23 Burst results for "kidney cancer"

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:17 min | Last month

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Is a worldwide survey Every couple of years of kidney cancer patients and family members who are giving the care to ask about their concerns and another major project is world kidney cancer day martin. Could you tell us a little about those yet. This actually this Survey that indeed is a bi annual Has been discussed today. Among many other things the findings of an i should say because the survey has happened so last year at the end of the year said so now we are discussing the findings and Also discussing what is really the biggest finding and because there is a again this time ocean of information. It's very difficult to determine. What exactly is the biggest one. And unfortunately it's very difficult to throw people as seventy pages reports and just tell them to read it budding. It's it's ready providing a lot of information's and what is most fascinating is to observe and here differences between countries when we ask questions about the time spends to diagnosis. So the time between the first symptoms have occurred something worrisome and then Before the diagnosis was given it's very interesting to see the similarities and also differences between different countries and we already had a number of discussions that sometimes it's also culturally sensitive the way we are Giving back our perspective so in some cultures day to bring complains and to be unhappy about something is more common and in some countries is in some countries is your more agreements with what is happening. So sometimes we ask about your experience whether you understood or whether you are happy with the treatment sometimes we have to take this into consideration at. It's not only about the facts. What is happening on the way you feel. It also is is strongly Rooted in the culture that you're coming from so these surveys are really f- fascinating tool to see how shared experiences can also be have small differences between countries. And i think it's a yeah. It's a great invitation to Have a deep dive into the kidney concert. World overall and It's difficult to give view like five most important findings because they are exactly how this and then as to the world kidney concert day. That is happening in june this year. Topic is Feelings emotions so we have to talk about how do we feel and the wellbeing and the psychosocial status is definitely i think no surprise something incredibly important particularly in times of denic and i think that it's on one hand i would say that's you know this is such a huge mental burden of depends on ink that that the pandemic grubs upon all of us absolutely whether we are patients or not But i think this this year's topic off world kidney concert day is.

last year seventy pages june this year today this year kidney concert day bi annual couple of years first symptoms day martin concert day five most important one hand
Twins bench coach Mike Bell dies of cancer at 46

Dan Carroll

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Twins bench coach Mike Bell dies of cancer at 46

"Red's organization Mourning the passing of Cincinnati native and brother manager David Bell. Mike Bell Mike it was a bench coach with the Minnesota Twins died at the age of 46 Friday after a battle with kidney cancer read Spanish David Bell is currently with his family. Bench. Coach Freddie Benavidez is acting manager this weekend as the Reds wrapping up spring training the Reds and Cactus League action on Friday afternoon, beating the Arizona Diamondbacks 7 to 3. They were turned a good year later tonight when they host the Chicago Copes. Pregame coverage begins here on the Big One at 8 35. First pitch is at 905. Following Saturday's game. The Reds will have two more games in

David Bell Red's Organization Coach Freddie Benavidez Mike Bell Reds Minnesota Twins Cactus League Kidney Cancer Cincinnati Mike Arizona Diamondbacks Chicago
Minnesota Twins Coach Mike Bell Dies at 46

Dan Carroll

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Minnesota Twins Coach Mike Bell Dies at 46

"The Reds organization mourning the passing of Cincinnati native and brother manager David Bell. Mike Bell. Mike it was a bench coach with the Minnesota Twins died at the age of 46 Friday after a battle with kidney cancer. Reds manager David Bell is currently with his family bench. Coach Freddie Benavidez is acting manager this weekend. As the Reds wrapping them spring

David Bell Reds Mike Bell Cincinnati Minnesota Twins Kidney Cancer Mike Coach Freddie Benavidez
"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Prevent cancer diets that are high in processed foods smoked foods like hot dogs and bacon although they taste really good are kidneys have to filter all the byproducts of of those highly processed foods and it can be said that those do contribute to a higher risk for for cancer. Scott that's pretty much. The answer i get when i asked about preventing heart disease or other health issues as well colorectal cancer and so a healthy diet is just a good thing all around. It is just a good thing. If there was one thing you can do diet and exercise to help your body and your overall health that is the one thing to do and you just get the bonus that it helps to to prevent cancer not smoking. I suppose which is the other thing that that is good for preventing lots of illnesses. That's right it's never too late. I see patients all the time with cancer. And i always tell them that is never too late. You know doctors. I think a lot of us are can be judgmental about patients who smoke. And it's my job to be really supportive of those patients and to be an advocate for them. I know not. Everybody is going to stop smoking. But i will always put my two cents in and be supportive and caring and loving about stopping smoking because i know how big of a deal it is for helping to stop the spread of cancer in helping to prevent cancer especially lung cancer but also kidney cancer as well. I agree scott..

Scott two cents scott one thing colorectal cancer
"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Would you use that technique. So that's called kreil ablation. That's the way where we can treat a kidney tumor through the skin and there's multiple different ways of doing it. You can freeze the tumor with kreil. Ablation you can do radiofrequency ablation. I think of it. As burning the tumor. But it's all done through his skin through the skin using a cat scanner again. Just like a biopsy to target and put a probe into the tumor and freeze that area. It's not suitable for all patients It might be that. The tumor is located in an area. That's really close to another organ. Say your liver or your intestines and you don't want that. That ice ball in their freezing the tumor to affect an injure that other organ in those cases. It's it's critical to actually go in and do surgery but tumors located on the backside of the kidney closer to your back. Those are a lot easier for an interventional radiologist to get in there and treated per continuously. The downside of treating it. That way is that there's a chance that it could come back for younger healthier patients who are able to undergo surgery. I will typically recommend surgery for them. Because i think it's a better way to completely cure the kidney but for older patients Patients who have smaller tumors Patients who aren't suitable for surgery. Maybe they have other medical problems diabetes heart failure things like that. You don't want to put them through the risk of taking them to surgery pre continues ablation is is really a great option and one other option that we didn't talk about yet is that not all tumors treated. Actually you know especially in recent years. We've found that really small tumors. That aren't growing very much and i'm talking tumors that are smaller than than about two to three centimeters smaller than an inch. As long as they're not growing very very fast you can watch them and you can watch them especially in older patients who have other risks for for mortality for for for death in a younger patient. You're not gonna do that as much because they've got a longer time left to live a much longer time to potentially have problems from that tumor so we patient you're going to treat them earlier and try to cure them of that when it's more feasible to do a partial effectively in spare as much of the kidney as possible. Gotta go back to something. You said a word. Use twice perky tenuously. Does that mean going through the skin and so does that just mean a radiologist using a smaller hole than you would to do surgery. Yes it's it's done through the skin and actually patients are awake with that that procedure. They might give them kind of twilight anesthesia. Kind of like you would get for a colonoscopy but most patients are awake and they will numb the skin and the muscle and then they they basically use a small needle so when we say per it just means through the skin and they use a small needle and put it through the skin through the muscle and into the kidney again using either ultrasound or or cat scan guidance what are the survival rates for kidney cancers like if you take all comers seventy. Five percent of patients will be.

Five percent three centimeters twice seventy about two one other option an
"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:17 min | 3 months ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome everyone to male clinic. You and i am got to helena's alka. There is more to march than colorectal cancer. It is also kidney cancer awareness month the most common type of kidney cancer in adults is called renal cell carcinoma. Young children are more likely to develop tumor. Called wilms tumor. The incidents of kidney cancer seems to be increasing in adults..

colorectal helena's alka
Study uncovers long-term damage in firefighters battling blazes

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:57 sec | 10 months ago

Study uncovers long-term damage in firefighters battling blazes

"In Northern California say they're gaining control over historic deadly wildfires that have burned more than one million acres. However, researchers and former firefighters working on a new study here, responders battling the blazes are in danger to suffer unprecedented. Long term damage As the wildfires destroy over 1400 homes and businesses. The level of exposures of these firefighters are are getting at these situations extremely toxic for long periods of time. Retired captain Tony Stephanie is a 28 year veteran of the San Francisco Fire Department. He started the Stan Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Fund after he himself was diagnosed with kidney cancer, He tells CBS News Can't wait for that period for 5 10 20 years down the line to see if these men and women are contract various forms of this insidious disease. Something has to be done about it now.

Stan Francisco Firefighters Ca Tony Stephanie Kidney Cancer San Francisco Fire Department Northern California CBS
Study uncovers long-term damage in firefighters battling blazes

WBZ Midday News

01:14 min | 10 months ago

Study uncovers long-term damage in firefighters battling blazes

"Firefighters finally gained control over the deadly wildfire fires burning across California, inhaling smoke and actually cause long term damage to their health. GPS is Carter Evans. With more on this fast moving wildfires in Northern California have now destroyed more than 1400 homes and buildings. Beating back flames in these unpredictable conditions is already a dangerous job for front line cruise. Researchers now say it could also have lasting effects on their health. Would you see a community burning in a wildfire? What goes through your mind. Now The level of exposure is that these firefighters are are getting at these situations extremely toxic for long periods of time. Retired captain Tony Stefanie work for the San Francisco Fire Department for 28 years. Before he was diagnosed with kidney cancer. Researchers say that at the health risks persist, departments may need to consider getting new protective equipment. And, of course in Boston recently, they got some grant money to buy some new industrial strength washing machines and dryers machines that Khun treat their gear their apparatus that had have been exposed to the toxic chemicals.

Kidney Cancer Carter Evans San Francisco Fire Department Tony Stefanie California Northern California Khun Boston
"kidney cancer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"The kidney cancer and she's still cancer free to this day from that kidney cancer and then three months ago she came to me with a colon cancer and she came to the cancer the cecum big mass six and a half centimeter mass in the colon bleeding causing symptoms and again she did not want to have surgery deforming surgery or surgery with it might even take their life for that colon cancer should one of surgery sure of a colostomy no she learned about radiosurgery twenty years ago and she came to me and she came this week at the cancer returned in the colon is in remission is already shrunken by eighty to ninety percent and we got pet scans to prove it this is the work that we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway this woman who lost her breast to breast cancer before she met us came for kidney cancer twenty years ago truth radio surgery just a few pinpoint treatments this is the work that we do how does radiosurgery work wouldn't make a frame of the body it's all painless non invasive to slide out of flat table we computerize your body we computerized the cancer than from thousands of angles reset in beams to attack the cancer yes we did for the kidney and then she came to us this three four months ago with a colon cancers seco cancer and she came this week for follow up on the scans show marked improvement in remission from the kidney cancer from the colon cancer and I can tell you that our success rate is ninety percent through the cancers that we treat where will the being here at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway thirtieth street we have lots of information to send to you in call our office even now it two and two choices it's two one two two four six forty two thirty seven two one two two four six four two three seven our office to get information.

kidney cancer
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Treating your kidney cancer you might get treated for kidney cancer with low cutting and bleeding because most people when they learned about the options don't really want to go through radical surgery don't really want to go in the hospital really what I have and this the ship don't really want to have the pain of surgery don't really want to lose the function of one kidney why did god give us two kidneys we gave his two kidneys as a back up in case something happens to one we see many people who have kidney cancer on one side of a couple years later the end up with a kidney cancer on the other side of the urologist really stock up because they lost a kidney on one side now they have a cancer on the other side and they come to us somehow they learn more about us than it sometimes they don't even learn about the sometimes the kidney is removed the person's put on dialysis which is really pretty sad for the rest of their life well this man learned about so we talked about all the options in here of course unlike the surgeons who like to just remove the kidney without a biopsy without proof we of course like to get proof of everything so number two a one I like to get a scan of the rest of the body to make sure the cancer hasn't traveled three years this could travel to the bones of the longs or lymph nodes or elsewhere no one ever looked as doctors neurologists and primary doctor and big hospital never a log to see if the cancer spread and why do we fear cancer with your cancer because obviously it can spread that they can take our life that's why we're on the radio that's why we're here.

kidney cancer
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"We attacked the kidney cancer travels to long at one of the biggest cancer meetings I think the largest cancer meeting in the world Chicago so this is the work we do we have data we have experience we have a team we have a group of physicians and physicists to some interest and technicians and staff and nurses for you to offer innovative treatment or think about this woman should gone through surgery the cutter kidney gone through chemo going through mental therapy nothing works you can't breed there so there ought to die short of breath what could be worse than that and what could be better that she came here thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway and thirty eighth street and now this one is a breath is gone she feels normal what could be better than that and that's what we do every day whether it's for this woman with kidney cancer travel into the lymph nodes and long for breast cancer lung cancer liver cancer pancreas or bladder or prostate or primary or metastatic lymphoma or head and neck or brain cancers this is the work that we do every day first American to kind of stand by the surgeons in the chemo doctors don't like me why would they we've upset the apple cart we brought in a new method of treatment an innovative new method of treatment which is upset their apple cart they thought everything was made in the sun and then we upset the apple cart by offering treatment which is focused and well tolerated and highly successful where we attack the cancer and we have the longest experience for first in America this is the work we do we have lots of information to send you can call us at two one two choices two.

kidney cancer Chicago America lymphoma chemo apple
"kidney cancer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"And he presented with blood in the urine scald hematuria and is found to have a kidney cancer and his doctors we're going to cut out the kidney that's usual treatment in fact the usual treatment in America if you have a mass of the kidneys is kind of the kidney and thrown in a pocket that's the usual trip without a biopsy without even consideration of other treatments yeah that's what happened and well he had the urothelial cancer we arranged for a biopsy he did have a cancer and he wanted to come here he wanted to live his life with both kidneys and who could blame him he's a smoker and probably the smoking is related to the cause of this cancer most cancers don't have a cause but there is a relationship between smoking and kidney cancer it's a good reason to stop smoking if you're a smoker if you smoke into the air please stop Amanda came with a mass in the kidney he was scheduled for nephrectomy the doctor the surgeon already planned to remove his kidney to open up his body colors kidney and throw it in a bucket of that be the end of his kidney and that's how it came to me for planned affected me and someone a radio listener like you told him Hey you may want to see doctor later and I saw him a year ago we met he canceled the surgery he came with us had not invasive treatment just a few treatments pinpoint treatments to the kidney cancer and is now cancer free doing well in remission with no side effects allergy treatment fine perfectly well unlike with surgery with us he has his kidney the function of the kidney god gave him two kidneys why to have a back up into better kidney function and he has his kidneys he's got the back of his kidney function is fine and the only thing missing is is cancer what about the fifty nine year old email woman from Dominican Republic she's fifty nine inches marriages two sons who is diagnosed with lung cancer she had a mass in the left upper lobe was three point two centimeters casket was positive the pet scan was positive the MRI was positive this woman she had trauma there's another patient this week fell down or got hit head trauma goddess scans like Ruth better Ginsburg for amber she fell down in her apartment she had a cat scans his from the have the lung cancer the only difference between our patients and Ruth better Ginsburg is she whether that are long removed her part of her lung removed our patients are pretty smart pretty smart they didn't fall for that removing the long business this woman fifty nine years old from Dominican Republic married with two sons have drama at a scan founder of cancer and she remembered her friend told her about doctor leader met her biopsy was added NO carcinoma she never smoked and she said she didn't have any secondhand smoke and just because you didn't smoke doesn't mean you can't get lung cancer is a woman who got a lung cancer never smoked never was around smoke he lost twenty pounds I examined her her lungs were clear as of some others teaching point just because the lungs are clear doesn't mean you can't have a long cancer and this woman had clear longs which of the lung cancer and she came to us with a three centimeter mass of surgeons want a cut on her and she just did not want to have surgery she was smart may be smarter than someone else smarter than a lot of other else's because she came here for for a second opinion we treated her she was treated about three years ago three years ago we trigger for adenocarcinoma of the left upper lobe biopsy positive found after trauma and she's now in remission there is no cancer seen in her body she's fully functional or scans are fine physical exam is fine blood tester fine she's fine this is the work that we do every day for this woman and for everybody including that woman.

kidney cancer
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Kidney cancer there's a relationship between smoke and kidney cancer and she came to me I saw her she had this kidney mass and we talked about all the options I met with her examined her well kidneys out something one can feel doctor can't feel with the usual symptoms of kidney cancer could be bleeding it be pain or just a scam showing a mass so we offer biopsy because that doctor want to cut or kidney without even a biopsy just gonna cut out sort of the pocket well sometimes you see people with kidney masses of don't have cancer wow so she came here we biopsied her we found the cancer was easy painless biopsy and offered treatment and she had cancer of the kidney cancer the long should stage for kidney cancer number the surgeons wanted to cut on her even though she had stage four cancer that haven't talked to her about non invasive treatment whatsoever they didn't talk to her about the cancer already travel to long whatsoever here she had all the information up front and she chose our treatment and she chose our treatment because she just did not want to go through radical surgery she didn't want to lose the kid nation wanna lose half of the kidney function that god gave her and they didn't even prove that it was kidney cancer before they're going to cut out the kid the other doesn't even look to see if the cancer traveled what we did all those things we treated her and does she tell you one more thing so that is that we treated her two years ago two years ago treated for stage for kidney cancer in the kidney in the logs and now two years later with our treatment only no cable no immunotherapy nose surgery nothing else our pin point treatment she is cancer free there is no evidence of cancer clinically ready graphically there is no evidence.

Kidney cancer two years
Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

Science Magazine Podcast

11:57 min | 2 years ago

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

"Hello. This Welcomes the science podcast for may seventeenth two thousand nineteen. I'm Sarah Crespi this week show Meghan. Cantwell talks with science writer Saratova's about a nonstick chemical that sticks around in groundwater, and I talk with sham. Ota about his science translational medicine paper on using a smartphone. So listen for ear infections. I'm here with Sarah helps who wrote this week's feature to talk about how a small group of citizens in Rockford Michigan uncovered groundwater contamination in their town. And with the greater implications of this discovery are thinks much joining me. Sarah, thanks for having me, Meghan, of course. So could you talk about what prompted these citizens to investigate whether the shoe company factory in their town? Wolverine worldwide had contaminated their water in two thousand and nine wolverine worldwide announced that they would be closing their tannery, which had been inoperational for over a century. And the citizens were requesting the company I do a comprehensive environmental assessment of the property before the demolition. They knew from other tannery closures that Henry's often use hazardous substances when they're transforming rawhide. Hides into leather. And so they wanted to be sure that those same substances had not been sort of left behind on the tannery grounds. They were told that because there was no evidence of contamination on the property, that there was really essentially, no way require that testing be done. Meanwhile, will Verena had said there was no known contamination on the property. They asked the city to assess the site, but they did not want to instead they went and got the help of a scientist and launched their own investigation. What did they find from this, they uncovered helped uncover some of the highest levels of Pecos contamination in drinking water wells anywhere in the country and after many years of trying to get the company to test, the tannery grounds discovered that the tannery grounds are also contaminated with pitas, what exactly is p fasten? How long is this chemical been in production p bosses are a class of chemical? Nls known as per in Pali fluoro- alkyl substances. They were first synthesized by American chemists in the nineteen thirties and forties and their salient chemical feature is that they have a carbon fluorine bond, and that's among the strongest of all chemical bonds. It doesn't degrade naturally an environment that can be very useful for some products at lens durability. And also, these compounds can repel water and oil and stains, and so they're widely used in products, such as firefighting foams, nonstick, coatings, carpets, food, packaging, even dental floss some dental floss, it was discovered recently, there are over four thousand of these compounds. But the two most widely studied are called PF OA sometimes referred to as PICO and PFOS those two are no longer in production in the US. What are the impacts of these? Goes on human health were still looking into that. There was a massive epidemiological study called the seat health project, fat looked at people exposed in West Virginia and Ohio, they were exposed to fella, and their drinking water. And in that project what they found was a probable link to six conditions that included high cholesterol, all sort of colitis by ROY disease, stickler cancer, kidney, cancer, and pregnancy induced, hypertension initially, a lot of the Pecos research, focused on these communities, where there had been this high level of exposure, more recent studies, have started looking at the general population, and I think that that's where this gets really interesting because what they're starting to find is that studies are suggesting that even people exposed to what might be referred to his background levels of p fusses show, negative health effects, most interestingly and may be most concerning laid. Some of these negative effects are on the developing fetus babies. So researchers are saying that it can affect, for example, the immune system and these populations. Is there a standard level for what's considered a dangerous p fast level or is that something that's still also being determined? That is very much being determined and a believe it was two thousand and nine the EPA established a health advisory level of six hundred parts per trillion of PF. Oh. A and PFOS combined drinking water. And then in twenty sixteen. They dropped that level significantly to seventy parts per trillion and that in twenty eighteen a branch of the CDC came out with a new study suggesting Twenty-one parts per trillion for PF away and fourteen parts per trillion for PFOS, and then you have some researchers one at Harvard saying one part petroleum is where that level should be. So there's a lad of conversation around. What is a protective level in drinking water, this investigation in the small town has also prompted other areas to look into what their p Fasces levels are, and what has this unveiled one of the interesting consequences of the concerned, citizens work is that shortly after the state of Michigan launched what I believe is the most comprehensive statewide survey searching for pizzas, and they found is that here in Michigan. Nearly one point four million residents are drinking water from orces, contaminated with pitas. It's also showing up and things like foam, that's on our rivers. And so there have been a number of advisories. Do not eat befo. Don't touch the phone fish advisories, dear advisories. It's really extensive ubiquitous exposure to these compounds. And then other states also. Oh, are just starting to look, but nobody has looked quite as comprehensively as the state of Michigan has right. It interesting that all these investigations are being prompted but this also isn't the first time that p asses have been under investigation happened several decades ago as well. Right. Are you referring to the DuPont trial? Yeah. Sometime around nineteen ninety nine early two thousands a cattle farmer in West Virginia suspected that something was going on. Some of his farm land had been purchased by DuPont and not long after that his cattle died, and he wasn't able to get much help locally. And so he ended up going to a Cincinnati-based Turney who sued the company and in the process of that he was able to obtain a lot of internal documents from DuPont. And what he found in those documents was that both DuPont, and three who. Had been making pieces as well. Head Ben documenting negative health effects from exposure, experienced by humans and animals, and that they hadn't done enough to make this available to the PA, for example. And so the attorneys sent these documents to the EPA, and subsequently DuPont, was fined, and three m was fined believe a year later, was around that time that both companies agreed to voluntarily phase out PF away and PFOS. So when they phased them out, they replace them with a different chemical is this one actually safer persists lessen the environment. Well, that is a matter of conversation. They replaced PF away and PFOS those two compounds are known as long chain pieces. They replace them with shorter chain passes. So molecules with fewer carbons and. What we do know is that those carbons don't bio accumulate the same way as the longer chain compounds. And for that reason, there's an assumption out there that these are safer, but there are studies, just starting this is just starting to be studied suggesting that this might not be the case and the national toxicology program. For example, is in the process of starting study of believe it's one hundred twenty five of these lesser known. Short chain compounds to see if they really are safer than the longer chain compounds after this, this fine that they received were their cleanup efforts, or is there, a way to clean up these P asses from water supplies. What we know is that you can use something called granular activated carbon to filter out in particular longer chain passes, so PF away, and PFOS from drinking water, however. That approach. It has variable success with the shorter chain passes which can sometimes break through the filter and they can break through more quickly. So one of the things that water systems are starting to look at is using perhaps a combination of granular activated. Carbon with reverse osmosis, which is a little bit more effective at filtering out short chain passes. All of this though is very expensive. And so that has really put especially some of these smaller municipalities in a tough spot, and others Superfund cleanup sites that kind of thing is there any sort of fund that these local communities can tap into that ole pay for this remediation, one of the things is that because pizza's is not as needed as a hazardous substance. It doesn't qualify as far as I know for cleanup funds through Superfund now, some states are starting to pass their own legislation. In New York, for example, does designate FOSS as a hazardous substance so you can get funding through there. And then the other thing that states are starting to do is actually sue the manufacturers to try and recuperate some of the costs of updating their drinking water systems. Would you say this whole investigation all across the country is still kind of the first step of finding where these sites are? And then the next step of cleanup is still a little bit murkier. Yes. That's very true. Historically are understanding of pizzas and exposure has really been concentrated in these areas around particular very few limited number of military, bases, and also communities that are near manufacturing facilities, and what we're starting to find now is, especially as we have the tools to detect passes at lower levels were finding that these are in drinking water supplies and places, people would never have suspected. But not everybody is looking. And so that's one of the things that I think different states, and different municipalities will be grappling with for years to come. Thank you so much. Sarah. Yes, thank you. Sarah helps is a freelance, writer and senior editor at undock. You can find a link to her story at signs MAG dot org slash podcasts. Stay tuned for an interview with Shaam Gula KOTA on using phones to listen to erections.

Sarah Crespi Dupont Pfos Michigan EPA West Virginia Writer The Shoe Company Meghan Verena Cantwell Rockford Michigan Wolverine Saratova United States Shaam Gula Kota CDC Henry
"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"<Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Getting. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Even suggestions <Speech_Telephony_Female> on who to <Speech_Telephony_Female> see <Speech_Telephony_Female> <hes> I know when <Speech_Telephony_Female> I log into <Speech_Telephony_Female> those sites and <Speech_Telephony_Female> and initially <Speech_Telephony_Female> that person <Speech_Telephony_Female> was me that <Speech_Telephony_Female> was looking for answers. <Speech_Telephony_Female> But <Speech_Telephony_Female> lots of people <Speech_Telephony_Female> contact <Speech_Telephony_Female> those <SpeakerChange> sites <Speech_Telephony_Female> looking for <Speech_Telephony_Female> specialist near <Speech_Telephony_Female> them <Speech_Telephony_Female> or for a <Speech_Telephony_Female> recommendation on <Speech_Telephony_Female> on somebody <Speech_Telephony_Female> to see to get <Speech_Telephony_Female> a second opinion <Speech_Telephony_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Female> I have learned <Speech_Telephony_Female> all about <Speech_Telephony_Female> these places <Speech_Telephony_Female> all over <Speech_Telephony_Female> the country and <Speech_Telephony_Female> and even Great <Speech_Telephony_Female> Britain and and <Speech_Telephony_Female> such that <Speech_Telephony_Female> have become <Speech_Telephony_Female> <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Female> places to <Speech_Telephony_Female> go to if <Speech_Telephony_Female> you suffer from <Speech_Telephony_Female> Renal Cell <Speech_Telephony_Female> Carcinoma. <Speech_Telephony_Female> And I'm <Speech_Telephony_Female> very thankful to <Speech_Telephony_Male> learn that <SpeakerChange> information <Speech_Telephony_Male> that <Speech_Telephony_Male> is so good <Speech_Telephony_Male> and and ladies. <Speech_Telephony_Male> We have <Speech_Telephony_Male> almost completely <Speech_Telephony_Male> run <Speech_Telephony_Male> out of time. Each <Speech_Telephony_Male> one of you <Speech_Telephony_Male> has about forty <Speech_Telephony_Male> five seconds <Speech_Telephony_Male> to summarize <Speech_Telephony_Male> <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Male> something you would like to <Speech_Telephony_Male> share with our <Speech_Telephony_Male> audience. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Chris. I'M GONNA. <Silence> Let you speak <SpeakerChange> first. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> I <Speech_Telephony_Female> promised my kids <Silence> and my family. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> that. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I'm I'm <Speech_Telephony_Female> not going to die from <Speech_Telephony_Female> cancer. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Something else <Speech_Telephony_Female> might catch me, but <Speech_Telephony_Female> it's not gonNA. Be Cancer. <Speech_Telephony_Female> So. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I. Say <Speech_Telephony_Female> go out. Find <Speech_Telephony_Female> you specialist, <Speech_Telephony_Female> listen <Speech_Telephony_Female> to their advice, <Silence> follow it <Speech_Telephony_Female> and. <Speech_Telephony_Female> And fight <Silence> don't <SpeakerChange> give up. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Great. Well said <Speech_Telephony_Male> Chris Thank <Speech_Telephony_Male> you for being with us <Silence> and. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Well, I would do <Speech_Telephony_Female> everything that Chris. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Aside, <Speech_Telephony_Female> It's like someone <Speech_Telephony_Female> asked me one time. <Speech_Telephony_Female> They asked me what my <Speech_Telephony_Female> job about <Speech_Telephony_Female> my job and <Speech_Telephony_Female> I told him my job <Speech_Telephony_Female> now to take care <Silence> of myself. <Speech_Telephony_Female> and. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I, think that's true <Speech_Telephony_Female> for all the patients <Speech_Telephony_Female> you've got to really <Speech_Telephony_Female> really really be out <Speech_Telephony_Female> there and be your own <Speech_Telephony_Female> advocate <Speech_Telephony_Female> and I. Think <Speech_Telephony_Female> one of the <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Female> on the smart <Speech_Telephony_Female> patient side wall <Speech_Telephony_Female> back. Somebody asked <Speech_Telephony_Female> about theme <Speech_Telephony_Female> songs <Speech_Telephony_Female> and mine <Speech_Telephony_Female> by re. Rare <Speech_Telephony_Female> Earth and says, I just <Speech_Telephony_Female> want to celebrate <Speech_Telephony_Female> another day living. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I just want to <Speech_Telephony_Female> celebrate another day <Silence> of life. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> That <Speech_Telephony_Male> is so thank <Speech_Telephony_Male> you both for being <Speech_Telephony_Male> with us. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Robyn, <SpeakerChange> final <Silence> thoughts. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <hes> for <Speech_Telephony_Male> anyone who needs <Speech_Telephony_Male> to know where <Speech_Telephony_Male> to find a specialist <Speech_Telephony_Male> or how to advocate <Speech_Telephony_Male> for themselves. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Please do <Speech_Telephony_Male> join smart <Speech_Telephony_Male> patients, dot. <Speech_Telephony_Male> COM, we're here <Silence> for you. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Thank <SpeakerChange> you, <Silence> Joyce. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Thank you what a wonderful <Speech_Telephony_Female> conversation. <Speech_Telephony_Female> This has been great <Speech_Telephony_Female> to <Speech_Telephony_Female> talk with these brave <Speech_Telephony_Female> ladies and I <Speech_Telephony_Female> do hope that you'll continue <Speech_Telephony_Female> to <Speech_Telephony_Female> coach others <Speech_Telephony_Female> because as Chris <Speech_Telephony_Female> Ed, not <Speech_Telephony_Female> everybody knows how <Speech_Telephony_Female> to ask the right questions <Speech_Telephony_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> we need to help <Speech_Telephony_Female> each other <Speech_Telephony_Female> to get to that <Speech_Telephony_Female> spot. <Speech_Telephony_Female> And it's worth <Speech_Telephony_Female> the investment <Speech_Telephony_Female> to go <Speech_Telephony_Female> and talk <Speech_Telephony_Female> with a specialist <Speech_Telephony_Female> and <SpeakerChange> make sure <Silence> you're on the right track. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And we'd like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to find Jimmy one <Speech_Music_Male> to be. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Powerful patient. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Join US again. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Test. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> People.

Chris Britain US Jimmy
"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Gov, and look for trouble kidney cancer, just to find out WHO's working on it. But for example, I'm an advocate with kidney program here at Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Center, which is one of the leading institutions in the country for. Kidney Cancer. And, one of the things we learned is that. Regular old fashioned chemotherapy really just doesn't work with kidney cancer and we're and yet we're still hearing about people who are being put on standard chemotherapy treatments like you would for breast cancer or things, it does work for other conditions, but it just doesn't work for kidney cancer, but there are a whole bunch of new drugs that have come out in the last ten years. There's a lot of action in this area and that that's a really compelling reason for talking to one of the top experts. So like Dan, George who are up on the new drugs where to find them how to get access to to clinical trials and to help you make smart decisions about your own particular situation. Like you mentioned, you're young. You're healthy I all to has very good track record for. really good enduring a healing, but not everybody can tolerate the treatment, and so you need somebody to help you decide. Are you a good candidate or not a good candidate? Having expert guidance makes such a difference. Made such a difference in the lives of Chris and the AM and that's one of the things that we tell people. You don't necessarily have to have all your treatment for away from home, but you do want to have a specialist. No matter how far you have to go. And we may point out that this is not only true with kidney cancer. It's something that people with any type of cancer sewage seriously consider because. UNLESS, you're dealing with one of the more prevalent ones such as breast or maybe Coa rectal. these other cancers have all kinds of developments that may be the local oncologist is not familiar with. I'm fearful for the patient though that is. will not speak up for themselves. You know right and they take everything the doctor saying. Chris are outspoken enough. I? Think that you know we're going to go out and get the best that we can, and it's that other patients that no doesn't know to ask. Questions to ask because you know they're in shock. You're absolutely right and I think that's one of the particular values of the inspire side and the smart patients site just talking or even just listening in as other people talk about kidney cancer and find out what are they hearing from their doctors for what kinds of other options are there that I'm not hearing from Dr?.

kidney cancer Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Cen Chris Dan George
How to Get Out of Depression and Lessons I Learnt on This Dark Journey

The Chalene Show

02:43 min | 2 years ago

How to Get Out of Depression and Lessons I Learnt on This Dark Journey

"I was hit by car. I had cancer and all in one year. And then the person I was in a relationship with left, and it was like really a good person that happened. My crash February twenty first. They found kidney cancer. I had my surgery in March by June. I was offered the show. I was told hey, you up for this. And I was like, okay. And I thought hey, I'm gonna go through the motions. And see what happens. I think because I was headed into a business with someone. I think I had the crash to discover the kidney cancer the person left. I let go of a lot. So the doors could be opened for this TV show because I know I have a greater purpose on this planet. Yes, it is to help people and inspire kids because I want to be that role model for kids that I didn't have what I hear from this. It's just like everything you're like. Oh, yeah. Car accident cancer pirates. Just the chaos, and the craziness of all it all seems like you're so grateful for it. All there's always a silver lining. You just never know. And when you're in it like I'm witnessing someone right now. Go through something very difficult. And I always say this. The crew it's easy to do a good job when everything's going. Great. It's how we show up when it isn't. That's what defines our character. How are you going to show up when it's all falling apart who were you in this game of life who are you in this situation? Tune into that song that inspires you. Because really music was very big is a very big part of my life. And when I feel like I don't have the energy or I'm feeling like I'm getting a lot of pushback, I'll play a song that really gives me that drive. So I changed the station in my head. I hit my knees, and I asked for help, and then I do the next right thing. And I follow my gut feeling. Does this feel right? Does this feel wrong? If feels wrong, I'm not doing it. And if you don't really know how you feel then don't make a decision you wait for that feeling. You wait for the answer. If you are in a situation where you're not happy, and you feel like you're losing yourself, and your soul is little dim leave because there are people out there like. Me like you that want to help other people here just on the wrong boat. Change your vote, right? And learn to navigate people always say you made it in a male dominated world. How did I do that? Here's how I did it. I learned my skill. I learned how to be a yacht kept. I learned navigation. I learned how to drive a boat. John Flynn taught me I learned to ability where I'm very confident in what I do that.

Kidney Cancer Cancer John Flynn One Year
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"He single without children is high blood pressure and cholesterol, and he had blood in the urine. So we talk about it. A lot blood is a warning sign. He had blood in the urine. He was seen by his doctors. Dr set up to a urologist is a surgeon who specializes in the urinary system, he had a cat scan. And he had cystitis Coppee. So they did everything proper. And then they found the mass and the kidney, and it was thought to be a kidney cancer and the surgeon wanted to remove the kidney. And the patient doesn't want his kidney removed is hundred ninety eight pounds same as two years ago. As weight is stabilize identify for ten. He's not a smoker. He's never been around smokers. And that's important because smoking is offered to the cause of kidney cancer. So I want him and his example is normally as most probable kidney cancer because the scan so solid mass. His sergent wanted just to cut out the kidney. He came here for a second opinion. And we talked about all the options. He said, well, I said the surgeon can cut out if he wants if you want that. But we try to be more logical. Here we tried to get biopsies, and we offer get biopsies of the kidney. Mass to prove I often see people probably ten percent of the people who have kidney masses are not cancerous. And I just saw another man this week who had his kidney removed at one of the big hospitals for not cancer. And he's really upset that he lost his kidney for no reason. Well, that's.

kidney cancer hundred ninety eight pounds ten percent two years
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"That information and dvd's i won't talk about the gentleman we're talking about kidney cancer we just had a caller talking about kidney cancer so let me tell you about a man this van just came to me a couple of days ago it came with his wife is sixty two years old is married with three children it came with his for evaluation of metastatic kidney cancer so in two thousand ten he had blood in the urine and you'll see a recurring theme had blood in the urine is found to have kidney cancer and he underwent surgery for removal their head radical surgery and and then of course he was told dr got all the cats are out of course he was told that but five years later the cancer spread to his lung and they cut up part of his lung and then the next year the cutout another part of the long on the opposite side and then they cut out another part of the long ball talk about that in a minute and now he's got another najrah so remember he's had the kidney surgery he said the lung surgery with three areas of his lung cut out and now has a new najah jordan along and he's got numbness in the chest he got numbness in the right chest from opening up his right long he's got numbness in the left chest from the left chest and he's got pain in the right chest from opening up of course you got the picture pain numbness and he's losing weight he's gone from one sixty five to one thirty five is five foot nine he thinks he needs knee surgery he smoked as a teenager i examined him and over always pretty good shape he said this lung surgery and now he's got a new long mass so him i got his records i reviewed his records and what's interesting well there's a few thing that's interesting number one is which is he told me the surgery on his kidney to remove the that he had surgery on the right long term of the right lung cancer and had surgery on the left longterm of the left lung cancer but he never told me about the third surgery for the long he never told me about it and i was reviewing the documents and said why did a second there was another surgery in another part of your lung and they cut out a knowledgeable they cut up part of your lung and there was no cancer at the no that i said oh yeah i forgot that well he may forget about it but his body doesn't forget about it god gave us this body and lungs to breathe we need oxygen and water on what her lungs four will longs are to allow oxygen to enter our body and a psycho say our gen factory well our oxygen engineer fear god gave you a six cylinder engine and you're down now to three seven years well it's hard to be the same engine that you were when you had six cylinders well he was sitting there and his wife was sitting there and his wife is telling me that she loved surgery that she thinks surgeries the best and he was sitting there telling me he hates surgeries never going to have surgery again so here we have a husband and wife who obviously love each other they care about each other but the husband has this cancer and he's gone through kidney surgeries had three options on the lung one of which wasn't even for cancer they just removed part of the long they thought it was cancelled i didn't think about doing a biopsy but what are biopsies for biopsies to tell you something before you take action while they didn't do that by up see the long that is cut up part of the long lost three parts of the long and the kidney and i just got a new nod joel and he wants to know what is options are in the surgeon wants to remove that fourth part of the lung and his wife wants him to do it and she says she hey hates radiation hates radio surgery and love surgery so what did i say well i said number one sometimes people come here thinking that radiation or radio surgery is the enemy and our after a while they learn that it might be their best friend i had a very good friend who once told me that love and hate are very close together on the spectrum sometimes loving and hating our very close well think about the person who has breast cancer maybe they hate radiation radio surgery but if we can give them health and take away the cancer without removing the breast they might think that our treatment radio surgery is the best and.

kidney cancer three seven years sixty two years five years five foot
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"For kidney stones a kidney cancer by that time when it was first diagnosed he had cancer from the kidney that traveled to the lungs the doctors at this super duper fractured it's the same super duper place in new york city cut out his kidney even though the cancer had already traveled stage for and then he started on drug studies been on drug studies for three years it's not helping him the cancers growing he has cancer and the ribs he's had radiation to the rip standard radiation he said another third drug study with no response and now another drug study well what's a drug study for kidney cancer well number one most chemo's don't work for kidney cancer number one number two he can take drug study after drug study drug study means that the drug company in the hospital or analyzing a drug for their benefit they're profiting from this patient who still paying for drug that's most likely not gonna work clinical trials for cancer patients have an overall success rate of about six percent and that's just a temporary success oh more than ninety ninety four percent of people don't benefit at all the drug companies benefit and the drug companies use your pay the hospitals and the doctors tens of thousands of dollars the patients don't see that money the patients are giving their body kind of the science but they're still paying for the care seems a little ludicrous doug company so this man has come to us with terrible pain kidney cancer had his kidney removed they remove part of the long they ready it gave standard radiation to the chest wall the ribs and now the cancers growing right back in the same area yeah there's cancer the opposite kidney and in the long and the liver and the pleura and this is what we have a man sixty one years old gave up his practice of psychoanalysis to take care of himself with stage four cancer and getting treatment that's not helping him compared to here registered in.

kidney cancer new york cancer ninety ninety four percent sixty one years six percent three years
"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Of kidney cancer and in this man we could have treated him with eyes excess red and kept his kidney intact instead he went elsewhere went to a hospital in the tristate area and they did was called morsels atias like turning the kidney or part of the body to hamburger in fact the gizmos written up at almost all the newspapers seems to have caused death of people whose cancer gets spread in the blood stream has been used in got a collage cancers and got a clutch by brides mainly uh there was one woman doctor who had a more slater treatment on her fibro roads in our uterus and at fiber would contain cancer and that cancer most probably because the morris later spread and now she has metastatic stage for cancer well that gives him o was written up at most of this papers and many many hospitals with drove it from used because it as a grinds up something akin spread into the bloodstream will this fan guess what he adam as kidney after he saw me he uh is a daughter whose outspoken and his daughter said he has to have knee surgeries got cancers is cut it out at forget about a and the surgeon did more association they took that gives mon turned it into a hamburger and while just when we thought the world was safe he's lost his kidney he lost the function and it's very possible that machine could have spread the cancer elsewhere in his body so the good thing about this man is he came in he learned about all the options he came to me afterwards because he's not doing very wachter surgeries got half his kidney function he's got hip pain is not doing very well so came to me to see what i thought of that i said i was really shocked that someone who had a chance of avoiding removal the kidney would instead get the kidney removed and then get removed with a gives.

kidney cancer cancer morris adam
"kidney cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And kidney cancer and uses his experience as an example i had six million dollars of care now looking back at it sciences tell me that ninety percent of everything we ever did to me was destined to be wrong medicine is often a matter of trial and error so that's not so unusual that dishman also have the dna in his tumor decyphered and that give scientists yet one more clue about what to do and led to an effective treatment though even that process wasn't entirely scientific i'm nervous about sharing the story because it is both hopeful but i also know there was a lot of science but also a lot of luck that this worked for me dishman regards his story is a lesson about what could be we are in the early days of precision medicine and this is exactly why we need to accelerate the science and the discovery so there's an evidencebased for the decisions and choices that we're making for using individual as well as the general population among those skeptical about the big talk in big investment behind precision medicine is can weiss who recently retired from his post as a genetics professor at penn state i think there will be some progress but i also think there this is as much of a slogan to get funding as it is a serious promise gathering huge data sets may be useful for merchants trying to suss out you're spending patterns that he cautions that in biology it may lead to more confusion rather than clarity that's because many health conditions and fall hundreds of genes and the pattern is different in every individual as it is the more scientists look the more variance they find so think about what that will look like when they have gathered a million samples and bigger and bigger samples will just identify more and more very rare or very weak effects when the human genome was sequenced many scientists hope they would quickly be able to identify the common genes that are responsible for common diseases like diabetes heart disease high blood pressure and so on that simply didn't pan out there were no such variance why says it's time to cut our losses pursuing that concept i think we're already at the diminishing returns point for many of the complex traits that are important to our society in terms of health the solutions to those common conditions law largely in changing diets exercise habits.

kidney cancer professor penn state human genome blood pressure weiss six million dollars ninety percent
"kidney cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"kidney cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And kidney cancer sir and uses his experience as an example i have six million dollars of care now looking back at it sciences tell me that ninety percent of everything we ever did to me was destined to be wrong medicine is often a matter of trial and error so that's not so unusual but dishman also have the dna in his tumor decyphered and that give scientists yet one more clue about what to do and led to an effective treatment though even that process wasn't entirely scientific i'm nervous about sharing the story because it is both hopeful but i also know that was a lot of science but also a lot of luck that this worked for me dishman regards his story is a lesson about what could be we are in the early days of precision medicine and this is exactly why we need to accelerate the science and the discovery so there's an evidencebased for the decisions and choices that were making for using individual as well as the general popular asian among those skeptical about the big talk in big investment behind precision medicine is can weiss who recently retired from his post as a genetics professor at penn state i think there will be some progress but i also think this is as much of a slogan to get funding as it is a serious promise gathering huge data sets may be useful for merchants trying to suss out you're spending patterns but he cautions that in biology it may lead to more confusion rather than clarity that's because many health conditions and fall hundreds of genes and the pattern is different in every individual as it is the more scientists look the more variance they find so think about what that will look like when they have gathered a million samples and bigger and bigger samples will just identify more and more very rare or very weak effects on the human genome was sequenced many scientists hope they would quickly be able to identify the common genes that are responsible for common diseases like diabetes heart disease high blood pressure and so on that simply didn't pan out there were no such variance why says it's time to cut our losses pursuing that concept i think we're already at the diminishing returns point for many of the complex traits that are important to our society in terms of health the solutions to those common conditions law largely in changing diets exercise habits.

dishman professor penn state human genome blood pressure kidney cancer weiss six million dollars ninety percent