these sea urchins might fall into that category of supporting motto. Qendra and uncoupling protein just goes to show and highlight just how complex the body is in the sense that on the one hand, you want to increase. ATP want to have a lot of ATP study shows, you know, build more muscle burns, more body fat got cognitive boosting affects seems to be some any oxidant effects, at least for the heart. Doctors are now prescribing or at least telling people recommending to take creating when they had things like anxiety, depression. But on the other hand, it's very important to also encourage a process that depletes ATP things like exercise, fasting medics. And then of course, the ultimate which is fasting. Now, here's something that's fascinating. I want to ask you a question on this. We had a a stand efforting on our show the other day. He's a, the world's strongest bodybuilder, really, really cool guy fifty years old now, but at one point had one of the highest builder strong. Oh, he, this guy is very good. He's got one of the highest three lift totals girl. Listen girl. No, no, no, no, no. He's also powerlifter spa. Okay, eight, nine hundred pounds. Very, very strong. So we were talking about fasting and he's like, no, I'll never fast. I was feed my body and feed my athletes, and I told them my my my personal experience with fast in which which I thought was fascinating. Now I didn't go into fasting for any kind of performance enhancing benefit. I employ forty eight or seventy two hour fast. You know, every other month now or so for things that gut health longevity reduction inflammation, I get a spiritual effect from it in the sense that it clears my mind helps remove me from food and all these other benefits may I say something real quick. Oh, you for people listening, especially my audience listening right now. Sal is not like a skinny ass facet like cold Mencia do like he's he's built. Yeah, then you're still fasting forty eight seventy two hours and maintaining muscle. And in fact, I did. I was doing a forty eight to semi too fast once a month, and I did that for about seven months. And here's the side effect that I and I did it for gut health. I did it for all those other things that I mentioned the spiritual effect a detaching from food, the low inflammation, longevity, all that stuff. The benefit. I note. Which was fascinating was about two or three days after I started to repeat. So I seventy two hour fast. Then I start to slowly reintroduced food about two or three days later, some of the best workouts that ever had incredible pumps and I built more muscle during this entire process. Now, part of me thought, okay, maybe it's because my gut health got so much better. I'm better. I'm able to simulate more food. Well, I've since retested this and by the way I had a similar effect years ago years ago, I started employing a once a week vegan day, but really what it turned into as a once a week, six hundred calories meatless candidate and it would, but it really was like six hundred calories. So it was kind of like this low calorie day. Now he's notice the day after when I'd eat me get like this rebound effect and bodybuilders have seen this. I've talked about this for a long time. One of the most anabolic periods you'll ever that deliver experiences post show after hardcore dieting. So after these long fasts, I repeat two or three days later. I'm building more muscle and I'm wondering if it's, you know, resentencing meet approach. Team. It's increase in the way used glycogen and giving me some of this affect that we're talking about where I'm depleting ATP and then I'm giving myself more ATP. Have you ever noticed anything like that from fasting or when you get repeating? Well, it's interesting because the the human body in general seems to respond very well in terms of whatever ATP depletion and then ATP restoration or caloric depletion and caloric restoration a to the this idea of cycling, right? We know this is the basis of of period is Asian, and that stair stepping effect to get better fitness, you build, then your cover than you build, then you recover. We now know that there are cancer is doing what's what's called, press pulse. Cycling of, I believe it's gloomy that they're the high gluten and low glutamate high gloomy Logan mean this is during reenter treatment. Yeah, yeah, it's caused him. I think I think that the term for it and and I don't know a lot about it because I can feed what's called. Yeah, exactly. Which is why I think it's good, but it's called press pulse. Cycling. Interesting. I think Thomas Siegfried is, is the guy to look up to. To to who's looking into a lot of this research on this type of dieting for cancer patients. We see guys like Dr Dan Pompa who I interviewed on my podcast, doing feast, famine, cycling right five days, low calories calorie restriction one day fast. One day Adler, beat him calorie feeds as many calories as you want. We look at the bible God Bill any worked as azoff for six days. And then on the seventh day he rested right? So so we see there. We go out of my four. So so yeah, the ideas it seems the body responds very well to hard. I mean, a frigging high intensity interval training, right? Same thing. They just second tar, four minutes easy. There was a study that came out within the last five years where they compared because the old the old way of approaching dieting, at least from a fat loss standpoint in our space in the fitness personal training space was let's figure out your how many calories you're burning. It was putting out a deficit and then that's your new calorie and taking. We'll do your macro, whatever. That's you counting take every single day. So if your body is burning two thousand calories a day, I'll put you fifteen hundred calories a day, and then this is what you're going every single day. And that was the old way of approaching it now through my experience working with clients and do it myself. I always noticed that people got better results from staggering that. So I would still average out to at the end of the week, a thirty five hundred calorie deficit, which is what five hundred dollars a day adds up to, but it wasn't five hundred calorie deficit every single day. Some days it was a thousand some days. It was no deficit. Some. It was a surplus and so on, and I saw better results part of me thought, I wonder if it's a psychological effect from that because some days you feel like you're eating more or less what they did a study, and they actually controlled for that and they compared to groups of people that at the same calories both in a deficit one group, same deficit every single day. The other group kind of staggered it, and the group that staggered, it got better more fat loss, preserve more muscle, got better results. And here's the best part mitigated. The metabolic adaptation that happens from restricted calorie diets, which is one of the biggest problems that you'll run into, especially for people who compete in bodybuilding and stuff like that, or even people who just diet real hard. When you drop your calories, your metabolism, adapts downward, and becomes very efficient, which we all know is extremely frustrating. You know, you lose twenty pounds, and then you're fucked your metabolism down. Now you're doing all this cardio, you're eating low calories and it's like you eat anything over that and you. You gain all the way back real quick staggering. It seems to mitigate that. Metabolic adaptation now still when you're when you're fasting, like that for that forty eight to seventy two hour cycle, what are your workouts look like? None actually. What I feel. No. So what I do during that period is I, I'll I'll walk or all hike. I'll stretch. I'll do mobility work. If I do do resistance training, it's very low-intensity full range of motion. I'm not trying to drive to body anymore. I'm not trying to increase my performance. I'm not trying to get stronger or more body fat. Really. I was treating it like a like a spiritual experience. If you will. But I am. But when I would come back, I'd get stronger and better pussy really. Russia. Well, you know, you know, taking time off from exercise. I think's important too. But anyhow, it's funny because now I get a text from STAN. He's like, I did my first twenty four hour fast. So I actually was able to convince him to give that a shot. And I think it's because I told them there may be some muscle building benefit from it. I when I am at home, I try to Saturday to a Sunday night dinner fast. So everyone, your twelve to sixteen hour, intimate and fast every day. Aside from the days where I'm traveling internationally across many times owns where all eat breakfast at whatever time zone is where I happened to be at. And sometimes I mean, does not twelve six hour fast, but I do that twenty four hour Saturday dinner to Sunday dinner fast. I've got to two other things regarding longevity. Yes, one would be and I don't know if you guys have talked about this much on the show before, but these any d. or in our precursors now that they're becoming more and more popular companies like true Nigen and leasing basis thorn has one called on. Nias cell and it's it's called NPR nicotinamide Riva's all there you go. And it's a precursor to NA D. And we know when it comes to longevity amount of Conrail health inflammation seems to be a very incremental roll any d. h. ratios are incredibly important. And so now you can buy supplements that have some really good research behind them. Last week article came out, I think it was a New York Times about the pill that cost less than a Cup of coffee that can make you live to one hundred and fifty years. All of that. Well, ten years ago it was Rivera trawl you know now now now it's now it's it's nicotinamide riboside and the way they move. Can you? You can. You can also, and there are companies now who are selling patches, a nasal sprays injections, and IV's are very common. A lot of these anti-aging. Yeah, so so I actually once every two weeks, I have a company in Texas that sends me any d- in a syringe, I'm not allowed to. I'm still competing in a water sanctions. Oh, so you can't do any again, put more than thirty m l. in in my body, I can't do a drip. I've even I can do push the. So I do a push IV of any D. And super uncomfortable injection, like your gut burns and your body feels like it's on fire. Geeta or finish and you feel frigging on stoppable it's it's a different, yes. And in tracking my telomere length, it drastically reduced telomere length when I began using not just an are in between my NA de injections, right. So two AD injections. What's every two weeks? I do NRA every day to keep my NASD levels up. I drink a, there's a t- Dr. McColl introduced me this t's called powder. Oko bark t that's also an eighty precursor. So I have a batch of that t- in the fridge and I'll just drink. That is one of my beverages throughout the day. I like that because I like that because it's a natural form and here's why because and I'm always careful because, for example, you know, fifteen twenty thirty years ago is all this research showing antioxidants are great for you. The fight free radicals. You need lots of Antioch since then they did studies where they gave people high fucking doses of antioxidants that you wouldn't necessarily find in nature. And one ended up happening was increased risk of cancer and other problems because if they face and now you know why. Why? What are some of the primary signaling molecules in your body. Free radicals free, radical limited, go rhino Kandari. Whether energy is high or energy is low. We take all those away and all of a sudden the might O'Connor don't know which way is up in which ways down get fancier, right? Yeah, so so they go into these states of of unobtrusive energy production. So yeah, so so the NRP precursors and and our NASD there's injection clinics popping up all over the place, and there's some really good research behind this. I go to a lot of these anti-aging conferences now and are in any D. And stem cells are probably two of the biggest things that anti-aging dachshund folks and a lot of these conferences of talking about, but but you know, stem cells. I think that's a horse has been kicked a death. You know, I've talked about stem cells a lot, but it's interesting there's there's one other category in my research for this book that I found really interesting, and that was a profound improvement in rodent life span with fecal. Transplants with actual bacterial replenishment, especially in your Shelvin sewin- should up your ass now? No, I'm not. I'll get to that. He's eating ice with issues like crust, clustered difficile seat of a seal, you know, seems to cause a decrease in life span, but by replacing colonic bacteria with with some kind of extra fecal matter from someone else. There appears to be some kind of an immune modulating effect. Now, even though there's clinics now like the tame out clinic in Britain, there are websites where you can purchase stool from a healthy donor. Have it shipped you and some pretty straightforward videos about how to do your own at home fecal transplant. The Paul underwear I would. I would rather like eat a lot of really good prebiotics and take care of my gut and hopefully keep my gut to the point where I'm not getting classrooms have so. But if you if you testing he did have it, it might actually be prudent to do something like a fecal transplant therapy. But what I find more interesting and this is something I started doing after seeing some. The data on this working very, very similarly from a longevity standpoint in terms of immune system modulation and gut health is this whole old friends hypothesis. The fact that we live in this Oltra clean culture with antibacterial hand. So, and you know, super clean hospitals and antibiotics, and you don't want your your dog to kiss your kid. God forbid. And so what happens is you see a decrease in beneficial bacteria in the immune system, becoming stronger in response to germs and bacteria. And so a lot of people now they're eating fermented foods and they're laying their kids go to petting zoos and play with farm animals. And now word is beginning to get out that it's pretty good to get dirty and into get in touch with. But then you can take that to the next level because many of these things, measles parties. That's entre over here, but I was actually. The the, some of these things are a little bit lesser known like, say, whip worms or tapeworms. These actually have some very potent immune modulating effects, and many of them are not parasites because a parasite has to do damage to the host and and live within the host to be classified as a parasite, but lives within the host that doesn't do damage. And one could even argue, motto Qendra fall into that category as an as an ancient thing. It's a eukaryotic organism that that got invited into a Sal. I read a book on this. There was a there was a guy who wrote a book who had terrible Crohn's disease and started reading about how people who get infected with hookworm, for example, had much lower rates of symptoms of Crohn's disease. So he actually went to a third world country because nobody would give them hookworms infect himself with and you walked barefoot around latrines and stuff got infected and his Crohn's disease pretty much went away today. Now I don't think you can find any of these clinics in the US, but I know Mexico Mexico. They have some of these where you'll go there. And they'll actually infect though inoculate, Chris, Christie is talking about, here's the problem with that. Those live within you and they don't go away. And so a lot of people who do this, let's say with with like tapeworms and they go to Mexico and get an Oculus. Did you start like pooping tapeworm babies in your asshole? It's. It can create a situation where you are intensely aware that something is living within some people lose weight because it begins to eat a lot of your calories and food stuff. But at the same time, there are certain forms of exactly along with your fat burning calorie restriction Mimetic. We feature hookworm kion hookworms anyways, though some don't actually have the capability to survive for long periods of time within the body, but still cause immune system modulation. And there are specific forms of rat tapeworms and pig. Whip worms that I research for this book and for the past four months, every two weeks I've been dosing with, oh my God, women terms goddamn tapeworms latest, you drink them down. That's like this little salty. I'm not making. To you're sitting in my seat right now, I'm shedding or I'm sitting in my seat what what I has disturbing, but I have noticed is my gut feels much better particularly when I travel. Right? So I so I used to get like some gut issues and constipation get would just feel kind of funky when I'd go overseas that went away and my immune system feels like it just feels better. You know, I didn't get sick a lot anyways, but I, you know, I know I'm doing a lot of things. There's a lot of confounding variables. Ultimately, just the the. Section of just the data alone on dosing with with it's called hell mythic therapy right there you go. Now there you have to keep taking them because they die. Right. So it's not like if you stop? Yeah, your body gets rid over me to dose for four months. I think it was about seventeen hundred bucks. So it's it's a spendy protocol if you're doing, I don't know if I'll keep doing it at least wanted to try it and see I fell thirty good. Hey, to get rid of those things are paying them. But anyway, but I wanna know I wanna know how often like so you I know you've tried so many. I mean, you're the guy to for sure. I'd love reaching out to. I did the BBC. One fifty seven by the way for my Kelly's and it was miraculous really was. I know, Sal was anti wait. Made me feel that it was. He was huge for me. So instead of coffee. Did did you. Did you know it actually may influence the way that the dopamine acts in the brain, and there's some studies showing that the they'll give BBC two rats and then give them amphetamines and the infamies won't affect them the same way because the brains become less sensitive to doklam hitting administration, they were doing addiction and and then so I took a few shots of and I felt flat subcutaneous -ly I I did and I felt flat. And so I stayed away in your mind. Yeah, I did. Wow. Wow. I I've injected in joint never done like the the subcutaneous into the gut. That's interesting. Yeah. But anyways, I know masking this because you've you've put so many things probably in your protocol for a while, how often is it that you eliminate something that maybe you've been doing for a while? And you're just like, okay, just the hassle to do that. I'm not seeing or noticing the benefits that much. It's not going to become something very regular. I can't imagine you can keep up everything. Yeah, per pretty regularly pretty regularly. Their stuff like. What were some of the last things fell off? I guess the last couple I hate to say so because I feel shoveling people under the bus. Oh, I also have to be radically honest out is for she, like, you know, like, like, you know, like like the green was developed by one of my friends, Sean, and you know, it's like supposedly the super potent creating precursor that gives you energy for days and center. So I went through two bottles of and just didn't feel thing, you know. And I was hoping it would be like the the next new biggest creating and grant. It could be just me because I know they have some good data behind it in in some decent clinical research, but I didn't notice anything so. So that's one example. Another one would be, of course, like CBD for energy. I haven't really seen any benefits or something like that, but I haven't used too much of those. Like pick me up energy focus caffeine. CBD pre workouts. I have them at home to try probiotics, almost zero probiotics. Have I noticed much of a difference from is that because you do such a good job of eating. Foods that are for mental, but you know, but they say probiotics, increase cognitive performance and see. I only feel that's true for people that are not probably getting fishy residing of perceived exertion and improve sleep and not. I'm not depressed, but markers of depression, and I don't notice that much connected us probiotic use for some people with increased risk of CBO believer. Yup. Yeah, there is an and I one of the formulas I want to do for keen on a complete gut formula. You know, I want so for Fain and I want Colostrum and that put him in there. Says, as does not scalable, you know. It's not NSF certified for sport anyways, though. I also want to include a form of probiotic that could potentially seed the gut on. And so I'm, I'm an investor. I'm not gonna say the name of the company right now, but I'm investor in a probiotic company, developing a probiotic that could potentially act, you know, seed the gut and stay in there and knock it degraded by the stomach acid and prevent, you know, none of the difficulties that are currently presented with probiotic absorption. And if that one turns out to really flesh it self out in more clinical trials, that's what I would include in something like a supplement. That'd be robotic that I'd take, but I've tried like twelve different kinds of products and never kept up with them because I haven't noticed thing I've ever much about Colostrum. Could you go further into detail the isn't that from breast milk? It's it's well, the first part of mammalian milk. It has a lot of immunoglobulins in it. It has a lot of growth factors in it. It's a precursor for both growth hormones and old school bodybuilding supplements might growth factor. Old school bodybuilding. Supplements studies have shown that it helps to heal a leaky gut by improving the stability of Zahn Ulan a protein in the gut lining that can win. It's not moderated 'cause leaky. Gut, like increased gut permeability. It's also been shown to allow athletes to experience less gut distress and less gut permeability, especially when exercising under stress in hot conditions. So the fact that it's relatively anabolic has some pretty good gut barrier protective capabilities, make it something that I like. But that is something I cycle based on the fact that it's such a potent growth hormone precursor Niger have precursor like you don't wanna be in a continental bollocks day, returned to our press pulse discussion. So I load with colossoma Colostrum right now take Aitken Colostrum every morning because I have the Tahoe race coming up right here in here in a week, so I know my body's going to be going to battle for, you know, I think that. Missile be twenty. Seven hour? No, for me, that'll be like two. And I've raced the big long one there. But this year I'm racing the fittest CEO challenge Sobe race pretty hard for about the health gonna compete with you at that. Dave aspirin, I heard also too. I have a traffic on on Sunday that I'm racing. I like to do some some short faster. So again, multiple reasons from you tend Colostrum. So I don't take it year round, but what I do is whenever I have a big event coming up, I load with it for two weeks. Prior in the same way that you'd load with beet juice for two weeks prior tune or events or did you did you jab Dave Asprey twice in the show? No jobs, no. He asked him once or fair. Thanks kept enough. Yes. Have you have you ever messed around with the anabolic effects of cholesterol, dietary cholesterol? This is something that bodybuilders have used for a long time, and I've experimented with doubling or tripling my cholesterol levels intake for, you know, a week or two strength increases every single time. Every single time I get strength increases from doing, have you ever messed around with anything like that? Do you think that's because of the availability of fat soluble vitamins or because it's an increase in in cholesterol? Increasing. Cholesterols I ask is that that there's, there's some, there's there's some research out there that shows that food does not have a big impact on cholesterol levels. Well, so you're right, but here's what's interesting, what's and I just read that what you're talking about, but here's what's interesting, so I control for all those factors I control for all those factors, but also there are several studies that support what I'm talking about where they'll take. There was one in particular where they took people between. Fifty to sixty. So they were a little bit older and they broke them up into three groups, and it was a a low cholesterol mater cholesterol and very high cholesterol intake, and they compared them all to each other. And the biggest difference was strengthened muscle strength and muscle gain, and it was directly related to the amount of cholesterol that they were consuming, and it came from jokes embody, but like Vince Koran who's with the old old school scientists bodybuilders back in the nineteen, maybe forty used to put his athletes on these high cholesterol, you know, full fat dairy, lots of chicken liver and beef liver and Eyo type diets, and people with TS crazy gains since I started experimenting with this item, you're saying, even when controlling for for all the other anabolic factors like Jim, more protein, more calories, fat, correct. And so I started, I've now told several people they've tested at themselves and they've also noticed the same dug. In fact, I think Doug, didn't you? You do the same thing and notice an increase in cholesterol gives them more strength. So, yeah, so I would love for you to look in. To that. 'cause you dive deep into things and I think it's a fascinating because we've been known for so long that it's not good for you is it? Is it an increase in HDL or LDL cholesterol? You know, if you know they didn't blood tests? I don't do any blood to. It's just I literally will go from eating on average two eight yolks day to, you know, twelve eight yolks today. So dramatic increase in diet, and I can tell within a day or two, I literally can feel it when I work out and it almost feels like my CNS fires harder when I've never intentionally tried to raise cholesterol. But I, I guess I kind of have in that. I try to keep my total cholesterol above two hundred. Oh yeah. When you say you you'd actually. Yeah, the the cognition enhancing and the effects on the cell membranes and having high cholesterol, assume you don't have familial hypercholesterolemia, assuming you don't have high blood glucose which can oxides that cholesterol, assuming your HDL to triglycerides ratio is favourable meaning you don't have high cholesterol but also high triglycerides which would indicate overeating or high Antica vegetable oils or some, you know, non alcoholic, fatty liver disease or something like that. And finally, assuming you don't have high levels of inflammation like Hayek, Jessie are p. or high homocysteine or high fiber engine in the absence of any of those factors that make cholesterol cardiovascular risk factor. It's a good idea to keep your cholesterol elevated. You just have to, in my opinion, this is where I like blood testing. You got to kind of pay attention to some other variables or at least know intuitively, what's going to affect those variables. Like if you're eating a high cholesterol, diet process, sugar and vegetable oil is probably worse for you than the person eating the low cholesterol diet because you've got more around to be oxidized, right? You've got more around too. To build these phone base plaques in the arteries. So yeah, I like I'm a, I'm a fan of keeping cholesterol elevated, but it needs to be couched in terms of you also mitigating risk. What about what about sodium? Do you manipulate that at all? Or are you paying attention to that as an athlete? Especially I have really been geeking out on minerals. I mean, meaning a lot of minerals, less water, more minerals based on all the stuff I've been doing with light and the fact that your body needs to be rich and minerals in order to properly respond to light bay signals, whether it's, you know, the Juve or sunshine or whatever, and just drinking more water is not necessarily going to increase your level of minerals. You must actually drink like salt water, or, you know, put Himalayan sea salt. I hate to say this, but it's it's it's high in iron. It's high in metals. It's one of the reasons it's colored flipping. Even though it's pretty high in minerals, Celtic salt is actually higher and minerals and clean up people. If you're going to have. Salt? Yeah, you have the Celtics, soul knife, hey, so big fan of that. There are there are companies now sewing like these super salty sachets. There's one called Quinn Tron alone called quintessential. I showed you like it was pulling on my magical, Mary Poppins bag. I showed you like these, these trace liquid minerals that had trouble with on a plane. So I do a lot of minerals, but I got into that way back back in the ironman days. Again, when I go to bed and I get to hear my heart rate pounding in my ears, and I knew there was some kind of blood pressure, regulation issue or something. It turns out I just went for a long period of time mineral depleted, and we used to have an exercise physiologist come in and use a sweat sodium analysis patch to test all the athletes. When I trained for team Thomas soda, they lose when the easier sweat sodium loss. I was two to three times most the other athletes. So you just went out robust, zodiac excretion mechanisms, which dictates that I need to take more sodium in or more minerals in. And the interesting thing we. When we talk about genetics is that I come from a heavily northern European heritage where traditionally there is a lot of fermentation lot assaulting a lot of pickling it's a, you know, it's it's what is used to cure food well, and so it makes sense that the body would respond by developing a mechanism that allows it to get rid of excess sodium for excess salt so that you don't see too high of a rise in blood pressure, or the other thing that can happen is it can have a little bit of a d. l. colonizing effect. So let me tell you something that I just did recently, and I want your opinion on it, like what you think it might be. So something happens sometimes when we get so caught up in work here will work like a twelve hour day. We're talking like crazy. I don't get a chance to e. I do make sure because I've teased this out to make sure it's not that I hydrate myself, but I'll sometimes start to get these headaches and they're pretty bad headaches. And I've gone home and tried the in its ohi dre drinking more water thing. It's, oh, I just need food. A period. Right? So we we, we were having this conversation. We, we got into a talk about sodium the other day, and I thought I wonder if if I'm just like really depleted, and while I wonder if my body goes through it really fast because I also notice to like I can hold and release lots of water to. And so I wonder if I just have this ability to use it up really quick and my body's needing that maybe has something to do with blood pressure. Maybe that's why my headaches were happening. And so I the last three times this has happened. I've eight to deal kosher pickles and the headache has gone away like almost instantaneous. It's crazy, and it's a pretty serious headache. What do you think that is? Pickle fetish. Pickle fetish Tehran did very good, very guard on very well could be related to a mineral deficiency, although headaches, it's typically magnesium, and I don't think pickles very high in magnesium, but it certainly could just be as simple as what you've just alluded right, it's it's it's a mineral issue causing blood sugar disarray or blood pressure dysregulation, which is resulting in a headache. It's it's, I'm three for three right now. So I don't know yet for sure. But I mean, this has happened to me three times three times I've gone back to that and it's like instantly it's, it's relieving it's, you also crave things like bananas sausages. As we can have a discussion about this later, there are some other things that could be play here. Achey talk your shit, so so so t- two more things you were what we were just talking about before Adam, Alec headaches. Oh, the minerals, the genetics. So when you look at the African American population, right, not a strong heritage of salting and pickling and enting foods not to stereotype. I know this sounds horribly racist, but time spent in in especially in like like the southern American areas time spent on slave ships, right? Like losing a lot of a lot of of sweat, losing a lot of sodium during those long periods of time in boats transported over from Africa and potentially the development of some pretty robust sodium retention mechanisms. You put someone with that type of genetic ancestry Nario of heavily salted foods and all of a sudden you see an epidemic of high blood pressure in African Americans that you don't see with the same type of salt intake in northern European. It actually says in medical journals that African Americans tend to be more sensitive to sodium in relationship to high blood pressure. Actually in the if you. Read medical journal would actually say that you because your your body gets rid of sodium so quickly. Do you find do you test or other minerals? How are you with your calcium, for example, do you? Are you worried about building up to Miguel show? I test on a quarterly basis. Hydroxy vitamin d. which which can be relevant to calcium levels because if you have too much, which I rarely have based on the reasons I was talking about earlier, you can get excess calcification. I test calcium. I test red blood cell, magnesium, potassium CO two, which can be indicative of minerals because a lo- by carbonate level can indicate that you have, for example, too much, unopposed sodium that you're consuming, which would typically be from packaged foods and I test chloride levels. Those are the minerals that I analyze on my blood and really the ones I pay closest attention to. It'd be that chloride bicarbonate level which can indicate overall net acidity in the body. Many you gotta eight, less sodium, less caffeine, less alcohol, less red meat step up your intake of dark, leafy greens, that type of thing. And then magnesium, which I think is one of the most important minerals and and it's just called an RBC. Magnesium test, super simple test, but those those the minerals that I pay attention to on a quarterly blood analysis. So, yeah, I do. Track that stuff. Excellent. And the interesting thing about pickles, this was the second thing I was gonna say, is that you know it was relevant for all those people listening in who might be racing Tahoe next week, or who are athletes is that it turns out that cramping during exercise is very rarely do to mineral depletion or due to dehydration, especially in people who are already paying attention to those variables, they're using electrolytes, they're salting their food regularly, going into a competition. They're staying adequately hydrated. I- cramps during during my race, Dermot workout, what the hell, you know, how could that have happened? Well, it turns out that the majority of cramps are due to a protective mechanism. An alpha motor neuron reflex that basically causes the muscle to go into a protective spasm or cramp so that you don't tear it a rip it. It's generated by the Gogi tendon organ. So what you can do to reverse this cramp and we know this works because when you do this, there's not enough time for any of these things to get absorbed into. Your system and absorbed into your muscles and provide salt your muscles. Instead, it's all neural. You can inhibit this alpha motor neuron reflex when you cramp by tasting anything incredibly salty or incredibly spicy. And this is why there are companies now developing high priced, like, you know, like these gel shots that are like carbohydrate, gel shots while they're doing like pickle shots with Cayenne pepper and and things are like like, like mustard powder with incredibly high amounts of salt. So there's almost like this gag reflects, but as soon as that hits you, it's a trick to reverse cramped. So what I do when racing is I carry these electrolyte capsules that if you ever break open and electrolyte, Kaplan, deputy mouth, it's horribly like gag reflect salty. But if you cramp within twenty seconds after that thing hits your your salt lingual or the inside your cheeks or anywhere else where you can taste it, the cramp goes away. It's crazy. Now, what does not every athlete have these on hand and know is it because the because they don't listen to mind puff because of the taste. A signaling something in the brain to reverse the taste of something salty or spicy causes what's called a motor neuron reflex cramp loosens. Now this is something that you're you're talking about, people are making products for it. So I'm assuming that this has lots of science supporting it and it's a taste that sends a signal. So with that, this is one of the arguments at ten. I make a lot with people in our space who try to say things like artificially flavored products with zero calories have no negative effects on the body, and I was seldom the taste alone. Even if even if you were eating, was the signal of taste alone, does tell the body to do certain does. I'm did you see the study that came out this week on sucrose Nolanda which what would it? What was it? Would you get. Stores delays activates glucose gone, like peptide GOP one, and that actually results in insulin insensitivity with frequent sucralose intake. Now, granted has a, you know, you mentioned lane Norton, I'm sure guy like this is going to know this is going to say this, that's with quivalent of close to a dozen packets of splendor per day that equivalent of sucralose. But frankly, when you look at a lot of these energy drinks and way proteins and artificially sweetened compounds, there's the equivalent of a good two to four packets of sucrose or splendor in just a single serving of those. So there's a lot of people in the fitness industry, especially. Yeah, how common is is, and we've talked about this. We both share this on the show before where I would have you know, two or three of these in my coffee in the morning because they'd have two or three cups of coffee. So I have getting at least three there. I have a protein shake. I have a protein bar and have some sort of a pre workout, three workout shake or something easily. We were over that easily. There's also derision. I'm using it for years because what I do everyday. Yeah. In granted, I realized that this might sound hypocritical coming from a guy who regularly uses stevia, but I've never said that. I believe that stevia may not be having an impact on increasing hormones or an insulin. For me, the pros outweigh the cons. I think there's a la- it's less artificial and less potentially neurotoxic than aspartame me or sucralose. But and it allows me to restrict calories very easily when, for example, on a long plane flight and I put some organic vanilla, Stevie into my into my seltzer water to make it taste like cream soda. Right? So so for me, the pros outweigh the cons of you. Artificial sweetener. But even for that, I use either monk fruit or organic stevia. So yeah, yeah, the artificial sweetened thing I'm with you. Yeah, good. Good point though. Based on the fact that when you taste something that can reverse a cramp then why wouldn't it be that when you taste something it can cause an insulin release or at least a release of of coal assist to kind or some other increasing hormone? Well, we need to remember that these signals exists for reason why do we even perceive tastes to begin with? Because it tells us a lot about what's happening around us or inside of our mouth, and that signal by itself over thousands of years of volition, that signal itself already starts to cascade of events before whatever was anticipated acts on the body. And so it only makes fucking sense. So we manipulate all these different senses thinking, oh, but the calories aren't there. It's inert or has zero affect wrong, that's impossible. Now there may be less of an effect or maybe a cost benefit analysis that you do, but there's definitely a fucking affect and you're, I'm the same way I. I, I would air on the side of something that's natural versus something that's synthetic just because it's been around longer and we tend to know and react better to things have been around long as things that are. Then what do you, what do you? How do you feel when you when people referred to is like the pseudoscience guy, you know what I saw that comment a lot after you did your Rogan interview. People like, oh, see a lot of trolls on there. How do you feel about that when someone says that, technically, some of the things that I talk about our pseudoscience such as religion and spirituality, which is very difficult or I would even say impossible to prove in many circumstances, but I would argue that some of the things that I talk about such as the fact that sells communicate via bio photonic light signaling has been a proven scientific fact since almost the seventeen hundreds. It's just that a lot of this stuff is not common knowledge or people are. To to a certain extent afraid of it because it disrupts societal expectations. Meaning when you find out that plastic bottled water that you always knew had some of these plastics and Fido estrogens in it and is probably bad for you also has a different electrochemical structure than the spring water that you get from a natural spring. That sounds like pseudoscience and people people kind of get a little bit uncomfortable about the fact that, gosh, let me I need to replace the Water Filter in my house and go to find a spring dot com and start drinking more natural water. I think a lot of people like it's uncomfortable, it's inconvenient to accept the fact that sometimes pseudoscience what we call pseudo science can tell us things that we get very uncomfortable with. Yeah. I mean, like those, those are the two things that come to mind. And then you know, I think the last would be that there is a certain amount of industry influence everything from the pharmaceutical industry influencing most medical physician stance that essential oils would be useless or worthless simply because there are pharmaceuticals that could do the same thing or there's a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that beats out the Saint. John's wart that we were talking about. So using Saint John's wart as an antidepressant could potentially be pseudoscience, you know, Ben's out collecting yellow flowers with his kids in the world. And let's let's make a ha ha. You know, skipping naked through the meadow joke about Ben because you should just take Prozac right, exactly. We will these studies on Prozac. Why wouldn't you just take that? So I think a big part of it too is, is that there there's some amount of industry manipulation. Same thing. When I say, you know that, oh, you should have. Have if you're going to have milk have it from, you know cattle with with an eighty two genetic history because that protein compared to a one is is better absorbed by the human body and results in less of an allergenic response. But if you're really wanting to dial things in, then you should drink milk and prepare for all the trolls jump in and laugh here like q. trolls, you should drink something that's a little bit more thermodynamic favorable for the human body. Meaning it has a smaller protein than cow's milk like goat's milk or camel's milk or water. Buffalo milk even has a smaller protein the cow, and that's where everybody jumps in last because this is the stuff that either people aren't talking about or there's a big, you know, there's a lot of industry influence from from the American der was that the American dairy association. Probably the f. forget if that's the exact title emerge, dairy farmers associated with whatever you call it, you know? So. So I think those are few of the things that that you need to bear in mind is. A big, some of the stuff talk about religion and spirituality that is pseudoscience admittedly and I'm okay and comfortable without. I think if you could prove it, it would not be as magical as it is right. If you could prove in JR Tolkien's book that the dragon was there and the ring actually works, and here's the science behind how the ring could work, and here's how Gholam could have lived to be as oldest. He live all of a sudden all the fun is stripped out of out of this magical pseudoscience book. And you could say the same thing about religion, spirituality in the life that we're leading. In addition, you know, it's inconvenient for a lot of people, and people just tend to basic evolutionary ancestral mechanism, be afraid of something they don't understand or something that's going to inconvenience them and then see, there's, there's the c or three. I don't remember again. That's why the industry influence that. I think also pretty dramatically influences consumer choice and yesterday's pseudoscience was microbiome health. It was leaky gut syndrome. I mean, I remember talking about these things to my doctor clients. I don't know fourteen years ago and then you know, laughing at me like, oh, that's hocus pocus. That's that was considered pseudoscience today. That's real science. The real stuff coming out with that was the reason why I ask because I would I would imagine because we know you really well. And so we have a lot of respect for you, and I think anybody who doesn't know you well, and they ask about you like to us. That's the first thing that they say to me is like, oh, that pseudoscience guide. I'm like, oh, you really don't. Right. And and I'm guilty of that myself. I make fun of make fun of Dr McCullough for talking on the phone on his frigging selfie stick know what maybe when people are dropping dead of brain cancer twenty years from now, everybody's going to say, gosh, that's pretty smart of him to do. Right. So so I I've been, I've been in. That chair before where I've I've laughed at him doing that or the fact that he wouldn't get an sorry if he's listening in a not throwing around the boss. I'm just using this as an example of him. I love Dr MacLeod too. I learn a shit ton from him, but he wouldn't get in the car to travel with me from LA to Malibu, to visit a friend over there that want him to hang out with because of the m. f. potential and the highways and all these five g. power lines and get there. But you didn't go so teleporting and you know what, you know what ten years from now rather than me raising an eyebrow at that God, Jesus Lil. I can't prove that by taking a car from LA to Malibu, you're gonna get cancer. You know what the all that quote pseudoscience, unquote, that people might accuse him of he could be laughing at us ten years from now when when the people followed his advice are far healthier and living longer time. I agree. I agree. All you have to, you have to judge. You have to juggle modern life with a lot of these risks. But I think he's somebody who I mean, he lives it and breezy. And so he goes in that sleeps in a Faraday case leaps in a fair day cage. Right. So and people like you, I appreciate people like you do that kind of stuff so that the rest of us can pick and choose what we think is important based on what you're doing. So you may be doing all this other shit, all kinds of crazy stuff. And I'm going to take two or three of those big rocks of the big ones that I see make the biggest difference. Right. And falls off, you know, to avoid doing and do his dick yet. Don't do dick shots by the way speaking of of your. Yes. Nice. Guay. I'm listening talking about dick totally shove my my. Oh. Can't say anything. Les Norton tax. Kidding kidding. Suggests today ever hung out with lane. Talk a little bit, but but honestly we're going to get rid of him. He's he's a very, very cool grounded, nice dude. So I meant nothing by the Dixie Guay. Actually referring to that, I guess he's going to be debating Dominique de Zeno on the Joe Rogan pod? Yes. About Kito genyk diet. How do you think that's gonna go European. I wish you were on there. Yeah, know I, I saw three naming Lale well, no, I'm not a PHD. You know about both of those are doctors right. Yeah, I think if you have a death match Dr against doctor versus doctor gets like, you know, pseudoscience guy. An exercise physiologist, Tristesse board-certified exercise, physiology, and I'm a master's degree in, but you know there, there's a whole bunch of reasons why I'm less qualified in both those dudes. So I think it's going to be, I think it's going to be way more humble way better even. I'm not sure. I think there's another guy that's going to be debating on their Joel con vegan, dude. I don't know who he's going to be debating Chris Christmas. It could be. Chris? Gosh, interesting. It's hard because everybody just listed except lane and it's just we haven't had it up to hang out there of sort of my friends and acquaintances for me to make a prediction in public. But you know what? There's also something we said for radical honesty. So I'm sorry to say this Joel, but I think Chris gonna kick your ass in that debate because I think he's a less dogmatic, perhaps, Levy Joel, you know, and then regarding lane Dom I suspect that that's going to turn into a polite exchange of ideas versus actual debate. I think both of those guys are all they're both there. They might be on a little bit too friendly of terms or they are way too light and gentlemanly. And I think it just gonna turn into a scientific exchange of ideas is going to be them. Yeah, if no, it's going to be like that. I could see that, especially. I mean, you know, I've hung out with Dom like a big cuddly teddy bear. Rip your head off and said, know that's bullshit. I actually a little disappointed Joe as matching Joe, the decision somebody else's matching those two. Because if you were wanted some good radio, you would put something fiery on. The other side of his lane can be that like Lincoln poke it lane lane Gary tubs or something. Going after niggly ethic. That's what he should have done. He would have made better radio Dom. I know Dom to is going to be. I know lane like lane will throw some points out, but then and okay. In that case, I could see that. But in most it's going to be a lot of green back and forth on their points. I don't see him challenging that, right. Well, the the older I get the less I give shit about what people actually care about me and the less I find myself being people pleaser, which is probably why the old in the locker room walk around or hip stressed out and their Knicks ball rather log. 'cause they really give shit anymore that now saying same thing hour to go on that podcast and debate somebody I would be blow drying my balls. And on out bullshit. Right. And as I really don't give ship lex, we love you fucking love you. We love you brother. Always a good time when we were run into you and always good time. Yeah. When when you take off tonight or tomorrow flats and like seven or something. So I actually San Francisco, so I should probably God you better get pretty soon. Maybe maybe maybe pop a few, these wonderful candies that we have laying around. Yes, sir. Sir. He did. Okay. Yeah, yeah, maybe maybe four. I don't know what I. Just the way I wanna finish with this that I only endorse responsible use of any mind, altering substance. And Furthermore, I think that it's perfectly fine for Bros. to sit around shooting the shit and dropping f bombs and everything else. But you know, when when I'm when I'm around ladies and polite, etiquette situation, I am. I'm not a foul mouth druggie I guess. Greatest claimer. That up. No, you are. You are very stand, tremendous integrity, very humble to hang the dudes. A great time and your mind pump studio. This is how we roll do it, we, we appreciate it. Thank you. Awesome. This podcast. Then greenfield fitness dot com for even more cutting edge, fitness, performance advice.

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Q&A 420: Which Stimulants Are Safe To Take At Night, Maximizing Benefits Of Cold Thermogenesis, When To Do Blood Flow Restriction Training & More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:00:42 hr | 5 d ago

Q&A 420: Which Stimulants Are Safe To Take At Night, Maximizing Benefits Of Cold Thermogenesis, When To Do Blood Flow Restriction Training & More!

"In this episode of ben greenfield fitness podcast which stimulants are safe to take at night maximizing the benefits of cold thermo genesis wind to do blood flow restriction training and much more help performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more. My name is ben greenfield. Welcome to the show. Well jay i. I had the floss. My teeth this morning before our podcast. no man. What did you have to floss your teeth for. That's a that's an uppity scale around these. These waters yeah. Well i mean you guys got pretty big gaps in your teeth down there in the southeast so anyways i have to be careful by the wave insulting rednecks in the southeast. I might. I might get people. We have drones gun. Racks shown up at my door. You have to drive a long way washington state and then destroying me. I had jerky for breakfast and i. I've got this new recipe. I've been making liver jerky liver jerky of you. Heard of this now. I mean. I have not heard of it actually. No i've heard of it not try to not have heard of it. It's it's famous by now. it's my it's my famous liver jerky not i actually have been making both heart and liver jerky. It's kind of a cool way to get all the all the nutrient benefits of organ meats. You know the heart has a lot of coq ten and deliver on your label vitamins and some choline and you know other good nutrients in it. so what i did i do a lot of my organ meats i soak it and keefer. You know a lot of a lot of books you to soak your organ meats and buttermilk or lemon juice or even better but kiefer turns out to be really really great for breaking down in like drawing a lot of kind of gamy flavour. It's got these really good enzymes in it. And so i make i make keefer every week anyways because sometimes use as a base for smoothies often on us bone broth but sometimes kiefer so always got a batch in the fridge It's super simple. It's kind of like making sauerkraut. Or you know. Pickles or any of their ferment. And and these keefer grain just kinda grow almost like a sour dough starter so you know you feed them every week with milk. And you get a new batch. Every week and i with my key. I put a little colostrum in there and a little. Bit of pre biotic fiber it gets super creamy because the product fibers kind of feed the bacteria and the colostrum seems to lend some cream minus two as well. So anyways i soak the liver in that for about a day like a good twenty four hour soak and then i found this really really kinda cool trick that makes it just tastes absolutely amazing before i put it in the food dehydrated right so you cut it in your jerky size pieces after you've soaked it in the keefer doing afterwards it just cuts easier and then What i do you rinse the key for often and it's all chopped up and and in night preferred jerky size is a bunch of of salt on it before. Put it on the dehydrated. But this last batch. What i did was i put all the little liver pieces into just like a stainless steel bowl and i coated it with an and i wish they were a sponsor for today's show a shout out. I coated it with the organic fire. Red juice pomegranate. Yeah cranberry and beads. And my my thought process was that this could kind of like almost like a caramelized type texture to the jerky. And you know it's a little bit sweet and it's got an interesting flavor profile. So i did that. So it's all coated with this red juice and nc salt like a red use powder. I should clarify. And then i just did the you know the like a twelve hour jerky dehydration. I think the settings like one hundred fifty five degrees anyways. Oh my gosh. this jerky is so good. Like like with this red juice powder and sea salt on it with that pre keefer soak you know. I just finished writing a cookbook. That's often the publisher right now. And i wrote to the publisher. My can i add this to the cookbook. Amazing like nope dart already felt bad. But anyways so yeah. There's there's a little jerky recipe for those of you Those of you martha stewart. Who are out there listening and dawn the apron and chop up some liver baby. Yeah so a couple of things. You say so ben greenfield says that when you when you perform this routine of of dehydrating this liver and heart that it doesn't have a gamey taste but to somebody who has not either partaken in liver or heart. Do you think that that individual would say the same thing or do you think they would still find it pretty game. I think they find it pretty good. Because i had a dinner party at my house the other night and there were three people who had never had organ meats and i i gave them all a piece of this jerky and they loved it. They said so. Yeah does it actually taste. I mean they. Won't they were drunk but tastes pretty good. The only caveat. Yeah yeah all right well. Let's jump into today's newsflashes. Do i want to start with Something kinda sad ireland's supreme court has ruled that bread sold by the fast food chain. Subway contains so much sugar that it cannot legally be defined as bread bummer. Now we can't go there anymore. Yeah i mean we we We've we've all not explain to somebody who's doing a consultation with last night and they couldn't lose weight and they were having whole grain bread with breakfast whole grain bread With lunch like a sandwich would launch in a some toast with with breakfast and I was explaining to them. That bread can spike your blood sugar higher than like a snickers bar cause a snickers bar has some peanuts fats. Little bit of protein but bread is notoriously high in terms of glycemic index. It turns out that the sugar content of subway sandwiches bread is about ten percent of the way to the flower and be classified as opposed to being higher than two percent so that was one blow against subway that makes i'm assuming it's the same in the. Us as is an ireland. Not i didn't do a ton of research but at least kopf kind of raise my eyebrows. Because i'm always kind of know paying attention to some of the stuff about food. But then a canadian study you know which is closer to us than ireland so must be legit. They found that the subway chicken is only about fifty percent actual meat. I've i'm not trying to take down subway or anything. But i just want people to know because a lot of people still think subway is healthy so it was about fifty percent meat and the rest is all In terms of the dna that they tested in the meet. The forensics team in a laboratory All all of the rest of it was just soy while which is a little bit concerning because subway actually claims that his chicken strips and other nurses chicken contains one percenter less of soy protein but actually did a forensics analysis. And i think the they use the same type of lab that can figure out who murdered somebody so it must be again legit accurate. So yeah i mean you know the food babe all member of the food babe when she she she's a health blogger who criticized subway's bread for containing it was like zotov dyke carbonneau made that which is founding yoga yoga. I don't tech technically when you consume that the body breaks down in the water to. It's actually not as big of bills that sounds like but this is a big deal. I mean you're you're down on fake meat and bread. That's not even actually bread. 'cause it's so high in sugar when we eating at subway just proceed with caution. My friends he so there are a couple of things here number one i would. Actually i mean. I don't know this i mean you say that there's probably this probably the same thing here in the us but my guess is that it could be even higher in sugar content here in the us just because everybody here in the us a frigging sweet tooth so they might be like. Oh damn we need more sugar in this bread and the other thing is i used to eat subway when i was in college like probably two or three times a week because you know i thought it was healthy and the chicken was the thing that i always got. But he was always grotesque. Like i never liked eating it and so i mean haven't been to subway in probably a decade inside. I don't plan on going back. Yeah i switched the subway from. I used to go to mcdonald's for four years in college for lunch every day. And i did the the big mac. I got the extra secret sauce. Giants dr pepper in the super size fries is my lunch like every day in college and i started taking all these nutrition classes and kind of learned a little about vegetable oils and sugars. Switch to subway because i thought it was healthy and i ate subway for about three years and i actually really liked a lot of like there would they have like the meatball a meatball sandwich. Those i still do walk by subway. Calico walk by cinnabon at the airport. And i still do salvat a little bit. I gotta admit. I still think it smells pretty bomb. But then you remember you'll get mandates if he'd that chicken yeah anyways though Show shifting shifting focus from mandates and subway. This was kind of cool. Because i love cold water swimming. I was have since i was a traffic. That's one of my favorite parts was just like having a nice chilly. Invigorating cold water swim. Even though my my skinny ass often needed you know like a wet suit even even at then. What's it to be able to survive for that long but it cambridge university. They studied a bunch of cold water swimmers. It was very interesting because doctors have known for a long time that cooling people down can protect their brains. Dr jack crews for example. Who's a neurosurgeon of well known in the alternative health community in the biohacking community is a guy who does some of his brain operations and uses cold thermo. Genesis is packing around the head and even has his patients do a lot of like a cult therapy leading into an after surgery and the reason for this is. That's what happens. Is you get the production of these cold shock. Proteins and the cold shock proteins Those can actually be relatively protective to the brain and have even been known to be associated with staving off things like alzheimer's and dementia and at cambridge One of the things that they did was they cooled mice and then they. They also called mice with alzheimer's disease and pre-owned disease which is the nervous gender disease of the brain to the point where the mice became a little bit hypothermic. Which actually met people get hypothermic. When they do this kind of like intense cold water swimming like the folks you know boob you know. Meet every week on the bay in san francisco and do the cold water swims out there which i tried. I lasted like ten minutes again. My my skinny ask ago. But then what they found was when rewarm the mice the ordinary mice could regenerate their synapses and the alzheimer's and the preowned mice Could not and they found levels of a cold shock. Protein called rbm three really went up very quickly in the ordinary mice but not in the mice with alzheimer's and nerdy jenner disease. And what they showed was if they artificially boosted the rbm three levels in the mice with the alzheimer's and the disease they were actually able to stave off dementia and alzheimer's and so they they were doing this because they're trying to develop a drug that prompts the production of rbm three. Because we know you know only like one percent of the population who has dementia or alzheimer's concerned about brain. Degeneration is actually going to get an ice bath or go do cold water swims because they do kinda suck you know to a certain extent for for a lotta people get like this rush of endorphins and it gets kind of kind of a sign you almost get addicted to a little bit cold here and there after a while But they also tested a whole bunch of cold water swimmers during the winter Take those like the past four winters. They tested rbm three levels in these winter and cold water swimmers at a club in london and they found they all had these really high levels of rbm three and It it turns out that essentially what this comes down to. Is that cold water swimming and production of these cold shock proteins which arguably you could also get through things like cold showers in cold water. Immersion they stave off the progression of dementia and alzheimer's and may even decrease your risk of actually developing that even if you have a genetic propensity towards it due to the production of the cold shock proteins. It's also interesting because you know in the finnish study. They found the same thing with saunas. So i mean you know once again it turns out that probably one of the best things you can do for your body is like sauna few times a week and in coldwater swim a few times a week or just cold water. Soak or something like that. Yeah yeah totally agree. I mean had to grow to love this. it's something that. When i first started it i hated it. Instills like the first like fifteen seconds on my hated and still after a few years of doing this but like from a neuro cognitive neuro. Protective type type factor. Like this is this is like my number one thing is like such an easy free hack for for my overall Kind of neuro cognitive effects. And so i love it. Yeah and and we know you know related to to the mantis that you brought up earlier. I don't know is it offensive for us to say manage it. We'll see we'll see culture you you never know like. I'm sure if somebody anyways though ted's we do so we we know that in the case of something like called them re-genesis you get an increase in of the conversion of metabolic inactive white adipose tissue into metabolic active brown fat. It's based off. This thing called called might o'connell protein and this uncoupling protein generates heat. You know it. It burns calories to generate heat. Brown fat is very high in this uncoupling protein. Well another study. That recently came out Showed that ketosis or tones can significantly increase that conversion and so even though this has never been actually studied if we know that the consumption of ketones or the presence of ketosis whether it's intentional ketosis or in this case they were actually Were consuming In rodent models the ketone beta hydroxybutyrate. Which is what you get in a lot of supplements that kitone salts or keep no significant increase in the activation of this uncoupling protein and the conversion of white to brown fat. And so what this means theoretically is if you wanted to kind of enhance the facts of something like Morning called thermal genesis session. Not only should you do it Fasted you know but you can also take a dose of these kito esters or kitone salts prior and increase the effects of of the white brown adipose tissue conversion or the activation of this uncoupling protein. And that's really interesting because we did a podcast. You remember that podcast. While mac where reported on a study that looked at all the different food ingredients that could enhance white to brown adipose tissue conversion. Yeah yeah remember that one yeah. They were Cap sason was one like red pepper. resveratrol was another curcumin. Was one green tea omega. Three fatty acids from fish and then Like a topical mental. You know like those those topical cooling appointments and all of can can enhance the effects of cold thermo genesis. And so you know. May maybe this idea for for My supplements company kion or other business minded person out there but why not develop a pre Cold thermo genesis product. That's like red. Pepper is virtual curcumin green tea and omega three fatty acids along with some kitone esters and you could like consume that Prior to doing like a cold bath or cold so cold shower or a cold water swim and enhanced the fat loss effects even more. This is my bright idea. I'm game i would. I would definitely partake well. You get the fat loss effects and also to the cognitive boosting effects from both of them. So i mean it's it's a win win all way around so count me in. Yeah you know you know It wouldn't be that hard honestly you know. Everybody's got a little bit of red pepper in their in their pantry. Rivera trolls and easy supplement. To get curcumin is an easy supplement to get green tea simple to find. any mental. Topical lotion is simple to find We are right now in the process of launching an amazing fish. Oil at kion. And so what you put all that together. It'd be pretty just like you know. Stock your pantry and have your little section know even if nobody was able to formulate a supplement. That was kind of like done for you. And just you know have have your have your little stack that you take pre-cold so anyways anybody out there governments with go to the show notes ben greenfield venice dot com slash four twenty and. Let us know if you try that out if you if you notice anything if you do things like track your body composition regular basis or something like that. It'd be be curious but it's kind of cool idea. So they haven't as elsa school is that you just mentioned that this is qa four twenty so all of our stones are ready to go. That's true that's true. We'll take a break for you guys to to light up and continue into this week's goodies. All the didn't realize this as part of the discount codes for kion. I can actually announce on this podcast. That are fish. Oil actually is out. I didn't realize that you know at the time that we're recording. By the time this has released our fish oil or new fish. Oil will be out and it's amazing. Did you know. We've been developing official behind the scenes for like the past year. Now i didn't. I'm actually a little pissed off with you for not telling me i've been ordering the super essentials like that you guys offer for the past year now and so. I'm hoping it's going to be a one to kick that one's ask. If it's like the super essentials good fish oil. I mean that's the one i've been taking. But arguably i think the one that that we just finished formulating for kion is better so not only did we. Went with a ratio of epa dha. That's just fantastic. it's about five hundred. Thirty milligrams of epa and four thirty five of dha. All the fish oil comes from these sustainably sourced small cold water fish so th think anchovies like that type of fish. But then we added to really cool ingredients to stabilize the oils. asda's anthon which is a nord pigment. You find unlike fish food to give the pink color but really protects the fish oil. And it's also a meeting for your skin and your joints in your heart and then we used a rosemary leaf extract which also does a fantastic job preserving the fish oil and then the the really cool thing is that a lot of fish oils when they extracted from the fish breaks down the triglycerides into what's called eath lester form. And it's expensive or a longer process that takes a little bit more in terms of the processing to convert it back into the natural triglycerides form which is actually more bioavailable to the human body. But what we're doing is we're we're actually converting back into the triglycerides form. So we take these sustainably source. Small coldwater fish. We are extracting the fish oil then converted back into its natural forum at an asset santon and the rosemary leaf extract. And it's a really good fish oil. In my opinion. I think that sounds i mean. That's what i'm completely gonna start using with myself and my family and recommend to everybody so i wanna give everybody who's listening in right now. A twenty percent discount on the brand new key on fish oil So it's bg f two zero at get kion dot com bg f two zero geeky on dot com sub is gonna fall off the shelves. But there you go. There's your big fat discount code on think signed about donna. You're a nerd when you get excited over. Fish oil it makes me. I'll use bumpy This podcast is also brought to you. By juif and juve just upgrade all their devices may twenty five percent lighter. Get it later. And then they. They intensified the coverage area. You can stand like three times further away from it. I'm still waiting for my new device to get to my house. But apparently they added ambient mode which is like this calming lower intensity light mode at night to help you sleep and optimize your circadian rhythms. And you know it's still like the low e. m. f. light that that produces a ton of the near pariah red light but they're they've upgraded all their devices and they've also given us An exclusive discount code which is super simple just ben to go to juve dot com slash. Ben is j. o. The dot com forward slash ben and use code benson and Yeah you can get these these brand new devices which are pretty again. I have yet to get my new device. But apparently they're the bee's knees and even better than the old ones. So i'll tell you that yeah. And then speaking of infrared clear light They also are giving everybody a discount on their sanctuary yoga sauna. The the one that i have is big enough for me to push ups and swing kettlebells and do yoga and have dinner parties on four twenty. Invite everybody over in light up in the sauna. Not that i would ever endorsed doing something like that but sometimes the greenfield house parties go. That direction insider sauna. You don't have to get their sanctuary. They have all sorts of different models. Single person to person four person but anyways We all know songs are good for. You mentioned that. Alzheimer's and dementia study. They've also says diabetes and overall longevity. You get heat shock. Proteins had a cold shock proteins. So great thing to combine with your cold protocol they're all. Emf shielded like juve lights. Are they all come with a lifetime. Warranty and they're going to do is give a discount if anybody goes to their website at. He'll with heat dot com and just let them know that you heard about it on the podcast could usually gotta like call them to have them walk. You through which saunas is gonna work for for your needs. Or i think there's like a form on their website where you can say where you heard about us and Or you heard about them. So it's he'll with heat dot com and just mentioned the show and they're gonna they're gonna throw in little discount so And then finally. The last thing is This new clothing company that makes athletic gear that is distracting. The comfortable and also has really great looking designs. Meaning you can use it for hiking or running or training or yoga or spinning or sauna or anything either. Could there called the ori- you tried this stuff on at all j. the closing currently i have on your pants on very short of your shirt so crazy you actually got dressed for the podcast you can address for. That's impressive. i rarely rarely get dressed for often. I'm recording this podcast and my boxers. Actually i'm dressed this morning because it's cold outside like twenty nine degrees in. My house is about sixty. So i do pants on. I i actually have the fans on the jury pontoh pants. Twenty five percent on this clothing. It's really really great. Look illuminating fits well they. They focused primarily man. David a few women's options but it's spelled funny view own. I saw you go to the clothing. The you owe our clothing dot com forward slash ben in. They're giving twenty five percent discount. Use code ben twenty twenty at checkout get twenty five percent with ben twenty twenty at vre clothing dot com. So i think. I think you know we used to on all of announcement to all these places. I was going to speak and people come. See me speak and conferences and expos. None are happening. So our our special announcement section is pretty simple to get through really folks because dink world the world has slowed down anyways ben greenfield tennis dot com slash. Four twenty will also put all those discount codes. All the news flashes and will also include robust show notes for everything you're about to learn about in today's listener. Qna still a lot of talks on using blood flow restriction vans which purchased when gyms were close to us for keto training and now the gyms reopen back to training heavier weight with barbells dumbbells and cable machines. Do you see any benefits. Incorporating be far with hard sets of strength training inside of a gin or not so much. Bf our training. It is kind of uncomfortable. I mean the the burn be of our training is distracting lee uncomfortable. But i mean i i just got back from sedona where i had like a four day getaway with With angelo the ceo of kion. We were just planning out some stuff. like our amazing fish. Oil and I i just. I just traveled. My beef are banned. And i also like to bring some of those three bar resistance training bands. You know i do. I do just like body weight. Resistance training. and that's generally like kind of like the convenience factor of using the tourniquet seclusion devices to cut off a little bit of blood flow to muscles and allow you to essentially trick your muscles into thinking. They're lifting heavyweight even though you're just training with say body only or with some resistance bands and you know we could go deep into the science but in the show notes all include links to some pretty like cat sue and be afar training that we've done but i mean in in in a nutshell you get an activation of these. Things called myojin stem cells. Which are responsible for the repair damaged muscles and the growth growth muscle fibers those increased just as much as they do with heavy resistance training when you do bef. Are you get a significant increase in growth hormone and insulin. Like growth factor To increase collagen synthesis post exercise and a down regulation in mile staten which inhibits cell growth. And so when you down regulate you get more muscle hypertrophy you get hypotheses because you're cutting off a lot of the the blood delivery to the muscles that hypothesis environment causes a surge in lactic acid. Which once you take the band's off you get this big release of what's called hypoxia. Induced factor which can grow new blood vessels increase increases like bedia naff vascular endothelial growth factor for the brain. So you get like this. You know russian in mental energy and then you also get a little bit of cell swelling like this anabolic reaction of cell swelling Not only due to the activation of those magic stem cells but also the blood pooling from the blood rushing back in. And so if you are one of those people who just likes to have you know say fellas you like to have your arms popping for date night or something like this. Is the perfect workout to do on that day. That you're going to wear your favorite t shirt or go to the beach And so there's a lot of a lot of benefits of bef our training but the question is Specifically to hear like is is it worth doing in conjunction with just like regular weight training like could you somehow get an advantage with doing barbells or dumbbells or cable machines and turns out. They actually have research this. And what what they've found when they've combined these blood flow restriction bans where resistance exercise. Which is something. I used to do back in the day. When i was bodybuilding. I would turn get my arms and legs usually for about one workout every couple of weeks or so and just do my normal workout with the arms turner candid and i would always get this amazing response for few days it. It was just more swale. I didn't know about any of this senior lifting as heavy as you would. Yeah i was doing my normal weight training routine but with the bands on now What what they've found when they've actually looked into this. Is that if you do resistance. Exercise with the bans on versus without the band's you actually do see a greater release of growth hormone a greater release of testosterone more of the benefits. That i've just described and the the kind of the the tricky part though is everything is way more difficult to lift. So so you're probably going to be able to do fewer reps. Which is that's one reason that people who do be if are trained. They're often more frequently. Because you're actually damaging the muscles last but getting a lot of the same results the muscle damage however you can. You can exercise a little more frequently. Because you're typically doing few reps and sometimes using less weight when you're doing this blood flow restriction training But it turns out the studies that have compared like doing your high intensity training or weight training with pf are versus without be afar with the bef. Are you actually do see. Even if you're not able to do as many repetitions or even use as much weight increases similar to the gains that you would get without the afar. that's interesting. i did not expect you to say that. Actually yeah yeah. There's definitely something to it now. A lot of people get concerned about thrombosis formation of a blood clot instruction of blood flow. But there's no research that low intensity increases the type of coagulation that would cause that that breakdown of or the increase in the production of clots as a matter of fact the research on it shows me increase more. What's called fiber analytic activity. The breakdown of clots. So we know that's perfectly safe lifting super heavy with a lot of inclusion though. There's no studies. I could find that looked at risk of increased coagulation or blood clot formation in that scenario so. I can't say i've seen any research that indicates that you're going to increase the risk of a clot by lifting heavy with bef our training. I can tell you though bodybuilders do it. All the time you don't see bodybuilders in dead left and right of blood clots while they're doing far training. I've i haven't even seen a single case. Study your anecdotal study where that's occurred or anecdotal incident. Where that's occurred. So i i'm not that concerned about it. I mean proceed at your own risk and make sure that you're not putting them on too tight and ideally if you can afford it you get one of these cats who train devices that let you very precisely dial in the millimeters of mercury that you would use kind of senior safe range which would definitely for a heavyweight training session probably not be anything above three hundred millimeters mercury pressure but ultimately You you can see greater benefits doing. You're normal weight. Training routine with. Bf are bans on or cat sioux bands. Even if you're not able to do as many reps would. You probably won't be able to do so. Yeah would you recommend and let's say for this listener. If they're let's say they're lifting four times a week do you think they should limit it to like once or twice a week or you think they'd be fine with doing it four times a week. You could just be suck. It's painful yeah. Well it's a lot of burn. I mean if you're a glutton for punishment yeah. I mean the way i use the f. Our trainees honestly you know i. I only use it with body weight or resistance bands. When i'm traveling. Just yeah and and part of it too is you know you do get some restriction of movement that may impair your mobility your bio mechanics your form especially if doing things like you know. Squats cleans some more complex. Barbell exercises multi joint exercises. You just might up. You'll to maintain quite as good of form when he got lactic acid porn out your eyeballs. So that's something to think about it. Yeah it's kind of kind of the same concept as like wearing those elevation training masks. When you're training. Yeah you're gonna you're gonna strengthen your inspiration expiratory muscles and increase your would you tolerance and everything like that but you kind of impair bio mechanics just because you're so g- asked so of same concept right and it was. Oh yeah it makes sense. I mean you do get a crazy good pump from it. But yeah i'm like you only use it if i'm doing body weights or like sandbags or some functional fitness. I've never used them actually in the gym doing bench. You're doing squats or deadliest tries. We haven't hey. Ben recently had surgery for cancer and need to do six weeks of radiation as just one of your thoughts on the top three things to do to reduce side effects. Love the show man. Well my my my heart goes out to. Jim and jim will keep you in our in our nuts and prayers there with the with the surgery for for net cancer. And the radiation. 'cause i know that just kind of sucks when you're when you're undergoing radiation therapy and that is a form of ionizing radiation kind of depends on the type of reation. That's us you know. External beam radiation is delivered outside the body. But then there's like internal beam radiation where you're actually placing radioactive materials inside the body which arguably would be a scenario in which the consumption of certain nutrients and compounds etc to to to limit of. The damage could be a good idea. And and there is of course evidence that external beam radiation therapy based on the same concepts as you know the type of damaging ionizing radiation you might get from wi fi router cell phones etc can do a little damage to cell membranes or increased calcium influx into a cell or even do a little bit of dna damage and so you know arguably even though i'm not doctrine don't want this to be misconstrued as medical advice Of the same things that have been studied for any form of ionizing radiation including cell phones wifi etc could extend to be applied to staving off some of the potential damage from therapeutic radiology. So and technically when you're playing radioactive material inside your body that that's that's a type of radiation therapy. That's very commonly used to treat. Cancer is called brachytherapy. You know when it's internal radiation. It's a little bit more more problematic than the external radiation. Because again it's going straight into your actual body tissue radioactive materials. But you know if i were actually undergoing radiation therapy whether internal or external there are certain things that i would do and this actually has been It's been studied There there's a very interesting very interesting paper that was published back in two thousand seven in which they investigated the radio protective potential plants and herbs against the effects of ionizing radiation and. This is something anybody who does get exposed to ems wi fi. Radiation therapy travels a lot through airports etc on a regular basis. Should actually sit up and take notice of because you know the the the general concept here is that some plants and herbs do have radio protective potential. And that's that's very very similar to the idea of the zeno hormetic effect meaning that the polyphenyls can scavenge radiation induced free radicals due to elevations of cellular antioxidants by these plants and herbs. You know they. They have mildly toxic compounds in them. That of course they have been roughly vilified by the carnivore community. And that we actually covered in our last podcast. If you guys want to take a listen to podcast four one nine we can talk about. Which of these are problematic in which are not like electons gluten fighting acids etc even polyphenols but these polyphenyls up regulate as of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and good transfers to file phony peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. And so they can counteract a lot of the oxidative stress induced by ionizing radiation. I would argue the benefits of that occurring would exceed any cons in terms of like mild You know like like a little bit of of gut damage for example. You know like stephen gunnery talks about in his book plant paradox or potentially a little bit of the toxicity from some of the bilton protective mechanisms of these plants. I think that the the response in terms of cellular antioxidant production. Especially in the face of ionizing radiation dictates that you know. I think the pros outweigh the cons of the consumption of the type of plant and herbs that have been shown to have some radio protector potential Specifically the ones that they looked at in this study that were that were most notable even though they used a lot of kind of like the The the botanical name. So it's tough to know exactly what they are you know when you look at like mentha piper rita. We know that that's that's going to be a form of black pepper. But it's not like you're gonna type in meant piper. Read on amazon. And find what you want but you do some research on some of these. You know it's not gonna be that hard a link to the paper in the show notes but the big fear. The most most significant were panicked. Ginseng which is commonly known. Pretty to get your hands on jink oklahoma jamaica. Boloba was another Black pepper was one curcumin. Extract like tumor at curcumin. Things like that and then ginger. Ginger was a biggie as well In all linked to the full paper. 'cause there's there's actually over a dozen different nutrients that they they looked at in the study and there. There's actually another paper in two thousand eleven and that happened. After the fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in japan in which they looked at virtual and they found that reservatrol grape skin extract could actually protect against radiation injuries as. Well she could throw that in there along with your ginger eugene saying boloba black pepper to mark in some of the compounds that are in this. This study that all that will link to in the show notes also in two thousand thirteen in the journal. The advanced practice of oncology they looked at some complementary strategies for the management of radiation therapy and that study they found aloe vera. Gouda mean Digress related liquorice extract And then Actually identified quite a few in their probiotics Salim manuka honey. A klenge ila melatonin and even acupuncture all to have some effect at limiting the damages of ionizing radiation. Now i realize that. I'm listing off a lot of things but for those of you who want to dig into the papers who are concerned about the effects of ionizing radiation kind of put wanna put together your own your own stack so to speak what i'll do is if you go to the show notes at ben greenville dot com slash four twenty. All linked to a lot of these papers. Now i would say. And this is my own strategy which i developed after interviewing dr jomar cola and digging into his book. Emf we talked about the three basic mechanisms of action. View which ionizing radiation can damage cells and maddock kondracke was basically direct dna damage via radiation this steep influx of calcium into the cell and the up regulation of oxidative stress. Do the activation of everybody's inflammatory pathway called the nerve to pathway. And what what i did. After interviewing him was every time. I travel now. I use a higher amount of any. Nasd along with us or two. And in my case i'll just use. Well i think that's something called it's Like an alternative to resveratrol it is. Why am i blanking on the name of it. It's one that starts with the p. And it's up in my pantry but it's not pantry. It's i'm talking about terro- stabbing tariffs dubbing. So i take that. Because i think it's better than resveratrol as far as this goes but pair that with any and then and that's for the dna damage. And then i use magnesium to offset the calcium influx and. then i just you key tones to down regulate the nerve to pathway. 'cause i don't have the time to like you know. Put twenty things in my suitcase. When i travel. But i just use the with terrorist. Delbene the magnesium and the key tones and. That's what i use when. I'm like going through airports flying I i actually. If you go to ben grateful thinnest dot com slash g package. I just made like a An amazon list of those three things that i use to kind of protect myself from some of the damaging effects of using radiation. But that's my approach. Although a lot of other things like i mentioned from other studies have been looked into. But you don. I'm just kind of a creature who likes simplicity. so i use any deans or tunes. Magnesium key tones. A couple of these studies looked into a lot that goes beyond that like the ginger of the janko blah the nude saying the You know the curcumin. I it cetera. I i think that armed with the results of those couple of studies and then that The that list i made ben greenfield dot com slash. Five g package. You should be able to To get your hands on decent decent amount of things For natural production. I don't think you got to use all of them but you know just choose. Maybe three to five different wants to throw into the mix. And that's that's right start high then. This is caitlin from canada. And i'm questioned. I have recently started chewing the lucy nicotine gum I'm not a smoker. I've never smoked before. I'm loving it loving how it makes my brain feel but i've noticed on my aura ring that my readiness score has been dropping and it's been about a month and usually i get Between nine hundred ninety three daily from readiness and it's now significant job to like seventy five to eighty two Eat late like six. Pm rarely have a drink in usually in bed by nine pm. So i feel like. I'm doing everything right and can't figure out what that change might be besides the nicotine and i'm just wondering if nicotine could have any effects on overall recovery. Thank you you you that lucy nicotine gum do i do. I don't do it as much as i you too but i do. Yeah yeah some company developing a new form that's flavored with like it's flavored with with monk fruit. They sent me a couple of their their their trial products. It's actually pretty good at some some kito company. I probably wouldn't say right now. But they're developing this nicotine gum. This guy is just like monk. Fruit and nicotine. It's really good like four milligram dose of nicotine. But as lucy us do they do they. St or do they use something they use all sorts of different but these lower amounts of of some of of these other companies. And that's generally at you. Nicotine gum usually do that. Lucy stuff or i also like john. Laroche's zen spray which is like the amazonian hoppy. That's more like a nasal spray that does have some nicotine in it as well. And i i like it because unlike coffee has a pretty short half life. Nicotine does meaning. It's not gonna stay in your system. It's got half life of a couple of hours gets metabolising delivered a coating in or It's called a co kotani and then Coating it will stay in your system a little bit longer but doesn't seem to like disrupt sleep or activate the sympathetic nervous system quite as much as nicotine and so because of that i can chew nicotine gum before like a dinner that i wanna be a little bit more wasteful during and maybe i'm tired at the end of the day and it doesn't wake me up quite as much as a cup of coffee or keep me awake. You know quite as long as a cup of coffee might but but it is a stimulant and they've actually looked into this. There's there's a few interesting studies that have looked into the effects of nicotine specifically on activation of the sympathetic nervous system or specifically like reducing. hr v. one study found that a single dose of four milligrams produces a significant reduction in your heart rate variability due to its its increase in. What would be called the the low frequency score And so you know the of that It it could definitely affect your Your or a ring readiness score. There was another one where they actually looked at rabbits and they found a similar thing like nicotine. Induced catecholamine released that also decreased. Hr v. now. Interestingly there there was one study that found that that nicotine did not Lower hr v. In i don't i don't know why. But in this case they they combined it with With black tea not quite sure why the team black t. May maybe it's because a little bit of caffeine and the black tea or maybe they're trying to see some of the polyphenyls would do but in this case they use less nicotine these about two milligrams and they didn't find that had as big of an impact on hr v. so there's definitely a dose response effect you know and you'd probably want to if you're using it at night especially go with this as low and nicotine dose as as you're able to use like closer to to two milligrams for example or cut four milligram piece in half or something like that the the or ring readiness score that caitland is referring to what what the ordering ring does. And that's generally the wearable that i prefer just because i don't like warrants on my wrist. We're like a cheap ass. Fifteen dollar timex watch and then just my oral ring but it takes resting heart rate. It takes heart rate variability right. The amount of time between your heart beets Your body temperature. And you're spire tori rate. It it takes those four variables and then feeds that into an algorithm and kicks your readiness score And i believe it also takes into account. In addition to the body tap the heart rate the hr v. and the respiratory rate. I think it also takes into account your sleep balance and how much you've exercised. I'm pretty sure it does. Yeah okay good. I and so. If you're if you're consuming nicotine and noticing that it drops your readiness score then. Theoretically it's probably doing so due to the slight increase in resting heart rate probably the the decrease in hr v. it does impact sleep parameters a little bit like it can disrupt deep. Sleep if you take it at night. Yup and so You know i. It's one of those things where I mean the the short answer is yes. I mean it is a stimulant. It's less of a problematic stimulant at night compared to say like caffeine for example or your mateo or something like that but it definitely is going to like basically. Yeah i decreases your heart rate variability and will decrease your readiness gordon not only the decreased ability but the increase in resting heart rate and the drop in sleep. And and so you just have to ask yourself whether the the surgeon energy or the increase alertness that you might be looking for is worth that that trade off. Yeah i'd say for caitlyn. Just run a simple experiment. I mean just try it with it and try it without it and see what happens to the rain. The score consideration body temperature resting heart rate and hr v. respiration rate and sleep. And so. yeah it's likely affecting some areas so kind of just open up the data and analyze it a little bit and then from an hurry variability standpoint perspective and this would kind of really qualify for everything we just mentioned. Is that when you are taking any caffeine. But more specifically we're taking it. This is a constrictors has also going to start the sympathetic nervous system. And so because of that Therefore you're gonna see drops in hr v. the part is gonna start regulating itself because basically nicotine is going to be a signal or to the heart that. Hey you took this. Or this was ingested For a means like you have reason to take this and the reason for you to take this is to get up and get going whether it's cognitive or its physical performance. Whatever it may be and so you're bound to see this if i take nicotine actually for me. Interestingly enough been. If i have nicotine later in the afternoon i would say evening time. It's i have a very similar response actually from a readiness perspective on or a ring then when i drink alcohol it almost looks exactly the same. I might have a little bit lower. Hr v. with alcohol but for the most part it it will drop my readiness. So for me. I kind of cut it off past like one or two but i just really am sensitive to nicotine. Yeah the vasil constructive effect or something to that. I actually had a couple of guys who started a nicotine it might depend on your nitric oxide pathways to like if you have dr ben lynch the author of the book dirty jeans would would call a dirty nitric oxide. Pathway we have trouble producing nitric oxide anyways. Or was it the last podcast where he took a deep dive in nitric oxide. I think it was it. Was he the last one. The one was podcast fourteen. Four nineteen if you check that we geeked out on all the things that can decrease your ability to produce nitric oxide like mouthwash. Fluoridated toothpastes a host of factors. And you know if you already have impaired nitric oxide function or impaired nitric oxide production. It can also contribute to almost like an erectile dysfunction type of scenario if you throw nicotine along with that so i i've nothing against nicotine and of course we know. It's mildly addictive as well which is a wonderful business model for company like lucy gum But anyways ultimately yeah i mean you need to be aware of of some of the some of the potential trade offs so You know this kind ties into the next question. So let's play this from steve. Hey ben this is steve. I recently started taking night classes for my graduate degree and the classes are typically from eight pm to ten pm. Which really late and i was wondering. You have any tips for maintaining mental acuity. Making sure that. I'm nice and sharp for those classes without keeping me up too late afterwards because things like caffeine are great but they do tend to disrupt my sleep. I want to get to sleep as soon as possible. After those classes sony advice you have would be great. Thanks all right well as we were just talking about Nicotine could be one option. Do shorter half life compared to converged caffeine. Which i think caffeine's half-life of what fifteen hours twelve hours something like that and it wasn't that long it depends whether you're slow or fast coffee oxidizer but it definitely will impair sleep at night more than nicotine because it's going gonna stay in your system for a longer period of time even if you're a fast coffee oxidizer i mean in most cases coffee afternoon whether you're slow or fast oxidizer will disrupt sleep period. That's just it just happens so there know when when i have to stay awake at night because i'm traveling outside my normal time zone going to like late night dinners or parties or meetings know which again happens when i travel or you know even if i'm gonna go whatever see if i in vegas or something like that you know. There are times when. I'm definitely past my bedtime. But i know. I still want to go to sleep. Like i don't wanna take one hundred micrograms of lsd and be up till five. Am or drink a cup of coffee in and sleep but not really at my deep sleep cycles and so there are certain things that i use at night. One i already mentioned and it would be due to the short half life. I will use nicotine at night like before dinner party. All all popped some gum and chew while i'm driving to the dinner party all right. So that's that's one thing that i've found When i take it's still decreases my readiness score decreases my hr v. A little bit. But i can at least sleep if i if i take. Nicotine's delays like eight. pm. And still you know go to bed at ten thirty and be fine another one. That's similar that. I already mentioned it. Due to the presence of small amounts of nicotine is that zen nasal spray from dr john. Laura which is which is a blend of oxytocin which is kind of nice if you're on social setting anyways is great for a date for social setting for an evening activity but it's blended with a little bit of this amazonian a hoppy extract which is really great for clearing the head. Scott trace amounts of nicotine in it and It's actually a little bit of a bagel nerve stimulants. And so i think that it because of that there might be a trade off in terms of the potential impairment of hr v. The cool thing is. And i don't know if john talked about this on the show was he has one version. That's got the amazonian hop in it. But then he has another version. That's just a peppermint and rosemary. And i think it's I believe it's cinnamon essential oil and a little bit of oxytocin. And so that doesn't even have any nicotine. But essentially like you're like you're huffing peppermint and rosemary up your nose. Which are all wonderful natural essential oil stimulants and do that at night a lot. Because i have both zen spring that's made of the hop and then i also have his end spray. That's made of just the regular essential oils and the multi essentials at night doesn't disrupt sleep a bit. It's literally just like smelling and so sounds spicy. Yes that's one yet burns a little bit. When i goes in but i mean it's so that's that's a really great option and is that available for purchase. Yeah it's all legal you can tell you. All linked to his website. We might have a discount code or something somewhere. I'll sit down. And you know. I i did a great podcast. With him. super smart formulator. He does both the the suppositories the melatonin and the cbd's positive is in the zen spray. And the zen essential oil sprays. That'd be another option on another one. That'll do a lot of times in the later afternoon or the evening to get an increasing alertness as a mild stimulant without disrupting sleep and arguably actually enhancing deep sleep cycles. Based on research on rem sleep is a lion's mane you know in in lion's mane as trace amounts of caffeine in it but not enough to really keep you awake at night and studies on lion's mane have shown that it can increase Rem sleep and so you know that that's great. Because we know can improve focus improved neuro plasticity increased levels of of brain derived neurotrophic factor and even balance out the access a little bit almost like an adapted genyk. Herb would but it's not disruptive to sleep yet can make you alert. And i know some people who swear by it for improving their dreams lucid dreaming and things like that so lion's mane would be another. I know some people in the plant medicine sector will even take lion's mane right before bed along with a small dose of silla sivan for the dream cycles and I find suicide into be to stimulated for me at even microdosing will just make me super creative and aliyah thinking of of amazing ideas but lion's mane would be one that i think would definitely fit as evening south and that's another one that i'm fine using it night doesn't keep me awake at all Another one is lt and was just fantastic. You know it's an amino acid. You'll find in green tea like caffeine it's got two components. Filing theobromine that can enter the brain by crossing the blood brain barrier when it does so increases the formation of alpha brainwaves gives you the alert relaxation And affects gaba and dopamine pathways a little bit in a way that increases attention and brain function. But not only does it not keep you up at night but if you combine it with the stimulants such as caffeine it can actually make caffeine a little bit less stimulative right and so it's one of those you can have in your back pocket. You know if if you happen to have made the mistake of having too much coffee but it's also something that you can take by itself. Mona earn one hundred milligrams or so i find to be the sweet spot. You can take it with lion's mane you could stack with anything i've just described and that's another one. That can be stimulant you can use at night. That's not going to a deleteriously impact your sleep cycles so that's one then. There's one more one more that that. I'm fine with taking a smaller dose of at night and it's a neutral bec- formula it's made by a company called neuro hacker collective. It's called kuala mind and it's it's like a whole shotgun for me it's got like who you know for learning and memory it's got us alas stress which enhances memory learning garlic artichoke card jingle blow but they make a caffeine free version of it. And even though. If i'm gonna crush a day of work and i wanna take a neutral book formulation all actually take anywhere from six to eight capsules of it in the morning and the reason i liked the caffeine free in the morning is because i still do like to have a cup of coffee a lot of times in the morning. I don't want double up on my caffeine. But then i found in the evening if i just need a little. Pick me up. We'll take a half dose like three or four never seems to impact my sleep at all And that that one already. Has you know if you take three or four. It's already got about a hundred milligrams athenian so we already getting some training to and that's another kind of done for you. Formula that. I find about a half dose of gives gives me good mental function the evening. And you know. I'm talking about the caffeine. Free version doesn't seem to impair sleep cycles at all. So that'd be another throw into the mix. I think it's got line main lines as well. I'm not positive on that one Thank you doesn't know it's got yeah. I loved that as well. You know wondering thing. I would add to To give a try actually texted you this morning about this. Because i've recently been using it. Is i actually have been using a table note sorry a teaspoon of the be powered by the beekeepers naturals brand which is kind of a mixture of honey. Propolis royal jelly people and It is a great dislike cognitive. Pick up that. I can utilize without any negative side effects. I mean it's only got like five grams of sugar in it so for you know a teaspoon of honey all A lot of Like acetylcholine colin precursor. Doesn't it. yep it does. It's phenomenal so i would recommend that as well especially if you take it right before class. I think kind of the amount of mental acuity. You'll you'll receive from that and if you like stack that on top of like a small dose of quality of mind mapping free. Thank your in for a good night. A learning their siv awesome. Awesome so There's there's a drug bag steve. Well that's great. I hopefully camp with some new tips for people you know. This is kind of fun because Hopefully people have gotten some ideas for enhancing their coal thermo genesis enhancing their their jim time with the blood flow restriction training enhancing their evening activities with with non sleep disrupting stimulants and Stay the hell away from subway so Willing to all this stuff. At ben green fitness dot com slash. Four twenty along with the brand new fish oil and some of other fantastic sponsors like Like juve and and clear light and who's the other sponsors head today. Laurie yeah inventory clothing. So all at ben green venice dot com slash. Four two zero. And we'll also give away some swags. We give away some swag. Got someone to get some swag. Let's do it. This is the part of the show where we will read a review and if you leave us a review on any podcast platform that you listened in on and say something nice and you hear your review read on the show. That means we're going to send you a sweet ask gear pack with a bg f. T. shirt and beanie and bpa free water bottle. And all you gotta do. Is email gear at ben. Greenfield fitness dot com. With your t-shirt size if you if you hear your review read so that being said i take it away jay alright. So we've got a review from kim. One two three four five she says or maybe him. My health energy outlook has all increased. Because of this podcast it is so fun to try new things to increase all these fundamentally important facets of life the how to as well as the science that backs up the info in the podcast is what i needed to buy into this life enhancing info. Thank you been team in. Thank you kim awesome. Well kim right gear. Benji will stock calm listener. T shirt size sweet gear. Pack sent your way in the meantime for the russia's noon ben grateful finished dot com slash. Four twenty who is where you'll mind All the show notes for your four twenty enjoyment and j. That was fun thanks man. Hey blast man catch you on the flip side see. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all shown announced resources. Pretty much everything that i mentioned or at ben greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful. Ben recommends page. Which is a list of pretty much. Everything that i've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion. 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How To Raise Adventurous, Healthy, Vibrant Children Who Have A Love For The Outdoors.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

How To Raise Adventurous, Healthy, Vibrant Children Who Have A Love For The Outdoors.

"Of the Ben. Greenfield fitness podcast. Our relationship with the natural world suggests that we are Superior Twitter we're GONNA dominate this mound. That's actually not really what I want to foster and my children. The child develops greater respect for nature greater respect for the mountain for the raging river for the cold for the heat etc. When they're not in it to beat it but just to be in it and dwell within it performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more my name is Ben Greenville. Welcome to the show all right. Today's episode is a good one. It's with a mom and a super athletes are her name. Is Katie Arnold? She has cracked the code on how to raise healthy kids how to stay active. How to get your kids outdoors. We delve into the science of that we delve into how to be a busy parent and stay fit at the same time and we delve into Even more deeply you know I cover a lot of these productivity in parenting concepts in my new Book Boundless. Which if you haven't read it yet. Pleased grab at Boundless Books Dot Com. And please please please. If you do not get a chance to read a review or or not read a review about a I'll leave a review on Amazon or Barnes and noble or good reads. Please leave my book review. It's the best thing you can do to help this. Message of Boundless Energy Take the world by storm and when we talk about in today's episode is a little bit of what's in boundless parenting productivity staying fit but having a life and having a social life and having hobbies and all those other things that you crave in the meantime that much more is imbalanced book dot Com. But what I'm specifically asking you for right now are reviews wherever you got the book. Or if you're getting the book please please please leave. Review helps the show or helps the the book out a ton and This podcast is brought to you in addition to to to the book which can get Boundless Book Dot Com. This book is brought to you by Kiana. Most popular supplement at Kion. It can be used to enhance recovery from muscle to get to sleep faster. It's a ports optimal cognition because it serves as a base for your neurotransmitters supports the immune system. It can help with the lining of the gut very similar to something like Collagen glycemic or bone broth. This stuff is like the Swiss army knife of supplementation. We've got it in a super delicious mixed berry powder also a cool lime powder. It's called Kion Amino if you haven't tried it yet. The gotTa give it a try and see what everybody is talking so much about so you get a twenty percent discount on anything kion including these Amino. They're fantastic. So what you need to do is use code. B G F two zero at GET KION DOT COM to get kion dot com and your discount code is B G F two zero. This podcast is also brought to you by Juve. Juve makes these near infrared and red light panels that are used for skin rejuvenation like Collagen and elastic formation to enhance nitric oxide production to help more rapid wound healing scar healing. Get rid of wrinkles. It can reduce joint pain. If you put it on your genitals it can be used to enhance your endocrine system your testosterone. It can be used. Pre bed to simulate the sunset for sleep in the morning to Jumpstart Your Circadian Rhythm by Simulating Sunrise. What can't these lights do? They mimic that natural spectrum of infrared. Light that sunlight's GONNA give you but inside wherever you need it. They have a tiny little travel and called the go. The at the big elite that I use in my office and the good folks at Juve or giving a free copy of my book boundless to anybody who gets Juve only while supplies last so to get your Juve. And get your Giovane. You go to j o the the dot com slash Ben. That's JUVE DOT COM SLASH. Ben and check out the New Scientist photo by modulation infrared and red light to enhance your health while folks my guest on today's show is Katie. Arnold you may have come across her writings before especially fear into the outdoors because she is a contributing editor at outside magazine and she even has a column with a great tile called raising rippers. It's a column about bringing up adventurous children that she writes for outside online. She's also written for the New York. Times runners world for ESPN and many many other publications. And as you no doubt have guessed she. Herself is an outdoors athlete. She's actually the two thousand eighteen leadville trail one hundred champion. She lives in Santa Fe. Great City to be an outdoorsy person and really relevant to today's discussion. The only she written a book called running home and a link to that in the show notes but she also has two daughters and she has managed to weave together life as a successful endurance athletes and also a successful writer and also a successful parent at least from what I understand. Her children are not in prison. So I'm going to put her. In the category of successful parent. Her name is Katie. Arnold and everything that Katy and I talk about today you can find over at Ben. Greenfield finished dot com slash Katie. That's been GREENFIELD FINISH DOT COM slash K. A. T. e. So Katie. Welcome to the show. Thanks Fan I'm psyched to be here. Yeah well I'm I'm stoked to have you seen some of your articles pop up now and again. You're you're raising rippers column about how you're raising adventurous children. And I know you've been involved in this elite ultra runner community for quite some time but just so people can wrap their heads around what it means to be. An ultra runner described the leadville trail race to me. What exactly does that look like? And that is one hundred mile. High Altitude ultra-marathon cal like how high it goes to twelve thousand six hundred feet so it's pretty high anytime you get above six thousand you can feel it. Yeah it starts at ten thousand right starts in Leadville which is about ten to and kind of rolling terrain but at high elevation. It climbs over. What's called hope pass which I love the name Because you do feel such hope when you're on top and you cross it you climb at once and then descend the other side and then you have to turn around climate back the other way and then descend and Yeah so I think some people would think that's a nightmare. Actually a you know. Mountains are my my favorite my specialty. So it plays to my strengths but It's a terrific race. It's it's a big field. About eight hundred people started and Maybe about three fifty four hundred. Finish it In the allotted time. But it's it's real and the scenery is stunning but Yeah it took me just under twenty hours. So that's a long time to be in motion just out of twenty nine now when you say that. That number of people finish based on my rough calculations that's less than a fifty percent fash rate or people primarily dropping out aside from pure boredom in the case of some folks due to injuries due to attrition from Poor Nutrition Management Or. What do you think's the reason that the failure rate so high? A lot of people I think are getting cut off. There's time limits so that that's that's in the interest of runners safety so that they're not out In the mountains you know too long so that there's a thirty hour cough and at various aid stations. Their cutoff time. So if you don't make it into say the fifty mile AIDS foundation in the allotted time There's someone there race official who just clip your job and you're done and so that I think is I think most people who show up at Leadville I mean. Obviously some people have injuries or their stomachs. Go south on them. But most people I think would be able to finish if there wasn't a time limit right. Just got it out at that point. It's so mental due to get to the finish line but There are those very strict down to the down to the minute. Absolutely I I was crewing last year. I was helping someone so I was pacing. Someone and I got to hang out at an aid station at mile. Sixty two coming back in to the finish and You know saw the woman cutting people off and I it was. It's very moving because they runners. No there's no wiggle room. There's no talking her out of you know cutting their bib and but she has so much compassion right and you you can just feel. The absolute human will to keep going is so strong. How many times did you? That was my first time. You want it the first time you did it I did. That was my first hundred mile race. First Time at LEADVILLE. Wow Okay so so for you for something like that. I want to get into your training a little bit. I don't just turn into you. Know an insider. Glimpse of ultra running that zero point one percent of folks who are listening are actually going to go out and do so. I'm not sure how relevant your your training but I want. I want to hear you weave that into family. But I'm curious just for me because I am huge into the logistics of the nutrition. The fuelling pacing aspects of these type of events. Having done iron man for quite some time. I just I love to geek out on it so I'm just curious like how how you actually engage in self care during event like this like like what are the big wins when it comes to the type of nutrition or hydration tactics. You use the type of pacing. You might use whether that be power heart rate to ensure your I'm blowing up too soon. Like are are there specific? Big Wins that you think really helped you win. Yeah I think first of all nutrition and so fortunately I. I usually have a pretty good stomach. Meaning I can take in calories and convert them into energy and not get upset stomach and And I so but my strategy for that is that I eat every thirty minutes. So I'll take Gel. I'll take a Goo- Every thirty minutes during the race and that Just kept my Energy Steady I'd never had really any low points where I felt like I was bonking and And I really could get down to. It was probably the last ten or fifteen miles that I started to have a little bit of that gag reflex when I tried to eat I'm also like I also trained myself so I practice that in training and I've I've always found that that works for me about two hundred calories in our that's at lower elevations so when I get above eleven thousand feet. I need more so than. I'm about three hundred calories in our but I'd practice that as I've been ultra running for eight years and I've been doing that. The whole time. But what I really practicing trading cycle leading up to Leadville was also myself to be able to eat whatever they were offering on the aid station tables to eat what they're off and to not be so rigid with my nutrition that I couldn't say a have You know watermelon or I tend to go for fruits bananas. I had some Rahman Soup At the high point at hope pass I learned how to drink soda when Iran which I'd never done and I thought that was you know I just thought that was sacrilege right to have soda and Soda can be a godsend that none only do. I agree with you that in these long events where flavor fatigue can become an issue that you don't anticipate for the first few hours or that you haven't actually gotten too because you've only gone. As far say seventy five miles and a training run flavor fatigue becomes an issue which dictates that what is available at aid stations becomes increasingly attractive as the race progressed. Whether that be cookies or coke or bananas or watermelon or what have you and if you're say relying upon that fancy I don't know liquid kitone Esther dextrose plan that that is all you're going to touch during the entire race it. It can become an issue when you can't even think about that. Particular form of fuel without the thought of vomiting or gagging and then when it comes to to coke specifically I I used to stick to my guns during iron man all the way up to the half marathon mark of the run and it was at that point when I figured out that the sugar caffeine flavor combination of coke was perfect for that final kick to the finish line so I would kind of wait and wait and save it but I would also occasionally during training. Do things like have an oreo cookie or eat a piece of a power bar or or consume. Those things might not be staples but that. I knew were going to be part of the aid station because of the flavor fatigue and be what if it goes south and you actually lose your your fuel belt or or your nutrition and have to rely on course fuel. You can't pay yourself into the corner of of being just a stickler on whatever this has got to be gluten free or this has gotta be you know something that shifts into ketosis versus Maltodextrin and fructose yet to be a little bit free wheeling with these things. I'm a big believer in that I think to train to be nimble and that goes for life as well as training and endurance. Right is when we get so superstock on the only thing that works. That's pretty good. Sign that we need to shift our thinking and be more open minded. And so that's what I did. I think that I love what you said about flavor fatigue but I would also say that texture fatigue is a big one right. So I'm a I'm sponsored by Gu so I I eat goo and they've always worked for me and I love it and know credit winning leadville really to a lot of my nutrition strategy. After a certain point right the just the texture of those gels becomes oppressive. And so I would just mix in watermelon. you know whatever I could and certainly the soda and like you is I you know. I just did a race on Saturday. Sixty K. And I didn't drink soda until I wait until about the halfway mark or a If I'm having a bad day then sooner but you know if I really start thinking about it and I'm down. I'm having a hard day or something's not working out. Get Out. Get to the Coke Center for you. In addition to the nutrition. Are you doing things special from from a hydration standpoint hydration and electrolyte etcetera? Yeah I'm drinking the Rachane so I'm drinking. The you know the the bottles have what I think. If you put the right amount of powder in like two hundred calories so I've gotten a lot of liquid calories too and My hydration strategy has always been a pretty much a minimalist when it comes to sort of bells and whistles and strategies and products but When I when I think about drinking I drink right so anytime I think should drink. That's my cue to drink and This just this race on Saturday I was even more deliberate and my goal was it was a training race so my goal was to practice things that I would note strategies that I would try to use later and some of my bigger goal races but one of them wise to finish a bottle between every aid station so I'd never been so delivered about that right sometimes. I've come into aid station be like oh I only drank half a bottle And so this was a really good practice to do that. And I and I. I was successful in that regard in race. That empty bottle between every station which was about seven or eight miles. Gourock teen also is interesting for those you listening in most energy gels are either fructose or multi. Dexter and I used to use garage team. During some of my ironman races Prior prior to shifting into the use of essential Amino Acids I would use Rachane Energy jail because that has the branch chain amino acids in it and I think they double the electrolytes in that in kind of turn it into like a little bit more of a slow bleed. Ultra endurance. Fuel and I've I've since become a little bit Let less excited about branch chain amino acids and essential amino acids better just. Because I think those do a better job staving off. Central nervous system fatigue and and post race or post workout soreness but yeah the the. Rock Kane is in. It's an interesting blend and it's just it's something so many people don't realize is the amount of training that goes into one of these. Ultra endurance. Events can immediately or very quickly be negated by the improper nutrition practice. Not Fuelling early and fuelling often. I would always have a timer from. It was twenty minutes during the iron man that I would fuel you know. Maintaining hydration and electrolytes. Not Waiting until. You're thirsty things. You have to stay ahead of now for your pacing. Did you simply listen to your body or do you use a running power meter or a heart rate monitor anything? Lo Tak listened to my body actually in leadville. I had just started using. I rarely use a watch even but sort of in the lead up to Leadville Like the last six weeks I started using My GP LIKE CINTA. Watch and just to get a handle on pay. But I really when I run I tried to let go of time and be in time and be in flow with time and not try to raise it or you know I think also you know in life. Sometimes we're trying to slow things down right slow time down. Your kids are growing. Everything's going too fast. You're trying to fight time and or you're in a race and that's just we create so much resistance around time and so my whole mantra at Leadville was to be in time to be in the flow of time and let it carry me And so I didn't WanNa get hung up on the time on my watch or you know my pace down to the second right which an ultra means nothing you can certainly get hung up on it and so it was a little bit. It was a a little bit out of character for me to use my watch but right before the race I was debating it and a friend was like just use it as a tool. Just don't don't get fixated and so I had a great race with my watch because it died at mile fifty wait for time or your watch for heart rate. I know I don't do heart rate I was. I mean I don't really look at it and not on my watch was telling me distance so I knew where I was. I knew my pace I would check it occasionally and so it gave me a good sense and because the course is an out and back it was actually quite helpful to have it on the outbound right on the on the way out so I could. I knew what sort of pace I was running. And then right as I got to hope pass. That's about mile forty to my watch died right because I didn't know to run it on low and very low tech as I said so I didn't know how to run it on low low energy use and so my watch died which was also a gift because then I could like go and I was already in the flow of the and I'd already I was really having a great day and I And then I could just run free of all that and just run with my body and the mountains and the energy. That's just in the mountains and and so The pacing was helpful and then it was nice to not have to worry about it. But that's when I picked up I did pick up pace serve so I picked up three runners one. My husband started at Mile. Fifty and brought me to mile sixty two and then I picked up another who took me fifteen miles and then I picked up my third who took me the final twenty five and then they were keeping an eye on the peace and I just said you know I wanNA roll nine minute miles in here and they would keep an eye on watch so I could just focus on running the. That's one of the difficult things to about. Ultra endurance. Events is this idea of cardiac drift. Meaning that if you've identified your aerobic heart rate zone that you would rarely want to shift out of so that you're not exhausting. Glycogen stores or causing lactic acid metabolites etcetera to build up too quickly. You would stay within that zone but as your blood volume decreases in the race progresses. That heart rate shifts dramatically. By the time that you've finished so it can be dangerous to rely purely on heart rei versus associated with the feeling that is associated with that fat oxidation kind of aerobic heart rate and relying more on that in the feel of it during the race itself. I think that you know what one thing I do. Is I use technology quite a bit in training and then unplugged during the race and listen to my body. Because I knew I knew the sensation like I know my lactate threshold heart rate might be at one seventy five but here. I am at mile or our nine of an ironman triathlon. I have that same feeling in my heart. Rate is at one sixty five right and that's because of that cardiac drift and so you know if I would have pushed and tried to get higher and higher closer to that one seventy five mark I would have blown up and so so yeah understanding to listen to your body. I think that's also very important in these events. Yeah I mean that's always how I've been an athlete. I've been an outdoor athlete. My whole adult life and You know I am low tech and it's interesting to hear you talk about your strategies that that's it's so interesting that you train with all your metrics and then let go of it during a race. I I didn't race on Saturday with my watch and I think it was actually a mistake because it was too early in my season it was a training run right and so I hadn't maybe in my mind like earned the ability to leave my watch behind right. I hadn't done the work I needed. Which normal it's February. I mean I'm scheme on outdoor athlete. I ski all winter. And you know But I very different places when I am in August where I am August where I've been training in the mountains running hard in my element in my natural habitat for months rate. And you can let go of the watch and this time you know. I think I probably would have been better served having my watch checking my pace because I spent a lot of mental energy on Saturday wondering am I going too fast. Too slow rate and a watch. I had this idea that my watch would sort of enslave me to the time but it actually would have probably been pretty useful tool so that's just good learning for next time. What was the most difficult part of an event like this for you? Leadville was such a magical day. It was one of those really rare days when everything converges right and kind of comes behind you and is just powering you and There really weren't any low points and I'm not I mean at all and I had a little bit of it. Dep- when I was climbing hope pass Where I felt an energy slump. A little bit of it'd have been raining so I was wet and I was climbing hope for the first time and and so I'll do what I did what I will do when I'm feeling like my you know I'm losing my Mojo or Getting a little down as I ate something right and then I I changed something so I got out my trekking poles and I had. I knew that was part of my race plan that I would use my trekking. Poles climbing hope Steep enough and You just it's it's just a nice break it helps your back instead of really bending over your knees your on your polls and I had trained with them and so I stopped. I made a conscious effort. I stopped took out my polls and I knew you know part of me. I was in that slump a little bit and I when you're in that slump. There's this stubborn tendency just to keep going. Because maybe you'll get out the other side if you just put your head down and grind through it but I knew enough that that was my signal Katie. Stop Take thirty seconds get your polls out and just changing positions just changing something about the dynamic is such is such a great Reset and I'll use music to do that too so I run I run a lot with music And but I often races I will use the music as a reward. Say when I get to the halfway point a let myself put in music and boy that makes such a difference. Music is dangerous museum so driven by an connected to music. Not The human beings don't inherently have a connection to music and you know and I I think music is woven deep into our DNA. The way that our cells vibrate and respond. I realized that might sound a little. Woo Esoteric but I think most human beings are more connected to music and dancing than we actually realize like I. I think our our very existence to a certain depends dwells upon frequencies and vibrations in tunes and for me Well I'll I'll I'll give you an example. Music is so powerful in such kind of a sometimes drug that. I'll pull out during a difficult training session Most most of the races I participated. And you weren't allowed to have any type of of earphones in so I I wouldn't use music that often during race but two days ago I was driving my boys to the Ymca to work out and they asked if I could play some epic music. Some epic music so no went to spotify and found It's basically epic battle music right. It's it's just like very deep orchestral driving occasionally Kinda crunchy and dark. But but you know all over the place when it comes to to motivation particularly you know just think like Lord of the Rings or pirates of the Caribbean or or movies like that and so I I played it for them in the car just just to humor them but then Although all usually listen to a podcast audiobook when I'm working out I kind of pride myself on the ability to be able to do hard things. We'll something boring is playing because is nice bill to educate yourself in not just entertain yourself during a workout but I I kept these tracks on my phone and I worked out while the trucks are on. My phone am literally felt yesterday morning like I had rab though because I will push myself so much harder for so much longer when the music is playing that I almost have to be careful not to over train when I play music so I actually a fan of it. Sounds like you are like not using music all the time but pulling it out when you really want to push hard when you need it. Yeah I think it's really good to have in your back pocket especially sounds like we're similar in that music is very powerful. There's something about that. Vibration sound healing. You know kind of just put you. I feel more connected to my body and myself and the environment that I'm in when I'm when I'm there's music in the background and people will say. Oh you're disconnecting you know you're escaping and and I actually have the opposite experience but like you. I had this when I I you know I think when ipods were first invented this was maybe in the early two thousands and I was doing a Lotta trail running. I was so into running with music that I ended up getting a stress fracture in my foot because I was just doing these epic miles on not very much training and you know it was the music that was I was just lost in it So I know what you mean about it being dangerous so make sure that you know. I don't have it. You can't have it all the time you have to be able to run without it and like without. I just listened to my body. Today's Day I wanna just hear the birds. I WANNA be nature in the silence or no. I WanNA listen to the stories of these songs while I run. It just depends. I grew up on a walkman running loose tonight how I'd run. I'd run the hills back a- behind my house on the Lewiston Hill where I grew up to get myself fit for my tennis matches. I had about a two mile straight up the side of this grade two miles down. In retrospect it was. It was horrific sport specific training for. Tennis. 'cause I was engaged in Kinda like lactate threshold movement for four miles. When that's now you experience it in a test match but but I love those runs that I'm not even remember now. It's so burnt into my memory. I would play Qaisy. Ufm Ninety two nine in loosen running up that hill just old school. It was kind of like eighties but rock and it would just push me this old old Walkman so even even before Ipod it was just me the Walkman the radio and that hill and occasionally my dog might my boxer. Bruno would run with me and man like early on. I was just so driven by by that in then I would lift weights as well. I converted One of my parents bedrooms spare bedrooms into a gym like I had you know. Went to guard sports on about the little rusty dumbbells and a bench in the Bar Bells and taught myself how to lift weights and had a couple mentors. Come to the house and show me how to squad and how to dead lift and I used to play the entire rocky series all week long I would watch rocky one through five over the course of a week while lifting weights and then when the next week would start. I would do it over again so so still burned into my memory when I hear you know like eye of the tiger. I'm I'm ready to go. You know we had. I had a similar story in that like and I write about this in running home. Is that sort of. I've always been a runner and always been an athlete and always most comfortable outside in motion. And and like you. I would go out and I would just go for these runs with my Sony. Sports Walkman the yellow right with those like awful metal Headphones that would go in Jab in your ears and Just run and run and run and I wasn't. I was not on the track team. Are The cross country team. Iran really loved it and it was my way You know to be creative. And it was part of how I saw the world as a writer and this is you know in high school and and so I've always had this relationship with running. That's more than competition which I think has helped me Just stay in the sport because it is coming from this deep place of Intrinsic Right. It's this intrinsic pleasure of running. But I was also really into tennis but my version was that I would do the Jane Fonda Workout Right. That was not in the living room. I'm from New Jersey. It's in my dream at the time was to be in the. Us Open Right. That was like as a kid I always wanted to. You know. Get to that level in tennis. And it's just funny how the world works and how life works right like you. You get to a different level different sport. But it's sort of you know it's not that dissimilar to pursue that life emotion of of You know dedication and commitment to to endurance. 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You can get into detail details if you'd like but I'm curious what an actual week of training looks like for you and I would be particularly interested in if you can weave in some helpful anecdotes of what that looks like inconsideration of family and time with your daughters why this is something. I've thought about a lot written a lot about. I wrote a piece last su