17 Burst results for "katie barlow"

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:56 min | Last month

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with katie barlow. Welcome to words matter. i'm katie. Barlow our goal is to promote objective reality as a wise man once said everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not their own facts. Words have power.

katie barlow katie
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

05:43 min | 4 months ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Love this podcast. Support this show through the cast supporter feature. It's up to you how much you give. And there's no regular commitment. Just click the link in the show description to support now. Welcome to words matter with katie barlow. Welcome to words matter. i'm katie. Barlow our goal is to promote objective reality as a wise man said everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not their own facts. Words have power and words have consequences. Our guest today is a best selling author. A documentary filmmaker a television producer. An nbc news political analyst columnist and co host of sirius. Xm's alter family politics. Jonathan alters books on presidents franklin roosevelt and barack obama the defining moment. fdr's hundred days and the triumph of hope and the promise. President obama year one detailed to chief executives who took office during times of extraordinary crisis. His most recent book is his very best. Jimmy carter a life. Jonathan alter welcome towards matter. Thanks katie how are you. I'm good. I'm excited to talk to you. I am native georgian I want to dig into the jimmy carter book but given where we are in this moment in the history of presidential politics. I want to start with your books on. Fdr and president obama i and their transitions into the white house at critical moments in history. There's a belief in washington and among those who watched the presidency the so called lame duck period that we're in the time between the presidential election in the inauguration was shortened from the seventeen weeks between the november election and march fourth to eleven weeks between election day and january twentieth because of the disastrous transition between. Herbert hoover and fdr is that true. No no it was actually In the period just before that in the early nineteen thirties but before nineteen thirty..

katie barlow katie jimmy carter Jonathan Barlow franklin roosevelt fdr Xm obama nbc President obama white house washington Herbert hoover
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

03:41 min | 6 months ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Love this podcast. Support this show through the cast supporter feature. It's up to you how much you give and there's no regular commitment. Just click the link in the show description to support now. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. welcomed. Two words matter. Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality as a wise man once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion not their own facts words have power and words have consequences. Our.

Katie Barlow Joe Lockhart.
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with Katie. Barlow and Joe Lockhart welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality as a wise man once said everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not Their own facts. Words have power and words have consequences. Welcome to a special edition of words matter the contenders. Welcome to the contenders. I'm.

Katie Barlow Joe Lockhart
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart welcome to a special edition of the words Matter Library Joe every week we put speeches books explain what you decided to talk about well the moth is a great organization Thad when I did it I don't know how big a platform they habit over the years they really have built up now they have a very strong following but it's very simple they are dedicated to reviving the art of storytelling. So what do is they'll go into a city and decide what a theme is the day you found out what your professional calling was and people tell very compelling often emotional often deeply personal at times wickedly funny stories about something their wife that fits that theme the only rule is the have to be brief the stories are generally ten minutes or so and you can't use notes so have to go up and tell the story like you were telling a story at the kitchen table with your family or out at a bar with your buddies and so that's that's what the moth is I did Performance is the Lincoln Theatre in Washington DC wanted the New York Public Library here in New York City they range from p people who you know identified public figures people in the entertainment industry to people you would never know in your wife that just have a compelling story ready to tell I knew nothing about this as I went into it and learn to love what their mission is of all the stories and all the things you've done in your life and career explain how you picked the subject of your moth presentation the theme of it was tell us about a day where your wife changed or an experience where your wife changed and I didn't know anything about this so I got out there and they were you know d- to very professional and relaxed women who run them all off and I said okay how do I do this and I figured I'd be in the room for about five minutes telling them a story and they'd say okay that's great so they said okay we'll tell us the story I told the story about getting the job as the White House press secretary what the process was and they said that's interesting tells another story and I told him a story about about how the impeachment process was working and how my piece fit in and they're like that's that's that's okay tell us another story and I and I told the story about impeachment day you know what actually happened on that day and they looked at each other and offer minute and they came back and said Okay we want you to tell all three stories and you have ten minutes to tell it and they sat with me and worked with me for five hours on how do you tell that story it was the incredible experience to watch them say you don't need that you don't need that and to help me tell the story in a way that was way more compelling than I would on myself so that's how it came about I still had no idea they said it's in front of a live audience and I just thought when I did these political panel between people in the room they'd listened but they didn't care that much I won't walk into this room and it's five hundred people it's packed and it's standing-room-only and I'm sure that it's not to hear my story and I quickly found out that it was a program of six story towers five of them were either professional actors or professional India's and I just thought what have I gotten myself into I'm not a actor I'm not a comedian I'm not I don't I don't sing I don't dance I don't do fifty White House briefings nothing compared to the nervousness of getting up in front of this crowd and and and telling the story but I got up and I told the story and the Audience his speech by saying who put this program together this guy's telling stories about fucking Air Force One how am I going to compete with that and I thought okay my story was okay so this week in honor of impeachment we're going to put Joe Lockhart performance from them off into the words matter library Please Welcome Joe Lockhart.

Joe Lockhart Katie Barlow Thad ten minutes five minutes five hours
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with katie barlow and joe lockhart last week we lost one of the most influential and celebrated novelists in american literary history tony morrison a novelist essayist. They ask 'em princeton. Professor morrison wrote nine major novels all of which earned extensive critical acclaim as oprah winfrey said after her passing last week she was a magician with language who understood the power of words she used them to royal us to wake us us to educate us and help us grapple with our deepest wounds and try to comprehend them a woman who certainly understood that words matter among dozens of other awards and achievements she won both a pulitzer prize and american book award in nineteen eighty eight for her novel beloved and in nineteen ninety-three tony morrison became the first black woman of any nationality to win a nobel prize the citation for her award in literature declared declared morrison to be an author who in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import gives life to an essential aspect of american can reality in two thousand twelve tony morrison was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by president barack obama and during her commencement address at rutgers university in two thousand eleven tony morrison encouraged graduates to seek a meaningful life something she herself had certainly achieved so so this week we give american treasure toni morrison the final word i have often wish that jefferson had had not used that phrase the pursuit of happiness as the third right although although i understand and the first draft was life liberty and the pursuit of property of course i would have been one of those properties one had the right to pursue so i suppose happiness is is an epochal improvement over a life devoted to the acquisition of land acquisition -sition of resources acquisition of slaves still i would rather he had written life liberty and the pursuit of meaningfulness or integrity or truth. I know that happiness has been the real if covert goal of your labors here i know that it informs your choice of companions the profession you will enter but i urge you. Please don't settle for happiness. It's that's not good enough. Of course you deserve it but at that's all you have in mind happiness. I want to suggest to you that personal success devoid of meaningfulness free three of a steady commitment to social justice. That's more than a baron life. It's a trivial one.

Professor morrison toni morrison oprah winfrey american literary history barack obama pulitzer prize nobel prize katie barlow joe lockhart princeton rutgers university president jefferson
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with katie barlow enchilada when in the course of human events it becomes necessary but one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected him with another it was with those words written by thirty three year old thomas jefferson in the spring of seventeen seventy six the american experiment began the declaration of independence set forth america's mission statement like all mission statements the words represented not what we were but what we aspired to be in fact be author himself while a gifted writer with a deeply flawed human being who like his country did not in body de ideas an ideal of that documents for more than two hundred and forty years the story of america has been the struggle between those who want to move us closer to the words of are mission statement and those want to stop them is often forgotten but the declaration itself was intended to be spoken in two thousand four the john f kennedy presidential library released a previously unknown nineteen fifty seven recordings then senator kennedy leading the declaration of independence in new york on july fourth so this week to honor independence day in remind ourselves that as a country we must continue the struggle to turn america's founding words into reality we give john f kennedy leading the declaration of independence the final word when in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another new assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal station which the laws of nature and nature's god entitle them eight decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare player the causes which impel them to the separation we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights but among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these am it is the right of the people do all that or to abolish it andrew institute new government laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form as to them shell seem most likely to affect their safety and happiness proven cindy will dictate the government's long established should not be changed changed polite and transit courses and accordingly all experience has shown that mankind more disposed to suffer while evils of suffer both then to write themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed atlantic long train of abuses and usurpation pursuing invariably the same object vince is designed to reduce them on the absolute despotism it is they're right it is their duty the throw off such government andrew provide new god's their future security such has been the patients suffering some of these colonies in such is now the necessity which constrains them to all their former systems of government the history of the president's king of great britain is a history of repeated injuries in usurpation all having indirect the object establishment of absolute terror any over these states to prove this let facts be submitted to a candid world he has refused his center laws the most wholesome unnecessary sorry for the public good he has forbidding his governors to pass laws of immediate impressing important unless suspended in their operation deal here's a sample should be obtain an win so suspended he has only neglected to attend to them he has refused to pass other laws where they accommodation of large districts of people unless those people would relinquish they're writer representation in the legislature hey right in estimable to them and formidable to tyrants only he has called together legislative body the places unusual uncomfortable an distance from the depository of that public reckon but the sole purpose of putting them into compliance with these measures he has dissolved representative house's repeatedly proposing manley fairness this is invasion john the rights of the people he has refused a prolonged time after such disillusioned because others to be elected whereby the legislative power incapable capable of annihilation have returned to the people at large for their exercise the state remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without an convulsions with them he has endeavoured to prevent the population of these states for that purpose obstructing the laws but naturalization of foreigners refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hitter and raising the conditions of new appropriation of lamb has obstructed the administration of justice by refusing his assent the laws for establishing judiciary powers he has made judges dependent on his will alone with a ten year of their offices on the mound and payment of their salaries you had a wreck there they multitude of new offices insent hit us swarms of officers to harass off people eat out there substance yes kept among us in times of peace standing armies without the consent of all legislatures he has affected to render the military independent dog and superior to the civil power he has combined with others to subject us jurisdiction foreign do are constitution unacknowledged by outlaws giving his assent to their access pretended legislation requiring large bodies abomb troops among us for protecting them by a mock trial from punishment bernie murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these states for cutting off on trade with all parts of the world part imposing taxes on us without consent for depriving driving us in many cases of the benefits of trial by jury for transporting us fiancee's to be tried for pretended offenses for abolishing the free system of english laws in neighboring province establishing their in an arbitrary governments an enlarging foundries joys to render it at once and example and fit instrument or introducing the same absolute rules into these colonies but taking away a charge abolishing are most valuable laws and altering fundamentally the forms about government forces spending our own legislatures yours in declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever he has abdicated government here by declaring us out of his protection should end waging war against us he has pundit are sees ravage dot coast bird towns undestroyed alive is of all people years at this time transporting la john major foreign mercenaries to complete the work of death desolation and tyranny already gone with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy ghastly power allowed in the most bobbers ages and totally unworthy the head of civilized nation yes constrained our fellow citizens taken captive on the high seas to bear arms against their country will be calmly executioners of their friends and brother in the fall themselves by their hands you has excited domestic insurrections among us in has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers who's known rule of warfare is in in distinguished destruction of all ages sexes end conditions in every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redrafted in the most humble terms are repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury yuri eight prince who's character is best mocked by every act which may define a tyrant is unfair to be the ruler of a free people nor have we been warning intentions to a british rather and we have worn them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend unwired about jurisdiction over us we have reminded them of the circumstances of are immigration in settlement here we have appealed to the native justice and magnanimity and we have conjured them by the ties about common kindred to disavow these usurpation which would inevitably interrupt connections and correspondent spawning they too have been death to the voice of justice and a con sanguine a day we must therefore acquiesced in the necessity which denounces are separation and hold damage we hold the rest of mankind time enemies in war in peace friends we therefore the representatives of the united states of america in general congress assembled appealing to the supreme judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions do and the name and by authority of the good people of these colonies solemnly publishing declare that these united colonies i end of a ride ought to be free and independent states if they are absolved from all allegiance to the british crown ended all politicos connection between them and the state of great britain is in order to be totally dissolved an that as free and independent states they have full power delivery war conclude piece contract alliances establish commerce enter do all other accidents things which independent states may of rice do end for the support of this declaration where they firm reliance on the protection of divine providence.

katie barlow thirty three year forty years ten year
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. And now katie's final words. Seventy five years ago this week on June sixth nineteen forty four soldiers sailors, airmen of the allied expeditionary force undertook the largest amphibious invasion in military history. More than hundred and fifty thousand US, British and Canadian troops landed on the heavily fortified beaches of Normandy, to liberate, France and the continent. From four years of brutal Nazi occupation as the operation began armed forces radio broadcast a message to the troops from the supreme allied commander and future. President general Dwight D Eisenhower generalizing how're knew that many under his command would not survive the landing, and more than four thousand people were lost that day. But as he sent his troops into battle general, Eisenhower expressed confidence in their courage, and told them that the righteousness of their great and noble cause would eventually lead to victory over the forces of fascism, tyranny and approach. Shen so to commemorate, the seventy fifth anniversary of d day, we give supreme allied commander, general Dwight D Eisenhower the final word. And when general Eisenhower says that the freemen of the world are marching together toward victory. He didn't include the one woman who landed at Normandy, on d day, Martha gal horn who stowed away in a bathroom to be able to land with the troops and cover it as a journalist. How your sailors airman of the allied expeditionary force. You are about to embark upon the great crusade toward, which we have striven these many months, the eyes of the world upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty loving, people everywhere March with you in company with our brave allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe and security for ourselves in a free world, your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely. But this is the year nineteen forty four much has happened since the Nazi triumph of nineteen forty forty one, the United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans, great defeats in open battle man-to-man. Our air offensive has. Seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground are homefront, have given us, an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war and place that are disposal great reserves of trained fighting men, the tight turn the Freeman of the world are much together to victory. I have confidence in your courage devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory. Good luck and let us all be the blessing of all mighty gods. Upon this. Great and noble undertaking. Thank you for listening to words matter. For more information on our show and hosts visit words matter media dot com. Please rate and review words matter on apple podcasts and other podcast providers.

Dwight D Eisenhower allied expeditionary force supreme allied commander Normandy Katie Barlow Joe Lockhart US Europe United Nations France apple Shen President Seventy five years seventy fifth four years
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality. As a wise, man, once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, not their own facts. Words have power and words have consequences. Joe and I are thrilled to welcome. Our next guest and milgram began her career as an assistant district attorney in the legendary Manhattan District attorney's office in two thousand one she went to work in the criminal section of the United States, Department of Justice's civil rights division where she rose to become the lead federal prosecutor in the nation for human trafficking crimes during her time at DOJ an was awarded the department of Justice special commendation for outstanding service and the director's award from two thousand seven to two thousand ten and served as the fifty seventh attorney general of New Jersey and she currently serves as a law professor and distinguished scholar in residence at New York University school of law, and is the co host of the cafe insider podcast with people are and milgram, welcome to words matter. Thank you for having me, and thanks so much for joining us. I think what the lawyer start though two years room start on this. And then I may have a political question. Or to put you? So we want to kick off, talking about a couple of cases, that have recently been decided in the southern district of New York, and in Washington DC, by district court judges responding to congressional subpoenas for Bank information and accounting information on the president of the United States, and some of his businesses both the southern district judge Rama's and in Washington DC judgmental said congress is absolutely allowed to investigate this request this information and knock down any of President Trump's lawyers attempts to quash those subpoenas, but wanted to get your read on those opinions, and what's next I think you're completely, right? Those two cases are unbelievably important for where we are today. It's almost worth taking one step back, though, which is to say that congress should never have had to gotten this infront of federal judges in order to have the administration and the president come to congress and give testimony and provide documents. This is constitutionally required. There Coequal branches of God. And it's extraordinarily to me, what we're saying, which is the president just basically saying, we are not giving any information. We don't agree with what you're doing. We don't like the way you're doing it. And so you get nothing. That's not the way our system of government works. So these cases, you said it perfectly one, judge in DC, one in York have both said congress gets information, and it's worth just on one of the things that judge Mehta said, which I think, is so important as it's impossible that the United States Congress would have the power to impeach the president, but is not able to investigate him. And I think that sort of sums it up in my mind where where the opinions are now the president's already decided to appeal the writing in DC case, I think they'll appeal the southern district judge Ramos's opinion yesterday. I think will also be appealed and that was the Georgia van Capital One decision saying they have to provide all these financial records, but to me, it is so incredibly important, we're talking about the financial records of the president were also talking about what was publicly reported recently that the president has three hundred million dollars in debt. That's an. Extraordinary amount of debt, we don't know who it's too. We don't know if they're foreign governments involved and to say that congress and the American public doesn't deserve to know that which is essentially the arguments that the administrations were making. It's just completely wrong in my view. Hey, let me ask you to hypothetically step into the role as chief counsel for the speaker of the house. Hypothetical law school. I back to ask for a former press secretary, I rules, you never answer hypothetical but now I'm asking not answering. So give me a sense of given all the issues involved is there a way to stack these things up the because there's there's six or seven cases now. There's been some movement, for instance onto yo Jay and the house intelligence committee. There's the New York state legislature passing a law. There are three other committees. Looking give me what you think is the strategy for stacking the sequencing so that it's the most advantages for getting the information or is this just throwing things up against the wall and seeing what sticks? So that's a great question. It is can I say both? And maybe to answer without ical. But the first thing is that, you know, you wanna get in front of the best judges who are going to be receptive to your arguments, and that could be any judge the cases gonna wheel. And so, I don't mean to suggest you wanna political judge wheel you mean it's random. It's random and what I mean to say is you want to judge, who's going to, you know, take the facts and evidence and who's got a real quickly and who's gonna be receptive to hearing arguments in my view on the law congress wins on all of this. And so all you want is a judge who will call this. You know, you're looking for judges. We'll call it straight down straight down the line in accordance with the law, and the constitution. It's a little tricky when you start thinking about what the administration is doing because they are blanket, people call it stonewalling. I think it's beyond stonewalling. I think it's it is obstruction of some sort, which is they're just saying we're not giving you anything, I think congress needs to move to put themselves in a position to litigate, every single one of those, and which ones go, I it's always best to have your strongest cases go. I I've done. A lot of test cases when I was prosecuting human trafficking, prosecuted, the first case under a lot of the new statutes that were passed in two thousand and we would have loved to have had the best case we did not have the best case, but we still went forward because we felt it was the right thing to do. So I think you wanna pick the strongest case, but I wouldn't hold back in litigating at this point, because it's not also clear, which cases will move the quickest one thing I'd say about the litigation peas, and we shouldn't have to use the courts away, we're using them. But my view right now is it's clear we have to use them. And there's no other way, the president is a bully and like all bullies. You know, if you give them half your sandwich, and they're not gonna eat the other half. You're always wrong. They always take both apps. And so the only way and the only reason there's been any movement over the Mola report is that they were willing commerce's wanting told barring contempt. And so to me, I would gate on all of this, I would pick the best cases I think, though, that even picking the best cases doesn't guarantee that they'll be the first ones to come out. Is it -secutive privilege demonstrably harder to fight? Than your basic, constitutional oversight responsibilities of the congress. The things that the first to have looked at I believe the reason why the financial stuff should move quicker is there's no argument for executive privilege there. And so there's no basis to deny any of it, and that's why though should move quicker in the court, the executive privilege cases, I would also litigated on those because what's happened? Now is this sort of blanket almost preventative way, that they're saying, everything is privileged right now under the Muller report, all of those documents are privileged, and they did that just that they had the opportunity to come back and argue this privilege on page ten or on page twenty whatever that is, there's going to be litigation around executive privilege with this present because they're claiming it for everything everything. And there's no possible way. That's right. Not everything. First of all, is executive privilege, second. You don't get to blanket walk in and say, we're not giving you things. But here's the problem and you guys know this the problem with executive privilege is that the administration then comes into court and says, here's what we think is privileged. The congress comes in and others. And say here's why we don't think it's privilege and then the judge has to rule on all of it, and that's more cumbersome intakes. I think there's a lot more time involved in that kind of litigation. So let me switch from hypothetical your counsel for Nancy Pelosi to your the legal handicapper what would you guess is the first thing that will get to the highest court in the land, which, you know, which one of these cases, if you had to guess, and then predict what the dynamic within the court will be on that. Tricky questions. So I think it's tough to know what the court takes I because I think the financial one of these financial cases, whether it's Missouri Georgia Bank, Capital, One. And how quickly could this move as I think could move fast? So I wanted to ask about that, because there have been these two schools of thoughts among prosecutors and lawyers. One is that they're drawing this out? This is going to be a long slog through the courts. This is gonna take forever. But the other side is saying, actually, there are ways to expedite this and cases of national import will move quickly and even yesterday, Trump's lawyers filed to expedite the case in DC. And I suspect that the DC circuit will grant that they've been granting a couple of expedite cases lately. So what do you think about the trajectory and how quickly it's all going to happen? One of the things that's really important about the DC circuit, and they have an approved yet, this expedited briefing, schedule, and hearing schedule on, the Missouri case. But it looks like they will and that would get that done in July. Right. July twelfth I think by the end of briefing, and then an oil argument, it's really faster. It's really fast for federal court. What what's important though is that I think they did it because the judge said, you've seven days. Yeah. Right. You have seven days to appeal this, and we and this needs to be expedited, because every day, it's not as hurting congress. And that's very similar to the opinion that came down from judge Ramose, and so judge Ramos, did the same thing, seven days and this has to be expedited 'cause it's hurting congress. Now, I think the second circuit in New York. The appellate court in York will do the same thing and we'll expedite. So I do think that courts will make an effort to move these cases quickly. I personally think there's no reason for them, not to go quickly and the courts for them to be effective as a Coequal branch that sort of deciding between congress and the president. If it takes them, two years, it basically destroys everything, there's no possibility to have that to have that enforced that the Congress's Coequal branch, and it would be atypical for the DC circuit, because they traditionally, actually pause oil arguments or conclude. Their oral arguments may so that they can get a number of opinions out over June and July. So having or argument on an expedited case for the DC circuit in July would be extremely rare. This is all rare and then remember that after those appeals go through the, the DC circuit or the second circuit. That's when let's say that they, let's say they uphold the district courts which my view is under the law. They should uphold the district court findings. Let's say they uphold it then Trump can petition to the United States Supreme court to take the case. The supreme court doesn't take every case..

congress president United States New York Trump DC Katie Barlow DOJ United States Supreme court New York University school of York Joe Lockhart executive Missouri judge Mehta milgram Ramos
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. And now katie's final word. Sixty five years ago on Friday, the United States Supreme court decided landmark case Brown v board of education, which famously struck down separate but equal and said that segregated schools and facilities deprived, African American children of a richer. Fairer educational experience the case was sparked by third. Grader, Linda Brown who was turned away from Sumner elementary school and to Pika Kansas and her father brought suit on her half the decision was nine zero written by chief Justice Earl Warren at the time, but there's still more work to do. In fact, the university of California at Los Angeles, just released a report sixty five years after Brown looking at how segregation is still an issue throughout this country and back in March, we gave Linda Brown, the final word during women's history month and given the important aniversary. We want you to hear her, again, to honor the sixty fifth anniversary of one of the most important Judy. Sial decisions in American history. This week, once again, we give Linda Brown, the final word it all started for me on a balmy day in the fall of nineteen fifty in the quiet. Kansas town of to Pika when I'm out mannered black man took his plump seven year old daughter by the hand and what risk free. Four blocks from their home to the all white school, and tried without success in role, his child the child of whom I speak was I Linda, Carol Brown, and my father, the late Reverend Oliver Leon Brown. That parents into PICO south that the day of trying to enroll their children in the school nearest to their home was long overdue many were the evenings my father would arrive home to find my mother almost in tears because I would get halfway to the school bus stop, which was a seven block walk from my home. I could only make half that walk because the coal would get too bitter for a small child to bear. I can still remember starting that bitter walk and the terrible Cole that 'cause my tears to freeze up on my face. I would return running as fast as I could I had to cross a very busy avenue in order to catch the school bus, which would carry me more than two mouse across town to all black Monroe public school. These were the circumstances, which so angered black parents. My father pondered, why. Time stood steel as the highest quarter of the land, pondered over Brown versus board of education until an afternoon in may of nineteen fifty four when I was in school my father at work, and my mother at home during the family earning and this Ning to the radio. At twelve fifty two PM than nouncement gain the court's decision on ending. Segregation was unanimous. My mother was overwhelmed on returning from school. I learned of the decision which at that time, it only to me that my sister's wouldn't have to walk so far to school. The next fall, that evening in our home was much rejoicing. I remember seeing tears of joy in the eyes of my father as he embraced this repeating. Thanks be unto God that night, the family attended a rally given by the local in AA CP and held at the Monroe public school. The following school term was so very different, but not for me because I was never to benefit from the now famous decision for during the fifty four school term. I in junior high school, which was already on an integrated basis as were the high schools in the city. The latter. Fifties found my family living in Springfield, Missouri, where my father held the pastor of bitten avenue, AMI church at this time, newspapers and magazines began to follow up on me and my family, because the significance of the supreme court decision, which carried our name was beginning to really take whole throughout the country. It was during this time that I inherited much of the recognition that might have gone to my father had it not been for his untimely death in one thousand nine hundred sixty one at the age of forty two. If he had lived, I'm sure he would have become a strong civil rights activists in the movements of the sixties. Little. Did he know that years ago when he stepped off the witness stand he stepped into the pages of history? I didn't understand what was happening then. But it was clear that Brown versus the board of education was a necessary victory. It might have been a little slang, but it served to set off a mighty frame. I ran across a quote in a new book by one of our black women Arthur's her and her name is Mildred pits. While tres that I believe says it all. Is not the treatment of people that degrades them, but their acceptance of it. Thank you. Thank you for listening to words matter. Please rate and review words matter on apple podcasts and other podcast providers.

Monroe public school Linda Brown Oliver Leon Brown Sumner elementary school Katie Barlow Supreme court junior high school Pika Kansas United States Justice Earl Warren Joe Lockhart Linda Cole Mildred pits university of California Kansas Judy Los Angeles apple
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality. As a wise, man, once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, not their own facts. Words have power and words have consequences. So Joe you and Adam sat down last week with the author of the art of the deal. Not Donald Trump. The real author Tony Schwartz. Joe, a lot of journalists have studied and written about Donald Trump, but Tony has probably spent more time with him than anyone else outside the Trump family. I'm sorry, you missed it. But it was a fascinating forty five minutes with Tony. We got a real sense of how Donald Trump works or doesn't work as the case may be, and I'm not going to give you the, I'll give you the questions you have to listen for the answer. But we quoted James Komi damn about losing a little bit of your soul. And I asked him if he'd lost his soul to Donald Trump and the answers. Well worth listening. Good question, you know, right at the end I, I asked, if whatever, legal authority or political thority had the goods on Donald Trump, what would it take to get Donald Trump to resign, the office of the presidency and? And his answer was fascinating there. Let's listen to the full interview. He's the author of the art of the deal. Not Donald Trump, the real author Tony Schwartz. And bookie now says should be reclassified as a work of fiction, many of interviewed studied research, and profile down Trump as our next guest did it as journalists in nineteen eighty five but few outside his family have spent more time with them and saw the fraud firsthand. Tony schwartz. Welcome awards matter. Thank you, Tony. You have a unique perspective on our current president and we as a country, I think have a more unique perspective on the time where you were joined at the hip with him now with the New York Times story about him being the biggest loser in business and history. What start with held all came about? How did you become, you know, part of the Donald Trump myth machine? Well, I was a journalist in New York in that era of the seventies, and the eighties, I was New York Times reporter, I had worked for the New York Post. Writer at Newsweek. And then I landed at New York magazine as a staff writer, and I was always looking for sexy stories. We all competed to be on the cover, and I, I was aware of Trump, you could not be aware of Trump because of Trump Tower above law, which. Gone up in the in that period of time, and he'd gotten attention. And I heard about the fact that he was he had bought this building on one hundred central park. South, this very elegant location. It was a rent control rent, stabilized building. So the tenants in the building were paying very low rance to live in a very attractive appealing place and Trump's plan as many of real estate developers did was to get rid of the tenants, and he hired this notorious company called urban relocation. And in the funny way, the world works. I actually the very first professional piece of journalism. I ever published was in my sophomore year of college. I was a intern at the village voice, and I was given the opportunity to appease the piece by the city editor, this legendary woman, married, parrot Nichols, and it was about a real estate developer guy named Sheldon sallow owned a lot of New York real estate who was trying to. Vert actually some Brown stones trying to rip them down. So he could build a luxury building, and I wrote this piece called and it's funny the name of it just came back into my head, even though it was, like thirty five forty years ago, speaking up for the harass tenant, and

Donald Trump Tony Schwartz Trump Tower Trump New York New York Times Katie Barlow New York magazine Joe Lockhart New York Post Joe you James Komi Joe Newsweek Sheldon sallow fraud intern
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality. As a wise man once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not their own facts words, have power and words consequences. Welcome to a special edition of words matter. Katie's on assignment, I'm Adam LeVine, Joe, and I are thrilled to be joined today by former federal prosecutor me Rocca me is currently pace laws distinguished fellow in criminal Justice and a legal analyst at MSNBC and NBC news from February two thousand one and talk Tober two thousand seventeen maybe he was an assistant United States attorney in the southern district of New York as an ASA Mimi successfully prosecuted and tried several high profile organized crime cases, while at the Y Mimi held a number of leadership positions, including chief of the organized crime and racketeering unit as well as chief of the general crimes and narcotics units me. Rocca? Welcome to words matter. Thank you. Thanks so much for having me. Welcome made me. So tell me about that moment in the fifth grade where you said and saw the light and said, I wanna be a lawyer. And not only what do I wanna be aware? I wanna prosecute bad guys and bad guys. I want to prosecute mob guys and drug guys all that. Well, I actually had several of them snowman's that wasn't in fifth grade. It was much later in life. One of them to be honest was watching two different women speak Linda fairstein who is the former head of the sex crimes unit the Manhattan DA's office. And when I was in college, I saw her speak, and I literally had one of those moments of I want to do what she does. And I really did start out wanting to be sex crimes prosecutor had people close to me who had been victims of violence sex crimes. And that was what I wanted to do. I actually tried to get a job with her as a paralegal after college working in her unit, but her paralegals weren't leaving. So I ended up in the as paralegal in the appeals bureau of the Manhattan DA's office, which turned out to be a great experience and exposed me to a broader range of crimes, which I think was. A good thing and kind of went from there. And then I decided I wanted to be a federal prosecutor I worked at the New York City police department for a year and just really wanted to get into law enforcement and the work on different kinds of cases. And I clerked for a judge named John Gleason who had tried successfully John Gotti senior. And I think his passion for organized crime cases rubbed off on the and that was how I got into that field to begin with. I'm going to stay with the fifth grade because it works for me was her a moment in the fifth grade where you thought, you know, what I'm gonna be one of the most recognized lawyers in America, and I'm gonna be on TV every day, and I'm gonna get stopped on the street and people are gonna say go for it made me stay after definitely not. And there was not even a moment two years ago when I was working at the US attorney's office that I would've thought that would've been me. I only left the raise office in October of two thousand seventeen and I did not leave with the intention of going on TV or doing any kind of media. But I. Like, many former prosecutors federal and state and starting with one of the most recognizable. One's prix Perera who's my friend, and was my colleague and my boss. You know, I think it just we're in a different time. We're in an unusual time where it feels like there's really a need to speak out about the rule of law, and what the proper role is of the department of Justice, and that's more important than today. This is going to be the most important question. Do you watch billions asked that a lot? And I think I need to start watching it. So I can say, yes. But the answer is no I have to admit my good friend. Brian Koppelman created billions is before you get back to your office going to have four seasons delivered to you. I will we the next time. You're back. I want to I want to ask you how real is. They would go some I guess breaking news. Have yet. Breaking news podcasts. The Trump tech story in the New York Times have you were still sitting in Sunday's to give New York. What

Rocca Katie Barlow Linda fairstein New York John Gleason Joe Lockhart New York Times assistant United States attorn department of Justice prosecutor MSNBC NBC Brian Koppelman prix Perera John Gotti ASA Mimi Adam LeVine racketeering US attorney
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote objective reality. As a wise man once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not their own facts words, have power and words have consequences. Joe, and I are thrilled to be joined today by award winning journalist and bestselling author. Mark Liebich Mark is the chief national correspondent for the New York Times magazine and among other books. He's the author of blockbuster bestsellers, including this town to parties and a funeral plus plenty of LA parking in America's gilded capital as well. As big game the NFL in dangerous times too must reads or muss listens. If that's how you consume your reading Markley. Welcome to words matter. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me, Mark. When you wrote this town only, Bob Woodward? I think gets people worked up as much in advance of the book, and you found an event that crystallized your cynical view of Washington DC, which is the Tim rustler funeral. You recently wrote about George Conway, Kellyanne Conway's. Not not funeral marriage. Well, you know, it's just whatever partout it struck me that if you were going to write a sequel that might be the same scene is. I mean, how, you know talk as much about as you. I have about this town is you think is relevant Scher, but I'm really interested in because you have this unique perspective on Washington. How you think Trump has changed it? And as you know, is that marriage like, you know, is that your lead? Yeah. I, you know, it's funny. I do think this way this is sort of thinking cinema graphically about how one would write a book or a movie or something like that. And and the Tim russert funeral scene which took place at the Kennedy Center, but also took place. I mean, you were by sume at all of them. I mean pointed to Adam the burial. There was the wake at which was at at and it was a number of different venues at rolled over several different days because it was NBC. And because it was Tim russert. There was all kinds of coverage attached to it. But it w-. Also a moment where it was just a Washington moment. A giant has died. The Obamas the Clintons the bushes. The McCain's are all sort of a Sembwang on the Kennedy Center to pay respects to this giant of journalism giant of Washington giant of the revolving door, basically because he, you know, very freely went from the political world of the media world. Basically, it was an end of sort of an old media franchise, the beginning of the internet as sort of a political force. And so it was a moment where I could introduce a lot of characters if I were going to do something like that. Now, the Conway marriage is a great metaphor for the Trump era in that there's always been this this Washington trope, though, he's a democrat. She's a Republican is an acute that they went up together. How do they stand? Each other. The Carville Madeline thing is is kind of the prototype of that. But Jordan Kellyanne Conway, this example of a Trump era marriage, a Trump era relations. A Trump era thing that just goes completely perverse from the start. You have a husband and wife seemingly very sincerely feuding over a political figure Donald Trump. It's very ugly their children involved, they could be putting us all on. That's always a possibility in the Trump world. They could be looking to monetize this down the road. You can I mean, it's lends itself to all kinds of very cynical and devious. But maybe I guess not maybe not empathy. But just there there's a lot going on take out the empathy in all of this. Then is right up your ad, e I have empathy. You have totally have empathy. But we'll come back to our to. Right. If I were what why don't we just will put this up? Yeah. If I were to write a book, though about this this era in Washington. A Trump era version of this town, which I have thought about admit the John McCain funeral I think would be the bigger production because it's hard to kind of write a scene around a marriage or a thing or just a spectacle that unfold on Twitter on. TV through Trump because it's a little tired almost on its face. But the McCain funerals, I think a good sort of record ask moment to kind of look at old new transitions. And it's always good to start with a funeral if he end, and but for those who either haven't read the book, which I can't believe there's many, but who weren't around dresser was a giant journalism and got no proper send-off. Yeah. But you are perspective was more to show the grotesque angling and positioning a funeral where people were wearing

Washington Donald Trump Tim russert Mark Liebich Mark Trump John McCain Jordan Kellyanne Conway Joe Lockhart Tim rustler funeral Katie Barlow Markley Kennedy Center Bob Woodward George Conway Conway chief national correspondent NFL Scher Twitter Clintons
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. And now katie's final word. The shooting at Columbine high school in Colorado happened twenty years ago this week it has been twenty years since America watched in horror as its children were murdered by gun violence at school a place that was at that point a safe space. But in those twenty years schools, the place where we send our children to grow and learn and give back to this country schools have changed. Yes. Teachers still come to work everyday excited to grow young minds and teach our next generation the way of the world, but their classrooms, they look different. Now on this side of the twenty years since Columbine desks that are supposed to be used for writing or painting. They have another purpose now emergency barricades against a man with a gun wandering the hall, choir room closets used to store music and instruments. They have another purpose. Now, a hiding place windows used for letting in sunlight. And maybe daydreaming are now dangerous entry points. Hallways are for running and doorways are for fleeing. That's not what the parts of our schools should be. But too often and for too many young people that is what they have become since Columbine. So for today's final word, we give you two sisters who survived that day in Columbine, Colorado. And just recently ran the Boston marathon race together. And they just sat down to tell their story and sit down and reflect on what those twenty years have been. We'll give Lara hall and Sarah Bush the final word. A couple of things that helped me were. Sarah. I think finding finding somebody who understands and although our experiences were very different in our healing was very different. She was that positive person. And I I didn't get to that place for many years after but always knowing that there was somebody that knew what I was feeling in that I could just cry to or listen to was huge for me. I think on that same note understanding that a the grieving process, no matter if you go through the same thing or your, you know, I think the grieving process for each person is very unique very different. And of course, healing still happens in we've gathered friends throughout the years together each on each aaniversary, Laura, and I have. Each year gotten a little stronger as we've made a point to make April twentieth. A good day, and we'll get together we'll have spa day or will go shopping or will just make it a point to touch base with each other. If we can't be together, and you know, are pretty much in constant contact on those days, and that's been a huge source of strength and healing for us to be together. Thank you. For listening to words matter. Please rate and review words matter on apple podcasts and other podcast providers.

Columbine Sarah Bush Columbine high school Katie Barlow Colorado Joe Lockhart America Lara hall Boston apple Laura twenty years
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and Joe Lockhart. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. Our goal is to promote of genitive reality as a wise man once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Not their own facts words, have power and words consequences. Joe, and I are honored to be joined today by Margaret Sullivan. Margaret is the media columnist for the Washington Post and before that Margaret served as the fifth public editor of the New York Times. And was the first woman to hold that position. Margaret is a native of Lackawanna New York and began her career as a summer intern at the buffalo news becoming the first woman editor there and managing editor in its hundred and thirty nine year history of that storied newspaper. Margaret Sullivan, welcome towards matter. Thank you, very much fun to be here with you. So Lackawanna New York is in the western part of the state located in Erie county, and that's also the birthplace of the late. Great, Tim russert. And while he was born in Germany CNN's. Wolf Blitzer also grew up in Erie county and considers buffalo to be his hometown. So is there something in the water over there or what's going on? It's just a great place. And it seems to you know, seems. To sort of spun media types. I can't explain exactly why. So it's even but I certainly knew Tim, and I know wolf, and you know, we wear our buffalo routes proudly buffalo pride I like it. So you recently wrote about the state of local journalism in in that context. Tell us about your time at the buffalo news. So I was there a long time I came as a summer intern. And I kind of made my way through the ranks. I mean, it is funny because you know, when I came there there were two papers in buffalo as there were in a lot of cities, and I hit internship offers at both places which made my mother, very very happy. And you know, but I said to dad, you know, what should I do? And he he said, you should go to the buffalo evening news because that is the dominant paper and dad was kinda right because they hired me at the end of the summer and two years later, the morning paper was out of business, and I was at the evening paper. Yeah. So you know, I was a reporter and a columnist and did all kinds of different. Things and eventually kind of worked my way up through management. And you know, was really honored to be the first woman editor of the paper. And did it for a long time. Did it for twelve years. Yeah. That's an incredible honor. Has there been another woman in that position? There's only been one person since my Connolly is the editor. And and he's been there since I left in twenty twelve but I was there in two thousand eight when things really began to tank in local newspapers, and we had rounds of buyouts, and we did not have layoffs. I'm happy to say, but, but it was tough, you know, the print advertising model was disintegrating and in it has an the whole situation has not improved in this is true around the country with rare exception. So what's what's the solution was the future? I mean, I really wish I knew that Joe. I really do because it makes me very sad. I mean, it's got it's some combination of nonprofit news organizations, local people deciding. To really support the paper local philanthropy. And I don't know what else there's no clear answer. So as we noted at the top after your time at the buffalo news, you served as the public editor of the New York Times explain for those who may not know what a public editor is and what she does. So the public editor which is position that's been discontinued at the times and a lot of other places. But not while. I was there. I'm happy to say is a kind of a reader Representative and internal media critic. So you are not exactly of the times you are. You are looking at it as an observer. And as a critic, although an employee of the paper, and so there's an inherent tension there. I think I was a pretty tough critic. Although I also think I was fair, but it's very tough to come to work every day and essentially be in the role of criticizing your colleagues. I would imagine. Yeah. For the first time, Margaret I ever crossed paths was that's right. When the New York Times story on the front page about the NFL, which I objected to. Issue with and it was a very interesting process because you know, from the editor side, I got we stand by our story. And I you know, I talked to dean, and he was like, I appreciate everything you're telling me, but we say by story, but Margaret, and I had a very healthy back and forth at the end of the day. The story stood, but you know, just as a communicator. And as a reader, I felt like at least I was heard right. And it's a way to people don't get satisfaction from the paper. Like, I want a correction or this is wrong. This was unfair. I've been plagiarized or something, and they don't get any help from the usual channels. It's a place for them to turn sort of like an ombudsman in any organization at a university or or anyplace else. So when you were in that position, I believe we counted correctly. You wrote six hundred ninety one blog posts or columns productive say the lease airy. You were the first woman to hold the post as we said in your the long. Longest serving public editor at the times to date. How did you approach that assignment differently than your predecessors will for one thing? I approached it in a much more digitally forward way. So that instead of in. This is not to say that my predecessors didn't on of this. I just did a lot more of it. I basically decided I was going to kind of treat it as a conversation an ongoing daily conversation between myself and the readers of the times. And so whatever issue would come up. I would deal with it immediately. It was funny because the first day that I was on the job. I think that the editors expected me to kind of come in and get the lay of the land go to launch a few times and do a few different things. But I was determined that. I was going to write a blog post the first day, which I did. And it it was about the whole issue of fact checking which was sort of hot at the time, you know, kind of new and hot, and I had a great assistant. I always had these great assistance because the assistance at the time are these. Overqualified young people. And so I wrote this thing and my assistant read it. And he said, are

editor public editor Margaret New York Times Margaret Sullivan Joe Lockhart Tim russert intern Katie Barlow New York Erie county buffalo managing editor Wolf Blitzer Margaret I Washington Post Germany CNN reader Representative reporter
"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on Words Matter

"This is words matter. Welcome to words matter. I'm Katie Barlow. I am a proud native Georgian and a longtime DC resident who is a journalist turned lawyer turned journalist once more I believe in the power of the spoken and ridden word to educate and to protect the truth as the daughter of an English teacher. I learned early on in my life. That words matter that the language we use is the best tool we have to make a difference in other people's lives. So I went to law school. I went to school to learn the language of the law, which is inaccessible to many Americans an unnecessarily complicated. I joined the practice of law to learn how to speak that language fluently. And now, I hope to translate that language for those who do not speak it. I'm grateful for the opportunity to ask questions to promote an objective reality. And to use the space to hold others and ourselves accountable to the mission that brings us. Hear words matter. I hope you enjoy the journey along with us. You can find us here every week and don't be afraid to give us your feedback. We want you to be a part of the conversation. Thanks for listening to words matter. Thank you. For listening to words matter. Please rate and review words matter on apple podcasts and other podcast providers.

Katie Barlow DC apple
"katie barlow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"katie barlow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wade in Planned Parenthood versus Casey been reaffirmed many times have you ever followed president of the supreme court when doing so conflicted with your personal belief. My personal beliefs are not relevant to how I decide cases. What did you base your conclusion that assault weapons are in common? Use and whatever answer study did you use to do that. I faced a decision where as in every other decision just about on the DC circuit. I had a foul precedent precedent of the supreme court. I don't get to pick and choose which supreme court precedents. I get to follow. I follow him. All please, tell us. What judicial independence means to you, including whether you have any trouble ruling against the president appointed you against the executive branch in any case before you to begin with your correct, no one is above the law in our constitutional system. Under our system of government, executive branch is subject to the law subject to the court system. And that's an important part of federal a sixty-nine important part of the constitutional structure now very quickly. Let me just ask you this. Can I sitting president he required to respond to a subpoena? I can't give you an answer on that hypoth-. Medical question. So you can't give me an answer on whether president has to respond to a subpoena from a court of law. My understanding is that you're asking me to give my view on a potential hypothetical. And that's something that the every each of the justices Carly sitting on the supreme court when they're sitting in my seat declined to decide potential hypothetical cases as democratic senators pro Cavan offer, his beliefs and Republican senators offer praise the question remains how would Cavanaugh act as a supreme court Justice while most of the focus has been on his past decisions and writings Katie Barlow listened to hours of judge Cavanaugh presiding oral arguments from his twelve years with the US quarter of appeals for the DC circuit Barlow is an attorney and co editor of circuit breaker, a website covering everything coming out of the DC circuit. I think what we can glean. Both from his oral argument style and from his opinions with twelve years on the bench, which is a long time for anyone on the supreme court before they get there is that he's a straightforward conservative. He's a conservative judge, and he will try to carve out the smallest areas possible when dealing with areas where congress has spoken and areas of clear executive power. Can you give us a sense? Like, maybe an example of what that means. Because even the definition of conservative today feels as though it's evolved. If you will sure I think in the legal sense has volved less so than in the political sense. But I take your point. I think it is helpful to look at a case from his very first day on the bench back in two thousand and six on September. Eleventh, in fact, and the case is called democracy Emba, the Bush, and it is about an individual named Jamal Kimba who was a Ugandan citizens. Who was being detained in Guantanamo Bay? And he was afraid that the government was going to transfer him to another country, and that that country would torture him. And so he asked the court, can you please require the government to give you thirty days notice before they transfer me. So we can deal with any issues related to that transfer and the lower court said yes, and it came up before the DC circuit. And during oral argument Cavanaugh explicitly questioned the advocates about the role of congress here and the role of the president. And he said isn't this for congress to decide if they wanted to they could craft a rule right now about detainee transfer, and they know how to because they've done it before. And we actually have a clip of Kavanagh during these oral arguments if want wanna take a listen to that. And then hear your reaction to that harmed on the court found that the president's exercise of his authority was constrained by what congress dining in conflict with congress had done here. We have a situation that's really the opposite. Congress is not prescribed any particular rules governing the detainees. My question is do you agree that congress has that authority to enact such rules consistent with Congress's authority and the president's authority. He spoke exactly the way, he wrote his opinion. So the court actually said it is not the court's role to second guess the executives power here, particularly during wartime when it's at its apex. But he wrote in the very first part of his opinion, his concurrence that congress can speak here. And that nothing that the court ordered prevents congress from creating a carve out creating a rule governing military detainees in this context. And he telegraphed that right off the bat in his first question to the advocate the question of the scope of executive power in this case seems to be one that's quite important this week before the Senate, right? Absolutely. And in fact is an issue that is still coming up before the courts right now there is detainee. That's being held on a military base abroad right now. And has not been able to get his petition heard in the US courts. It's a case called Dovy Mattis. And the question is whether or not the president can transfer him to the custody of the country that he's in. And this case is has been percolating in the DC federal courts for nearly a year at this point. It's still an issue the president's wartime roles, but also the president's role in appointing these federal judges this president has appointed a huge percentage of federal judges that will impact the future of jurisprudence in this country for years to come and how President Trump fits in that role is certainly something that's gonna come up in the in the next few days. I'm talking to Katie Barlow of circuit breaker about what we can learn by listening to judge Cavanaugh from his time on the DC circuit. And we're here on the takeaway, Katie are there any cases that Cavanaugh heard in the DC circuit that could potentially reach the supreme. Court. Absolutely. There are a couple. The first is a case called archdiocese of Washington. The will Mata and colloquially, we call it the transit ad wars. And the Catholic church wanted to put up a Christmas ad on. Washington transit buses will motto buses and the war modest system said no because it has a policy against religious themed ads and the Catholic church sued and said, you can't do that that violates our first amendment right to speak, and in part is religious discrimination. And the case came before the DC Circuit Judge, Kevin I was actually on the panel in that case and was very heavy hitting in his questioning of both sides, the court eventually ruled after Cavanaugh was appointed that the woman policy could stand that they could tell the Catholic church. Now, interestingly judge Kavanagh did not participate in the opinion because after his nomination to the supreme court he stepped away from all of his open cases. And so it will be interesting to see how cavenaugh handles that at the supreme court because there is no requirement. That supreme court justices recused in any case, it's entirely up to them. And we have a very short clip of Kavanagh actually during these arguments that we can take a listen to the idea that you can say, no churches. Need apply is odious straw constitution. Yes. Cavanaugh was very clear, and that oral argument that he had a hard time taking the transit authority. Word on their policy against religious ads and their policy against issue oriented ads he seemed deeply offended by that on behalf of the first amendment. What's Kavanagh's style is he combative when he's on the bench. So it's interesting. I think that clip you just heard he sounded a little combative. And I think at times he is when he's trying to get a point across and many times he will say his argument from the bench, but he also is known to help out oral advocates on both sides when they appear to be struggling or as I've heard when he thinks he can articulate the argument better than they can. And we have another clip from Cavanaugh in twenty eleven where he's helping to reframe the FBI's lawyer in a case about the court's ability to review FBI decision regarding security clearance. Let's take a listen y'all Gatien's kind of a Dwayne to a trial, and that's a big burden and therefore. That turns show, that's your theory. That's that's absolutely. Of course, better than I have been able to those far. So there are times when an oral advocate just either doesn't understand a question or is field and multiple questions at once or is taking heavy fire from a particular judge and can get caught up. And from what I've heard from advocates that have practiced before cavenaugh that sometimes he will love softball their way. Or he will do what he did in this case and re article late their argument or redirect them to a new point entirely. And all of those things are helpful from an advocates perspective because it re- centers their mind on the task at hand. Katie Barlow is an attorney and the co editor of circuit breaker and analysis website covering everything coming out of the US court of appeals for the DC circuit. Katie thanks for joining us. Thanks so.

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