17 Burst results for "juban"

"juban" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

02:06 min | Last month

"juban" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Chickpeas go just like them. She fucking elitist raccoons funny but there is no vhs trailer gay but we all have to bow down. Ask chris cabinets d for a second only alert but though the the the end of the ceremony should be handing out the okay steve. I'm just a contested. They lost you know that the light went dark and now alex rebecca's to come out and suck you know it's Migration is coming out of some nba depending on a private since. None of that's happening because they all got fired. But chris cabin won in dramatic fashion. If you didn't listen to you are mad. Max beyond thunderdome episode last week dramatic fashion. He was down to andhra juban. He overtook him in the secret. Dvd around shocking couldn't believe it. I was very close is very early in the game. He could've won. he could eat. One was nice. The fact that i could have one last round speaks a lot to does your with a great contest. Eric is getting in shape for the vhs trail again which is gonna start very shortly with not in this episode but this month there will be a brand new season twelve vhs trailer but as we Have been teasing entire time. Chris cabin the big winner was allowed to go on. Cameo with the with the We hit movie slush fund and by a cameo of his choice. Chris kevin. would you do. Oh i picked ernie hudson. It had been my plan for quite some time. It's just a presence. i love. Who was who is like runner-up. Would you say giuliani on it. Yeah oh yeah you sent me and that was too late game. I had already had planned. I one i.

chris cabinets alex rebecca chris cabin Max beyond andhra juban nba steve Chris cabin Chris kevin Eric Cameo ernie hudson giuliani
"juban" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

Wendell's World & Sports

02:05 min | 4 months ago

"juban" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

"Game and being the best power for being one of the best big men in the league bar none. I mean you already is that in certain extent but as just these injuries that just keep holding them back from being. that guy. were lebron's going to say here. Let me get on your shoulders. You take a to a championship undone. You know being the guy that's going to be the reason why or the main reason why we don't wanna championship. You be that guy you now be. lebron james. As far as the responsibilities for winning of the team is concerned. And i'll take the co starring role. Please so movie for nets what we're going to be talking about my next podcast. I'll go ahead and talk about. I'm frothing at the mouth to talk about the dallas mavericks and all the stuff. That's going porzingas in luca lucas talking about this rumblings reports that lucas not sure about his long-term Employment with the dallas mavericks in. There might be some discontent and there might be some grumblings and this that and the other mark cuban comes out is called bullshit is not sense that the other if juban have to be soulful syphilis in his mrs is bullshit this nonsense because fake news. This is horrible. This is trash this is garbage concerning lucas lucas. Desire to stay with the mavericks at least that the mantra tiff about that. Then where there's smoke there's fire so although stuff stop porzingas we're gonna deal with him. Who's going to be coach. Now of the mavericks moving forward and the next time. I do a podcast. I mean we're going to have a conclusion of the second round of the eastern conference in the western conference. All be speaking about that so a lot of good things. That's coming up here on windows world in sports. The podcast in the most trying to do some shit to get my youtube channel back in terms of actually going to try to buy a camera in try to actually learn how to a shift together so never too old to learn. Even though technology sucks you special specification for everyone listening to.

youtube lebron lebron james juban second round dallas mavericks mark cuban windows world one of the best lucas luca lucas porzingas mavericks
"juban" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"juban" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"We package up The road that people would recognize from another operating system. The we can bring nixon show as possible you to have. One co basin very easily have native looking applications home on all of the platforms. So if if you're a software developer in your interest in creating applications you know see shop perhaps through mono then yeah lookit platform crite martin. What have 'em juban to enduring. This week Well they've been taking a look at the microsoft age browser on lennox hand. I was inspired to do the same. So i have also installed microsoft h on my new computer. Is it ready ready fossil. Yes unfortunately i can't tell you how well it performs to the other browsers because just everything is fast as lightning at the moment. So i can't tell if it's any faster or slower than any of the others as the first world of first world meet is so fast i can't tell you how else. Yes so yeah i. Taking a quick look at a at a surface level is very reminiscent of chrome chromium in terms of sorts of the initial user interface. But when you start to dig into a little bit particularly in the settings it is clearly very different from crime at that point and the first thing see when you start up is a little animation that tells you we value your privacy and then not messages is repeated several times. I've throughout the settings of the browser. So there's privacy and cookie settings where that message is repeated. The privy and cookie settings are very detailed and lengthy an considerably. More attention has been paid. That than any of the other parts of the settings. But i also noticed. It's got family safety so it's got parental controls. So you can connect the browsers together. And you can set your children's browsing preferences and site blocking an audit what they've been looking at and stuff which has kind of impressed with interesting and as this thing collections. All about yeah. I've tried that out yet. But apparently it's a way to actually save like archive versions of a site inside. The browns are so it's not a link to a site. it's actually. The cycle has appeared..

crite martin em juban microsoft nixon lennox browns
"juban" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"juban" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Nobody likes you us. You hear that Laura Turner. Nobody thinks your whole face Jackson. God bless you. God bless. That's right nobody but us we saw you. Yeah sorry whose verse. Santi is here in his own. Assign She Edison Manila Figueroa and the building. Hey Shannon and low batteries how. Hey Ray girl. She got her ways shots to wash your show. That's right we really. Why are you buying the hurt? Why you minding her business Valerie. Calling Sakir Call. Call in Valerie. Tell Sean where to go and get there. 'cause you know she will right. You can't go on this. Baloney jet. Joe Is he make Dandy women last time you heard somebody they then how many of those left. I have two three or four. How old are you how I think the young as my my nephew is having one skis and I have another cousins three. I think twenty. Serve the old if you you got a name like Nathan. Maybe your kids confront. Let's stop the keeping keeping going. Dumbness because he will no way to changing that name. I put that burden of my son. I Hate I hate them back. I did that today. He's not junior. And My name is Shawn Shawn Quitting Harvey. That's not that doesn't qualify Juban. I should've I should've never named my son at the myself. And my son in law has your name to right right. Yes tour today resort to see all right just saying the young man enervate with. I love my son-in-law smashing my daughter what it is and like the young kids say the factory they don't say that's fax this facts. They bank he's trying to make it home right now. Hopefully don't because somebody from our factory built in tune with the latest slang your body better say that to me is go come a day where. Mandel come around. You're going to be sexually active so you better be ready for Seattle man so like you. Don't nothing out of the water body in your daughter's vase ask me my.

Valerie Shawn Shawn Quitting Harvey Edison Manila Figueroa Laura Turner Dumbness Shannon Santi Jackson Joe Mandel Seattle Ray Sean Nathan Juban
"juban" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Guy showed him h._r. delong shoe butchers or should then then what should be own heart human shot joe schmo make which when here senior g._t. you'll keisha jochen twenty are two hours ago okay to whole by switching peaceful y'all to pay town jail yet your home eighteen five dollars gnashing coyote gene key issue is okay we'll fathers that whole gig jewish will lead to haul will say that with whole idea to teaching german the g the junior via luger join making you wanna make you how'd you both on that she door to kind of war should i know cutting those into hotel to make the it good i even though she's that huytler and join you and new torching teela into enter your legal you for sure that u n t that The debates each that. Thomas tissue, cheer tissue. dates in the out england don't mean to that juban does don't daughter into takaiser tinto to the deeds to the newly the may were out on the league german the jorda to go towards the end Oh, you don't become dumpster, the.

Thomas tissue takaiser tinto joe schmo eighteen five dollars two hours
"juban" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

16:05 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast, Robert Juban with us Robert Jeff Bezos, of course, as unveiled his lunar Lander for his early space company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the Beatles Landers, okay, it's functional, but it's a two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning stage on the surface of the moon. I, you know, I in the book case space, I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it moon direct, and it involves creating a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do. What's called the velocity change? Delta v of six climate is a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer trajectory, and then capture repulsively into lower orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellants from lunar waters. Oxygen. You can feel it on the moon. Why back to Leo, okay? Lower orbit. If you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it and something like a falcon nine and you give it six tons of propellant Achim fly one way to the moon, and this is the most efficient way to do the moon single stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a medium lift launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very very sustainable and the same vehicle that can do six kilometers second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to explode. It's it's a fishing now in terms of concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that be those got from a man named Gerardo meal who believe that you could build. Flying cities in space. And then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of lunar materials. I think that this is possible, but it's more in the far future. I mean, you know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a thousand tons in orbit. One of these colonies is a billion tons in earth orbit. Oh. It's huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make them out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Our time in our this is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do spaces establish the first basis even settlements for humans on the moon and Mars and among the asteroids, creating flying artificial cities. That's that's a generation later. Interesting. He did say one thing which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not gonna wanna stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that rubber? Well, I some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you're born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why people would ever wanna live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So. So be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have Uman settlements on Mars space technology is going to advance by leaps and bounds. And look Columbus cost the Atlantic and ships that even fifty years later, no European attempted to cross the Atlantic, and he did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no it Lanta class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If he hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In fact, one of the ships was sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three mastered caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens. Once you become transoceanic you start creating ever-more advanced Transocean, transportation NATs, the same thing with interplanetary, the first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. My view in March direct style tuna can habitats that relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months. Do the transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury on and you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents have how they immigrated tomorrow, we like us listening to stories of our grandparents team over and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being sick for four weeks while they did it and that so it the, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in luxury will make it possible for more adventurous salsa travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space Telus. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet in its habitable zone that is in the zone where you have the right temperatures for life. And that's eighty billion planets. It's just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from the vast majority of you and beings are not going to live on the earth. Still will be billions of people on the earth's going to remain inhabited world, but there will be thousands of digital inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's gonna lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jeff in Goldsboro North Carolina to get us started. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, Robert, North Carolina. I'm a member of the March looking for you new book there, Robert George head on Frank white wrote Cosma hypothesis over you, and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay outlining your philosophy space. What would be the three main aspects or three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical three points that you would you would give an over what about technological singularity? How would that affect space like all right? Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural raw materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture oil. It was not a resource until we invented oil drilling refining machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power. The Tyrian is not a resource now. But it will be once we develop fusion power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once there are resourceful people there. We are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manatee by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places into places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also chew on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space, that's another fundamental point. Inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are the more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention and. What we're talking about is is is is is creating a future for humanity as grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes in the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species a species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now, I mean, well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions for many different nations. You know? You know, we have books paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans created the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into kind of masturbation books and mass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians are going to want to invent all kinds of things they're going to need first of all in any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you don't wanna have labor saving machinery have artificial intelligence. You're going to want to have super productive crops because you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely affective forms of of energy production such as fusion power. But what you gonna wanna free your population to the? Greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy is spaces creativity. And creativity. Will get it done. Let's go to Joel and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How okay Joel. I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I guess the other night come on and said, you know, that the the earth is very special because it it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet moon is very special and unique. It's extra large immedi or came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period, we're in now. So that advance life could could exist. You know? None of this stuff is evidence that this is going to happen. You know, a around Mars or any of the planet outside of the moon. We can barely go on the moon and do anything except hop around like bunnies. I don't know. I just wanted to see what you thought about that. Well, you know. What we have generally found as we go into space is that if there's one there's another the the the we have based on the findings of the Kepler space telescope, there's something like eighty billion earth sized planets in habitable zone of their stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy eighty billion there's ten of them for every person there is on earth today. Ten planets for every person on earth today. You know, when I was a kid, there were still people going around with a theory that only the son had planet's because it would take a collision with another star to make planets now, we know that practically all stars have planets and these theories that you know, somehow that were special and or that life could only on her. I see no reason whatsoever to believe that life would only Volve on are. In fact, I see plenty of reasons to believe that evolves everywhere everywhere proof of that is that life appeared on earth almost as soon as they could okay within a very short time of the of the earth cooling down enough for life to be here. Life appeared here, we have no evidence that the earth was ever habitable and style at the same time. So I think life everywhere and the whole history of life on earth is one of development from simple form smart complex. Firms with greater capabilities for activity and intelligence and ever more rapid evolution. If why everywhere intelligence is everywhere. I think. You know, I I don't think that makes us less important. It means that life on earth is part of a much bigger phenomenon. One of cosmic significance as opposed to just bunch of weirdos living on his strange planet, and in total Lee sterile universe. I think life is fundamental to the universe. What about the argument that humans cannot sustain the zero gravity and they can't handle the Brady? Okay. Well, zero gravity does deteriorate bone and muscle 'cause you lack the workout that you get from just walking around and gravity. Now. You can resist it by doing strenuous exercise programs on exercise machines on the space station, like two hours a day. But I think the best way is if you're in a spacecraft rotate spacecraft create artificial, gravity by centrifugal force terms of radiation. You need a solar flare storm shelter on your spaceship that can be created using provision water and food can be used to block out solar flares. And so I I mean, I think we can do it. You know? I mean, these are all real considerations. But their technical answers to all of them. Let's go to Gordon and plant city Florida, Gordon would squeeze you in here before the break. Now, I'm the biggest Star Trek saying there is a doctor's Renan, George. Thank you, both for taking my call all respect, Robert. I've heard very reputable scientists and a few degrees behind on nine. Difficult is not impossible to to build something strong enough to protect one from the radiation out there in space, and you're basically it fried..

Robert Jeff Bezos Galaxy Joel Florida Europeans North Carolina Kepler space telescope propellant Achim Gordon Robert Juban Leo Delta China Gerardo Columbus Kenyan Rift Valley Robert
"juban" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:44 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Back to coast to coast rubber Juban with us. Robert, Jeff Bezos, of course courses unveiled his lunar Lander for his early space company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the bees, though slander is okay, it's functional, but it's a two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning stage on the surface of the moon. I, you know, in the book case for space, I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it moon direct, and it involves creating a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do. What's called the velocity change? Delta v of six there's a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer trajectory, and then capture repulsively into lower orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellant from lunar waters making high. Oxygen. You can feel it on the moon. Fly back to Leo, okay? Low-earth orbit if you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it and something like a falcon nine, and you give it six tons of propellant it could fly one way to the moon. And this is the most efficient way to do the moon single stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a meeting with launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very very sustainable and the same vehicle. They can do six kilometers the second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to explode. It's it's it's a fishing now. In terms of these those concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that these those got from a man named Gerardo meal who believe that you could build fly. Cities in space, and then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of lunar materials. I think that this is possible, but it's more in the far future. I mean, you know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a thousand tons in orbit. One of these colonies is a billion tons in earth orbit huge huge. It's huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make them out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you could reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Our time in our this is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do in spaces establish the first basis even settlements for you on the moon and Mars and among the asteroids, creating flying artificial cities. That's that's a generation later. Interesting taking he did say one thing, which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not gonna wanna stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that, Robert? Well, I some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why people would ever want to live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So. So be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have Uman settlements on Mars space technology is going to advance by leaps and bounds. And look Columbus cost the Atlantic and ships that even fifty years later. No European attempt is across the Atlantic. And he did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no it Lanta class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If you hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In fact, one of the ships was sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three mastered caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens. And. Once you become transoceanic you start creating ever-more advanced Transocean transportation, not the same thing with interplanetary. The first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. In my view in March direct style tuna can habitats that relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months. Do the transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury. And you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents have how they immigrated and be like us listening to stories of our grandparents team over and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being sick for four weeks while they did it and that so it the, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in luxury will make it possible for more adventurous salsa travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space tell. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet and its habitable zone that is in the zone where you have the right temperatures for life, and that's eighty billion planets versus just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from now, the vast majority of human beings are not going to live on the earth. There still will be billions of people on the earth's going to remain inhabited world, but there will be thousands of dishes inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's gonna lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jefferson Goldsboro North Carolina to get us started. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, george. Hi. Robert, North Carolina. A member of the March looking for to you new book there, Robert George head on Frank white wrote Cosma hypothesis over you, and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay outlining your philosophy space. What would be the three main aspects or three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical three points that you would you would give and what about technological singularity? How would that affect space like all right? Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture oil. It was not a resource until we invented oil drilling refining machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power. The Terry MS not a resource now, but it will be once we developed Uson power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once there are resourceful people there. We are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manatee by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places into places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also chew on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space, that's another fundamental point inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are the more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention. And what we're talking about is is is is is creating a future for you. Mandy. As grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes and the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species a species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now, I mean, well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions for many different nations. You know, we we have books Kate paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans created, you know, the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into the kind of masturbation books and mass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians. Are going to want to invent all kinds of things they're going to need first of all and any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you're gonna wanna have labor saving machinery have artificial intelligence. You're gonna wanna have super productive crops because you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely effective forms of energy production such as fusion power. But you, and what you gonna wanna free your population to the greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy spaces creativity. And creativity. Will get it done. Let's go to Joel and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How okay Joel. I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I heard a guest the other night come on and said, you know, that the earth is very special because it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet moon is very special and unique. It's extra large immedi or came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period, where now so that advance life could could exist. You know? None of this stuff is evidence that this is going to happen. You know around Mars or any of the planet outside of the moon. We can barely go on the moon and do anything except hop around like bunnies. I don't know. I just wanted to see what you thought about that. Well, you know. What we have generally found as we go into space is that if there's one there's another the the the we have based on the findings of the Kepler space telescope, there's something like eighty billion earth sized planets in habitable zone of their stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy eighty billion there's ten of them for every person there is on earth today. Ten planets for every person on earth today. You know, when I was a kid, there were still people going around with a theory that only the son had planet's because it would take a collision with another star to make planets now, we know that practically all stars have planets and these theories that you know, somehow that were special and or that life could only on her. I know reason whatsoever to believe that life would only Volve on are. In fact, I see plenty of reasons to believe that evolves everywhere everywhere proof of that is that life appeared on earth almost as soon as they could okay within a very short time of the of the earth cooling down enough for life to be here. Life appeared here, we have no evidence that the earth was ever habitable and style at the same time. So I think life everywhere and the whole history of life on earth is one of development from simple forms Tamar complex for. With greater capabilities for activity and intelligence, and in fact, ever more rapid evolution. If why everywhere intelligence is everywhere, I think, but you know, I I don't think that makes us less important. It means that life on earth is part of a much bigger phenomenon. One of cosmic significance as opposed to just bunch of weirdos living on his strange planet, and in total Lee sterile universe. I think life is fundamental to the universe. What about the argument that humans cannot sustain the zero gravity and they can't handle the Brady Asian? Okay. Well, zero gravity does deteriorate bone and muscle 'cause you lack the workout that you get from just walking around and gravity. Now. You can resist it by doing strenuous exercise programs on exercise machines on the space station, like two hours a day. But I think the best way is. If you're in a spacecraft rotates spacecraft, create artificial, gravity by centrifugal force terms of radiation. You need a solar flare storm shelter on your spaceship that can be created using provision water and food can be used to block out solar flares. And so I I mean, I think we can do it. You know? I mean, these are all real considerations. But there technical answers to all of them. Let's go to Gordon and plant city Florida, Gordon with squeeze you in here before the break you kinda stole my thunder. But I wanna go. Now, I'm the biggest Star Trek saying there is a doctor's Renan, George..

Robert George Jeff Bezos Joel Florida Kepler space telescope Europeans Galaxy Leo Delta Transocean Atlantic Columbus Gordon Gerardo Mediterranean Jefferson Goldsboro North Caro North Carolina
"juban" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

13:29 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast, Robert Juban with us Robert Jeff Bezos, of course, has unveiled his lunar Lander for his Earl space company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the Beatles Landers, okay, it's functional, but it's the two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning stage on the surface of the moon. I, you know, in the book space, I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it known direct, and it involves creating a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do what's called a velocity change. Delta v of six is a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer trajectory, and then capture repulsively into lower orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellant from lunar water is making you can meet fuel it on the moon. Fly back to Leo, okay? Low-earth orbit if you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it and something like a falcon nine and you give it. Six tons of propellant Achim fly one way to the moon. And this is the most efficient way to do. The moon's single stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a meeting with launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very very sustainable vehicle that they can do six kilometers the second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to explode. It's a fishing now in terms of these concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that these those got from a man named Rondo meal who believe that you could build flying cities in space, and then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of lunar materials. I think that this is possible, but it's more in the far future. I mean, you know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a foul tons in orbit. One of these colonies is a billion tons in Thorpe it oh, huge huge. It's huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make them out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you could reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Art time in our this is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do in spaces establish the first basis even settlements for you on the moon in Mars, and among the asteroids, creating flying artificial cities. That's that's a generation later. Interesting take, and he did say one thing, which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not to want to stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that, Robert? Well, I some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you were born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why people would ever want to live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So. Oh, be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have Uman settlements on Mars space technology is gonna dance by leaps and bounds. And look Columbus cost the Atlantic in ships that even fifty years later, no European attempted to cross the Atlantic, and he did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no it Lanta class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If he hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In fact, one of the ships was sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three masted caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens. Once you become transoceanic you start creating evermore advanced Transocean transportation, not the same thing with interplanetary. The first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. In my view in March direct style tuna can habitats relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months. Do the transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury. And you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents have how they immigrated tomorrow, we like us listening to stories of our grandparents team over and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being basic for four weeks while they did it and that that so it, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in luxury will make it possible. For more adventurous souls to travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space tell. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet and tablet Ables zone. That is in the zone where you have the right? Temperatures for life. And that's eighty billion planets there is just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from now, the vast majority of human beings are not going to live on the earth is still will be billions of people on the earth's going to remain inhabited world. But then we'll be thousands of digital inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's gonna lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jeff in Goldsboro North Carolina to get started. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, Robert, North Carolina. I'm a member of the March looking for to you new book there, Robert George head on Frank white who wrote Cosma hypothesis over you, and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay outlining your philosophy space. What would be the three main aspects or three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical three points that you would you would give and what about technological singularity? How would that affect? Thanks like, all right. Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture. Oil was not a resource until we invented oil drilling refining and machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power deteriorate is not a resource now. But it will be once we developed fusion power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once they are resourceful people here, we are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manatee by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places in two places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also true on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space. That's another fundamental point. Inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention and. What we're talking about is is is is is creating a future for you, man. As grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes in the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now, I mean, well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions from many different nations, you know. You know, we have books paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans created the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into kind of masturbation books and mass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians are going to want to invent all kinds of things they're going to need first of all in any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you don't wanna have labor saving machinery have artificial intelligence. You're gonna wanna have super productive crops 'cause you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely affective forms of of energy production such as fusion power. But and what you gonna wanna free your population to the. Greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy spaces creativity. Creativity. Will get it done. Let's go to Joel and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How okay Joel. I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I guess the other night come on and said, you know, that the earth is very special because it it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet or moon is very special and unique. It's extra large immedi or came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period were in now. So that advanced life could could exist, you know, none of this stuff is evidence that this is going to happen. You know, a around Mars or any of the planet outside of the moon. We can barely go on the moon and do anything except hop around like bunnies. I don't know. I just wanted to see what you thought about that. Well, you know. What we have generally found as we go into space is that if there's one there's another the the the we have based on the findings of the Kepler space telescope, there's something like eighty billion earth sized planets in habitable zone of their stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy eighty billion there's ten of them for every person there is on earth today. Ten planets for every person on earth today. You know, when I was a kid, there were still people going around with the theory that only the son had planet's because it would take a collision with another star to make planets now, we know that practically all stars have planets and these theories that you know, somehow that we're special and where that life could only Volve on her..

Robert Jeff Bezos Galaxy Joel Kepler space telescope Europeans propellant Achim North Carolina Robert Juban Leo Delta China Robert Thorpe Columbus Rondo Kenyan Rift Valley Goldsboro
"juban" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

16:46 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"To coast Robert Juban with us for Robert Jeff Bezos, of course, has unveiled his lunar Lander for his Earl space company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the Beatles Landers. Okay, it it's functional, but it's a two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning a stage on the surface. I you know, I in the book space I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it noon direct, and it involves creating a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do. What's called the velocity change? Delta v of six a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer trajectory as in capture repulsively into lower orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellants from lunar waters making hydrogen oxygen. You can be on the moon. Fly back to Leo. Okay. If you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it in something like a falcon nine and you give it. Six tons of propellant Achim fly one way to the moon. And this is the most efficient way to do the moon single-stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a meeting with launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very, very sustainable vehicle. It can do six kilometers the second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to explode. It's fishing. Now in terms of concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that from a man named Gerardo meal. Who believed that you could build flying cities in space. And then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of lunar materials. I think that this is possible. But it's more in the far future. You know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a thousand tons in orbit. One of these is a billion tons in orbit. Huge huge huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make them out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you could reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Our time in ours. This is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do in spaces establish the first basis even settlements for humans on the moon and Mars, and among the asteroids, creating artificial cities. That's as a generation later. Interesting taking he did say one thing, which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not going to want to stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that, Robert? Well, I. Some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you were born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why? Live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have Uman settlements on Mars space technology is going to advance by leaps and bounds. And look Columbus cost the Atlantic in ships that even fifty years later, no European attempted to cross the Atlantic, and he did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no Atlantic class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If he hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In fact, one of the ships sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three mastered caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens and arts. Once you become transoceanic you start creating evermore advanced Transocean transportation. It's the same thing with interplanetary. The first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. My view in Mars direct style tuna can habitat relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months to do. The transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury. And you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents have how they immigrated tomorrow's we like us listening to stories of our grandparents came over, and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being seasick for four weeks while they did it, and that that so it the, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in will make it possible. For more adventurous souls to travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space. Tell us. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet in its habitable zone that is in the zone where you have the right? Temperatures for life. And that's eighty billion planets, there's it's just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from now, the vast majority of you and beings are not going to live on the earth is still will be billions of people on the earth's going to remain inhabited world, but there will be thousands of additional inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's going to lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jeff in Goldsboro North Carolina to get started. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, Robert, North Carolina. I'm a member of the March looking for you new book there, Robert George head-on on Frank white wrote Cosma hypothesis over you, and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay, outlining your philosophy is space. What would be the three main aspects or three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical three points that you would you would give an what about technological singularity? How would that affect space like all right? Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural raw materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture. Oil was not a resource until we invented oil drilling and refining and machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power. The Tyrian is not a resource now. But it will be once we developed fusion power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once there are resourceful people here, we are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manatee by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places in two places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also chew on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space. That's another fundamental point stand inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are the more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention and. What we're talking about is is is is is creating a future for you man as grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes in the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species a species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now, I mean, well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions from many different nations, you know. Know, we have books Kate paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans created, you know, the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into the kind of mass circulation books, and amass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians are going to want to invent all kinds of things they're going to need first of all in any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you're gonna wanna have labor saving machinery, you don't have artificial intelligence. You're going to want to have super productive crops because you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely effective forms of of energy production such as fusion power. But you, and what you gonna wanna free your population to the greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy space creativity. And creativity. Will get it done. Let's go to Joel and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How the senior. Okay. Joel. I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I guess the other night come on and said, you know, that the the earth is very special because it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet moon is very special and unique. It's extra large a meteoric came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period, we're in now. So that advanced life could could exist, you know. None of this stuff is evidence that this is going to happen. You know, a around Mars or any of the planet outside of the moon. We can barely go on the moon and do anything except hop around like bunnies. I don't know. I just wanted to see what you thought about that. Well, you know. What we have generally found as we go into space is that if there's one there's another the the the we have based on on the findings of the Kepler space telescope. There's something like eighty billion earth sized planets in habitable zone of their stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy eighty billion there's ten of them for every person there is on earth today. Ten planets for every person on earth today. You know, when I was a kid, there were still people going around with the theory that only the son had planet's because it would take a collision with another star to make planets now, we know that practically all stars have planets and these theories that you know, somehow that were special or that life could only on her. I see no reason whatsoever to believe that life would only Volve on our in fact, I see plenty of reasons to believe that evolves everywhere everywhere the proof of that is that life appeared on earth almost as soon as it could okay within a very short time of the of the earth cooling down enough for life to be here. Life appeared here, we have no evidence that the earth was ever habitable and style at the same time. So I think whites everywhere and the whole history of life on earth is one of development from simple forms smart complex for. With greater capabilities for activity and intelligence, and in fact, ever more rapid evolution. If why everywhere intelligence is everywhere, I think, but you know, I I don't think that makes us less important. It means that life on earth is part of a much bigger phenomenon. One of cosmic significance as opposed to just bunch of weirdos living on his strange planet, and in total Lee sterile universe. I think life is fundamental to the universe. What about the argument that humans cannot sustain the zero gravity and they can't handle the Brady ation? Okay. Well, zero gravity does deteriorate bone and muscle because you lacked the workout that you get from just walking around and gravity on. Now. You can resist it by doing strenuous exercise programs on exercise machines on the space station, like two hours a day. But I think the best way is. If you're in a spacecraft rotate the spacecraft create artificial, gravity by centrifugal force terms of radiation. You need a solar flare storm shelter on your spaceship that can be created using provision water and food can be used to block out solar flares. And so I I mean, I think we can do it. You know? I mean, these are all real considerations. But there are technical answers to all of them. Let's go to Gordon and plant city Florida, Gordon with squeeze you in here before the break you kinda. Now, I'm the biggest Star Trek saying there is a doctor. Sue Brennan is yours. Thank you, both for taking my call all due respect rock, Robert I've heard of reputable scientists and a few degrees behind on nine. Difficult is not impossible to to build something strong enough to protect one from the cosmic radiation out there in space in your basically ended fried. And so I just want to hear your take on this partly answered I just want to redouble on that. Because it's a a really an important topic. Yes. It certainly is now. Okay. All right. So this requires going to a little more detail, there's two kinds of radiation that can get you in space, there solar flares this concentrate solar flares, you can block out using provision about five inches of water or its equivalent in food will block solar flare particle. So you use your pantries your shelter solar flare happens, you go in there rocked up in there for few hours, and you come out it's going to happen once maybe twice during a round trip mission to Mars now this cosmic rays, as you say, they are much more energetic..

Robert Jeff Bezos Joel Florida Europeans North Carolina Galaxy Kepler space telescope propellant Achim Beatles Landers Gordon Robert Juban Delta Robert Gerardo meal Columbus China Robert I
"juban" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:31 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast, Robert Juban with us Robert Jeff Bezos, of course, has unveiled his lunar Lander for his aerospace company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the Beatles is okay, it's functional, but it's a two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning a stage on the surface of the moon. I, you know, I in the book case for space, I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it noon direct, and it involves creating a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do. What's called the velocity change? Delta v of six climate is a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer trajectory, and then capture repulsive Lee into lower orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellants from the lunar waters making hydrogen oxygen. You can meet few it on the moon Twi back to Leo, okay? Low-earth orbit. If you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it in something like a falcon nine and you give it a six tons of propellant Achim fly one way to the moon, and this is the most efficient way to do the moon single-stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a meeting with launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very very sustainable and the same vehicle. They can do six kilometers the second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to eight. It's officiant now in terms of visas concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that beat those got from the man named Gerardo Neil. Who believed that you could build flying cities in space. And then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of Luna materials. I think that this is possible, but it's more in the far future. I mean, you know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a foul tons in orbit. One of these colonies is a billion tons in orbit. Huge huge. It's huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make him out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you couldn't reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Art time in our this is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do faces establish the first basis even settlements for humans on the moon in Mars, and among the asteroids, creating flying artificial cities. That's that's a generation later. Interesting take that he did say one thing, which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not gonna want to stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that, Robert? Well, I some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you were born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why people would ever want to live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So. So be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have you settlements on Mars space technology is going to advance by leaps and bounds and say, look, Columbus cost the Atlantic and ships that even fifty years later, no European would've attempted to cross the Atlantic. And he did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no Atlantic class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If he hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In fact, one of the ships was sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three mastered caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens and arts. Once you become transoceanic you start creating evermore advanced Transocean transportation. Now, it's the same thing with interplanetary the first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. My view in March direct style tuna can habitat relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months to do. The transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury on and you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents at how they immigrated tomorrow's we like us listening to stories of our grandparents came over, and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being basic for four weeks while they did it, and that that so it the, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in luxury will make it possible. For more adventurous souls to travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space. Tell us. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet and its habitable zone that is in the zone where you have the right? Temperatures for life. And that's eighty billion planets. There's is just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from now, the vast majority of you in beings are not going to live on the earth. There still will be billions of people on the earth. There gonna remain inhabited world, but there will be thousands of additional inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's going to lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jeff in Goldsboro North Carolina to get started. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, george. Hi. Robert, North Carolina. I'm a member of the Mars society looking for you new book there Robert George head on Frank white who wrote Cosma hypothesis and over you and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay, outlining your philosophy is space. What would be the three main aspects or three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical three points that you would you would give and what about technological singularity? How would that affect space like all right? Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural raw materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture. Oil was not a resource until we invented oil drilling refining and machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power deteriorate is not a resource now. But it will be once we developed fusion power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once they are resourceful people there. We are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manatee by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places in two places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also true on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space. That's another fundamental point. Inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention and. What we're talking about is is is is is creating a future for humanity as grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes in the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species a species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now, I mean, well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions from many different nations, you know. Know, we have books paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans to you to, you know, the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into the kind of masturbation books, and amass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians are going to want to invent all kinds of things they're going to need first of all in any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you don't wanna have labor saving machinery, you have artificial intelligence. You're gonna wanna have super productive crops because you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely effective forms of of energy productions such as fusion power. But and but you gonna wanna free your population to the. Greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy spaces creativity. And creativity. Will get it done. Let's go to Joel and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How the scene? Okay. Joel. I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I guess the other night come on and said, you know, that the earth is very special because it it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet moon is very special and unique. It's extra large a media came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period, where now so that advanced life could could exist, you know, none of this stuff is evidence that this is going to happen. You know, a around Mars or any of the planet outside of the moon. We can barely go on the moon and do anything except hop around like bunnies..

Robert Jeff Bezos Joel Robert Robert George Galaxy North Carolina Beatles propellant Achim Europeans Robert Juban Leo Delta China Lee Gerardo Neil Columbus
"juban" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

12:17 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"To coast to coast, Robert Juban with us Robert Jeff Bezos, of course, has unveiled his lunar Lander for his Earl space company. What do you think of that? And also, what do you think of his ambitious vision for space colonization where he literally wants to put people up there? Well, the bees, though slander is okay, it's functional, but it's a two stage Lander, which means it's not reusable. It will always be abandoning a stage on the surface of the moon. I you know, I in the book space I outlined my plan for doing the moon, which is a plan. I call it noon direct. And it involves feeding a Lander that I call it a lunar excursion vehicle. That's one stage that has enough propulsion to do. What's called the velocity change? Delta v of six kilometers a second which is enough to take off from the moon and go on to transfer its trajectory, and then capture repulsively into lowers orbit or alternatively to do the same thing in the other direction. So if you have a base on the moon that is making propellants from lunar waters making hydrogen oxygen. You can feel it on the moon. Fly back to Leo, okay? Low-earth orbit. If you then to fly back to the moon, you lift a crew of astronauts up to it in something like a falcon nine and you give it. Six tons of propellant it can fly one way to the moon. And this is the most efficient way to do the moon single stage fully reusable take advantage of Luna propellant, and each lunar mission would require only a single launch of a meaningless launch vehicle like a falcon nine, and this would be very very sustainable vehicle if they can do six kilometers a second. It could hop all over the moon and come back to the base. It gives you a global exploration capability. It's it's not only a cheap way to explode. It's now in terms of these concepts of building space colonies in earth orbit. These are ideas that be got from man named Rondo meal who believed that you could build flying cities in space, and then they would be funded by beaming power down to the earth, and you would build them out of lunar materials. I think that this is possible, but it's more in the far future. I mean, you know, look, even the most inefficient NASA Mars mission is maybe a thousand tons in orbit. One of these is a billion tons in earth orbit. Oh, huge huge huge. So I can see such things flying cities in space. Actually, I'd make them out of asteroids in the asteroid belt. And because they're many of them are made out of metal on you could reach fabricate them there. But this is not. Art time in ours. This is a generation or two down the line. So this is not a realistic plan for what we what we can do it spaces establish the first basis even settlements for humans on the moon in Mars, and among the asteroids, creating flying artificial cities. That's as a generation later interest in taking he did say one thing, which I find very palatable, and that is humans will still want to come back to earth. They're going to want to visit earth. They're not going to want to stay on the moon or Mars permanently. What do you think of that, Robert? Well, I some people will want to come back. Sure. But some people wanna stay permanently. I think if you're born and raised on Mars, you probably find coming to earth rather, unpleasant. You'd wonder why people would ever want to live in a place with three times normal, gravity, and this would even more. So. So be the case with the moon. I look. If he thinks we're just going to space to hang around in earth orbital space. I think that's a limited vision. If that's what he's thinking. We're going to space to expand. Infinitely once we have Uman settlements on Mars space technology is going to advance by leaps and bounds. And look Columbus crossed the Atlantic in ships that even fifty years later, no European would have attempted to cross the Atlantic. And. He did it in little Mediterranean class boats because there were no Atlantic class ships before Europeans became transatlantic. If he hit the perfect storm. He would have been cooked. Yes. In that one of the ships was sunk and the but fifty years later, you have people traveling in stout three mastered caravels and then later on there's the clipper ships, then there's the steamboats in the ocean liners in the Boeing seven forty sevens. And arts once you become transoceanic you start creating evermore advanced Transocean transportation, not the same thing with interplanetary. The first people that go to Mars, we'll go, you know in. In my view in March direct style tuna can habitat relatively cramped relatively small. They'll take six months to do. The transit their grandchildren will do those transits on fusion powered spacecraft that will do it in two weeks in luxury. And you know, when they listen to the stories of their grandparents have how they immigrated tomorrow's if you like us listening to stories of our grandparents came over, and, you know, eighteen nineties or something and tramp steamers, and, you know, living into bilge in eating orange peels and all this and and being seasick for four weeks while they did it, and that that so it the, but the same technology that will allow it to be possible to travel to Mars, and you know, in in in a few weeks in watch we will make it possible. For more adventurous souls to travel to the stars. And you know, I mean, that's the other thing. I mean, we have now discovered through our space Telus. Scopes that most planets most stars have planets. In fact, one in five stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy has an earth sized planet in its habitable zone that is in zone where you have the right? Temperatures for life. And that's eighty billion planets. There's just one of them. Okay. You know, five hundred years from now, the vast majority of human beings are not going to live on the earth is still will be billions of people on the earth. They're going to remain inhabited world. But then we'll be thousands of additional inhabited worlds orbiting stars in this region of the galaxy. We're going to become an interstellar civilization Mars is not the final destination Mars is just the direction, but it's going to. It's the direction that's gonna lead us onward. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Now, let's go to Jeff in Goldsboro North Carolina to get a start at. Hey, jeff. Go ahead, sir. Hi, Robert, North Carolina. I'm a member of the Mars society looking for to you new book there, Robert George head on Frank white wrote Cosma hypothesis over you, and he advocates for a need for a philosophy of space. If you had write an essay outlining your philosophy space. What would be the three main aspects are three main principles? You would include in that essay. I think practically we would go for land resources and energy and improve our quality of life. But I'm looking for a philosophical scree points that you would you would give and what about technological singularity? How would that affect face like, all right? Essential point that I make in the book is that there's no such thing as a natural resource. There's only natural raw materials. There are no natural resources on earth. Land was not a resource until people invented agriculture. Oil was not a resource until we invented oil drilling and refining and machines that could use the product uranium was not a resource to we invented nuclear power. The Terry MS not a resource now, but it will be once we developed fusion power. There are no natural resources on Mars. But there will be once there are resourceful people there. And that's the key point people are the resource and the bodies in space are the materials, and the, you know, there's no natural resources on asteroids. They will be once they are resourceful people there. We are going to vastly expand the resources available to you. Manitou by going into space going to new world taking our creativity with us and turning barren places in two places that are full of resources for the development and progress of humanity and the point then becomes that? This is also true on earth. And you know, by the way, the earth is in space. That's another fundamental point. Inventions made anywhere ultimately benefit, everyone everywhere. So the more people the more free. They are the more educated. They are the more inventors you have and inventions are cumulative so as we spread out into space as we create new branches of human civilization. We're creating new centers of invention. We're going to create thousands and ultimately millions of new centers of invention. And what we're talking about is is is is creating a future for you, man. And he as grant in comparison to our current situation as our current situation is in comparison to humanity's original situation, which was a few tribes in the Kenyan Rift Valley, a local species, not a global species a species with very limited technological repertoire instead of you know, all the things we have now. And and all the things we have now I mean. Well, you know, there's been unequal contributions. But there's been many contributions from many different nations, you know. We have books Kate paper and printing was invented in China, but Europeans created, you know, the movable type and the Latin alphabet, and and and and basically took those things that were invented in China and turned it into the kind of master relation books, and amass literate population that we now have so it goes back and forth. And and you know Mars is going to be a center of invention. The martians are going to want to invent all kinds of things they've been a need. First of all in any space colony is going to be tremendous labor shortage. So you don't wanna have labor saving machinery, you don't have artificial intelligence. You're gonna wanna have super productive crops because you're growing them in greenhouses, you're gonna have extremely effective forms of of energy productions such as fusion power. But and what you gonna wanna free your population. The greatest extent possible to innovate because once again, it's human beings that are the ultimate resource. So the philosophy spaces creativity. And creativity will get it done. Let's go to Joel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hello, joel. Hey, guys. How are you the cage? All I hope you are too. Yeah. I'm just going to play devil's advocate here. I I'm just curious. I mean, I heard a guest the other night come on and said, you know, that the earth is very special because it it has an extra heavy core. From like, a one in a trillion chance of a collision with another planet moon is very special and unique. It's extra large a meteoric came just at the right time to create the Goldilocks period wherein now. So that advance life could could exist..

Robert Jeff Bezos Europeans North Carolina Joel Galaxy Robert Juban Leo Delta Columbus Robert Rondo Mediterranean China Fort Lauderdale Kenyan Rift Valley Florida Goldsboro
"juban" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"To run Jason Vargas out there every fifth day the candle but said to north Brunswick New Jersey, Tom is up next. He's on a foul south, Tommy. I agree with you one thousand percent JJ. You know when I called Tony last night. I told them I had no confidence at all in Jason bargains. And you know for memo to Brody wet Van Dyke and you had a great off season. You know, you wanna be ripping talk. You know, it's gonna be a tough division, and you can't afford to give away games like this. I don't care what time of the year. It is. I mean, I release them and can Corey Onslow him down every single time. He pitches each thanks to my and Tom Mickey Senate after the game for everybody was wondering about Jason fogelson his status within the rotation. Mickey was basically like look, what do you want me to do right now? We don't have a whole lot of options internally and the guy that may have been the candidate take mortgages spun the rotation you. So what he did? He wasn't much better. In fact, he might have been worse. Yeah. Yeah. Well. It not on Calloway on the general manager, they're gonna they cannot keep running the sky out there, and he's they should release. Some I know that they eat eight million bucks. But if they want to be a contender, I know it's only a fifth starter, but they can't afford to keep every single tiny pitches. He can't get it out. He's terrible. He's killing the bullpen. And it's not fair to the hitter is. I mean, much seven months tonight. They you know, when you score seven runs, I know once in a while, you know, when when you do that. But you know, they're right now, they're on their, you know, they're they're playing. Well, they can't afford. He's like a Downer. You could see Sebastian as if it started. He's a gamer. He he does not like he used to be. But he fights he battles. And these, you know, I think he's all Famer to tell you the truth with that Tom, and he gave the keys exactly what they needed on Saturday. The Yankees pick me up the Yankees have had this brutal stretch of baseball. They've been playing poorly. They pitch poorly. They school runs. They don't school runs. They pitch. Well, it's one of those like terrible paradoxes. You don't wanna be in? And you combine that with all the injuries? They have they need to pick meal to give five shutout innings at assise about the hope gets these team going you hope the bottom half of the seventh inning gets the New York Yankees going, but to your point about a fifth starter. Yes. That is what you want out of a fish store. You gotta go seven eight innings. You don't be checkup the Brahmin, Noah Syndergaard. But you cannot be the guy that buries your team's chances of winning a ballgame right out of the shoot in the first sitting by not making it out of the first thing and JJ every single time. He starts he gets lit up and they can't afford them. You know, I know he had pitched a little better in the second half. But they he doesn't pitch. Well, and they they've got to do something about it. I know Kyko probably once of money is there any other free agent pitcher is available because I it's still free agent pitchers out there. That's the problem of aside from Dallas gyco. It's very tough to. Find name that fits the Bill very tough to fund that's way, look GIO Gonzalez. And I have no idea what he's going to end up being, but you could have had him very, very cheap, and we'll see Juban zealous ends up having a role for the New York Yankees. But with the emergence of the Mingo her mind. Is Dan necessarily spun the rotation for GOP zealous. So knows could be back on the open market in a couple of weeks. Let's say the fort Lee, New Jersey could pal Jeff next. He's on a family. Yes. Yes. JJ my man. It's been a while. Yeah. It sure has it's good to hear from you. But I'm just waiting for the day that we get John Durant and Kyrie, but until that Gs from your lips to God's ears, and will you be saying prayer on may fourteenth with Patrick sitting up in front of the podium, China bring lady luck on a sudden knickebocker you say print night chef watch that trip up into the lottery up until take after that. I just take a break. I take a ten minute break, and I just probably watch a met game. And that's why I'm calling JJ. I want to talk about the match, and I want to talk about what you've been saying these last this last hour, okay? Jeff, gordon. We have an an embarrassment of riches in the starting pitching on any day. I'm throwing out to Graham, Syndergaard we alert Mets. I'm not worried about Vargas, whether we win our fifth game or not every every I'm really not worried about that. We we gave into the rates go on with it tomorrow. I'm gonna come back with the ground. We're gonna shut. Yeah. We're gonna we're gonna win again. Because that's what we do. We win at the Anki had Sobat yet feel-good story. That's nice tow. Five innings, whatever he I didn't watch the game. I don't know what he did this nice that he's able to accomplish into the worst in baseball. But the Mets we don't want Tikal. We're good. Jeff you wanna have a quality fifth star. You do not want to be rolling out the likes of August and Oswald ever fifty trust me on that. And you're a little too bullish on euro season start. I'm not saying not to be excited. But this notion that your role in four aces out down. Sorry. Has been up and down. I three starts. I like him. I didn't kill perform close to the level. We saw last year. You want to tell me, the grand synagogue. Okay. We can engage in that conversation. We cannot engage when you mentioning the likes of Stephen mats and saying gal fifth starter spot is not a problem. It doesn't have to be store. And maybe this is something the Mets address down the line. Here's the problem. Those fringe type pitchers the more co Estrada's of the world, you know, like those guys they're going to be available come June and July. Can get by for a couple of months. Jason boyish right now. I think the jury's out on that. His first start against the Molins is exactly what you would expect out of a fifth Sar. Five innings to three runs given up some Hades and you'll have with it. But at the very least you look that. Void is. I thought you know, what you say get Tim chance to win. This game. Forget it. When you give them a four runs in the first inning. When you're not making it out of the first thing. That's when we can all agree starting pitcher did not give the New York Mets the best chance to win. And the reason I for one would be very engaged in Dallas. Geico is because I don't have as much confidence as some others about this found renaissance that is Stephen Mets. That's the other day. Give them credit sixth innings to runs against the Atlanta. Braves. Those good store Matt's last year to his credit made every store. I still don't look at him as a frontline starting pitcher. I still think there are serious questions about him. If I can end and other quality alarm, and I could get him on a one year deal. That's something. I seriously have to consider. And what each Vargas dud, it's going to bring up some interesting questions, and here the to come the mind will the Mets reengage on Dallas, cockle obvious the other. What do you do with Seth Lugo? When we come back a lot more calls. We'll get to see Sobat deal. I'm on a Brooklyn. Nets the masters whole lot going on. But.

New York Mets Jason Vargas Tom Mickey Senate Jeff Dallas JJ New York Yankees Jason baseball Yankees Corey Onslow Jason fogelson Tommy Tony north Brunswick New Jersey Brody Braves Stephen Mets GIO Gonzalez Noah Syndergaard
"juban" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Just lifts the weight of the world right off your shoulders. It's really incredible. And again, when you're Carol Juban tour, you're on the best boss Mercedes-Benz, Volvos right off, the assembly line brand new beautiful buses that are like our buses all English speaking guide that tells you about what you're seeing and where you're going, and that's great fun. And of course, the opportunities staying nice hotels. The food's fantastic. You're not rushed. You're not go. Go go, go go. It's just a perfect pace. You meet people that are just full. It's just so darn fun. It really is. And we're doing we're doing the north tour. We're doing. Before Nyland's look up the picture of before Nyland and tell yourself you don't want to you got to be there Sami villages a lot of history there. So that's neat Varner. Fosberg install a lot of World War. Two store. Excites. The Flom railroad. Fjord after fjord after going to be on the water, Fairmont ferries and trains and gosh, it's fun. June fifteenth through twenty nineth Norway at his very best. You really gonna love it. How are you doing Daniel on congressman Peterson? Okay. Does he have you have the right number to call? Did you give them there? Because we we had. I'm not sure that he did because they were going to see that we were supposed to call them. So why didn't you call back given the number at least? So he's got that. Yeah. We've got a cell phone and we've got. Regular numbers if something came up, you're not exactly sure what we're we're gonna. We're on this happens from time to time. You know what I'm saying? I did I tell you the number for the person texted about Norway here is killed Cubans number.

Peterson Norway Nyland Mercedes-Benz Carol Juban Flom railroad Varner Fairmont congressman Daniel
"juban" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"juban" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

"I sex some texts, right? Oh, sure. I'm here for whatever you need. Oh, great. Thank you. We'll do whatever you got some wine have some wine. I love God's really is. It a breakfast one. Everything winds. Exactly. He was red. No. Wires, right? Yeah. Pinot noir. We're alcoholic. Pino mean, then Pino means tasty because they hold on. So can you give us give me your names again, healthy and Southsea? Yeah. Yeah. Done enough. Impressive spelling right is is about whatever that Zak. Yeah. Z A C H O that like you know, what? Yeah. Like Zachary Hansen from the Hanson brothers who I'm obsessed with. Yeah. Longtime. So you are on a new unscripted comedy series on E is that right? Filter shag no filter. I know that it's on Monday. At ten thirty miles. What you know about it? Because. Show where we set people up on first dates, and then we are comedians on the show watching the dates like we're watching like, maybe. Yeah, technically. Yeah. Homie. Whatever you want. I love you guys. Watched the show along with the audience, and we're kind of that no filter perspective watching the date. Oh god. I wanna watch the bachelor with you. Right. It would be. Irene. So that you can like get some form of material for shearing down opinion and getting paid. So you don't set any you do set people up on a date or you just y I know we watched the finished product we want to take the first dates as they're like happening. Okay. Live live and commenting predicting Wendy's people know like the the people going on a date and know that you're watching or that they're being watched the filmed. Yeah. I mean, I know they're being reviewed in some form. Yeah. Little did. They know it was by two queers. Thank you. Angry lookout. Single. You're always purchasing. Single hit low that get along. So wait. So. These days that you guys are critiquing, quote unquote, are they same sex are they they're everything very twenty nineteen of them. Actually, I think like their I write verse dating show on earth like LGBTQ. I a, oh, let's say it is Google. Google. You heard it here. First. It's just very it's all inclusive. Right. So it was very fun for us to try and judge people on their sexuality seconds into the date like base as something and we're like gay. Yeah. We know. Yeah. Do you think that there is do you think that gay people have more of a gate are than a straight person would? Why be? I think it's almost definite. As you know, it if you know Juban straight women have tried to marry gay men breath. The thing that you have any sort of Gaidar fair. That's not not about point. Yeah. How many straight men have tried to marry gay women? None. Brian by banning street men also know when they're being hit on by do you know what I mean, gay straight? My love to be hit on by gay, man. I wanna be I wanna be on by female by everyone. Yeah. I got hit on once. I was walking on the street and a was like damn nice booty. And I was like. Complimenting another woman. I'm like, yeah. I feel good about is off today. So I'm not a cat call. It's just like you just like complex each other out. Exactly what it's on a cat call when it's a girl calling another girl thing. But a guy called me. Okay. So I want to get into one of these texts then that we have. So this is from khloe sexy. I guess from khloe she says we're both during college. We're both juniors in college. And after sorry, I had someone we're both juniors in college and after sending this he said, he's still wanted to talk. But I haven't heard from him, and this is the text. And I wish we could can we pass them out to them because I want I think it's being able to see it as big important. You wanna? It your mind is the training ground. So nothing nothing. Severe got go to college. I dropped out of three. John three college pleaded one Janka grace. Okay. Okay. So we Phil here. You know, he news you're on ear. Yeah. Yeah. So this is the tax close says I'm sorry. I'm just insane. At an insane point in my life right now..

Pino Google Phil Zachary Hansen Southsea Zak Wendy khloe Juban John Brian Hanson
"juban" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"juban" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"But you want to get the hand if you can so Boston Philly and New York City Wednesday, January twenty third at noon official presale begins for these shows. And I gotta tell them for shows in four days. Guess what gang? There's a little bit of a connective tissue here. That's right. I can explain the connective tissue to you. With two words that separately me nothing. But when put together mean, everything that is wreck is get ready. Nicholas cage. That's right. All four of these shows will be four completely different nNcholas cage movies. That's why we are not gonna cheap out on your four shows four movies four nights. All in a road. We are not doubling up on titles. I'm not going to reveal them just yet though. I wanna wait for the guys to be in the room. We can all celebrate the cagey -ness of it all but for right now telling you. Boston, nNcholas cage movie, DC nNcholas cage movie. Philadelphia nNcholas cage movie, New York City, nNcholas cage movie laugh, Boston DC, improv punchline comedy club, and the Gramercy theatre the northeast leg of the we hate movies twenty nine teen tour kicks off April twenty second Beantown. We're so super excited to get back on the road. So that's it. Let's get back to the the programming. WHM Twenty-nine teen tour kicks off in Boston Massachusetts this April four shows four nights in a row. Four different nNcholas cage movies. This is a head gum podcast. This week on we hate movies. I don't even know what this is what it calls itself. Life itself. I'm Andrew Juban. Stephen Sadek Chris cabin Eric itself. And we ate movies..

Nicholas cage Beantown New York City Gramercy theatre Stephen Sadek Andrew Juban official Philly Philadelphia Massachusetts Eric twenty second four days
"juban" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"juban" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Where are we with ISIS? So we are very close to eliminating the territory that ISIS controls. We are not quite there yet. I've always thought a bit like infection. That's you know, you need to apply the antibiotics, and you had to stay, of course. So you really get the, you know, the infection out. I think that's where we are with ISIS. I think there's there's still work to be done to get them entirely out of land that they hold. But that does not solve the problem. Isis as your listeners may remember is just you know, the version two point oh of al-qaeda in Iraq, a terrorist organization that we spent a long time attacking and moving out of territory taking their members off the battlefield, but we never completely did the job either in terms of of Radicati the land that they held. But I think more importantly. Going after the the ideology that led to ache URI I emerging and certainly into ISIS emerging. That's the hard work. That's the long term worked in these to be done. But I guess my reaction is it's pretty much correct? In your view. Then what the president said that ISIS has largely defeated fair. No, not fair. It's not fair if by defeat we mean, we no longer need to worry about ISIS. Well, I guess the way in which he would claim that ISIS has been largely defeated versus the way you claim. They're still remains to be done, which I agree with is that work that needs to be done by military forces remaining in various parts of the world. And you get. Troops or something else? Yeah. So I think you don't necessarily need US troops to do that to do the the work on the ideology, you'd need some some ability to watch what's going on. Whether that's you know, with the military or the intelligence community to see whether this this problem to mix metaphors as metastasized, you don't necessarily need troops on the ground, and you know, to go back to something we were talking about earlier, the decision to to withdraw troops from Syria or for that matter. What seems to have been a decision to withdraw troops from Afghanistan is not one that. I think broadly people in the national security community think is completely illegitimate. It's you know, we've been in Afghanistan for, you know, a decade and a half now or longer we've been in Syria for a number of years. Now, there's no-one no-one than. I know support if uses phrase, it's a controversial phrase no-one supports endless war, right? So I'm assuming that your concern is with the manner in which the withdrawal was an honest. And that means not just the, you know, doing it by tweet which itself is, you know, so crazy, but not having any. Planning emplaced for how would draw troops will not create more problems than we currently have how we're going to work with the Kurds. So that they don't become you know, the target of radicalization by the Turks. We're going to address the fact that Iran is emplaced in Syria and using Syria as a conduit to resupply. Hezbollah MS a whole host of things that we should have done. So that when we remove troops from Syria. We leave a situation that is. Yeah. Better than the situation that we have today. I want to go back to what you said about ideology. That's the hard thing. You know, some of the work that you, and I have been engaged with an in in our careers. There were real concrete tools. You know, you impose sanctions you decide what kind of sanctions, that's a real thing charging someone with crime. That's a real thing to get at the underlying root of those things. Whether it's roots of crime, you know, socio economic status and opportunity and all those other things or eradicating ideology on the part of people who feel they have grievances against the west legitimate or not that's really hard grit in a little bit out of sort of the wheelhouse of how you and I engaged as professionals in government, Juban advice to focus to how you deal with that ultimate issue. Yeah. I do think that one thing that we need to focus on as a country is how we engage with the world. Right. And I think the terrorism question is puts this quite precisely the United States out in the world. Does a whole host of really good things..

ISIS Syria US Afghanistan al-qaeda metastasized Hezbollah Iraq Juban president Radicati Iran
"juban" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"juban" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

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