35 Burst results for "kidney failure"

"kidney failure" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

04:33 min | 3 d ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"It makes so much sense because what you're talking about is as they those benefits. The insurance companies much happier to pay out for small benefits like getting someone to dialysis and getting them quality care in that way as opposed to saving money by not paying for that transportation and eventually having to pay for advanced treatment for kidney failure. And okay what do you wish. People understood about your role in healthcare. Yeah that's a great question Healthcare has become so incredibly complex with so many different layers So many nuances that. It's really hard to understand everybody's role I will say that. I'm also coming from a place of not understanding Some of the other roles in healthcare but i think what is important for Or i wish that you know maybe the primary care providers or the ip groups In our area sort of understood is sort of what we're trying to do so you know we really are trying to drive the patient back into the primary care providers office rather than take these patients away from them so sometimes certainty a little bit of a turf war that's perceived But i do think that once they understand that we are actually trying to increase the touches that they have patients in trying to sort of Take them from that place of despair where they think. They can't get any help and they're not going to reach out to their specialist or the primary care and start getting them plugged back in I think that that is something that you know. It's the perception that we'd like to change In there's many. That could go on. But i know you have limited amount of time here. No no is at all end and that really. I appreciate your sharing that. Because one of the goals of the podcast is for medical professionals to have a greater understanding of their colleagues and a greater appreciation for the work that their colleagues do and how they can work together..

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

05:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"The end of the day when the kids go to bed. I'm home by myself with three. Kids husband is an icu. Travel nurse works out of town. Thanks vid other steps. Forty five years old five five current weight one eighty seven goal one forty five medications taken frings -iety depression allergies and high blood pressure. I do kettlebells for thirty minutes three to four times a week and cardio which is dancing two to three times a week. I have seven year old twins and a two year old. Here's the ledge. I weighed myself this morning. Because i've joined a work weight loss program and that's part of the program to weigh yourself you work with a health coach etc. I'm still way over what i want to way. I hate looking at my body in the mirror. I have that post c. section apron and i'm forty five. Cellulite comes with the territory rate. I don't take progress picks. Because i can't bear looking at myself and my clothes weren't fitting any differently. I've had my hormones and other levels checked in everything except my vitamin d was fine supplementing. I'm crying while. I'm typing this. I'm so discouraged. I was hoping to drop some weight and nothing is moving. I'm so disgusted with my body. I'm ready to go by all devices and try all the quacked junk or just give up and be fat. Thanks for all you do sarah and sarah. I hear your discouragement. Through this whole thing. I want to give you a big hug first of all. I'm giving you a big hug. Imagine the hug right this minute hug. Because i'm i'm so so sorry to hear this and i feel like because this was a very very emotional email and i feel like we don't get quite as many emails that are this intense but i know it's something that i think a lot of people experience so i applaud sarah for writing us about it. 'cause he talks about wanting to go you know. Get the devices in trial. Thanks sarah i feel like you're looking for the solution is gonna sound cheesy but outside of yourself and what if maybe the solution isn't outside of yourself. I think there's a lot that you could benefit from from like the mental work here and your perspective of everything that you're experiencing. I had a really good episode with amy johnson. Who wrote a little book of big change. And that episode was really amazing for reframing everything that you're experiencing and then just recorded with her again and i think it might be out by the time this comes out so that episode is going to be coming out october first so it'll becoming out a little bit after this airs but will go ahead and put a link in the show notes to it and it's for her new book called just thought. I think listening to those. You might find very very helpful. I have a lot of thoughts. Didn't want to start though. yeah i do. I have some thoughts as well. And i'm gonna pinpoint to things that might be getting in the way of your weight. Loss and one of them is in your allergy medication. Antihistamines can cause waking and so. If you're taking an antihistamine every single day that could be just something to to look at and think about. I'm going to say the one thing that sarah does not want me to say. Do you know what. I'm gonna say melanie. I think you're gonna say the wine. I'm gonna say the wine and because i'm gonna talk about my own body and for me for me. That's a huge huge huge difference. So it may. It sounds like you're drinking a glass or two of wine every day when the kids go to bed and you know if you say that is the only thing you're looking forward to find something else to look forward to something out some other self-care ritual because i get how hard it is. You and your kids are little boy. Do i get it seven year old twins and a two year old. It is intense. But for me when i was losing way. Twenty fourteen to twenty fifteen. I stopped drinking. And you've already got the right kind of diet with real whole foods. Ninety eight percent of the time you're eating window is is in check but i stopped the wine and no drinking. I did it for about ten weeks. Boom accelerated my weight loss. Like crazy like crazy. And you know just from all the data that i had for all the time that i was losing weight and still weighing myself. There was a huge correlation with alcohol. And what my weight did so i. Would you know experiment with that. You may want to read the book. This naked mind by any grace. It's a powerful book and it really helped a think about my own relationship with alcohol. And and i'm not saying that you have a problem with alcohol at all but i was drinking a glass or two of wine every single day as well stopping that has made such a positive difference in how i feel and you know we've kind of your any grace does a better job explaining it may. She's the expert when it comes to this topic but gift that book a try and read it with an open mind. And if she doesn't tell you you have to stop drinking. But she wants you to examine your own statements and thoughts around Like if you the way it came through here is that you wrote literally in capital letters showing me. You have really strong emotions. You do not want to give up this line so think about why you don't and you may find that as like the secret sauce. That makes a huge difference that giving it up. Give it a try and see. That would be my advice. It's so interesting and just goes back to how individual we all are because like for me. Wine has no effect on weight. Gain for me if anything i feel like. I probably maintain a lower weight. When i am drinking wine which is really interesting if i had to focus on one.

sarah depression allergies amy johnson high blood pressure Travel allergy melanie
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"Can you avoid all digestive issues by only eating organic whole foods. Don't i know that this would be absolutely amazing. But sometimes it's not exactly possible. Our natural ability to digest food actually declines as we age. This is because our body produces fewer enzymes. Which are the protein responsible for digesting food. Fewer enzymes means more difficulty digesting food. And even organic whole foods don't necessarily provide enough in science to properly digest them. This is especially true if you cook your food because cooking kills enzymes so this is why you may have digestive problems even after a healthy meal. Your body can't produce enough enzymes to get the job done. This is where supplementing with a high quality. Enzyme supplement can be a huge help. I personally adore mass by optimize irs. And trust me. Our audience tells us all the time. How much simes is a game changer for them. It's a best in class supplement that is loaded with full spectrum enzyme for digesting proteins starches sugars fibers fats. Taking mass daily helps top off your enzyme levels and replace the enzymes ear body. Maybe no longer producing. This means you'll be able to eat all sorts of delicious food and digest them quickly and effortlessly after you start taking mass symes you may notice that you no longer feel bloated after meals and your belly feels flatter. I one hundred percent experience this and if you have leaky gut magazines could reduce irritation and help. You absorb more nutrients friends. Life is too short to suffer from digestive issues. Don't i know it you can try it. Risk free and see what improvements notice and we have an exclusive offer just for our listeners. You can go to mass dot com forward slash. I of podcast. If you use that link you will get an exclusive. Ten percent discount already applied again. That link is mass times dot com forward slash podcast m. a. s. s. z. Y. m. e. s. dot com forward slash i f..

Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:35 min | Last month

Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

"When she got to the hospital. Glorious heart was beating at a rate of more than one hundred beats per minute. Why did they need to fibrillation her. That seems like jumpstarting a car. That's already running hot. You know also. It just seems to me that pumping someone full of sedatives and then zapping. Their heart with electricity is a weird sequence of events. I'm sure they knew what they were doing. It's just as a lay person sitting here at my desk. It seems weird also can only hope the iv. The paramedics administered in the ambulance was to take blood because by the time nurse. Cain went to get a blood sample. Gloria was so hopped up on medical grade goof-balls that her blood probably would have gotten anyone within fifteen feet of it high. Wouldn't they wanna check someone's blood before dumping a whole bunch of shed into it like maybe make sure she didn't already take a bottle full of valium before giving her more valium next. Let me just ask why. The decision was to move the entire. Er to the parking lot. If dr our cia thought gloria was the problem why not just move gloria outside. Wouldn't that have been easier than moving the entire er department it's possible. Show a thought. The problem was coming from the er itself like the ventilation system or whatever but then. Why didn't gloria get evacuated as well and look. I'm sure dr ocho made whatever decisions he thought were best in the moment. I can't think straight under that kind of pressure which is why dr ochoa is a doctor. And i am a podcast art. Could you imagine getting rushed to the er for like i dunno hemorrhaging blood or something. The ambulance gets to the parking lot out front. And it's like well here. We are literally right here. And there's just rows of gurneys with moaning people and some doctors like who's nissan altima is this. I'm hanging an. Iv bag from the roof rack. The official cause of gloria ramirez death was kidney failure due to cervical cancer or possibly heart failure. I'm telling you the reporting on this case is all over the place. Whatever it was that ultimately killed her. Everyone was still trying to figure out what it could have possibly been about. Gloria that was making medical staff around her pass out.

Gloria Dr Ocho Dr Ochoa Cain CIA Gloria Ramirez Altima Nissan Kidney Failure Cervical Cancer Heart Failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

LeVar Burton Reads

04:59 min | Last month

"kidney failure" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

"Tell you what the doctor a woman who gave me the results of the tests and conducted the interview. Said you are a match. But i know your story and i think it only fair that you know then linden lashes. Kidney failure is his own fall. He has issues. He tried to commit suicide with a massive dose of acetaminophen aspirin an alcohol. That's why he's on dialysis. I think you should take that into account when making your decision later that day i sat with linden. Who said you don't have to do this. You have to be jesus. I know what you did. I said i'm not religious interesting then and said he stared at me. We sure don't look alike. I realized that this was not compliment. Because he was nice looking. He'd got the best of his mother's features. There was something else to his is shifted around the room. He kept biting his lip whistling rolling his blanket between his fingers. Are you a mail carrier. He asked i worked behind the counter. Mostly i've got a good route. He said yawning a regular out. I could do it in my sleep every christmas. My people even cards money cookies. That sort of thing. Did you ever think. I said that there was someone walking your route just beside you or just behind you someone there when you closed your eyes gone when you open them no he said. Are you crazy. That was me. I said. I picked up his hand and he let it go limp. We sat there together silent after a while. He pulled his hand out of mine and massaged as though my grip had her. I don't like you. He said this was my mother's idea. I don't want your kidney. I don't want a piece of view inside me rather get on a list. Frankly you're kind of disgusting one. I mean i'm sorry but you've probably heard this before no said but ever told me that you probably have a dog. He said dogs love whoever feeds them. I doubt you could get a husband or whatever unless you put a bag over your head even then it would have to come off at night. Are you saying this to drive me. Away my throat clamp down on my voice. I swallowed drew a deep breath to stop the shakes that it started in my body. You want to die. You don't wanna be saved right. I'm not saving you for any reason. You won't own me anything oh you. He seemed genuinely surprised. His teeth were so straight.

linden Kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:20 min | Last month

"kidney failure" Discussed on Medicare for All

"And so you know people with long term disabilities and then kidney failure. Those are additional things that the government sorta like picking up to support the private insurance industry basically and then the second wave expansion happened in nineteen eighty so a couple things happened in this decade home. Health services were added. So that's one good step forward to giving people living with disabilities more choice and freedom. Men than meta gap plans are brought under federal oversight..

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

02:06 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"Providing good care. so here's the bottom line. Trust is crucial when it comes to providing any kind of quality care. The care has historically been especially blatant when it comes to prioritizing profits over patient health so it's gonna take a lot of time hard work and dedication to turn that perception around next week. We hear what that kind of work looks like on the ground for all medical disciplines. We'll sit down with three women who have been talking to people all over the country. What's missing and what we can do to finally fix our broken system. They just wanna be heard they wanna be listened to. They want to be valued not treated like a second class citizen not thrown through the system as just another number because people feel that but just another number is a life. It's a brother a sister community member. And i sometimes i feel.

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

07:28 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"Listening to this. We're back in the last of soda. We talked about bio psychosocial health factors. This idea that everything is interconnected from our biology tour psychology to our social setting. Think about it like a car. The vehicle itself is like your body taking care of the biology of your car and means checking on the mechanics. Has the oil been changed as abbot of gas. If not it's probably not gonna run very well or get you very far. But let's say all systems are ago. Well then you'd look at the driver there like your brain your mental health. If they're distracted niebuhr created or sleep-deprived. They're less likely to drive the car safely. But then there's the world around you can have a car in perfect condition with a driver who's at the top of their game but then a blizzard hits and you can find yourself driving on a windy road with zero visibility focusing on any one element alone isn't gonna get you home safely if you're working downstream you're not worrying about your tires checking the weather until you're basically about to drive off the road but thinking upstream means making sure all of the conditions are optimal before you get behind the wheel when it comes to healthcare. It's much much easier to take an upstream approach when you have a dedicated team. That's what's happening at strife health. So we call her caregivers. Can you hear us in every patient. They're responsible for as impaneled to a team of kidney heroes an a nurse practitioner and then some carrots dinner resources like dietitians case managers and otherwise in with that team. That team has a finite number of patients that they're responsible for a relationship with That know their patients very intimately and then they're available twenty four seven and then they're able to solve really any need patient can throw at them. They're not just there to talk about kidneys talk about problems with cleanliness in the home. They'll talk about the fact that patients not able to find a ride to their doctor appointment the next week. They're there for anything and then they're taking the time to actually follow through on that they have the time in capacity to show up in the home. Unpack groceries bring groceries. They they can get rides. Arrange to that doctor's appointment you know they. They really can solve a wide range of issues because they're focused on holistic patient experience in they're always available there for that patient nephrologist dr. Natasha davi are key members of these kimmy. He routines we combat. These roadblocks by really establishing strong relationships with all members of the patient's healthcare team so primary care physicians nephrologist and vascular surgeons we also really believe and relentless patient follow up. We track these patients. Progress very closely and many of these patients can kind of be overwhelmed with information that they're provided during physician visit times. They're like. I walked into my doctor's office. I wait for an hour. I see them for fifteen minutes it is a blur so we sit down and we really talk to them about what your kidneys do. Why do we need them. Why are they important. How can we save our kidneys and we also kinda create these care plans. Each patient has kidney disease. As a result of something for example it could be diabetes center contributing to kidney disease or high blood pressure. So what we do is we create these care plans and we create these goals with the patient. Were sort of like a health coach. We break down goals into bite size pieces and then we track the progress for patients. And i believe this is why we've been so successful. Furthermore i think we kinda talked about social determinants of health but we dive deeper under the surface with trying to understand our patients. We actually look at social determinants of health in screen for it and we try to combat these problems as they arise what we always as. We don't wait for the patient to tell us that they're having problems. We actively engage them to find out what problems they have and we try to combat them. Strove health is not alone. Bobby soukous startup. Cricket health is adopting its own model of upstream care. There are three components that we really focus on. One is figuring out who the right patients to provide care for. We talked about how is under diagnosed. Sweep to unearth those patients. Bobby's team is working identify patients earlier around stage three when the patient is eighteen to twenty four months away from kidney failure. We've developed a tool of of data algorithms and analytics that can identify if a patient has kidney failure just by looking at their claims so they haven't been diagnosed. There is no claim for kidney disease but by looking at kidney adjacent claims hypertension diabetes and other things we can predict with about ninety percent agar accuracy not just if they have disease but what stage. They're at so now. We know who is the right patient to provide care to now. What's the right care for us. It's about changing behavior. And you can't change behavior until there's real truly engagement and there's not gonna be true engagement unless there's relationships of trust they're also trying to avoid that scenario where a piece in twenty minutes to learn about and decide what of treatment. They're going to receive for the rest of their life. Cricket health has a whole digital library of videos and faq's and critically our clinicians can see what our patients are watching and see what they're reading so while it sounds like big brother. Would it enables us to trigger automatic. Workflows that mrs jones is just watch videos about home dialysis and read three. Faq's about peritoneal dialysis versus home him o. Our nurse can call the next morning. And say mrs jones i see. You're you're thinking about home dialysis. Would it be helpful to talk to a patient peer mentor. Who's been on home dialysis for last five years. We've really started unlock engagement. Which is led to early indications that we're reducing stations to the tune of about sixty five percent. So it's been really terrific to see clueless as an older population not everyone's fast with the internet so we can still engage with people over the phone. We can engage people over video. We can send materials home. We can do in home. Visits doing home. Visits for high risk patients. So it's a multimodal approach. Do you have to create real relationship. Trust trust is really the foundation of the doctor. patient relationship We need to build trust with our patients by listening to them. It is so incredibly important to understand. Cool your patient is comes to understand what the right dialysis modality would be or what. The right treatment plan is for a patient and sort of what are the barriers that they're facing. And how can we combat them. We need to understand what motivates our patients. What rituals they have how their day is structure. And what they value when it comes to their health. This is so crucial when it comes to.

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

05:59 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"No one.

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

07:33 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"Help. Even though most patients find out they have kidney disease once. They've kidney failure. It's entirely possible to catch people much earlier when there is still time to turn things around. This is super important because the population most at risk is often totally left behind by the medical system. We see a huge amount of despair in the african american and latin next communities a lot of these patients. Unfortunately lack pre dialysis care One contributing factor is healthcare access. A lot of them may not have insurance or don't have good access to going into a clinic there working multiple jobs but it can't really be completely explained by lack of access or insurance. There's a whole complex interplay when it comes to social determinants of hell that likely contribute to this as well so it could be something as simple as like housing instability or access to healthy food or stress or transportation. There's this web of multiple factors that can contribute an even exacerbate these disparities it is inextricably linked to food deserts. His inextricably linked to the lack of high quality fresh foods. There's just no question about it parcel of the obesity epidemic here in the us. Hypertension and diabetes are the two biggest drivers of kidney disease. So in order to really tackle kidney disease you have to tackle obesity in order to tackle obesity you have to go upstream into all the psychosocial social determinants of health issues. You can think of no surprise as we. Americans continue to eat more and more big macs were contributing to obesity which contributes to kidney failure. And that that is exactly where i wanna go by the way. I'm feeling really sheepish. Right now 'cause. I had a big mac for lunch. I've guilty myself already now now. I really feel feel the weight of that. Nope nope unintended. Okay so i'm gonna level with you guys. I did eat a big mac that day. And if i'm being honest depending on what's going on in my life on any given day i often turn to take out. I don't eat big macs. Because i live in a food desert. I eat them because they're fast delicious. And that's what i turn to. And i'm having a crazy day at work and i just need something comforting and convenient and trust me. It would be so much easier for me. To have the producers edit out my little confession and frame food choices the thing that some people need to learn but americans at all socioeconomic classes have a complicated relationship with processed food. It's one thing to know. The stock of celery is better than a juicy big mac. But it's an entirely different thing to make that choice and adopt a totally new lifestyle especially when time and access are constantly working against you and were all dealing with these high levels of stress and anxiety. Promise you i understand that. No one really wants to talk about changing their diet. I don't want to talk about changing my diet. But in this case what we eat has real consequences adhering to a healthy lifestyle really does help not only with caen disease but with quality of life i always tell my patients that in some countries they consider food medicine. It's really important that we understand what we're putting into our bodies to avoid processed foods as those are associated with creating inflammation in the body. Really making sure that you stay hydrated. These are very very important and getting plenty of exercise and sunlight these are. I can't stress the importance of this. But unfortunately this may seem intuitive to you and i but someone that's suffering from multiple medical conditions you know having to work and take medications and track. Things can be very overwhelming for them and they don't know where to start and that's why it's really important that physicians along with entities such strive really sort of push anne having this dialogue with patients and breaking it down into bite size pieces where they can sort of understand their illness and how they can sort of combat some of the issues that they're facing so listen encouraging positive behavior change for patients is definitely important. But there's a lot of change necessary within the industry itself. There are so many gaps in kidney care. Unfortunately we currently practice in a system where we have fifteen to thirty minutes to see a patient appointment. And that's just not long enough. It's not enough time to really understand. What are the barriers patients are facing and to provide in depth it's almost like gear practicing in a revolving door of patients given this. I think the first barrier have dimension as education we should provide of education to patients. So they understand that they can actually slow the progression of kidney disease. And we have to do this early in the process before it's too late where there's too much scarring that's occurred in the kidney and we can't sort of act upon it another barrier along. This line is misinformation online so we need a directly combat this information in clinic before patients are harmed either physically or financially there are some other barriers One that i've really noticed is late referral from to enough religious or to an apology clinic. I've seen this many times where patients are referred when their kidney diseases very advanced and unfortunately so shock to them. We need to work with our primary care colleagues to educate them on when to refer patients and actually in the last couple of years. There's been very good evidence to support that early referrals associated with great outcomes in a perfect world primary care. Physicians would be on the front lines of prevention. But that's hard when you think about the two most common scenarios for how people interact with primary care. The first is the patient. Just isn't seeing a primary care doc. And this is pretty common either. You're under insured. You don't have easy access or you just don't want to go to the doctor's office but number two is you are going to see your primary karabakh but because of that fee for service monster you really only get like fifteen minutes of one on one time so the doctors just focusing on the big stuff. They'll address hypertension diabetes. And tell you to lose weight but they may not take the time to address the next possible steps down the line that could arise from those issues. They won't send you to an following early on or tell you clearly. Hey these conditions could lead the kidney failure and this is what life with kidney failure. Looks like along the same line. If we're talking about late referrals we need. To bring up preemptive kidney transplantation honestly we could do a whole episode on kidney transplants. The long story short. It's one of the most effective forms of treatment but they're still a ton of barriers. You have the industry giants doing everything in their power to keep people in dialysis chairs the qualifications to get a kidney are prohibitive and the cost to doni. Kidney are also really high and.

two biggest drivers One contributing factor latin african american americans Americans
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

07:06 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"And that's why i think in the space. We've moved well past payer frustration. And we're now again. The dialysis providers will come back and say this is cross subsidization. this happens in every segment of healthcare. And that's a fact it's particularly pronounced in dials is because of the fact that so many are paid for by the government and the government's not going to cover our cost. We have to make it up somehow. That's a true statement. But i think from the insurance companies perspective. I think they're looking at this saying well. You're i think you're gouging us. And so that's where the frustration has been for a long time. That frustration is so well earned over the last decade. There's been a lot of questionable practices industry. Giants davita and fresenius have found themselves in hot water after whistleblowers came forward and uncovered shady business practices between the for profit clinics and the leading charity. The american kidney fund basically the american kidney fund helps patients get onto private insurance to pay for care. There's a lot of reasons. Proponents cite for why private insurance is better than medicare. But basically the pitches you'll get better quality of care and will cover your premiums. Were sounds great right. Well it turns out that eighty percent of the american kidney funds revenues come from donations by vida and fresenius the big chains pay the kidney fund. The kidney fund pays the premiums and the big chains can turn around and charge private insurance up to four times what they're charging medicare and again. I know it's hard to sympathize when private insurance get stuck with the bill but this is a big reason. Why premiums are soaring now. This all sounds pretty evil. So it's kind of an awkward time to tell you. The bobbie used to work for fresenius and fact. It was his job to lobby. Congress to raise those medicare rates to try to even the playing field and believe me. I asked him again and again to dish the dirt on the doctor. Evil behind the scenes fresenius. Certainly there's been no dr evil moment when i was there. I was really picture for me. It it makes for for bad podcasting but at least it warms the heart just a little bit it is really easy to take a step back and just try and find the singular actor or the singular villain. I don't think there's one villain in the story I spent almost nine years of fresenius. Day is a large dialysis provider. Her her awesome picked as easy villain. I will tell you that. All the people who work there are phenomenal. the caregivers execs. Everybody is dedicated to trying to help patients But the incentives that have evolved over time are perverse. I think the bigger challenges that there's all the incentive of the world in the world for for the exact same for the folks who are throughout the company of just preserving the status quo partly. Because it's easy. This is the way we've always done it but partly because that's how they get paid. This is the really unsatisfying truth at the core of our system is rotten as it all seems from the outside. It's generally filled with mostly decent people just looking to do their job and get paid until we overhaul the payment system. Things aren't really going to change. And this is why people like bobby of left the big chains to build out new value base models. Like the ones. Vivian talked about a couple of episodes ago after the break. We'll talk about why. That's so important from the patient perspective support for this. Podcast comes from health. Line dot com america's leading digital health brand through an empathetic whole person. Health approach and medically verified content. Health line guides you towards clarity and taking healthy actions on your journey to wellbeing. I turn to health line for the latest and nutrition and sleep studies but i did just read an excellent think peace. They're called health matters pudding the care back in healthcare. And make sure you don't miss transform health equity which is health lines new interactive platform keeping you informed to create positive change in health and wellness for everyone go to www dot health line dot com slash podcast to learn all about how covert has disproportionately impacted marginalized communities. Share your experience and find resources to take action today visit. Www dot health line dot com slash podcast now and stay connected by following at health line on instagram and facebook health. Line guiding you to clarity on your journey to wellbeing if you like this show checkout. No one is coming to save us. A new podcast from limited media about america's childcare crisis and the people of all ages crushed by access to high quality early education care determines a kid's future and their families sanity laugh. Cry be outraged and here solutions in this. Four part series hosted by gloria riviera. Abc news parents teachers and call it like it is correspondent kristen bell. Yes that kristen bell reveal how we can create the care system we so desperately need and deserve because guess why the system doesn't work for anyone. Most parents can barely afford care. And centers can barely afford to pay a living wage. No one is coming to save us so it's time to save ourselves. No one is coming to save us. Premieres may twentieth. Listen wherever you get your podcasts or back stories about the kidney care. Industry often focus on the bad guys. And me i get it. There's a ton to say about the bad guys who are the people actually impacted by chronic kidney disease to learn more i sat down with dr who tasha davi. She's a frolicking aka kidney doctor at strife health you know if i were to think about who walks through the door For my clinic the majority of my patients or older as kidney disease often illness that you see around the seventieth decade of life especially if you have medical conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure and unfortunately many patients are not either told about kidney disease. Or don't understand kidney disease. Well when i see them in clinic. I've had a couple of patients that said. I don't know why i'm here. My primary care doctor referred me to kidney doctor so my first visit with patients really revolves around educating them about their kidney disease where they as far as kidney disease progression. Where are they now. How can we stop. You know there could eat disease from progressing towards dialysis and what are some of the things that we can do to.

tasha davi twentieth first visit seventieth decade couple of patients
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

08:13 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"So if you're not already familiar. Dialysis is a process. Where machine basically acts as your kidneys by filtering your blood. It comes into play when a patient reaches end stage renal disease also known as kidney failure. Which as you heard a top is unfortunately the stage would most patients enter the system if we have the science and the ability to catch it earlier. Why is it that we have this imbalance. This symmetry for these patients. Yes there's the classic problem of fee for service medicine nephrologist. Really don't get reimbursed. That much they have very little incentive often disincentive financially to see patients when there's chance to slow disease progression maintain kidney function in this case. The services for kidney care that are reimbursed and reimburse well at high rates is really just dialysis. Every time i ask the question and i ask it a lot. Why don't we invest in prevention. I pretty much already know. The answer is going to be some version of because sickness. Pays in the case of dialysis like it really really pays and it turns out. There's a historical backstory for this. Well i think in many respects it goes back to what happened in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. When the medicare benefits for dialysis was. i acted. That's bobby seppuku. Again co founder of cricket health back in nineteen seventy-two what happened was dialysis was still relatively new Treatment prior to that. If you were diagnosed with kidney failure it was effectively. A death sentence so in the sixties as dials started to procreate it was too expensive for people to access and so local communities whether it was in boston or seattle would often form committees of lay people of clergy of physicians to come together and they started meet at night almost a secret to evaluate people who had been diagnosed with kidney failure to decide quite literally who is live. And who would die. Who get dialysis. And who would not remember when people tried to peddle the idea of death panels back in two thousand twelve. Well those were fake but back in the nineteen sixties. They were actually kind of a thing. Dialysis was this new groundbreaking lifesaving treatment but it was prohibitively expensive so these panels of physicians nurses and community leaders would convene to decide who deserved access based on how much the patient could potentially contribute to society. Those deemed highly. Valuable by the panel received dialysis and those that didn't die Not surprisingly this was not a satisfactory state of affairs for most people and so lots of lobbing happened to try and get congress to step in and they did. They did something remarkable. They said if you're five or sixty five years old you are. If you're on chronic dialysis you're eligible for medicare at the time. It was monumentally saved without question. Millions of americans lives in one thousand nine hundred seventy two president nixon. that's right. socially and fiscally conservative. Nixon signed a law. Codifying this lifelong subsidy for dialysis patients and this presented an immediate market opportunity as soon as medicare conferred automatic eligibility on stage. Renal disease. what they did is they. Put a pot of gold in the dialysis space and so that's where the money was. That's where the reimbursement was and that's where You know started have companies like defeated like fresenius start to emerge and to grow by creating dialysis clinics today. There's about seventy five hundred dialysis clinics throughout the us two thirds of which are now owned by two industry giants davita and fresenius. What started as a way to make. Treatment streamlined accessible quickly became a booming business. I don't think anyone at the time however expected either of two things to happen. One the sheer number of people to have concedes to explode like as in to the cost of that care on an individual and agra basis to explode like it has when that law back in one thousand nine seventy two was passed. There were only ten. Thousand patients receiving dialysis in america today. There's nearly half. A million and dialysis sucks. Most patients have to go to the clinic three times a week for three to four hours per session where they are strapped into a chair and it's a huge strain on the body effectively. What you go onto dialysis. It's a massive stressed in your cardiovascular system so mortality spikes dramatically if you annualise the mortality rate for the first ninety days of dialysis works out to about forty percent. Remember patients usually start treatment once. They've already reached kidney failure. This is a really sick population. That's often been neglected up to this point by the system. Plus as four profit chains like davita. And for bob independent clinics their goal was to run a lean business that means more patients fewer clinicians and less time to disinfect stations. In between treatment there have been lawsuits and settlements to try to correct those challenges but the number of patients in need of the care just keeps rising. All of this needs to really horrible health outcomes for patients and exploding costs the system at large if we were all. Take a few minutes and try to imagine the worst possible healthcare delivery system for these patients. There's a decent chance we'd come up with the current system so the current system is clearly a disaster. But it's worth digging a little deeper into the why because on the outside it kind of seems like the way we pay for kidney care is what many people are advocating for today medicare for all and this case it's just medicare for all kidneys. The opponents will say well look look kidney care. you know. That's the that is the closest we've got a single payer system and it's were gouging payers and therein lies. the rub. Kidney care is not a single payer system. It's a hybrid. So today about the way because of the medicare benefit About ninety percent of americans were on dialysis or paid for by the federal government. Easy question bobby is what wait is. You just told me. There was a medicare benefit. Why isn't one hundred percent while in order to try and create some sort of cost sharing because the number of people on dialysis of exploded and that was just a huge cost for the federal government's trying bear. They reached out to the private industry to private insurance by reached out. They passed a law. That said hey if you have group health insurance you get to keep that for a period of time even after. You're on dialysis. After that period of time expires you'll go to medicare and foot the bill but for a while. Stay on your your primary insurance and today. that's about. The deadline is thirty months. A booming business cropped up in the wake of the medicare reform but as the number of dialysis patients skyrocketed. The reimbursement amount has not. And you know what happens when the medical industrial complex feels like. They're not making ends meet. They look to private insurance to make up the difference. This loophole provides two years for clinics to make as much money as they can from those private insurance companies. Now the challenge has been is that the differential between medicare and the commercial rates has has become fairly dramatic and in fact there are an awful lot of providers out there dialysis providers who will gain the system. And they'll figure out what iago can they open a clinic where they can have that split be his highest possible and so ensures blues plans and the national shares get very frustrated because they say medicare's paying two hundred and fifty dollars a treatment and yet for is patients were paying many many multiples of that..

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

The Cost of Care

02:31 min | 4 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Cost of Care

"Information into healthy actions. I turned to health line for the latest in nutrition and sleep studies but i did just read an excellent think peace. They're called black. Health matters putting the care back in healthcare. Make sure you don't miss it visit. Www health line dot com slash cost of care now and stay connected by following health line on instagram and facebook. Hey listeners the cost of care is a ten part series. We think it'll make more sense if you start from episode one so go back. Start there and we'll be here when you're ready to standard of care in. This country is for sixty sixty five percent of people who go on dialysis. They do it by what we call crashing into dialysis over half of patients really about sixty percent. Their kidney care. Journeys starts with a kidney failure event. They may have diabetes. Hypertension other common co morbidity. He's kidney diseases as symptomatic. they probably don't know it exists. That's we'll stokes imbaba asuka to co founder ceo with startups looking to disrupt the kidney care industry. Which is critical. Because if you're looking for a case study that embodies everything that's wrong with the american healthcare system. You're not going to do much better than the way we approach kidney care in this country there are thirty six million americans with kidney disease today. Ninety percent of whom have no idea. They have the disease. Even those who are late stage can disease stage. Four stage five. Half of those folks don't know they haven't and they become aware that they have the disease when their kids have already failed they have a traumatic. What's called a dialysis crash. So they will show up at an emergency room somewhere in their neighborhood and say i don't feel good. I blurred vision. I have chest pains. I don't know what's wrong with me. Dr a blood test and says your kittens failed. You're on dialysis today. And for the rest of your life have prepared for it. They don't even know they've had it. They certainly have manage their beds in the diet or anything else. Ninety percent of patients then run in center hemodialysis where they have to go to center three times. A week to receive dialysis care so today. The system is very reactive. A lot of infrastructure and clinical care is focused on the end of the journey. Post kidney failure. Very few patients who are receiving kind of proactive preventative. Holistic care ahead of that kidney failure so.

facebook instagram thirty six million Ninety percent ten part sixty sixty five percent today about sixty percent three times health line dot com episode one A week over half of patients american imbaba Four stage americans five asuka
'Total Eclipse' Songwriter and Producer Jim Steinman Dead at 73

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

'Total Eclipse' Songwriter and Producer Jim Steinman Dead at 73

"Bonnie Tyler saying the hit total eclipse of the heart, but it was Jim Steinman, who wrote it. The Grammy winning composer and lyricist was also responsible for hits by meatloaf. And Celine Dion Steinmann has died in Connecticut, where he lived. His brother says Steinman suffered kidney failure and he was ill for some time. He was 73.

Bonnie Tyler Jim Steinman Celine Dion Steinmann Grammy Connecticut Steinman
Jim Steinman, Hitmaker for Meat Loaf and Celine Dion, Dies

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Jim Steinman, Hitmaker for Meat Loaf and Celine Dion, Dies

"Songwriter Jim Steinman best known for his work with singer Meat Loaf has died of kidney failure near Ridgefield Connecticut according to his brother Steinman was seventy three I marches are a letter with a look at his career operatic rock songs with long titles that was Jim Steinman's trademark his songs with meatloaf include paradise by the dashboard light two out of three ain't bad and I'd do anything for love but I won't do that meatloaf wrote in his autobiography Steinman wanted to call themselves Jim and beats but the powers that be titled their debut album Meat Loaf bat out of hell songs by Jim Steinman whether collaboration lasted for years Steinman wrote hits for other acts like this one and this one

Jim Steinman Steinman Meat Loaf Ridgefield Kidney Failure Connecticut JIM
Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Moved to Prison Hospital

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:30 min | 5 months ago

Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Moved to Prison Hospital

"Alexei navalny the jailed reason. Opposition leader has been transferred to what authorities are describing as a prison hospital. But what is supporters. Say is just a different jail with some medical staff onsite. Navalny has now been on. Hunger strike for three weeks after he was refused access to a civilian doctor for severe pain in his back a numbness in his arms and legs. His lawyer says he may be close to death. After blood tests from independent doctors showed dangerous levels of potassium could cause heart or kidney failure. Joining me is natalia. Vassily ever who is moscow correspondent for the telegraph the talia. Thanks for coming on the show. What do we know about navalny's conditioned. Today i give having me Will the most peaceful information we have is the blood tests that you have. These blood tests were taking Onsides at the prison where is serving his prison. Term on Independent doctors have looked at the test and said that the petition station but they seem levels are too dangerous and will win with a patient with levels like that they should be treated in intensive care but again so far and independent doctor has not been allowed to see him and He has been transferred to another prison. Which has bigger medical facilities But again we still don't have enough information about his condition at this point.

Alexei Navalny Navalny Vassily Kidney Failure Natalia Moscow
Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Dies at 52

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Dies at 52

"Died at the age of 51 or something, man. The star of Didi's bad Boy Records was best known for his 2000 hit. Whoa! The performer who was born as Robert Ross had battled health problems, including several strokes and kidney failure. He died in an Atlanta hospital. A few days before his death. DJ Self shared a video of black rob paying tribute to the late DMX from his hospital bed. Wendy Gillette. CBS NEWS A three d Gun printing workshop is

Didi Robert Ross Dj Self Kidney Failure Atlanta Wendy Gillette ROB Cbs News
The Story of Miss Baker - Space Monkey

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

09:36 min | 6 months ago

The Story of Miss Baker - Space Monkey

"Okay so what was the plan. Were they going to do with these. Twenty-six tiny cute monkeys already worried about them. Yeah so nasa wasn't a thing until nineteen fifty eight so for years. The army and the navy have been running these tests to see if it's safe to send humans to space and that's where these twenty-six tiny monkeys come in. So were they going to send all twenty six of these monkeys into space or was there like some kind of training tiny centrifuges how they just please imagine for a moment a monkey training montage. They had to go through like stimulated flights and lab testing. And you know stress testing like they were looking for the smartest calmest monkey to send to space. Yeah i'm totally imagining the monkey version of the right stuff. And i'm sure this isn't isn't true but i'm picturing like tiny silver jumpsuits and little monkeys walking down the tarmac in slow motion for sure. That is what i'm picturing. So it all sounds really cute. Little monkey nuts blazing a trail to the stars. But actually the us government at this point has been trying for a decade to bring a monkey back alive so starting in nineteen forty eight we had albert. The i went down to the tail. Explosion albert the second valve failure alpert. The third parachute didn't open i. I mean it's interesting and this is like it's both totally awful but gives you some sense of why they're doing these experiments right because they're going to send people into space plans to send people into space years out from sending people to space and so far there just you know. Just a bunch of dead monkeys. This is i mean so. This is pretty grim up until we get to miss baker. How did they end up choosing miss baker. So it's spring of nineteen fifty-nine. There's all launch scheduled. And so the navy basically narrows it down to one candidate and its tiny female squirrel. Monkey barely on adults. And she's teeny tiny. You hold her in your hands She has this adorable little like white mask on her face. You know tiny little like bear shaped ears a long tail super long fingers. Ucr your heart just goes out to her and the researchers really liked this particular monkey. The even named her tlc for tender loving care. They basically figure if she she was the smartest the most docile and that she was the best candidate for this mission little known fact nineties hip hop group. Tlc named after her frie- you music box out there. Score that one away. That's that that's not true so the mission was coming up and all higher ups like we. We can't call her. Tlc that's not. That's not going to sound good over the radio. And so they renamed her baker specifically they renamed her miss baker and her co pilot for the mission was another monkey and they call her. Ms able and so finally. It's may twenty eight one thousand nine hundred. Ninety nine launched a cape canaveral. They load miss baker up into this really scary looking contraption it's like a water bottle or metal thermos and she's wrapped up in there like a mummy in this little jacket and she able or walked out onto the tarmac where they launched all the ships and they're loaded into the top of a rocket fifty ton jupiter rocket fifty tonnes for two tiny monkeys. Okay so they're on top of this building sized fifty ten rocket they're tiny they're cute and this giant rocket this big launch. It's all for them. There's nothing else going on today so owning to thirty five. Am one lengthening. We have looked up thirty monkeys strapped in escaping from the gravity of earth and into space at one point. They're moving at ten thousand miles per hour. Just imagine flint would be terrifying for anybody much less a monkey in total they spend about fifteen minutes in space and then the nosecone detaches from the rocket and it begins the descent. Forty-five minutes after the launch. The nosecone splashes down about two hundred fifty miles off the coast of puerto rico. Just after five. Am that morning. The uss kua pulls up at picks up the nose cone and everyone is very nervous. They were desperate for these monkeys to have survived. So one of the guys aboard ship popped open the nose cone and both the monkeys were alive. Everyone was just everyone was so happy. They radio back to cape canaveral and they said able baker are perfect. No no problems after unwrapping her from her coat and her thermos one of the guys on the ship gave miss baker at a little cookie. And so it was. It was a huge success because these were the first monkeys to return alive from space. Oh wow yeah and these were like the first american animals to kind of come back in one piece and you know like at this point. This is the middle of the space race. There's a lot riding on this as a very very geopolitically important little tiny monkey yeah she was a big deal and you would be for the rest of your life so immediately miss baker in her co-pilot miss able are shipped off to washington. Dc for a press conference because our what do you mean a press conference the monkeys you gotta understand there now vip very important primates but four days after the landing something really sad happens miss able dies in a freak accident and so now. Miss baker is the only the only monkey to return alive from space and america's only animal astronaut to have survived. And so that just kind of makes her even more special there. Were you know newsreels about her children's books printed about her or she gets fanmail especially from children. She was on good morning. America at one point. She got double billing with the jackson five. That is famous. Yeah i also. I also love post her career in science her life kind of like moves into the gossip pages. A little more public figures like that like they do something you know like kind of given a title. She's called america's first lady in space. That's how she was seen so miss baker after her flight. She goes back to pensacola. You know there's a yearly parade in her honor but mostly she settles down. You know her handlers. Even get her a companion. Another squirrel monkey named big george and after a while the hands even hold a wedding for them so like many young couples miss baker in big george moved to a bigger place. The newly built us space and rocket center huntsville alabama and by. Now it's nine thousand nine hundred seventy one and it's been more than a decade since miss baker took her spaceflight so big george eventually passes away and miss baker immediately married off again to another monkey. And it's very celebrity. It's very tabloid. The space center even sends out engraved invitations and has a real judge into the fishy eight And they dress up miss baker in like a train veil. She actually rips off a couple minutes into the ceremony. Good for you good for you. Miss baker and so she you you just get this idea of like how precious she was to people in nineteen eighty-four. She dies of acute kidney failure. She's twenty seven years old and at this point. She is the longest known living squirrel monkey in history. She at this point. She's broken every single record for like the average lifespan of a squirrel monkey. So miss baker's led this long life. She had like an official wedding when she died where she given. The same treatment was a funeral. Or what happened. Oh yeah she was sent off in style she was buried right outside of the. Us rocketed space center and three hundred people showed up just to witness her being laid to rest. I saw some pictures to like flower. Reason like these signs saying you know like miss baker america's first lady of space born nineteen fifty seven died nine hundred eighty four. And you know she was that day she was laid to rest next big george who had been buried there for a couple of years now. That's nice that's nice

Baker Navy Cape Canaveral Miss Baker Nasa Us Government Albert TLC Army Flint America Puerto Rico George Pensacola Washington Jackson
CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

710 WOR Programming

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

"Shah, longtime political reporter and anchor Roger Mudd is dead at the age of 93, his son Jonathan Mud, told The Washington Post. He died from complications of a kidney failure. Bud spent almost two decades covering Capitol Hill for CBS News. He served as the weekend and anchor on CBS during Walter Cronkite's tenure before moving NBC for a short while after not getting the role following Cronkite's

Roger Mudd Jonathan Mud Shah The Washington Post Kidney Failure BUD Capitol Hill Cbs News Walter Cronkite CBS NBC Cronkite
CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

"Was a story on Capitol Hill during the sixties or seventies. Chances are that it ended this way. CBS NEWS Washington Roger Mudd has died after kidney failure. He's being remembered by admirers and contemporaries is one of the best of his craft. Former CNN Washington bureau chief Frank Sesno Yes, was known as the Tiffany Network, and Roger Mudd was one of the jewels in the crown because he stood So far above everybody else, but left CBS when he wasn't chosen to anchor the Evening news when Walter Cronkite retired, but he once said he never truly ceased being a CBS man. Roger Mudd was 93

Roger Mudd Frank Sesno Capitol Hill Cbs News Kidney Failure CBS CNN Washington Walter Cronkite
Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

"A veteran network news anchor and correspondent has died Roger mode is dead CBS news reported died of complications of kidney failure at his home in suburban Washington DC much spent more than thirty years on network TV most of us air time log when there were just three major networks on the air well before people got their news from cable or the internet might be sued the Peabody Award for his November nineteen seventy nine special on teddy Kennedy which aired just before the Massachusetts senator challenge then president Carter for the nineteen eighty democratic presidential nomination during the interview might ask Kennedy simply why he wanted to be president Kennedy widely seen as marking the answer ended up losing the nomination to the incumbent Carter went on then to lose to Ronald Reagan Roger Mudd was ninety three I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Roger Mode Teddy Kennedy Cbs News Kidney Failure Peabody Award DC Washington President Carter Massachusetts President Kennedy Kennedy Roger Mudd Carter Ronald Reagan Oscar Wells Gabriel
CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

"A longtime political reporter and anchor Roger Mudd is dead at the age of 93, his son Jonathan Mud, told The Washington Post. He died from complications of kidney failure. Much spent almost two decades covering Capitol Hill for CBS News. Among the events he covered extensively was the Watergate scandal and its fall out. He served as the weekend anchor on CBS during Walter Cronkite's tenure before moving to NBC for a short time after not getting the role following Cronkite's retirement. His journalism and broadcasting career spanned more than 50 years again. Roger Mudd dead at the age of 93.

Roger Mudd Jonathan Mud Kidney Failure The Washington Post Cbs News Capitol Hill Walter Cronkite CBS NBC Cronkite
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

03:23 min | 9 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Pretend that that's an honest thing. That's the same thing they do with cannabis numbers with with craig numbers and pretend he died from crete him except he had a gunshot wound. The chest ben. Swann covered that. That's not a joke. The fda tried to sell you death that they said were caused by them and they found some that were so ridiculous such as a gunshot wound to the chest and said oh well the cranium and killed him. That's who we're dealing with. These are captured. Agencies says while the department of health did remove hundred deaths from account. Oh how nice of them. Which by the way is a quiet admission that they messed up but nobody talked about that. Good job at the freedom foundation did another analysis combining data sources from the department of health for nearly two thousand deaths as of early september. The new analysis found that one hundred seventy death certificates did not even mention over nineteen. This is on the second time so they removed deaths after they said. Yeah you're right. You got us those true. And then they found more another one hundred. Seventy one debts had no casual casual connection to the virus. According to the post millennial the group estimates washington's death count could be as waited as twenty percent interesting new data from the cdc regarding the conditions contributing to the death were covid nineteen is also involved clearly demonstrates the virus are overestimated nation wide but sure lock people down and control there and give governments uncontrollable power to do whatever they want based on their i mean. Let's pretend like that was just a casual corky coincidence right that they took action that led directly to their benefit and great amount resources and control and power. Just a happy coincidence. This is not surprising. Given the loose guidelines for attributing adept at cove nineteen and the financial incentives through public and private insurance insurance to put covert on. The patient's again things that were barely talked about. The jensen basically ruined his career to tell us about. And now it's just a passing discussion point. How disgusting is that. There's no way we can argue that. Having a profit motive to write it on the death certificate is not an obvious way to game the numbers it says. These poll four were deaths. Which is what. We're talking about often happened with influenza and pneumonia. What do you know when person elderly or severely compromised for example. The data shows the three thousand six hundred twenty two people over the age of seventy five died of hypertension renal disease with kidney failure kidney failure kidney failure is a progressive internal condition even with kidney dialysis an addition so the point is they died from something way we did. They died from kidney failure. And they're claiming that was covid nineteen. Why because well. We don't know that doesn't cause it. That's not scientific and that's not what doctors will say. But that's what that one doctor tried to say on the media and regard to a motorcycle accident months after he had recovered. Think about a stupid that is and always as don't know that didn't cost the accident will then you can just attribute every death in the world to go because we don't know it wasn't no doctor would say that but they sure as hell put that doctor on the news kidney failure three thousand six hundred twenty two people second the report demonstrates most younger patients were also suffering from a different severe illness if they died from covid nineteen on the same line for kidney failure..

freedom foundation department of health Swann craig fda cdc hypertension renal disease kidney failure kidney failure kidney dialysis jensen washington pneumonia influenza kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:59 min | 10 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of patients and triple board certified, certainly help taking care of complex patients. Well, I talk about a complex patient, a 63 year old woman. This is a woman who's was widowed. But while she her husband was dying of kidney failure, he did not have cancer. He was dying of kidney failure. She had lumps in her neck, and they did biopsies. And radical surgeon or neck and throat. By a head and neck surgery. Who did and found the squamous carcinoma. Well, she never had treatment beyond the surgery and, well, you guess it. The surgery's not enough for head of cancer. The cancer came back satisfy. She lost her husband and that fight with surgery. She lost that fight, too, and the cancer came back. And then she saw a doctor who I wouldn't say is ah To be recommended, and he started giving her concoction chemo so concoction. Chemo is giving her chemo, but he was giving it to her in ways that really didn't work and wouldn't work. He was injecting chemo with a syringe right into the cancer. That's not really a recommended method of treatment. With a needle and he doesn't go throughout the cancer to treat cancer to treat the entire cancer and he just wasn't doing. He was trying to do focus treatment with chemo. You can't give chemo injected with a needle into directly into the mass like that expected to work Well, it didn't work and the cancer groom or so she had surgery. The cancer group. She had chemo injected of the masses of the groom or, and then she got involved with was called insulin chemo, where they try to give insulin. Supposedly to make the chemo go into the south. Well, that doesn't work either doesn't work. I've never seen it work. I know. Lots of people think it's so elegant. What's not elegant because it doesn't work and it's expensive and she was paying in an arm and a leg for these off the wall treatments. Which don't work. I would give you a heads up. Don't take a treatment that's not gonna work. You should get a treatment that works and to try to cure the patient most. How did that cancer patients that we see are cured? And what does it mean ahead in that cancer was not the brain. It's cancers of the throat, the mouth tongue, the tonsils, the voice box. Command of all those areas from the bottom of the brain below the brain down to about the clavicles that's called ahead and that cancer so she had a squamous carcinoma. The two most common causes. Number one is smoking. Smoking used to be the number one cause. Well, now it's not Now it's human papilloma virus, And if remember, a few years ago, Michael Douglas said he got his throat cancer from aural sects. And if, remember, his wife, Catherine Zeta Jones, went Think ballistic on him. That's how it was reported in the newspapers that he was talking about aural sects He didn't say with whom and well, but he was right in that the majority of people with head and that cancer's nowadays get it from human papilloma virus virus. And that's the majority not smokers anymore. Used to be smokers. Now it's a virus. Well, this woman had a head and neck, cancer, throat cancer, and it started in her throat and went to the neck, right neck and left neck and shed surgery didn't work. And then she said that Cock eyed chemo didn't work and shed cock eyed insulin into them to work. And that's what she finally came to me about five years afterwards, With cancer growing and in big trouble, it's always big trouble when the cancer is coming back after treatment in multiple sites. That's how she came to me in big trouble, big masses of cancer to golf ball sized masses and the right neck of the left neck. This is what she had. She came to me and I talk to about all the options what we could do to try to save her life, and I told her luckily for hers, the cancer had to travel beyond the collarbones. So we're still in the neighborhood, although it traveled to the lymph nodes and where that doctor put chemo with a needle into the lymph nodes that didn't work either, And the cancer has kept on growing the insulin concoction doomed to work and she came to me years ago. She came to me years ago more than five years ago with this recurrent Massive headed that cancer and we talked about all the options and she trusted me and we treated her and the cancer went away so probable to her. Finally, after all those treatments, surgery and chemo and concoctions and Insulin concoctions, none of which work finally a treatment. Worked, and she could've, of course, come to us first, and she would have avoided that radical surgery. Short of of what of the Chemo Times two. But luckily she came and she's been in remission from that throat cancer now for five years, and we know statistically, most likely she will never see that throat cancer again. And some people say Hey, Dr Lieberman, how do you know the cancer's cured? Well, we examined the patient. We get scans of the body. Had blood tests and we check out the patient and that's we did in her. And guess what? Remember, she's a smoker. She was a smoker, and smokers could get other cancers. Sophie Cure them of one cancer, another cancer and then She developed a mass in her kidney. So two cancers, throat cancers and kidney cancers both commonly associated with smoking. And she was a smoker, and she dropped this kidney cancer and went.

cancer Chemo kidney cancer Catherine Zeta Jones Michael Douglas Cock Sophie Dr Lieberman
Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

04:11 min | 10 months ago

Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

"Walk everybody to fasting. Transformation summit or rear uncovering agent inexpensive powerful healing strategy. Known mankind fasting. I'm your host. Dr david joggers. And today we're gonna talk about alternate day. Fasting strategies for chronic disease brought in one of the top experts. He's actually got to bestselling books where he really goes into detail on fasting. He's all over youtube band. You could find him. You just type in dr jason on youtube. You'll see all these amazing nydia his and brought him on today to talk about alternate day fasting in really go into a little bit more the history of fasting as well so dr. Jason fung is a canadian nephrologist which is basically a kidney specialist. Dr fund graduated from the university of toronto and completed his residency at the university of california los angeles. He lives and works in toronto canada where he co founded the intensive dietary management grants is a world leading expert on intermittent fasting and low carb Treating people with type two diabetes and is the author of the bestseller the obesity code and the complete guide. Fasting is high near the use of therapy Sassoon for weight loss and type two diabetes reversal in his. Ibm clinic and you can find his website ibm program that's all one word idea. Program dot com ad also featured on the diet. Dr dot com. And so dr jason. Thanks so much for being on the vast transformation summit with us. Thanks for having me great to be here absolutely and sought curious in how nephrologist how you really got involved with. Sassine will begin west. Well the the most common reason for kidney failure is type two diabetes and the thing about type two diabetes. It's really a reversible disease but it's not taking drugs that really reverses the disease if you take drugs if you take insulin really. You're not gonna get a lot better. In fact you just wind up taking them sort of year after year and every year you go to the doctor you get more and more drugs however Everybody already knows that if you lose weight that type two diabetes almost always goes away so if you have a friend who loses way you can almost bet your bottom dollar that diabetes will get better or go away so it's not a chronic and progressive disease like we've been told israeli irreversible disease but you've got to focus on what's important which is not giving drugs which is you know using the diet to effect weight loss. That's really where i started. So i became very interested in the question of weight loss and look at it from sort of physiologic standpoint. Because the thing about it is that we lost. There's all this Talk like this you know. No shortage of oxen talk about weight loss and how to lose weight. Big business weight watchers and jenny craig. And all that sorta stuff and they're all focused. I think on some things sort of not completely relevant. Which is the the calories there. They all talk about calories calories calories but when you look at it from physiologic stent white The body doesn't count calories it has no calorie receptors. Doesn't know how many calories you're eating so it's like if you're taking all this care to count the number of calories in your body doesn't really care about it at all then. Why do you think you're going to make a difference. You want the body to do something and you think restricting the number of calories does it with the body has no idea what you're talking about like you're talking to different languages so it doesn't it doesn't work and that's where i really got interested in the Sort of notion and it's really about hormones because the body responds to hormones are whole body works on hormones that is You know if you're hot then you sweat if you're cold than you. You know shiver and so on but all affected by hormones and our responses in this case in most cases of weight. It's insulin and one of the ways to really reduce the fun is to use something. Like fasting in intermittent

Dr Jason Diabetes Dr David Nydia Jason Fung Dr Fund Dr Dot Sassine Youtube Chronic Disease Sassoon University Of Toronto University Of California Kidney Failure Obesity Toronto Los Angeles IBM Canada
"kidney failure" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Premier Family Physicians is one of our best partners all throughout south, Awesome and amazing group of doctors and Kevin Thank you so much for joining us today. Absolutely thanks for having me appreciate it. So you know, as a urologist, we are really dependent upon the referrals from primary care doctors and their evaluation and the most common questions we get from patients is what should I look for? What? I'm looking for a primary care doctor, And for us, it's all about the interaction that That doctor and the patient have that we see and we see him and notes. We see him in how they're cared for how they're chronic diseases or taking care of, And so from your standpoint, I'd love for you to talk about what is kind of the goal of primary care medicine. And especially in this world where a lot of people do their own research and go their own doctor like you know why I even have a primary care doctor. Yeah, it's a It's a great question. I think the cornerstone of primary care is really the doctor. Patient relationship itself. You know, before you have a very A specific need blood in your urine, a kidney stone and abnormal of lab tests where we would send people to a urologist. You know the global holistic view of that whole person. What are their health goals? It's their life view. What do they want out of health? What scares them about sickness? What's happened to their family? What are things that we could prevent much earlier in the course so that instead of the big surgery or the worst outcome, they have something much more minor because they have a relationship that's trusted where they share their symptoms. So relationship to me finding a physician who's well trained part of a group that can deliver care where you have the results returned to you in a timely fashion, but really someone you're comfortable sharing your story with about one out of three people. We've seen the primary care setting. Have either depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. So a big piece of what we do is is designed to think about that person holistically not only their physical health, but also their mental health. And so I think the world has changed rapidly in the last year, So when you say relationship, I think the ability to use technology to leverage that relationship so we have the ability to do telehealth visits. We have a patient portal where people could email and connect with us in real time, schedule their appointments online and get to us having a great doctor. I'll listen to you doesn't do you much good if you can't get to them, But there's too many barriers to care. So so being accessible is kind of that first place into the system. When you do your own research, potentially You may end up going out into the healthcare marketplace and wasting a specialist time and you thought you needed neurologist, But she really needed in your nose and throat or you thought you needed a kidney specialist, but because you thought something was the kidney, but it's really within the field of urology so that that drives up cost they waste the patient's time. They waste the specialist time. So that's that's a big piece of what we're geared to such a great example you you've raised. I mean, I get probably twice a week. Somebody referred to me because of a concern about Kidney failure, and I hate to tell him like I'm a surgeon, You know, unless you want your kidney cut on, and this idea of having a relationship with a physician is such an important concept. Because I think that unfortunately, too many people self diagnose, or they feel like the type of care they're going to get from That doctor isn't going to be exactly what they envisioned. And unfortunately, I think that so many patients lose out on the idea of having you know, a family practitioner or an internal medicine doctor. Really taking care of their global health? Because I mean, as good of a doctor's, I think I am. I'm probably not going to deal with your other medical issues quite as well as a primary care, doctor. Well, yeah. I mean, I think if you just think about what our story is going to be our health story, we may need you. But for a very specific episode, But the things we take care of there, the kind of things that we manage we don't cure often times. You know your blood pressure wolf. He managed that instead of a stroke at 68,.

Kidney failure Premier Family Physicians Kevin depression sickness
Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

Outcomes Rocket

07:01 min | 1 year ago

Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

"Welcome back to the podcast that I have the privilege of hosting Tony Australia. He's a managing director at Talladega Investment and advisory for health tech and insure tech startups. He's also a fiction novelist Tony's a global thought leader and fiction writer and digital health with experiences working in Asia, the US and Europe as a startup founder investor or Britain ovation leader and strategic advisor Tony currently sits on the board as an independent director, for C, x group, and Savannah CTS as both. An investor and adviser Tony Partners with Asia focus companies who are working to develop solutions to change the face of cancer human longevity and population health with core IP stemming from AI genomics blockchain smart devices, his previous work within both life insurance at metlife and farm out with Pfizer, it was focused to drive measurable business impact allowing him to help entrepreneurs enhanced their product market fit and commercial growth plans across Asian markets, his debut fiction novel comatose, which will touch on here. In today's discussion is a fiction novel about Lucid Dreaming and it's all about health tech fiction something that will cover with Tony as well. It's available in bookstores today in the UK and Amazon globally. Tony is has done tremendous mono- work and he spent some time at University of Pennsylvania's wharton getting his MBA there the London business school and the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science in electrical engineering. So a tremendous individual and it's a privilege to host them. Here today. Tony thanks for joining the next. So the pleasure to be here, thanks for inviting me to share some of my thoughts and insights with with your audience. Absolutely my friend. So tell me a little bit about your journey. How did you decide on healthcare? So I academically studied electrical engineering and that's actually where I caught the bug Ford being more entrepreneurial minded and how I focused by professional life I used to build and race solar electric race cars really. Little coffee that I helped build up and and I started my career in consulting and during that period was great you know lots of. Ways to learn and be mentally intellectually challenged. But in two thousand, I had just finished doing work in Silicon Valley and that was the first Internet wave and lots of excitement about transformation and as I started business school I really thought about where did I want to dedicate my time and energy in terms of industry focus for several different reasons including personal wants healthcare just jumped out. I love the fact that you can build technology and it helps people live longer have better quality of life I had a couple of. Personal Peoria friends who dealt with health issues. I had an aunt who passed away from kidney failure and so all that just came together for me to say I can wake up every morning. Feeling excited that what I do is helping at least one individual of a better life love that man yeah. It's a compelling reason to choose the field and with your knowledge and background you've been able to make a big impact and so I'd love to hear from you. Tony will you think is should be the big thing. On health leaders agenda and how are you approaching it back when I started my first business in two thousand one, there was a lot of emphasis in terms of whereas the healthcare industry in the US the US at the time and fast forward through time they're still an enormous amount of of focus in the US in the healthcare sector is digital health or health tech has grown the US. Market clearly is an important one, but I'd say that equally as important that on every health leaders mind should be what can they Learn from what's happening in. Asia and Asia whether Asia's an opportunity or not is there are there things that Asia offers in accelerating growth and scale and product that can be leveraged for for their business and couple of facts about Asia that I think are important for plus billion people forty four countries over two thousand languages spoken and normally large region and from an investment perspective this two, twenty, eighteen we saw the Asia approaching the same amount of investment to help tech startups is in the US style so within the next. Eighteen months you'll see that Asia, actual have more capital being deployed from the venture community and startups. So when I say that every health leader medically look at Asia, it's because the region is just is as awards today with with a much greater growth potential in the number of people countries. So there was a book I read recently by Kaifu who was a venture investor, in China, who formerly headed up Google China and used to work. For Apple and driving their early AI, and he doesn't amazing job painting the picture for China's one country when when important region round where they're going with a and how it's different than the US and I think that's the key thing that a takeaway for health for health leaders it's just a different technical environment data standards, and in the way that the tencent and Alibaba by do have changed China much the same way that Google facebook. Changed West is lots of learning that can happen man that's fascinating stuff Tony and folks I forgot to mention to you that Tony Lives and works in Singapore. So he's he's been there for the last five years this time around but definitely, a global health leader focused on Asia that knows the INS and outs. So critical critical piece of of information there everybody. To know. Tony, without a doubt there's there's opportunity over there. The money's flowing over there. Give us an example of of what you've seen is working and creating results. Yeah. The landscape for Asia is complex As I said, there's lots of countries and so before a answered that question, let me give a little bit of context as to how to think about the region. So. One is mentioned China and you can group Hong Kong and China together from thinking about one of six hubs in the region. The other hubs are the Indian subcontinent, which obviously is driven largely by India, but there's other countries their third. It'd be Japan for the be the Korean. Peninsula, which includes South Korea Fifty Southeast Asia Singapore and then six to be Australia New Zealand and I didn't do these in any order of size of just kind of went north to south and regret yeah, an each hub has. Similarities that that make a logical grouping whether it's economic development or cultural lifestyle history or climate.

Asia Tony United States Tony Australia China Tony Partners South Korea Fifty Southeast As Tony Lives Managing Director Talladega Investment Metlife Pfizer University Of Pennsylvania Sch Europe Ai Genomics University Of Pennsylvania UK Amazon Japan India
Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist and novelist, dies

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist and novelist, dies

"Legendary New York columnist and novelist Pete Hamill has died he was eighty five Hamel had a long time love affair with his hometown New York my downtown is everything from Times Square downtown all the way to the battery panel was considered one of the last great crusading columnist you spoke to the AP in two thousand five about all the different neighborhoods in New York it was always a district of breweries that was a district of the meat markets they would describe districts of politicians that would district where the rich live and eventually with the poor live besides the people on the street he hung out with people like John Lennon and won a Grammy for his liner notes to Bob Dylan's blood on the tracks Pete Hamill died in Brooklyn from heart and kidney failure I'm a Donahue

Pete Hamill Hamel New York John Lennon Grammy Bob Dylan Brooklyn Donahue Times Square
Pete Hamill, celebrated New York newspaper columnist, dies aged 85

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Pete Hamill, celebrated New York newspaper columnist, dies aged 85

"And mingle with the elite. Pete Hamill died in a Brooklyn hospital from heart and kidney failure. He was 85. I met Donahue. AP News Most Americans work in the services sector and the Institute for Supply Management says it's index for it rose to a reading of 58.1 in July.

Pete Hamill Institute For Supply Managemen Brooklyn Hospital Donahue
The impact of race on kidney transplantation

Second Opinion

03:04 min | 1 year ago

The impact of race on kidney transplantation

"Is a slight man who worked as a house painter. Until his nearly lifelong high blood pressure wreaked havoc on his kidneys this week. He was told that he would not be put on the kidney transplant list because his kidney function was still too good, he was devastated to him. His kidney failure was wrecking his life. One of the main functions of the kidney is to filter the blood and remove contentment and fluid from the body. One important test used to assess kidney function is called the glow Mary Tyler filtration rate or G. F. R. The. Number is a mathematical calculation to determine the kidneys filtering ability. The calculation is based on the person's age and sex and race among other things we're the GFR becomes a subject for an NPR. Medical commentary is around the use of race in the calculation to determine gfr. Race in the calculation is quoted as either black or not black, according to a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine. The reason that race is part of the calculation is based on the stereotype that black people have higher. Higher Muscle Mass, the non-blacks studies suggest this assumption is not based on strong science, a higher muscle mass with lead to a higher gfr in less there was a mathematical correction normal. Jeff are levels are about sixty. When a person's gfr drops below twenty, they can then be placed on a transplant list, but Rodney's Jeff are was still too high because he had points added to his score because he's black. This made his kidney function appear more normal. If he was not black, he would've made the criteria and he'd be on the transplant list, and there is nothing about Rodney that anybody would label as high muscle mass. Five foot seven and weighs only one hundred and thirty pounds. Even if Rodney were placed on the transplantation list, he would face other problems. The scale used to predict the failure of donors transplantations uses race as an indicator of success. The reason race is included is a non evidence based assumption that kidneys that come from black donors perform worse than kidneys that come from non black donors regardless of the recipients race, so this discourages surgeons from transplanting black kidneys out of an unwarranted fear that they may have a higher rate of failure. What all this means for Rodney is that even when he does get on the transplant list. His wait for a kidney with a good match will be even

Rodney Jeff New England Journal Of Medicin Mary Tyler NPR
LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

The Daily 202's Big Idea

02:47 min | 1 year ago

LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

"Gerald Bostock joined a gay recreational softball league seven years ago, signing up for the HOTLANTA, Softball League his job in the Child Welfare Services Department for Clayton County. Georgia. He was fired for quote. Conduct unbecoming of county employ. That men he didn't have health insurance. He recovered from prostate cancer, but it set in motion illegal fight that led on Monday to a landmark decision from the supreme, court, which ruled six to three that the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four protects against discrimination based not just on race and gender, but also sexual orientation. And now Gerald's name will forever appear in constitutional law textbooks. After reading Justice Neal Gorsuch as majority opinion, validating his right not to be fired, simply because he was gay Gerald reflected on the journey from the den of his home. When I lost my job, it was my dream job, so imagine having. That, you went to every day and you enjoy doing it. the habits suddenly taken away from you because you decided to join a gay recreational Softball League I lost my income I mentioned that I had lost mine insurance while I was still recovering from prostate cancer I lost friends in relationships with with many colleagues. I had to sell my home in that community. So the Germans been difficult. The court ruling grouped three related cases involving employees who said they were fired because of their sexuality or gender identity. Gerald was the only plaintiff still alive to see the outcome Amy Stevens. A funeral director who was fired, because she was transgender, died last month of kidney failure after attending oral arguments in her case. Last Fall Donald Zara. A skydiving instructor who was fired because he was gay, died in twenty, fourteen, leaving his sister and partner to advance his case. Gerald, who's fifty-six plans to return to a trial court in Georgia to fight his case after all these years of legal roadblocks, he and his partner Andy toasted with champagne last night to celebrate the ruling, which he hopes will bring a little bit of sunshine. In some dark times. He told my colleague Samantha Schmidt that more work remains to be done. He wants Congress to pass the Equality Act which would enshrine nondiscrimination protections for lgbtq people in Employment Housing Credit Education public spaces and other realms of American life. The state of Georgia has also yet to pass a hate crime law. He, says joining the gay. Softball League was one of the best decisions he ever made. The arc of the moral universe is long. But it bends toward justice.

Gerald Bostock Softball League Georgia Andy Amy Stevens Neal Gorsuch Gerald Hotlanta Clayton County Child Welfare Services Departm Donald Zara Partner Director Employment Housing Credit Educ Instructor Samantha Schmidt Congress
Doctors Tally Up the Ways Coronavirus Attacks the Body

WSJ What's News

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Doctors Tally Up the Ways Coronavirus Attacks the Body

"If you can remember all the way back to the beginning of the krona virus outbreak you might recall hearing that patients who catch it show flu like symptoms of Fever. Cough and fatigue well our knowledge of virus and how it affects. The body has come a long way since then joining me now to talk about what medical professionals are now learning about. Kobe is Wall Street Journal. Senior writer Betsy McKay Betsy. We heard a lot early on about the corona virus being a respiratory infection. But that's not the case for everyone. Doctors report that the virus impacts more than just the respiratory system and you spoke to several medical providers who treated corona virus patients. What did they tell you about the other systems of the body that this can impact? What they said is that this virus really is looking like more than a respiratory infection. It's affecting all parts of the body and some really unexpected ones. I said you know. There are more complications that they're seeing with covert nineteen and they see with other other viral infections basically. They've learned that. The damaged goes far beyond the lungs. It can affect the brain kidneys heart the vascular system the digestive system. So you know. Patients sometimes are having sudden strokes. They develop pulmonary embolisms or blood. Clots in the lung. Some have heart. Attacks symptoms kidney failure. So it's a pretty wide range of complications. Can any of those factors help explain why younger people who seemingly without any underlying health issues have in some cases experienced severe cases of this virus helps partly explain? It doesn't fully explain it but it does show that you know you can develop these complications. And it's not necessarily tied to having an underlying condition or having a weaker immune system which is what puts older people at risk or being younger and having an underlying condition. They're clearly some kind of independent things going on in the body that don't affect everybody. I mean I think it's still a mystery as to why most people like eighty percent of people don't really develop complications like this but twenty percent to can you talk a bit more about the inflammatory response that the virus produces in the body and how that's presented challenges to treating it in some cases. Yeah I'm so. Some people develop a really powerful inflammatory response. You know anybody who gets a virus is going to have some inflammation so when a when a virus enters your body the immune system cells kind of Russian to kill infected cells. They also release. These molecules called cytokines and the whole idea is to try to sort of isolated and protect the body from the infected tissue. But you know you're you're inflammatory. Response can kind of Overdo it developed. What's called the site of kind storm? So once you get this inflammation in your body start to damage you know instead of protecting you. It starts damaging the body itself. So it can you know starve. The body of Oxygen. Because if your lungs are inflamed you can't take oxygen into the lungs and that deprives other organs in your body so so there's some pretty severe consequences of extreme inflammation and that seems to be driving a lot of these problems and what about the preponderance of clotting this also seems to be one of those mysteries associated with the corona virus. Yeah that has been a really interesting discovery. And it's you know. One of the most worrisome complications because it seems to be behind a lot of these complications so anytime that you have kind of a level of hyperinflation your body is more more prone to clotting. That's that's one of the consequences of it and what doctors are seeing is blood clots forming. I mean they form the lungs and that prevents oxygen from getting in. You know the blood then kind of just goes through the lungs without taking oxygen that can deprive the heart of oxygen. You can also get blood clots in the heart you know. They've even found blood clots in the toes causing this famous now famous and very strange complication called Cova Toe. Which essentially is blood? Clots forming down in the small very small blood vessels in the in the foot and the tow and causing this amazing swelling. So it even affects the kidneys so this clothing is really really strange. It seems to be a feature of the more severe in nineteen so we've talked a lot about the various mysteries that krona viruses still posing and we know doctors and scientists are working to answer a lot of questions. What are some of the biggest ones they still have at this point? Well I would say there are a lot of a lot of big ones. They don't really understand who developed severe disease and why although there are certain groups at risk and older people are risk because their immune systems are weaker people with underlying conditions like heart disease diabetes are also at greater risk because their bodies are just again in week position but but nobody really understands yet. Why sometimes rarely but it does happen. You know perfectly healthy. Young people can very severely ill among us will develop a very strong powerful inflammatory response. That will cause all of these problems. They still don't understand. How many of these complications are caused by inflammation? I say direct attack of the virus itself so there are a lot of questions that scientists are still are trying to figure out and you know. This virus was just identified at the beginning of this year. So that's it's less than five months. Old have been studied for less than five months so the scientists and doctors. We talked to said you know. There's just a lot of work to be done.

Inflammation Betsy Mckay Betsy Cough Wall Street Journal Writer Kobe Cova Toe
Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

Science Magazine Podcast

12:43 min | 1 year ago

Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

"What does it mean to be sick with current Oh virus we typically think I probably of shortness of breath symptom that will determine whether you should go to the doctor. You have a fever could lose your sense of smell. Maybe some stomach problems. Who What does this virus actually? Due to the body Meredith Wiedeman team of reporters from science looked at what we know of its effect system by system. It's not a complete picture yet but researchers are starting to pull it together. Okay Meredith how are you? I'm fine how are you Sarah? I'm good. This is a very comprehensive story from nose to Toews. I think they saw in one description of the work. Yes and so what happens? When a person comes in contact with the novel coronavirus. He essentially they inhale it and respiratory droplets. They might also pick it up on fingers that they then placed to their face from an inanimate surface the virus finds a welcoming home in the upper respiratory tract. A back of the throat the nose. Because there there are cells that are rich in what are known as ace two receptors and these are receptors that live on the surface of some cells and that the virus needs in order to get into those cells. We don't know the numbers but some people are just gonNA clear the infection and move on with their lives. Right they are. They're going to either be a symptomatic not even being aware they are infected and they can be very infectious in this stage or they might feel crummy they might have Malays. They might have aches fever. That really within a week or so start to recover ordered. They might go into a more serious phase of the disease. This is when the virus makes its way into the lower respiratory tract. That's right if your immune system can't beat back the virus while except in your nose and throat then the risk goes up of marching down your windpipe and into what we call the respiratory tree. The whole system of Airways that leads to the far reaches of the lung. And that's where the virus again finds a welcoming home because the tiny air sacs called Alveoli where oxygen exchange occurs with the blood also adds an abundance of these ace to receptors on their cell surfaces. And this is a problem because if the immune system goes on the attack these tiny spaces in the lungs you can get really serious problems. Sure it becomes what we know as pneumonia and ammonia simply as lung inflammation. This particular virus can cause a really rip roaring lung inflammation but these patients may have in quotes. Mild the MONJA. Although I don't think anyone has described how they feel as mildly affected or they may turn a severe sharp corner where they begin a rapid downhill. Slide into what we know is acute respiratory distress syndrome where. There's just a raging pneumonia and on their chest xrays or C. T. Scans you're GonNa see white where you should have seen black. Lack representing air in an white. Is this whole inflammatory? Response trying to beat back the virus but doing damage itself. Alveoli walls breakdown either can be clots in the little tiny blood vessels that supply the OBVIO- light nurse. Just a real STU real mess and when people deteriorate very seriously enough deny one thing that researchers are trying to understand is how serious is this immune response and would intervening at that point. Be Helpful for patients. If you have just a regular immune response and you start giving immune suppressing drugs your disarming your your Mahameed in a minority of gravely. Ill patients the immune system goes into this really damaging hyper immune state. Call that a cytokine storm when levels of certain chemical signals and the blood. Go absolutely off the charts and in the end what happens is the immune cells of the body began attacking healthy tissues and you can get widespread kwoh-ting you get the blood. Vessels leaking blood pressure plummeting. It's a catastrophe for the whole body. So in efforts to combat that out of Control Immune response they are deploying drugs that go after specific ones of these chemical signaling molecules known as cytokines and just to be clear here. Most of what we're going to be talking about is for severely affected patients people who are in the ICU people who are coming into the ER. So let's turn to the heart and blood vessels meredith. This is something surprisingly being seen in maybe twenty percent of patients. Yes it's clear that the heart and blood vessels are a target for Kovic and just how unwise still being sorted out. Let one paper in. Jama cardiology found heart damage in nearly twenty percent of more than four hundred patients who were hospitalized for the disease in. Wuhan another found forty four percent of patients in an ICU. There had abnormal heart rhythms. And then there's also an increased tendency to blood clotting that in a Dutch. Icu nearly forty percent of patients had blood. That was clotting abnormally. These are extremely problematic issues and people. That are already very sick from pneumonia. What has been seen happening to people's hearts there seems to be heart inflammation and it's possible because the heart lining and the blood vessel lining just like the cells in the lungs and the nose is rich in these ace two receptors again. They're the viruses port of entry into into cells. So the cells could be. It's possible that they're being in the heart. And the vessels directly inflamed. It's possible there at the lack of oxygen. Getting through because of the problems in the lung is doing additional damage to her vessels could be that a societal kind storm releasing all these inflammatory molecules again and sells remember they attack normal healthy tissue and that can include the linings of blood vessels so there are these multiplex of potential causes that may indeed vary between patients as to what's causing let. But it's clear that there's cardiac and vessel damage in a significant number of severely. Ill patients let's take a turn now to the brain. This is something that we've seen some scary reports on actually of inflammation in the brain and we've also seen law sense of smell in corona virus. Patients is that something that's related to the brain it might be that's not been established but there is a direct connection from so-called olfactory neurons. The ones that light you smell running from the nose up to. It's called the olfactory bulb which connects to the brain as one of our sources. Put It as a nice sounding feary who I have to go and prove that it actually extends to the brain but there are more general brain effects. That don't trace back to loss of sense of smell for one thing. The bloods increased tendency to clot can put patients at risk of having strokes. There's also a problem in that. A lot of these folks developed kidney failure that in itself can cause delirium and problems for the brain in addition there can also be a quote unquote sympathetic storm. It's sort of an overreaction of the nervous system that somewhat analogous to the site of kinds storm and that's common after traumatic brain injury some people with Cova nineteen can lose consciousness. So there's just a whole panoply of potential brain symptoms another symptom that I'd heard of before reading this story and I haven't heard most of this. Was that people can have symptoms in their gut. They can have diarrhea. They can have upset stomach. Does this mean that you know the virus pieces of the virus are surviving digestion? Yes apparently it does. And one of the suggestions is that patients are swallowing their own respiratory secretions and that the virus is carried live and somehow survives the acid environment in the stomach to land in the small intestine which is again replete. With these ace two receptors. An so virus can establish. Wow a robust infection. There that's it's thought what's leading to diarrhea nausea and other problems in perhaps on average about twenty percent of patients across studies. I WANNA take a step back here and just talk about how all these different systems being affected kind of expand the pool of people who have pre existing conditions that would make corona virus infection. Really dangerous for them. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure so since we were just talking about kidney disease in the kidneys. That's one of the organ systems. Where if you have a pre existing kidney disease that gives you basically a handicap when you start this race with this new virus than we think of something like diabetes harms the kidneys. So if you start with a lower baseline of kidney function these chronic kidney patients with pre existing kidney disease are at seriously greater risk of developing acute kidney injury during the infection in the same way diseases that affect the blood vessels will also put patients at higher risk. High blood pressure diabetes again congestive heart failure all these kinds of pre-existing disease just make patients that much more vulnerable. Should they become infected? So how is research like this? It's so preliminary. Were really just beginning to understand the progression of this infection. How will this help with interventions or treatments? I think it will certainly offer clues and sign posts. There will be new discoveries that hopefully will lead to highly effective drugs but we have already a good deal of information that points the way to either existing drugs or targets for drugs now being developed knowing for instance the outline of a site a kind storm which is something that can be triggered by other viral infections or bacterial infections. We have a starting place with that. We have these drugs already being deployed and other inflammatory states like rheumatoid arthritis that you can then say well. If they're beating back a certain site assign one of these out of Control Chemical Messengers in arthritis may be they will also be back some piece of the cytokine storm. That's going on in these severely ill patients and so you have such drugs being deployed in clinical trials. What we know about the ace two receptor and it's detailed protein. Structure has been defined by a couple of new important papers hopefully will give us new unique targets to actually prevent binding there. Which would be terrific. Yeah so what? Was it like trying to report on this? Big Mix of peer reviewed preprinted small clinical studies firsthand reports. Those kinds of things was very challenging. Every scientist and physician we interviewed really added the caveat. This is science on the fly. Our knowledge today may be completely eclipsed a month from now or what we're thinking about how this diseases is acting may be proven wrong within three weeks. This is obviously an ongoing endeavor to understand how the disease progresses what conditions set you up for getting extra sick and then you know the mechanisms that are happening at the cellular level. Where is the best information going to come from? Do you think. Is this something where people need to set up. These robust studies that you described. Are they doing that now? Yes in fact. They are doing it but hampered by the fact that they're trying to at the same time in many cases take care of desperately ill. Patients cleverly does the analogy goes trying to build the plane. While you're flying at this information is going to be constrained or imperfect because of the situation. It doesn't mean it's not going to be important.

Bloods Pneumonia Meredith Wiedeman Respiratory Distress Upper Respiratory Tract Respiratory Tract Fever Toews Sarah Lung Inflammation Respiratory Tree Obvio ICU Scientist
"kidney failure" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"In New Jersey at least thirteen of those are suffering from kidney failure lawmakers this week sent a bill to governor Murphy's gas that could save as much as four hundred million dollars annually in federal taxes for small businesses in New Jersey starting next year when the federal tax code was changed nearly two years ago to cap the deduction for state local taxes a ten thousand dollars for individuals no cap as opposed on businesses this week in response the legislature passed a bill that would allow pastor entities such as partnerships in LLC's to pay business taxes rather than have state tax the profits of each individual's income Allan Sobel of The New Jersey society of certified public accountant says that effectively recreates the salt adoption while this is a tax measure that actually will not cost the state a penny the taxpayers will not pay another dollar New Jersey tax but will save on their federal tax side at the state house Michael Simon's New Jersey one a one point five news somebody jerseys first news five ten a long legal battle to close the putrid Keegan landfill in Kearney appears to be coming to a close Z. sports and exposition authority which owns the landfills agreed to cap and close it permanently they'll also pay Carty two hundred fifty thousand dollars Carney city officials have complained for months about the rotten egg smell the noxious gases admitted from the rotting ways to the landfill making residents sick NJ dot com reports the NJ SCA voted unanimously to settle with the town and close in cap the landfill permanently a new medical marijuana dispensary is set to open this weekend in Paterson it is the first of six new dispensaries scheduled to open in the coming months after governor Murphy dramatically expanded the medical cannabis program in New Jersey there are now more than sixty three thousand medical marijuana patients registered in the garden state and that number is expected to grow significantly over the next several months to year how many jerseys first news five eleven the trump administration is celebrating the launching of space force it's the first new military service in more than seventy years authorized in the twenty twenty national defense bill that president trump is signing into law later today space force has been a priority for the president speaks of it is part of his vision for reinvigorating America's role in space although historic space force will start out small in its first year they'll likely have only about two hundred people the budget of forty million by comparison the army has four hundred eighty thousand active duty soldiers on a budget of a hundred eighty one billion tidy jerseys first news five twelve cold will continue for today will be warm up this weekend we'll get an extended look at the forecast in a recap of our top stories next has something to say on New Jersey one.

America medical cannabis marijuana Carney Carty Keegan Allan Sobel governor Murphy army New Jersey president trump Paterson NJ SCA Kearney Michael Simon accountant
"kidney failure" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Okay so hollywood the young woman whose kidneys were failing because the amount of cancer that she had in her pelvis was blocking the tubes between her kidneys and her bladder and this is in the mid nineteen eighties when we had less technological ways of relieving that's obstruction of the kidneys so she was dying of kidney failure caused by advanced cancer she was a young woman with teenage children living in a flat where her mom popped in and was doing the housework for her now because she was quite weary and she was so well she'd been bed bound now for a couple of weeks and have been very nauseated which can be one of the symptoms of failing kidneys so the macmillan nurses have been visiting at home and they'd recommend it a new truck for her nausea and then i was on cool for the hospice my first weekend on call for the hospice and hollis gp phoned and said that something ought was happening she having not been out of bed for two weeks was up had been up all night she was playing loud music she was wrongdoing around the flat trying to dance holding onto the backs of chas to keep a steady and she was talking fast and talking a lot and he just couldn't work out why she was behaving so oddly the when i went to long to see her i realized that what was happening was a side effect of the drug that had completely settled her nausea so it was the right drug to choose a side effect of that drug is to make people feel very driven as though they want to be mu.

nausea chas hollis gp two weeks