22 Burst results for "juilliard"

FDA plans to approve emergency use of new coronavirus drug

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

FDA plans to approve emergency use of new coronavirus drug

"The nation's top infectious disease experts says the results from a new coronavirus drug trial look promising NPR's Windsor Johnston reports the White House says the federal drug administration is teaming up with the pharmaceutical company Juilliard sciences to approve the medication for treating covered nineteen Dr Anthony Fauci says data from a clinical trial shows the drug Mendes heavier may help patients hospitalized with coded nineteen speaking at the White House about she said the anti viral could reduce the recovery time for the virus it is the first truly high powered randomized placebo controlled trial it was an international trial involving multiple sites not only in the United States but in various countries throughout the world including Germany Denmark Spain Greece doctor felt she warned that data from the drug needs to be further analyzed there are currently no approved treatments or vaccines for the corona virus but numerous drug trials are under

NPR Windsor Johnston White House Dr Anthony Fauci Mendes United States Juilliard Sciences Germany Denmark Spain Greece
Tracy Anderson - Fitness Pioneer

Mom Brain

09:24 min | 7 months ago

Tracy Anderson - Fitness Pioneer

"I'm Tracy Anderson. I created the Tracy Anderson fitness method. And I am a mom of two. You can find me at Tracy Anderson Dot Com and you can follow me at Tracy Anderson method. What is your workout? I mean everybody knows your name and not everybody might know they're like wow this really great workout. And maybe they feel like they don't have access to it or they don't know exactly what it is but they know that tons leverage are obsessed with tons of people are obsessed with it. And what's the? What is the philosophy? How did you develop it? And why is it taken off so much? So kind of you It the philosophy is that I. My mission is to continuously create balance where there's imbalanced in specifically in women's bodies. It does work great for men but all of my studies have been done on women so I don't feel like it's fair to say that I really know what I'm doing with any man quite honestly so I I went to college on a dance. Scholarship and I gained forty pounds at school for dance and My Dad has fought. He's battled obesity is whole life and my mom was a beautiful. Prima Ballerina and my genetics. Just weren't my mom's once I hit you know. Nineteen twenty twenty one and I felt ashamed in a lot of ways like I felt like this is unfair that I have to be. I'm barely five feet tall in a black leotard and pink tights and I'm like gaining weight and instructors are literally looking at me like why the officially in my class right now. And how does she have a scholarship kind of thing because of the way that I looked like I had some teachers like you have so much talent but like just don't have the body and so I felt like that was really unfair? Yeah so I really focused on Choreography. And I was like you know what I'll be behind the scenes all all learn really all of the elements of craigie really strong Sorry what was what was creating the waking though if you're working out all the time it doesn't matter if people work out all the time quite frankly just because you work out all the time does not mean you're going to make weight and come back in a heartbeat for sure and eat bagging heartbeat but also everybody's metabolic rate is completely unique and completely different. How we store fat. How we need fat. How we How stress affects us like there are so many factors that affect our engines as women too. I mean and our right to dress their children whether we want to have them or not like. It's just a human you know it's part of our system and how that system works for each of us is actually shockingly unique and wait has a lot to do with it. And I think that a lot of people when you're genetically predisposed to certain metabolic rate and you try really hard to fight at our becomes something else you can do a lot of damage to your body and your psyche on a lot of levels and so this is why. It's very important for people to know that my is about creating balance where there's imbalance in anyone's unique body. It doesn't mean I am trying to make you into a teeny tiny dancer or into somebody that you're not so it the I think the passion and the spark for me started then because the counselors it at my school. Where like you know you need to eat less and just eat? Sinoe or like you know your roommates. Do Coke every night. Maybe join them. You know like really know and I just you know for whatever reason my mom I I was raised in a way that thank goodness I never had an eating disorder. I it was never an option or a consideration for me and I never did drugs. I wasn't like in me to do it right I do drink though that anyway so I I felt the I felt what it felt like to not be able to get your body to be something else in a healthy way and I. My mom worked three jobs to put me through school and I had an I joined crunch. I I did pilates with Ron Fletcher. And I was like. She was like scraping. Pennies together. Knows a distinct. How pilates is going to help me if I do step aerobics. And this and that an and nothing would change my body to where I mean. Sure like fitness. When you're working out you feel good. A lot of things can happen but and I was a really good performer. Too so a lot of people. I think in fitness because they can't perform really well. They don't get the calorie spend that you would need to actually start burning real fat so the Diet and the workout have to go so so closely intertwined you know anyway so I tried all these things and then I MY SON. Who's twenty one? his dad played for the New York Knicks? And he was like I love your booty. I don't know why you need to be like. Let's have babies and I'm like yeah. Why always wanted to be a mom that was given and coming from Indiana? We've become moms at twenty three. Because that's what I and but actually it was such a gift because Eric you know when you play for the New York Knicks. If you have an injury you get the best treatment and the entire world. So he was sent we. I spent my pregnancy with Salmon Puerto Rico and with this league that he was rehabbing his back with and I met an incredible incredible doctor who was so passionate about sports and he was like Have you seen Concussion with will Smith Gasoline. Okay so the only difference between will Smith's character in that and finding that protection for NFL players was Desai was an avid basketball fan avid. And he was like these guys are going to end up in Lisi boy recliners for the rest of their lives. No one's thinking about their spines. You know there's a better way to train for the to support their spines BUBBA and I was like I was either going to rescue all of the homeless animals in Puerto Rico or I was going to figure out how to help this guy and I went to his little clinic every day and He had done a mind blowing research on the inner spine muscles. And how the brain is connected and how you don't have to to like if you go. After the transitional muscles in a healthy way like and all the strategic muscle exhaustion. And it's miraculous what we can do and it made so much sense to me because I was like well man if we can make ourselves freakishly large like these bodybuilders. Do or or then I went. I dissect it literally every pro sports like speedskaters for the Olympics or runners. Long distance runners. If you look at people at the top of their game their bodies start to look very similar. Because you're calling to action the same kind of muscles and if you've got that willpower behind it you can really do incredible things with your body. So I studied with him this whole time and I started creating the choreography to support his science and I was like this is incredible and I said wait a minute. Why are we stopping at the back? If you can do this for the back why. Why can't we create this kind of balance and symmetry for the whole body? And he's like no one's ever gonNA come up without much content and I was like I fully em and then I. I did a five year. Study on one hundred and fifty women that I went to Indiana University. I was like how do I do a study? How do I didn't know how to do things and I think one of the things that so corrupt about the fitness industry? Today is that people and I hate to even think that I would be part of this problem which is why I stopped training. Celebrities years ago I literally was like I'm not even higher help oversee their programming come to the gym just like every body else not because I don't love them as people or or what they can. The kind of awareness they can bring forward is so great too. It's because it sends a toxic message to everyone out there that you should want to do what they want to do. Because you want to be them instead of wanting to do what's right for your own health and your own body and In the industry now people think if there they can move or they look good and they get a celebrity all of a sudden they have a method. And I'm like you got method. You gotTA fitness met. The how'd you get word that words all that like research research and I know what it took me and how I was just think naturally without without my ego attached to it because I really didn't think I have permission to be doing this. I just wanted to go back to schools like juilliard or whatever and go. Here's a program you can give these girls where they're not stuffing suppositories up their bum at night and bleeding like you know like it's terrible. It's terrible environment and it's really toxic and So I did the five. You're studying throughout the five year study. I had asked one question. My question was can I take any woman from any genetic background and turn them into what a dancer like looks like so I started from a place that didn't end up wanting to I didn't end up there. But that's that was like this is my mission and as did it I realized. Oh My Gosh. Like all of these. Women are in so many different various levels of pain and they're also unique and then I was like well and also they don't all WanNa go dancers and they don't all they just WanNa you know feel good or on this or and also you can. You can put a bunch of people ask them to do a routine and the same thing is not going to happen to all those

Tracy Anderson New York Knicks Tracy Anderson Dot Com Obesity Indiana Ron Fletcher Salmon Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Juilliard Olympics Smith Gasoline Basketball Lisi NFL Eric Indiana University Smith Desai
Adam Driver Walked Out in the Middle of His Interview With Terry Gross

Celeb News Ride Home

03:39 min | 11 months ago

Adam Driver Walked Out in the Middle of His Interview With Terry Gross

"Do you feel that deal it. The air has changed changed. And we're now in the middle of a magical time in history. That's right Adam. Driver has somehow become one of the most famous people alive. How do I know this because it seems like? He's at the centre of different major controversy every single week. People Love Adam driver. People Hate Adam driver. I mean folks folks. This is the time to be alive. Today's Adam driver news revolves around him walking out on Terry Gross in the middle of fresh air interview that he did to promote his movie. Marriage story daily beast. Got The exclusive on this. They described the incident as follows and I quote sources at. NPR told told the daily beast. That driver walked out of an interview earlier. This month with fresh air host Terry Gross after expressing displeasure at the idea of listening to a clip of himself. Singing being alive from the musical company drivers character sings the song late. In Noah Baumbach New Netflix film marriage story and quote. Wow okay okay. So Adam driver walked out on Terry Gross. Because he didn't want to hear himself saying I mean that's kind of relatable. He also did mention before the interview. that he it doesn't watch clips of himself. Some people are calling him a diva for doing this. A lot of people are coming to Adams defense. Low calling his walking out on the interview a mental health self preservation tactic in Adam drivers October New Yorker profile. He discusses his anxiety over watching himself perform. The New Yorker wrote wrote quote. The first time driver saw himself in girls on Dunham's laptop he was mortified. That's when I was like I can't watch myself in things. I certainly can't watch this this if we're going to continue doing it. He said many actress declined to watch themselves but for driver that reluctance amounts to a phobia and quote depending on where you stand you either. Thank Adam drivers a diva shore. Like I said or you think he's someone with really intact boundaries. WHO's protecting his phobia or you don't care at all and you probably have a a really nice chill brain? That's not constantly thinking about Adam driver personally. I don't know what side of Adam drive her story. I'm on I don't know if there's a wrong or right side I mean I don't I just don't think about it. I really have to. I have to let this marinate if you are one of the people that's reluctant to make fun of Adam driver for walking out on this interview. That's totally fair. That being said surely we can all come together and make fun of Adam driver for how he used to eat. A whole rotisserie chicken back in the middle of acting class at juilliard. Right if you're behind on your Adam driver news and didn't know eater wrote about this a few days ago saying quote on an episode of the podcast. The film re Roll Drivers Juilliard Classmates Scott Yellow recalls drivers love for Rotisserie chicken to the point where he'd eat a whole one in class eater then unquote solo. WHO said quote? He would walk around school with an entire chicken in one hand and a jug of water in the other end quote. Can you just picture that a young young Adam driver walking into a black box theater with a whole chicken and a whole jug of water. I'm personally picturing the plastic jug of water that you get at the grocery store it kind of looks like it should have milk in it but it doesn't it has water and it has like the blue plastic top and listen. It's not like acting. Classes typically have desks so I'm guessing if Adam driver related eat a whole chicken in acting class he had to have eaten it on his lap the mandated chicken on his lap. Okay and we can all agree that that's funny and worth making fun of. Isn't it beautiful. How we all just came together like that I could cry?

Adam Terry Gross Dunham Noah Baumbach NPR Netflix Scott Yellow One Hand Milk
"juilliard" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"At Juilliard and Julie arts and in new York's school of music yeah well known well known yeah my parents were building the whole of state and no Windham New York I was in my twenties and I used to go walking through the woods and I used to actually listen you know to the sounds of the woods look at everything going on around there and based just gather thoughts in my mind to put it down on paper lone behold the song the bald after you know like a year or so put it on paper try to do something with it but it didn't happen until now is there something about the holiday season about Christmas that inspires you like we were just talking about for this specific song or do you do other songs as well not pertaining to the holidays I've done other songs too but this one is one that you know it is putting me on the map it's kind of like living my dream yes I do love the holidays I love the sights and the sounds I looked the peacefulness but unfortunately we don't really fight too much peace in the holidays everybody's busy shopping and running here and there are some just hoping people will pick up on the song sit back and just listen to the lyrics and to save file I forgot what it was like to be a kid again yeah there's so many established Christmas songs I mean everything from White Christmas to the religious tones during the holiday season and it's kind of hard to squeeze one end but it sounds like you have found a subject that is new for the holiday season one quick more thing before we run out of time this also led to a journalist getting an award to yes it said John hence join hence interviewed me about the last September he loved the idea of the background of the story and the build up and turned out that this past April after he wrote the up the entire story was featured in Newsday a three page story that came out in December than this past April he contacted me to see the story one best feature for him and for Newsday and I went whoa this is pretty basic a one of the war called the folio award for best feature that's great back by that right congratulations on.

new York John Juilliard
Talk Show Host Richard Bey Reflects on His Early Days

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Talk Show Host Richard Bey Reflects on His Early Days

"Without further ado. I bring to you Richard Richard. Thanks for coming on the show today well. It's my pleasure to be here and thank thank you for the invitation so Richard. Your New York guy and I have to say because my girlfriend is Jewish and and I know that growing up your dad was Jewish Mama's Irish Irish Catholic What kind of dynamic was that growing up for you. Is it difficult because I know religion does play a huge factor and families and so forth and it wasn't in difficult. It was to some degree. It was a good thing you grew up with the kind of schizophrenia half the family telling Ling me that I was going to burn for eternity in hell and the other half of the family telling me that I was part of God's chosen people and when my mother they're married my father and interracial marriage like this was a pretty big deal and her family really opposed they sent the priest to my mother to tell her that there was a boy in the parish who was willing to marry her and he was Catholic and that she should marry him instead even though she didn't know him but he shouldn't marry this Jewish corporal one while and did your did your parents. They see how successful you've become in life where the around for that long to see how oh yeah they were around to see the ascent. Fortunately they weren't around to see the decline Oh. I don't think there's no there's no decline. You're doing other things. We're GONNA get to that yet. You're evolving like everyone else. I can say. I never knew yield drama school. Talk about talk about that part of your life Richard Well. I went to Yeah I was acting before war. I went to Yale drama school professionally but I started to realize it didn't know what the Hell I was doing. I was inequity. I was in Sag and I said if I'm going to do this for the rest of my life. Better you know learn some technique so I applied to juilliard. I applied to Yale. I got into Yale. I was in a class class with a bunch of talented people. It's a three year program so you're there for three years and while I was there I mean Meryl Streep was they. They are sigourney weaver was there Tony Shalhoub Mark Linn Baker and a bunch of other people who are just fabulously talented Allenton actors who you never heard of Wendy Wasserstein was a playwright. Ted Tally who wrote silence of the lambs was was a playwright right and it was just when I graduated I was hired by the Yale Repertory theatre to do a year of all different roles and wrap so that was a great send off as well so I was really there for four

Richard Richard Sigourney Weaver Yale Drama School Yale Repertory Theatre Yale Richard Well Ted Tally Wendy Wasserstein Tony Shalhoub Mark Linn Baker Ling New York Three Years Three Year
An Interview with 'Sopranos' Actor Matt Servitto

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

12:04 min | 1 year ago

An Interview with 'Sopranos' Actor Matt Servitto

"Next guest is a Juilliard trained actor his filmography includes billions homeland in Konic roles on both banshee and the sopranos also hitch and big fan you can currently find him as Satan on adult swim. He is the legendary and very talented Matt Sereno, Matt how are you today? Well, TGIF another week a living the dream. So starting happy hour hear and months hoping. None of my children will be screaming in the background. I am one of those rare actors that leads a very normal suburban American existence, and I hate yearly Ford. Mentally and financially physically. So so that's kind of what's happening year in just a find the with billions in their area season for right now, which has a great twist for my character. Just looking for the next project in between stuff on a crazy show. I do call you pretty faces go to hell over on a jolt swim where I play Satan. So we promote promoting season four of that right now. So I'm down in Atlanta next week doing that. But that's nice of getting a bit of a break. I'm very lucky to be talking to Satan on a Friday. And I wanted to say two things one happy belated birthday. Thank you. And so much into I tell you about I'm really I find adult swim very refreshing. Because I was I watch your show on adult swim. I've watched the Eric Andre show. Religiously when it was on, and it really gives an opportunity just to give these quirky funny. Great shows and opportunity to breathe and for people to really take in something new. Yup. I agree. I really got to be honest. I of discovered it by working on it. Because I am definitely not the demo for adults with an older male. I mean, it it's tends to skew sort of fifteen to twenty five crowd. But the ones I just once I was passed on the show. I started bench watching a lot of their shows. And I agree with you. I've found it like unlike any other kind of television, I watched in it's still I mean, even in this day and age of five hundred scripted shows in tons of new networks in new shows. It's still sort of stands alone in its absurdity in. It's it's kind of a reverence it does the shows on that show doing that network. Do not have to make sense in the traditional sense in one of the best things they do is leave us alone. I mean, it really is like a group of guys and gals just kind of making the comedy that they wanna make an people find it funny. Great if they don't okay, you don't have to watch it. It's really isn't sort of it is a rock and roll kind of network that I still I feel so lucky to be a part of because it's so different as somebody who's traffic in the procedural drama world for thirty years. You know to sort of be able to go over there once a year and just rip it up at improv and put all this makeup on and just do the most obscene absurd kind of storylines is just that the light of the light in a you know, we all get the chew the scenery in. Now the shows so successful now that we're starting to be able to get really good guest stars on the show. We've got George went from cheers on this year as the four horsemen of the apocalypse. John Amos, Jon Abel's from good times of Dustin diamond came onto play itself in hill to just awesome. I mean, so we were really starting to you know, spread our wings a little bit. And you know. You just never know who's gonna end up in hell with their every year in real life stays meeting. New people were thinking that person's definitely going to hell so we can get into the show. So yeah, we're having a blast over there. And for you as an actor must be good to get her. I'm not saying I mean, you play some of the same role similar roles, but you have your very diverse actor, but this is like way out there in for your own mental wellbeing as an actor must be good just to get out there and just go nuts with this part. Right. That's going to feel good for you. I call it acting sorte. It's sort of like a coach something you eat between courses, you know, to kind of clean the pallet. I feel like, you know, I get a chance to sort of white clean all the doctors lawyers cops and firemen that I've played in just your something. So extreme so that when I come back to the other stuff, I've kind of had a chance to really do something extreme something that it is demands a little bit more creatively. So yes, it invite. I'm super super lucky in the show. You know, got word we're going to keep going for a little while longer. You know, we with season four starts airing next third. So we're we're site for that. And this season's the best by far. And I was watching some of the rough cuts of the episode from. I love this show. I just loved getting to do it. And it just sort of fell into my lap about six or seven years ago on just a random audition that didn't even know what the show was new. I didn't know as I said anything about adult swim. But I just sort of did my own spin. And what I thought this Satan character would be in just to the producers fell in love with the ideas that I brought kind of almost like an aging. Metal heavy metal rocker like, gene. Gene Simmons died went to hell that's kind of fake news. Still still wear a cheesy gold jewellery, and he has like the kinda, you know, leather with metal studs cod piece. You know, his his tastes in culturally to lend themselves to kind of the metal culture. So it it's right. I mean, it really is very very different than than, you know, which great is it so under the radar that so many people who are fans my work from other shows when they discover this thing to like what the hell is how did you? I couldn't believe this was the same guy. The guy that I love overrun sopranos is doing this just crazy ass show trip. Watching it, you know, so. That was great about is that it's Nala getting thing else. It's so it's so far in left field that it's just so funny and quirky and great. I mean, that's that's what makes it great. You know? So I have to say you. You mentioned binge watching do you? I mean, you're very busy as an actor. I get that. Are there shows that you make it a point of to keep up with that? You're not in that you're not in. You know, might my June, tastes are very fickle. 'cause I really do. I will I in fact, always saying to people there are so many shows now that I literally run into friends that have won Emmys on television shows, and I'm back at Ling. Like, dude, I'm gonna see your show, and we altered let each other. I have never seen sopranos. I mean, they've had twenty years to watch the show, you know. And and I I sit there and go like, you know, the explosion. And I use that tubby the big bang of television that has happened where we've just got hundreds of really could show. Some let's say we've got fifty could shows we've got over one hundred you know, shows that are worth watching. I it's just incredible. And so it's hard to keep up as a setup got kids. I think is aged my my television sweet tooth now lends itself more towards real life stuff. Documentaries. I watch a lot. News. I'm definitely political animal. So I I divided a lot of the late night comedy as well as the political commentary shows, so you know, and sports God knows to way too much sports is on in the background of my life part. The soundtrack of my life is some baseball game playing in the background. So, you know, but these days by wifi speed, a we did homeland together, and she kinda left it after puppy season three or four. I came back to it. Once I was on the show I've done game of thrones by myself excited for the new season coming up this weekend. What else do I watch a lot of? But I mean, you know, other than that it's sort of like, you know, trying to think. The problem is I I've ended up on some really good shows. You know, so I watch although show. Her mom, and so I'm always sort of key in or if I'm not, you know, like when I got booked on NCIS New Orleans. I think it was season five I had to go back and watch for I didn't have to I wanted to because I wanted to know who all these characters were what the fabric of the show was what the relationships were. So, you know, a lot of times, you know, I don't want to show until yet. They give me a nod in all of a sudden on which was a luxury. We did not have when I first started in the business of you had not seen God, I don't know murder. She wrote a macgyver that wasn't in syndication. The really wasn't a way to catch up. Maybe at blockbuster if they had you know, like back seasons on DVD on cassette. What am I saying DVD on Kostanic? And at that time, they only had things like cheers. Or or, you know, these these bigger shows that were highly successful they'd have them on on VHS that you could cut a bench wa so, but the purity of finish watching, you know, for enacted like me is that you know, where? A lot of stuff that you used to do with just kinda I go off to blockbuster. And then eventually just go off into the ether. Now, my God, I'm getting a whole new generation of people binge-watching sopranos, then it's a blast. I mean, like the kids I kids, you know, college age kids that are coming up to be saying, oh my God. That's my parents favorite show. When I was a little kids wasn't allowed to watch it. And I just thought I was my parents show. I'll take a look at it only got me, and my friends we couldn't stop watching it like we were dictated. So that's just a blast. I mean, I love that that content wise nothing goes away. Nothing goes away. Anything you know, I I did one episode of Grey's anatomy. I can't tell you. How many sixteen year old girls have come up to me from an talking like eight years ago, you know, and and because that show is so popular in the binge world on Netflix sex in the city. Same thing. One episode playing carries boss, very important character. But again one episode I get recognized all the time. Like, oh my God. My daughter. Just pinch watched the whole, you know, all the sex in the city in. She was just pointing at you over there saying that guy was on Sexton's phasing. So we kind of creates this weird binge culture that that, you know, nothing sort of goes away rounding like, you know, like right now, my fans that know me from the soaps, they're not running so upsetting where at least as far as I know. So a lot of that work is is truly gonna you know, just stay. I would imagine buried until somebody unearths it in decide just start streaming twenty four seven all my children. But the fan that recognize me from those those early days of soaps are getting older and older and older because it's just not running anywhere. You know, I love that. A lot of the network shows how the second shelf life, especially if they're good, you know, with with including my own children. I mean, my daughter's built binge-watching full house friends, Grey's anatomy, like this is definitely that that the the rate age, she's she's about to be sixteen and they. So what's great with them as they're not forced to watch. What's on TV? They don't find what they like on TV. That's what's so crazy. We have five hundred scripted shows on television, and they can still go back and binge-watch five hundred others from the seventies eighties nineties, you know, audits. So that's what's craziest. If she doesn't find anything. She's looking for on TV Chagos digs up some Netflix show. You know, something something that's on. Netflix throwback in incredible incredible with occasion about binge-watching. But the the beauty is I don't feel the pressure anymore. It's all sitting there. You know? I said as as once my kids were off in college. I can catch up on everything.

Netflix Grey Matt Sereno Konic Ford Atlanta Gene Simmons Baseball Eric Andre Dustin Diamond John Amos George Murder New Orleans Sexton Jon Abel Sixteen Year Thirty Years
"juilliard" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"juilliard" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"And my friend. He beat the guy. Yeah. My friend, George Creighton, he moved out to California to do stunt work. So he was you know, his father was on the kung FU stupa school in queens belong story short. He knew a guy that worked at the Juilliard school one night. We're out drinking, and he was telling this guy, Georgia vow. I wanna be a scenic ours. I don't know how to do it. And he goes, I'll go talk to this guy over here. So this guy over here works at the Juilliard school. He's a stage manager, and I went up to him drunkenly and said, oh ought to be a scenic artist, and he goes, oh, he should. Okay. He's I call this person at the Juilliard. He's like they haven't seen a guard at intern program. I said, okay, cool. So I called her and it was like two weeks before the deadline of applications, and I went in and I had no experience being a scenic ours, but I wanted to do it, and I beat up fifty other applicants from around the world because of how bad I wanted to do it does the boss that was air when she met me. She's like, I really want them. And you decide you just expressed to her that you were this was. Is it this is what you won't do. Yeah. How does she know that you wanted really wanted it? I mean, I was I was truthful. I was honest. I put my I, you know, I bear my heart and soul with stuff like that. Then a passionate about and you know, I need to see you ever lying knowing you in real life. Oh, no. My wife says I'm the worst liar. I can't I've had people. I work with saying. Oh body. You're a terrible liar a Mike. Well, yeah. To honest, but I want them over. I'm not, you know, play it. It's been it's been working out for me. I've been getting steady work since I got into business. So, you know, people like me for whatever reasons, I think the only people like you because you're a genuine, dude. Yeah. I hear that a lot. And I I don't like disingenuous on disingenuous people like I really I despise them like guys like Alexander Rodriguez. The baseball player every anytime he would speak a just cringe when I found that he was coming to New York..

Juilliard school George Creighton kung FU stupa school intern Alexander Rodriguez baseball Georgia California New York two weeks
"juilliard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Jonah? What say? That show. What are your qualifications? Well, I attended Juilliard graduate of the Harvard Business School I travel quite extensively. I lived through the black plague and had a pretty good time. During that I've seen the exorcist about one hundred sixty seven times and it keeps getting funnier. Every time I see it not mentioned the fact that you're talking to a podcast. What do you think you'd think I've qualified he improvised all that right early? Some of it. Provides the Juilliard Harvard thing for sure so good. He go to Juilliard Harvard. Juice day that. Okay. Okay. Now, I'm cracking up the notebook for fuck sake. Because here's the thing. We can I just before you go into. Here's the thing. Can I tell you the quote that you should have done? Okay. You either should've just done podcast podcast podcast. Hilarious already would have been funny considered it pretty good. You should have done. You know? I'm only truly happy when I'm podcasting. That's a good one. That's a good. That's a good one. And it also if you love do agree. Yeah. Okay. So now, I want to explain I've taken out my notebook. It's incredible to notebook. It's beautiful for children actually says on the side cracking open starting right now we into set out clear rules because if any of the b word more than three times in the two times in this episode. We're fucked so David has one tally. Yeah. Okay. But as we agreed. There are three different uses of the word. Correct. Your say the title of this movie twice. Yes. You're allowed to refer the character by name twice. And you're allowed to talk about. The animated series. Correct. The title like as if it's an Italian like, are, you sure I'm sure I would like to hear what that's like from you though. Because I already already said the characters name once I can only do it. So many times we can all do it two times though. Yes, who've he makes it clear like it's the same person to say now, our guest, we're both performer. So we understand like you gotta really make the distinctions clear. You gotta spin on the line readings make it a towel Cise. David is a man of words, you know, what I'm saying? A man of letters gives understand we might have to get into some sort of like, you know. I don't know what the term looking for is. I mean, I don't know how to figure out when you're using which you gotta make you usage is very clear I can refer to the star in the sky as many times as I like that's not true. You can only refer to it twice stiffer int- title animated. Honestly, here's another spreadsheet. And I to say though, I think we can refer to the animated series as many times we want because if we someone that thing like, I don't know a lot fees. Fees. Musical counts for two. You know what? Yes. Okay. So it's everyone gets a grand total of eight eight. You can't say I want to only use one musical and three titles. Do you know what I'm saying? Yeah. You just can't do more than two. Hello, everybody. My name's Griffin. Davidson's this has called blank check with.

David Harvard Business School Jonah Griffin Davidson
"juilliard" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on KSRO

"Can call me r j anyway great guys who did incredible improv and the one thing i think that in in in certainly inspired by your book because you have worked with children and you pose interesting questions to your art students to think a different way but it would be sensational if everyone life were able in a school situation to do improv classes yup i mean i agree with you it's scary even in the juilliard building where i teach rarely do those classical musicians get to improvise they're like the rest of us they've been trained in a very particular technical way and it's hard for them to go to that imaginative wild joyful place and one of my pleasures as a teacher in that place is that i get to remind them of why they got into the arts in the first place what is it that is so human about the arts that it doesn't matter if you know what sonata form is there is a way to access what the joy in the arts is if you cut out all of the pretentiousness and the sophistication aspects there's a way for everybody i read that you say maybe the first day of class you ask the students what is it i exactly this class is i look at these eager young faces and i say give me one good reason that an innercity fifth graders should give a damn about mozart and you know they kind of then they come up with a few pat answers but then they realize pretty quickly they can't think of a single reason that that kid should care about mozart you know you know white guy who died hundreds and hundreds of years ago in the music sounds tinkling and weird so suddenly they have to re here what mozart is and discover what is valuable exciting and new for someone who's never come to it before well similarly we're all coming to stuff new all the time and if we can have naive on demand a kind of openness to discover the new and americans are usually pretty cautious about discovering the new but as an artist does there's a fascination with discovering what something is to set aside the the impulse to interpret it to judge it you know so many people go through art museum saying oh i like that i don't like that i like that we take so little time to really discover what's there and it is in those moments when you set aside judgments and interpretations and you really attend to that world that someone who's made your developing the muscles almost as an isometric exercise hold on my here we're gonna take an isometric commercial we'll be right back i'm danielle ben dad the moment my son saw redwood tree is the moment i knew that for him you see that even the.

mozart art museum juilliard
"juilliard" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on KSRO

"Can call me rj great guys who did incredible improv and the one thing i think that certainly inspired by your book because you have worked with children and you post them interesting questions to your art students to think a different way but it would be sensational if everyone life were able in a school situation to do improv classes yep i mean i agree with you it's scary even in the juilliard building where i teach rarely do those classical musicians get the improvise they're like the rest of us they've been trained in a very particular technical way and it's hard for them to go to that imaginative wild joyful place and one of my pleasures as a teacher in that place is that i get to remind them of why they got into the arts in the first place what is it that is so human about the arts that it doesn't matter if you know what's not a form is there is a way to access what the joy in the arts is if you cut out all of the pretentiousness and the sophistication aspects there's a way in for everybody i read in your book that you say maybe the first day of class you ask the students what is it exactly class is i look at these eager young faces and i say give me one good reason that an innercity fifth graders should give a damn about mozart and you know they kind of then they come up with a few pat answers but then they realize pretty quickly they can't think of a single reason that that kid should care about mozart you know white guy who died hundreds and hundreds of years ago in the music sounds tinkling and weird so suddenly they have to re hear what mozart is and discover what is valuable exciting and new for someone who's never come to it before well similarly we're all coming to stuff new all the time and if we can have naive teddy on demand a kind of openness to discover the new and americans are usually pretty cautious about discovering the new but as an artist does there is a fascination with discovering what something is to set aside the the impulse to interpret it to judge it you know so many people go through art museum saying i like that i don't like that i like that they take so little time to really discover what's there and it is in those moments when you set aside the judgments and interpretations and you really attend to that world that someone who's made you're developing the muscles almost as an isometric exercise hold on my here we're gonna take an isometric commercial we'll be right back i'm daniel the moment my son saw redwood tree is the moment i knew that for him you see that even the.

mozart art museum juilliard
"juilliard" Discussed on Don't Mess with Christine Sydelko

Don't Mess with Christine Sydelko

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Don't Mess with Christine Sydelko

"Oh my god i should he is fascinating you would love to talk to the singer's me he is and he went to juilliard and he's like she experienced classic client classically trained actor on for him to okay i mean i don't need to and you're fear like yeah i would absolutely like i think if you're at all like but he will go he will take you down a you know down all the way down spiral into the depths of character look like a method actor like that tells me hardcore really good i mean talented well speaking specs a spike kind of like had a bigger role towards the later she's like when you when you have left the show of angel of buffy buffy wouldn't like when buffet him and delegates delegates from me a couple of times james the find that funny i don't mean it like that but that's funny that i put it like that yeah he was quick when i left season five i guess apparently david and james had wonderful chemistry together and then on season three like he is he was probably my favorite character watch on the two shows you know he was very entertaining very watchable you know well he kind of hundred story like cortez probably really intense actually looking at well so i don't know how familiar you are with like the show season four and on of buffy of buff not at all because i was working on angel i never got to watch because i was just wondering if there's anything you saw that you were like oh that would have been fun.

juilliard james cortez david
"juilliard" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"In public i don't know if it's true in london too but i got so good at crying in public that the tears just came straight out of my nose didn't even bypass the is and came like i'd sit on the subway and my nose just start running it was a tremendously lonely experience 'cause you're surrounded by people and so you're like lonely in a very public way and i think about loneliness everyone's having a very singular experience like no one's loneliness is exactly the same and i think also when you're single people feel entitled to that experience like to comment on it everyone has a pin an opinion about it so you're lonely yup yes so everyone has an idea of how does it been intensified i mean people talk about social media and often antisocial buses and the world being a smaller place we're also connected but that very promise of connectedness makes the loneliness maybe more profound deeper i guess that more profound or is it just worse definitely more visible i'm a terrible liar i don't know how to so i didn't know how to live my life pretending that i wasn't lonely and i think in some ways the thing that was most helpful in dealing with it was just being honest about it because then i could own the experience as opposed to someone else you know trying to take it away from me so how did you start doing that well i guess i started blogging when blogging was not a thing it was like two thousand eight and the economy had just collapsed and i was working as like a one of my first out of college was i worked for the metropolitan opera i solicited money from people and the economy was collapsing and i remember calling someone and the guy was like i cannot believe you're calling on today of all days and like i went home and check the news and bear stearns had just like folded i was like oh cool okay i graduated from juilliard with a degree in theater and the theater scene.

juilliard london
"juilliard" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And because nobody knows how to do it you have these cults like fundamentalist christian sects who look at a complicated world ago you gotta do it this way right and then you but but but you do like i think the experience like the gordon list writing call to new york and then there's all these acting coats out here but like the one thing that gets you is it gets you interacting with other people and like i you where did you train mostly i went to college in did theater at an an english wesleyan and then i went to juilliard we'll see but see that's the thing about training to be an actor someplace by juilliard you doing movement you're doing dance right you're doing swords play you like you know like all that stuff doesn't matter like kind of but i like you yes you can teach like how to use your voice you can't see in your body yes yeah but but you can't nobody knows you know how to teach acting the one thing you can agree on is you gotta be in the moment you gotta want something can't teach anyone gene hackman no right no like they you know or you just like you when you look at huge movie actors what whoever taught them whatever who what doesn't matter no well it's you know it's it's like writing you just like you just gotta do it a lot and have some good taste telling you what to do.

new york juilliard gene hackman gordon
"juilliard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You have no idea what the training bills are piano lessons was summoned from juilliard let me do a data check here before we come back with geoffrey yu of ubs futures up thirteen dow futures up one hundred thirty under twenty that's a big deal twenty four thousand one eighty nine in the dow twenty six forty two on five hundred and the viks really on the move nineteen point five one on the viks flat the yield market oil a little bit self but a jump yesterday brent crude or that seventy two pricing seventy one sixty right now brent crude with gold showing the risk on feel thirteen forty eight down a good eleven dollars and jeff for you space yen one oh seven fifteen the euro you heard jeff you talk about stronger euro one thirty right now one twenty three twenty two seven figures away from that ubs forecast news for new york city is michael barr jonathan don thank you very much president trump is pushing back on the new york times reports weeding if i wanted to fire robert muller in december i would have fired him the white house insists the president has the authority to do that but justice department regulations say only the attorney general can fire the special counsel and since jeff sessions recused himself from the russia probe that authority falls deputy ag rod rosenstein meanwhile the longest serving republican senator in utah history sent out a tweet orrin hatch says anyone advising the president in public or over the airwaves to fire bob muller does not have the president or the nation's best interest at heart the new york knicks made it official and announced the firing of jeff hornicek the knicks wrapped up the season last night at twenty nine and fifty three global news twenty four hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm michael barr this is bloomberg com thanks.

senator bloomberg official utah russia attorney new york michael barr jeff hornicek new york knicks bob muller orrin hatch geoffrey yu rod rosenstein jeff sessions special counsel president white house robert muller new york times
"juilliard" Discussed on X96

X96

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on X96

"He made him a winning chance strapped mit major oil is now he got that role um he was fairly young when he got that room yeah even though he was mind somewhat jerry old but he would i happen to see him act on stage he was a graduate of juilliard and when i was at penn state years ago the juilliard company came to penn state and did to place and i saw david ogden's tires and patti lupone in these plays and i i still remember their performances both of them patti lupone was really ver was very young she was a college student than at that time i remember thinking in a watching her from a distance on state she's hot and david ogden styris was in a a play where a comedy of manners where he had he was kind of like charles win chest he was good at that playing a stuffy stuffy guy and he but he was great and you know he did other stuff but he got their he's pretty young he didn't have to do anything else gone too soon will you seventy while too soon for you yeah well richie's a match festival ask on may i can't tell you how many people tweeted or facebook may about that it's never going to happen now now now hang on what ain't who do you have left radar sure you got colonel colonel a nope none old ed hurdles blood for how oh he found older and all of the red is eur loretta switch still rao not lips you got joe oh you've got to the mud hens uh the town jamie farr fiat much longer he's in his late eighty's efc that old leejay he saw bj b gmi clearly yep but what you've got to who's the who's in charge of the mortgage motor brizo risen what does that akio could get offers the interview him every six months on the radio is pretty he's actually pretty good so i after every one calling me out saying hey you know what you need to get on this massive khan i posted a picture in the salt lake fan ex group i'm part of right and said who would be down to pay extra money for a photo opportunity and a meet.

juilliard david ogden patti lupone charles facebook akio jerry old david ogden styris richie joe jamie farr salt lake six months
"juilliard" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Goal i didn't think i was going to be able to go but again god opened the doors and my sisterinlaw looked after my children i had five by that time and uh he uh as i say the doors open open financially i wasn't going to go with my husband but things just happen the lord opened the doors and we got to go there and uh in that experience i had always wanted to be a singer and that hadn't churn go too well because of sickness in home my mother taking a stroke and uh and my seeing teacher uh taking a heart attack all just about the time i was um 18 uh and ready to try to train as a proper sitting or an even thought i might even go to uh the juilliard school of music so i was very very excited and then all of this happened so the lord took me through all of that as well the back to russia uh we've visited um the sh baptist churches or shoe as people were saying they didn't have any at that point in time they didn't have money but they uh in moscow in leningrad they took us to see um um uh i'll later uh minsk belorussia we heard all about all the way went through during the second world war and um up into latvia regan lot fia then we visited hungary in churches.

moscow leningrad minsk juilliard school of music russia latvia hungary
"juilliard" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So you're going to go into juilliard while you are in high school right on the weekend yes that you already has its pre college division it's really hard to get into i of course at the time it no i mean i had heard of juilliard but to me it was just another of at laguardia high school of the arts ray and i'd never expected to be part of that was never on their radar but as i sort of blossomed into the singer on campus in ninth grade i and i started taking lessons and voice lessons and piano lessons and um until you i became the soloists and my my first music teacher veer at masters encouraged me to you apply to julie i pray college and as okay sure yet what what do i have to do it so she taught me a couple of song enjoy minimum french and as i went down and auditioned twice and then i got it and i was one of three with majors in that programme that's crazy and and so yet thus began this whole experience of being in a very very very high level musical music institution nests building quite get where i was until the eleven th grade and so it yet that i i still feel like that's a dream that i had that connection to what are you doing that was it focused on opera or just general voiced what what was was the list.

juilliard laguardia high school
"juilliard" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Uh he made a huge impression on my life at that time as well was it was an actor that you gravitate it's worth or style of acting of that when you started to kind of glean at the words of her a handful of people who just sort of rocked my world an anything they did i would see in that was me now the robert deniro's the alpe changers the daniel day lewis is the dark jacket b a meryl streep these people who did something magic for me and and and uh anthony hopkins israel people i have few jet narration foreign loved what they did with a shared with us and uh you know uh they made their impressions on me when i was young what was the environment like uh for you at juilliard with which is a tough atmosphere are not not everyone's cup of tea narrowminded nurturing and helpful for you or did it feel like a trial by fire or what it was everything i wanted to be i was sort of obsessed with doing place and being an actor in uh i had gone to ucla for two years and transferred to the juilliard school and i felt like i had done just about everything i wanted to do at ucla at that time so it seemed like a a good time to transition and um mm hmm juilliard was very loving experience for me i always felt very lucky to be a with a group of people that i god.

robert deniro lewis juilliard juilliard school ucla israel two years
"juilliard" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Professors who were teaching in our drama departments so all of them main acting instructors from juilliard were also teaching classes to us so i had the benefit of these resource really great irony teachers and they were the first ones who said to me should take a playwright in class you seem to be really interested in writing because i was sort of writing my own monologues steffan and then so i started taking writing classes from these julia writing teachers and so i was i was very i was doing like you know whatever an entire semester on check off for an entire semester on shakespeare with acting and then i was also taking play writing classes and i and then it was also doing a a lot of meeting with there's a show at columbia called them varsity show which is the show to be part of its all the cool comedy kids to it and it's a an original musical drayton and performed every year i remember i should is your boyfriends who had not been at school with me after and he said well you can put a lot of effort into this massive is certainly everybody was that was you know a big part of my experience too but i so i had i was wanted to be a playwright and then i i got rejected from neil yell and while you and and julia play writing graduate for graduate school and then i um and then but i had already sort of started working on these movies and i'd fi it also as a side bart fallen in love the cinema which i hadn't really been exposed to as an art form until i was in college so i was i i we weren't i was making a living making those movies with joe or or the do plus brothers and i had no idea how this was all going to like really shakeout over time but it became almost like a film school for me in in a new way i found on all levels as an actor as as the drivers.

juilliard steffan columbia joe neil julia
"juilliard" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"The drill the drug and by the way you'll hear that for many rock and roll musicians they picked up that qatar to meet girls that's it 1973 williams attained a full ride to the juilliard school in new york city he was one of only twenty students accepted into the freshman class and one of only two students to be accepted into the advanced program at the school that year the other was christopher reeve here williams talks about leaving juilliard and starting comedy workshops in order to feed off the reaction of an audience he says laughter as an orgasmic intimacy when i left juilliard and couldn't find acting work i started going to comedy workshops and started you know roofing because it was an idea of kind of employing the idea of not having an improv group to work with and then just saying okay do it alone and then gough and see what happens and still looking for and i still look even as of two days ago when i was performing a valley still looking for something to react off of while still exploring and perform so like making members of the audience or looking for stimulus that will trigger something there is an endorphin release of laughter and hardcore left her is close to orgasmic for some pick and as certainly breaks barriers found gets people kind of much more mandible too you know being it isn't intimacy and some cases false or some cases brief but you do get a chance that people will say to me after the i've never left so high okay great and they'll become burnt out like louise began his career doing standup comedy shows in the san francisco bay area in the mid 1970s his first performance took place at the holy city zoo accommodate club in san francisco where he worked his way up from tending bar to getting on stage from there he moved to la and continue you're doing stand up shows at various clubs including the comedy club in nineteen seventy seven were tv producer george schlatter realizing the williams who become an important force in show business asked him to appear on laffan show aired in late 1970s seven and became his debut tv appearance williams also perform to show.

qatar williams juilliard school christopher reeve san francisco george schlatter new york gough endorphin louise la tv producer two days
"juilliard" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"You went to juilliard in your mouth but you're not happy about it this way as he deserves expanding the real night were grandmother purdue artists beat the line but you get look isn't this what we want in employees this ryan this is made in america week bright the muppets there in american original so this goes to so many questions is it like we want our employees we asked them to what did you do every time you start a new job you that the employees they give the employer gets a winner room and he says i needed people to be invested in your work you got to put your heart and soul into this well i'll put it to you because you're a hope your audience know as a quote accomplish actor you've been in numerous commercials yes your komo her i'm just saying how would you how would you or i've seen on law and order obscene and last man so how how would your director feel if you were doing something for expedia let's say which i think you did and and you were like really don't think the character would do that like mr van repair said could you to save the now i don't like that line i think my character will come in your maybe contemplate his relationship with his wife say the lie i liz i was the i would do what they told me but believe me i worked with guys who were like i don't know but that like they're fighting with the director of a commercial it like it's insanity insanity insecure trying to sell it by the way was booking dot come wasn't expedia i've address they're both fine companies i apologise eight three three eight five two four eight six six we're here with ryan raise the what happened did kermit get shafted or you know just disney have the right to you know it's it's a job get any old voice over and you're how do you approach your job do you put your heart and soul into it like this guy witmeyer we'll be back after the break you're listening to tom.

ryan director expedia mr van repair disney america kermit tom
"juilliard" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"juilliard" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"When he decided to go to juilliard got accepted a juilliard his father in he was raised in detroit said to him that's great robin i'm glad you got into juilliard but you should have a backup job just in case and i would suggest plumbing boiler augusta and alan in in your case the way that you pursued this new now committed i'm gonna i'm gonna go after tv and you had been at university of texas at austin for not only a bachelor's but also a master right so now you finisher masire's and initially you're you're a i guess going to go after phd but instead you go after a grant which is going to rival you to pursue this how did that work there was a man running by the way just to go back to answer your the part of your other question there were there were no real courses in terms of how to produce or direct telepia this time out there there was a curriculum on television the history of television you know how it all happened with g e in nbc and the blue networka rednet were and all this so there was a man named bob squire who ran the pbs station the public television station channel nine in austin it's still there k r l anon is what it was and i think it still at they do austin city limits from there now and we played poker together in a wheelchair poker game.

detroit alan austin masire nbc bob squire university of texas