5 Burst results for "julie lindsey"

"julie lindsey" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"julie lindsey" Discussed on KTOK

"Kerry lucky vandals busted a windows kick down doors destroyed computers damage toilets and splashed paint around the interior of the plant and much so Wagner county sheriff Chris Elliott surprise surveillance cameras revealed two young boys did all the damage a local school identify the suspects both about ten years old who confessed they could now face charges Richard Elliott says the damage totaled almost one hundred thousand dollars no more allowing family members to deliver hygiene items to inmates at the Marshall county jail in Madill that's because the mother and girlfriend of an inmate have been charged with trying to smuggle drugs and cigarettes into the jail according to court records sixty three year old Julie Lindsey and thirty three year old Kyla Barnes put cigarettes into a bottle of body wash and math inside a tube of toothpaste for inmates have been charged in the alleged conspiracy a meeting is scheduled this week for the Cherokee Nation tribal council to consider whether the tribe should cut funding for the schools that ban native American students from observing cultural practices at issue in some schools hair length and students wearing eagle feathers on their caps during graduation a proposal has already been approved by the council's rules committee I'm Jacquelyn Scott Oklahoma is thirty five tribal nations with casinos have rejected arbitration in a dispute with the state over whether existing gaming compacts automatically renew at the end of the year the tribes told state Attorney General Mike hunter in a letter that they remain unified in the believe the contacts do were new governor Kevin stood as said the fifteen year old Compaq's expire at the end of the year and he wants to renegotiate them to give the state a larger share of casino revenue the tribes pay fees of between four and ten percent of the casinos net revenue and receive exclusive rights to operate casinos in the state the fees generated nearly one hundred thirty nine million dollars for the state last year two major motion picture productions issuing casting calls in Oklahoma as they prepare to fill in the state still waters starring Matt Damon and Abigail Breslin will be filmed in a near Oklahoma City the killers of the flower moon production has announced open casting calls in Oklahoma City and Tulsa I'm Jacquelyn Scott.

Compaq Marshall county Chris Elliott Wagner county Kerry Jacquelyn Scott Tulsa Oklahoma City Abigail Breslin Matt Damon Kevin Attorney General Mike hunter Jacquelyn Scott Oklahoma Cherokee Nation tribal council Kyla Barnes Julie Lindsey Madill Richard Elliott one hundred thirty nine millio
"julie lindsey" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"julie lindsey" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Maybe you've heard julie lindsey spelt insanely kyle chase shea savannah grayson khloe faye jackson like there are so many children in the christly brewed sitting on. We'll try to stay off. The sofa with buddhist avenue had to worry about having to get a new one because you've messed it up. First of all tastes chips saw it. Didn't you always out chips. Let's just after snitch on grayson on you dumped entire coke out on that that's exactly it's not share. It was a carpet. I believe the the eldest daughter who is lindsay. Who's belden saying l._a._n._d. Sl is <hes> has a different mother. The mothers julie christly but julie. I believe is the mother of all the other children and what's i guess not about the show why people like it is because todd christly is a._m. Wacky character right. He is very a big. He's he's got a big personality. People that people thought he was gay because he's big southern drawl so everything's like y'all like imagine i mean imagine a drag queen with a really thick southern accent riverside raise your eyebrows and act like you're mad at chaser savannah. I really hope oh yeah. Definitely gotta do a little bit here to get. Some of these lines loyd's but we also want to get your eyebrows up a little bit more in those little crow's feet are gonna keep on sneaking up unit to kill the cry. I'm gonna kill the crew. I walked in with my kids kids talking about me but now doc careers agree with it i mean. Can you not tell how upset i am about this now not with all that other talks. He's always a yelling at his kids and he's always like better. Get ready for school. I'm gonna spank bush whatever he said. It's very strange. I heard but it's just like it's i think what people like about the show is him as a personality and i think that they like him as you know a real talker about marriage and relationships and and child rearing you know yeah i'm just thinking of i just googled no country for old men movie quotes because i feel like imagine some of the weird things that josh brolin's has no country for old man where he says like where kelly macdonald is like where'd you get that money and he goes from the get in place but like imagine any weird southern thing but in like from the get in place like that start christly chill bomani that'll be the day where'd you get the pistol getting place imagine imagine llewellyn from no country for old men as has a very flamboyant loud other southern guy with a false seto but here's my thing also and i know you tell me u._s._a. Network doc somewhat low standards for successful reality t._v. n._t._b. In general so this show has kinda skated by with decent ratings for a long time yes and it's it's yeah it's been on for seven seasons..

julie lindsey julie christly bush todd christly grayson faye jackson josh brolin belden kelly macdonald julie loyd llewellyn
"julie lindsey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"julie lindsey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Awarded twenty thousand dollars to the author of a collection of short stories past winners have included the likes of Elizabeth kraken. She was on the show last week your Saunders. Patrick kief. The new anthropology collects the work of all fourteen of the story prizes past winners. It's called the story prize fifteen years of great short fiction edited by Larry dark. Hi, larry. He is the director of the story prize. He joins us now to discuss the fifteenth anniversary that is so exciting. It's hard to believe really that. We've been around that long. But yes, very exciting. Well, we'll discuss the finalists in just a moment because you're going to be awarding the prize on Wednesday at seven thirty correct. That's correct. All right. Let's talk about the history of the story prize a little bit. What prompted you to start at fifteen years ago. Well, what prompted me to start. It was someone contacted me and said they were interested in starting a short story a book award rather for short story collections. Julie Lindsey surname, and I was interested right away in doing that. Because I done the Henry awards for six years, which is an annual collection of stories chosen from magazines. So what does the selection process like this selection process is pretty much that Julian I've read the books that come in. I have some readers who helped me out. I have people on visory board who sometimes way in tell me to read this or that or that they like certain thing, but pretty much this Julian I choose the stories we have a conversation on New Year's rather the books we have a conversation on New Year's day. And usually there. Six five six seven books in the conversation. I don't know how we decide. Exactly. But at the end of the conversation, we have three books. That's that's the way you spent your New Year's day for the past fifteen years. And then you bring on judges it's three judges and sometimes they're librarians. Sometimes they're booksellers editors what do you want from all these different points of view, for example, from a librarian, what point of view, do you want from a librarian, for example. Well, librarians read a lot they recommend books. They're very knowledgeable. Some of our best judges have been librarians. In the beginning. We just decided that we didn't want a typical judging panel of just all authors of we wanted to really bring in different people from the literary community give people a stake in the award. So we alternate alive library in with a bookseller every other year. What about critics are critics and we've had quite a few critics. We've had last year we had a critic named Walton Leon. We had John Freeman and people probably don't know these names, but at this audience. Yes. We've had we've had some really good critics. We had James woods who writes for the New Yorker. So yes, the other the third judges sometimes a critic sometimes maybe the editor of literary magazine or a wildcard, my guess is Larry dorky is dark. He is the director of the story prize, which will be awarded this Wednesday at seven thirty. We'll talk about the final shortly. You know? It was interesting one article I was reading about the story priced talked about how this kind of short fiction was very popular sort of found its its roots in the early twentieth century. What is it about short story fiction? You think is valuable. In the twenty first century. I think I think the same thing that was valuable. Back in those days is still valuable. It's I think it's a very immersive intense experience. I think you can gain a lot of empathy from reading a lot of different types of short stories, and I think it's one of the forms. That's uniquely American and then American writers, right? Very very well. So the the art of it is on a very high level this story prizes ED's collection that you have out of the fifteen past winners, Anthony Dora, Jim shepherd bass lives with crack, and Mary Gordon. It also includes small snippets of interviews that are done summer done actually from your from the the events that you have before announcing finalists from different interviews. Why did you want to include those little snippets before everybody's short story? I cued the stories in the book to the stories at the authors read from at the events. So they talked about those stories we we have a format where they read for a while. Then I talked them on stage. And they say really incredible interesting amazing things that that is of great interest to the audience. So I thought that's something we have that separates us from other anthologies. We have interviews. We didn't do them the first couple years, we didn't record them. So there are other things to introduce stories like judges citations were. There's an excerpt from a radio interview here WNYC, I one of my favorites was Adam Johnson he wrote or he said during the prize event of two thousand sixteen there's something in a novel. That's a political act the characters want one thing the plot wants another thing the setting the situation, but in a story, you can be a pure dictator make every facet contribute to a total affect do you and another author Mehtab appoint similarly thing that you know, they're like snowflakes. They can almost be perfect. Do you think a short story has a better chance of being perfect than a novel? I do I think there's a more standard form to it. Even though there's a lot of variation within that form, and you can play with it and change it. But I think with given the shorter length of it. I think you can really work on it sentence by sentence by sentence in a novel. I don't think it's nearly as important on the sentence level. It's more the wave carries your throat, and you made a point in the introduction of your book that these short. Stories away really allow an author's voice to be present. Can you give us an example of that? Or somebody who does that particularly? Well. George saunders. Who's very known well known author. He is humor a lot. He uses somewhat futuristic speculative typesetting. Sometimes he is characters have kind of a blue collar vibe to them, and he has a lot of humor. He's very very funny. He's he's someone that I think has been very influential. And I read a lot of collections by younger writers who were clearly influenced by him like Friday black which is a big collection out now. Oh, he was fantastic. We had him on the show. He was I mean, and that's a really interesting collection. I wanted to ask you aside from the prize because you read so many of these collections. Do I mean Wednesday like about Friday black? It's all sort of based around one idea about this black Friday about consumption and consumerism do the best short stories have one theme that goes through the entire collection. Well. The best. I'm sure is it a is it a it's pretty common. I don't think it's always conscious. I think sometimes the authors just writing stories in a certain frame of mind over a certain period of time and these connections emerge or sometimes they're connected stories. And there's a very strong connection. That's intentional. So it goes both ways as you reread the winners for the past ten years from now collected in this book the story prize. Is there any sort of thing that you've noticed which is common among these fifteen besides that they're fantastic writers? The really they're very very different from each other. But what I think they all have in communist that. They're very true to each author's voice. And did who each author is let's talk about today's finalist. This year's finalists Jamal Brinkley. Deborah Eisenberg, and Lauren Groff we actually had Lauren on the show this past this past fall back in November. And this is what she said about short story writing the amazing thing about short stories is that you can do anything in them. You can you can use your canvas as sort of a broad canvas or you can go really really tight, and do, you know paint angels on a piece of rice. Right. I mean, you can do anything you want to. And I do love the really long langourous feeling of seeing a whole life trying to condense it into maybe twenty pages. I think it's really exciting. And it gives the story an extra level, you know, if you can see the whole life by the end of it. So that's she loves about the short form. What do you love about? It. I think I love that. It's. Endlessly surprising to me, I've been reading lots of short stories. I read three thousand a year for the oh Henry awards. I've read over a thousand a year for this. And it's nice to have a break sometimes read something longer. But when I go back to it. And I read the collections that are out. There's always something new so tell me a little bit about what happens on Wednesday March sixth at the new school auditorium at seven thirty pm is our award event our vet night cosponsored, I should mention by the new school graduate creative writing program. And we've been doing it there since the second year of the price or this'll be the fourteenth time, we do it there the author's. We'll all be there each one will read from their work, and then we'll have a conversation on stage. And then there is very suspenseful moment at the end where Julie Lindsey the founder of the prize announced the winner. All right. It's going to be an exciting evening. And the short story collection is called the story prize. It is a wonderful collection. Larry dark. Thank you so much for joining us in all of it. Thank you have a wonderful Wednesday. Okay..

Larry dark Julie Lindsey director Elizabeth kraken Patrick kief George saunders Adam Johnson Julian visory Walton Leon John Freeman Lauren Groff Mary Gordon Mehtab James woods literary magazine editor
"julie lindsey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"julie lindsey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dollars to the author of a collection of short stories past winners included the likes of Elizabeth cracking. She was on the show last week your Saunders. Patrick kief. The new anthology collects the work of all fourteen of the story prizes past winners. It's called the story prize fifteen years of great short fiction edited by Larry dark. Hi, larry. He is the director of the story prize. He joins us now to discuss the fifteenth anniversary that is so exciting. It's hard to believe really that. We've been around that long. But yes, very exciting. Well, we'll discuss the finalists in just a moment because you're going to be warning the prize on Wednesday at seven thirty correct. That's correct. All right. Let's talk about the history of the story prize a little bit. What prompted you to start at fifteen years ago. Well, what prompted me to start with it. So contacted me and said they were interested in starting a short story a book award rather for short story collections. Julie Lindsey surname, and I was interested right away in doing that. Because I done the o Henry awards for six years, which is an annual collection of stories chosen from magazines. So what does the selection process like this selection process is pretty much? The Julian I've read the books that come in. I have some readers who helped me out I have people on an advisory board who sometimes in tell me to read this or that or that they like certain thing, but pretty much this Julian I choose the stories we have a conversation on New Year's rather the books we have a conversation on New Year's day. And usually there are. Six five six seven books in the conversation. I don't know how we decide. Exactly. But at the end of the conversation, we have three books. That's that's the way you spent your New Year's day for the past fifteen years. Yes. And then you bring on judges. It's three judges librarians. Sometimes they're booksellers editors what do you want from all these different points of view, for example from a library. What point of view? Do you want from a librarian, for example? Well, librarians read a lot they recommend books. They're very knowledgeable. Some of our best judges have been librarians. In the beginning. We just decided that we didn't want a typical judging panel of just all authors. We wanted to really bring in different people from the literary community give people a stake in the award. So we alternate a librarian with a bookseller every other year. What about critics are critics and we've had quite a few critics. We've had last year we had a critic name Walton Leon. We had John Freeman people. Probably don't know these names at this audience. Yes, they've been. We've had we've had some really good critics. We had James woods who writes for the New Yorker. So yes, the other the third judges sometimes a critic sometimes maybe the editor of literary magazine or a wildcard, my guess is Larry dark dark. He is the director of the story prize, which will be awarded this Wednesday at seven thirty. We'll talk about the finalist shortly. You know, it was interesting one article I was reading about the story prize talked about how this kind of short fiction was very popular sort of found its its roots in the early twentieth century. What is it about short story fiction? You think is valuable. In the twenty first century. I think I think the same thing that was valuable. Back in those days is still valuable. It's I think it's a very immersive intense experience. I think you can gain a lot of empathy from reading a lot of different types of short stories, and I think it's one of the forms. That's uniquely American. And then American writers write very very well. So the the art of it is on a very high level the story prizes ED's collection that you have out of the fifteen past winners. Anthony, George shepherd bass lives with crack, and Mary Gordon. It also includes small snippets of interviews. That are done some done actually from your from the the events that you have before announcing finalists summer from different interviews. Why did you want to include those little snippets before everybody short story? I cued the stories in the book to the stories at the authors read from the events. So they talked about those stories we we have a format where they read for a while. Then I talked to them on stage, and they save really incredible interesting amazing things that that is of great interest to the audience. So I thought that's something we have that separates us from other holidays. We have the interviews. We didn't do them the first couple years, we didn't record them. So there are other things to introduce those stories like judges citations were. There's an excerpt from a radio interview here WNYC, I one of my favorites was Adam Johnson he wrote or he said during the event of two thousand sixteen there's something in a novel. That's a political act the characters want one thing the plot wants another thing the setting the situation. But in a story, you can be appeared. Dictator make every facet contribute to a total affect do in another author Mehtab appoint similarity thing that you know, they're like snowflakes. They can almost be perfect. Do you think a short story has a better chance of being perfect that an awful? I do I think there's a more standard form to it. Even though there's a lot of areas within that forum, and you can play with it and change it. But I think with given the shorter length of it. I think you can really work on it sentence by sentence by sentence in novel. I don't think it's nearly as important on the sentence level. It's more the wave that carries you through it. And you made a point the introduction of your book that? These short stories away really allow an author's voice to be present. Can you give us an example of that? Or somebody who does that particularly? Well. George saunders. Who's very known well known author. He is humor a lot. He uses somewhat futuristic speculative typesetting. Sometimes he is characters have kind of a blue collar vibe to them, and he has a lot of humor. He's very very funny. He's he's someone that I think has been very influential. And I read a lot of collections by younger writers who were clearly influenced by him like Friday black, which is a big collection. Now. Oh, he was fantastic. We had him on the show. He was I mean, and that's a really interesting collection. I wanted to ask you aside from the prize because you read so many of these collections. Do I mean Wednesday like about Friday black is it's all sort of based around one idea about this black Friday about consumption and consumerism do the best short stories have one theme that goes through the entire collection. Well. The best. I'm sure is it a is it a it's pretty common. I don't think it's always conscious. I think sometimes the authors just writing stories in a certain frame of mind over certain period of time and these connections emerge or sometimes they're connected stories. And there's a very strong connection. That's intentional. It goes both ways as you reread the winners for the past fifteen years from now collected in this book the story prize. Is there any sort of thing that you've noticed which is common among these fifteen besides that they're fantastic writers? The really they're very very different from each other. But what I think they all have in communists, at they're very true to each author's voice. And who each author is let's talk about today's finalist this year spineless Jamal Brinkley. Deborah Eisenberg, and Lauren Groff we actually had Lauren on the show this past this past fall back in November. And this is what she said about short story writing the amazing thing about short story is is that you can do anything in them. Yeah. You can you can use your canvas as sort of a broad canvas. Or you can really really tight, and do, you know paint angels on a piece of rice? Right. I mean, you can do anything you want to. And I do love the really long langourous feeling of seeing a whole life. But trying to condense it into maybe twenty pages. I think it's really exciting. And it gives the story an extra level if you can see the whole life by the end of it. So that's what she loves about the short form, whether you love about it. I think I love that. It's. Endlessly surprising to me, I've been reading lots of short stories. I read three thousand a year for the oh Henry awards. I've read over a thousand a year for this. And it's nice to have a break sometimes read something longer. But when I go back to it and every the collections that are out. There's always something new so tell me a little bit about what happens on Wednesday March sixth at the new school auditorium at seven thirty pm at is our award event era vet night cosponsored, I should mention by the new school graduate creative writing program. And we've been doing it there since the second year the price of this'll be the fourteenth time, we do it there the author's. We'll all be there each one will read from their work, and then we'll have a conversation on stage. And then there's various suspenseful moment at the end where Julie Lindsey the founder of the prize announced the winner. All right. It's going to be an exciting evening. And the short story collection is called the story prize. It is a wonderful collection. Larry dark. Thank you so much for joining us in all of it. Thank you have a wonderful Wednesday. Okay..

Larry dark Julie Lindsey director Henry Patrick kief Elizabeth George saunders Adam Johnson Julian Walton Leon John Freeman Lauren Groff Mary Gordon advisory board Mehtab James woods literary magazine
"julie lindsey" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"julie lindsey" Discussed on KGO 810

"Contest. And the winner gets to pick the first question, I asked Ann Coulter on Friday at three o'clock, you can say. Welcome to the show. What is wrong with seriously? What is wrong? I wanna know if how much of it is just for well last year when I interviewed her at the Republican national convention. She said their forty million illegals, and I looked at her and she winked at me like I'm just making it up as I go on. So I'm going to bring that up again as he remembers your show. I mean, that's. Contest for then if you get it you get to pick the put you on the air you have to ask her the question. So if Email me a chip Franklin dot com. What question first question. You would ask Ann Coulter on Friday at three o'clock, and you can Republican say will you go out with me or? You're going to win. If you have the dates is tell you those. Yeah. Jimmy walker. Really? Do you? Remember hearing something about that? But I heard that that was not really actually I had him once at a comedy club. How many years ago was this? I don't know twenty some years ago, and I picked him up at the airport because he had to do morning media. Right. So picked up on a Thursday night at the airport, and we went into a safe way to get some food. So he could take it back to the hotel room and some some older black guy. Some older black guy came up to us. And I was like, you know. He was drunk and Jimmy Walker lit into him about respect you're drunk, and you're out here. Just really, and I was like, whoa. Wow. And he's kind of news conservative. Then he didn't do it in a show. But anyway. He wouldn't he wouldn't do dynamite. He wouldn't do it for. Don't ask him to say, Donna Micheals ain't gonna do it. But then later on he started doing it again. So I let him do it. I think that's if he feels that I could high an Dino. She's probably going to cancel probably going to get back. Don't call her and tell her and we're talking about this. So the the question is obviously the Cavanaugh a hearing. It's still Chuck Grassley says that we have they have to let her know some sort of statement by ten o'clock, east coast time on Friday or she won't be able to appear before the committee. The Senate Judiciary committee. Mazi Hirano is a US Senator Macy maisy, I'm gonna I'm gonna say Mazi Senator Horon up. There you go. We don't share first name Senator Ron is only one of four women on the Senate Judiciary committee. And she is she says, look, this is no small matter. And that this is something we should be dealing with. Fishy points back in ninety one. When Anita hill came forward with allegations of sexual harassment against Clarence Thomas. It was all male Senate Judiciary committee that grilled her. As a nation watched obviously men are causing this. Listen to what she says here. Pretty good. Of course, it helps that they're women on that committee. But you know, what I expect the men in this country and the men in this committee, many of them believe me because we all signed onto this letter to demand and FBI investigation, but really guess who's perpetuating all of these kinds of actions. It's the men in this country, and I just want to say to the men of this country just shut up and step up. Do the right thing. Julie Lindsey Graham said gotta hate this guy. Every day Lindsay Graham more because he's just such a Trump sycophant, he came and he says I want to know where Blasi Ford got the three hundred dollars for.

Jimmy walker Senate Judiciary committee Ann Coulter Anita hill Julie Lindsey Graham Cavanaugh Senator Ron Mazi Hirano Senator Macy maisy Senator Chuck Grassley FBI US Lindsay Graham Blasi Ford Clarence Thomas Donna Micheals harassment three hundred dollars