17 Burst results for "journalist and Speaker"

"journalist speaker" Discussed on The Next Level Life Podcast

The Next Level Life Podcast

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on The Next Level Life Podcast

"You know what it to get the courage to make sure that I got my messaging exact. But My! Why was always begins in May I? Knew that that this was such a burning desire that I would just do whatever it tool coward book for free which I did a lot all I would. Get men toys R. I approached women who were wear I. Want you to Bay asks him to help me out. So I was doing a lot of things, but a year it it just came naturally back dame, and now as oppose the confidence that I put behind things. He's much more intentional. Yeah, beautiful, so what was some of the things that really surprised you so? The panic attack happened. And then you started to look into what? How do we develop confidence in what are the some of the strategies that we need to put in place to become confident? What was some of the surprising things that you've just described? I guess. Well the biggest surprise, is that people who I put up on a pedestal as having invincible confidence No one really has it and in interviewing people. Who are you know because I interviewed a lot of people? Try and get a confidence tips. Intrigues die all have imposter syndrome, and these people like for example aspect to Julie Bishop who used to be a strategy as foreign minister. She suffered from impulse to seizure. She would do things like way. Certain outfit she. She has a collection of broaches, so she would wear like particular broaches particular meetings to try and channel that confidence something that you can do. That's a little teapot. Four years is you can use a confidence prop so for example I have a fancy pin. We can save glitter in it and I. Take It on to the news desk and Yvonne. Feeling Novus what I'll do is I'll hold my pain and I would tell my nerves into my pens. And this is another trick that I give executive women who who often struggle we.

Julie Bishop Yvonne executive Bay
"journalist speaker" Discussed on The Next Level Life Podcast

The Next Level Life Podcast

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on The Next Level Life Podcast

"But almost redirect us in a whole new PAS lucky that hadn't happened. Where do you feel you'd be now? Honestly I. It's funny. You say that because who knows but I. I think the lifestyle. I was living before that moment and the life that I'm living now electoral can shave, and that was a huge white coal that was the universe hitting me across the face with a with fish. and talk about heating me where I think. Probably A had been getting little wakeup calls up until that point, but had been ignoring the and it took, it took made to potentially walk away from the job that I love the Mars like every time I see. This J., D. R. Rating the news. A pinch myself. I love it so much, and it was my dream as a little go as sorry. To have my confidence shaking so badly, was perhaps the only way that was full to look at a lot of trees about how I was dealing with Thea, and the way that I was talking to myself about things that were hard and getting out of my conference arm. Yeah, huge huge, and on my goodness so many different correlations that we can go down because we have. Almost, the correlation of what's happening now with and I feel like that's been a huge wakeup call for a lot of people to realize that lasted. They'd been living beforehand. Probably wasn't saving them the best, could bay. There was habits that went seven, and they really need to catch. Change the life to then decide what they wanna be now, but then it's also like with athletic experience for you. Do you feel it would be able to educate them that you now support in confidence why the June now? Well honestly a Christina. I've never thought that I'd be doing these because for me. Having wanted to be a journalist since the age of seven that was eat fa made all I ever could see myself doing, and it wasn't even intentional that I sit out..

Thea Christina
"journalist speaker" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Coast to coast George Laurie with you let me take a little bit about Craig Weiler while we get into this amazing story Craig is a graduate of UC Berkeley a parapsychology journalist speaker blogger on the science of parapsychology the skepticism and the psychics work began his spiritual path during the new age movement teaching and practicing psychic healing fascinating crack welcome to the program thank you George it's great to be there thank you very much how was our definition of parapsychology which was of course the investigations of evidence for paranormal psychological phenomena I'm sorry what was the question of how was our definition of parapsychology well technology is the study of science of psychic phenomena and they don't do they don't do a straw astrology they don't the ghost hunting they don't do anything of that sort it's strictly stuff that that goes into their scientific papers haha okay my aunt was so I could call her appear psychologist she was truly a psychiatrist who devoted her practice to investigating telepathy that's that's an interesting subject left at the end of the day you have the guns felt experiments where they've done something like five thousand trials and by fifty different researchers in several countries the the guts felt studies have been moved their mainstay that's that's one of the ways that they used to demonstrate that psychic ability exists how do you get involved in this interesting question I was up I love to blog so I started about in two thousand and eight blocking on a rather popular site at the time and I decided to blog a couple of times about parapsychology topics and boy did I get blowback I mean skeptics just jumped on that paging commented all over the place about about the fact that psychic ability didn't exist and they got me curious it's like well okay with a look so I started investigating more and more and then comparing that to the skepticism in the comparing that to what I found and just kept going farther and farther and farther and farther down the rabbit hole and it goes it goes a long ways and an interesting thing happened along the way I got angry and the reason was because I saw all this information about the science of psychic ability that was completely hidden from normal view really have to dig to find this stuff or at least you did when I first started looking at with the more available now but it it was like you guys have been doing all this for me and this is important information this is part of my identity and you know you're saying that this stuff doesn't exist in and you're hiding all the science by by virtue of justice not technology at and that was kind of an emotional moment and then eventually I settled in to just talking about it we were reading about it and you truly believe her of course that parapsychology truly exists archer well that's a there there's a distinction there do I believe that psychic ability exists yes and I also believe that scientifically it's been demonstrated I think so too I think so you know years ago there was a foundation called the James Randi foundation and it apparently had a million dollars in the tail to be given to any psychic who could actually prove to them that he was indeed she was psychic nobody ever got the money and I think it's been disbanded now isn't it yes yeah it it closed down some years ago how come nobody wants for well the process we're going through this thing was horrendous the people had to first apply and then they get dragged through a process that would literally they take two years oh my god yeah once somebody actually got to the challenge and they maybe did this like twice a year they would actually have a you know set up a test for somebody they would typically have it be a very short difficult test and if they could get away with it they have it in front of a crowd and you know you can guess how difficult that would be for any psychic to do but the real the real kicker for them was they they got everybody on effect size yeah this is gonna take a little bit of extra explaining here but the easiest way to do that is to say well let's imagine that we're going to have a test about whether you can shoot a basketball hello why have you stayed at mid court and then you have to show that three times through the group and if you can get that three times in a row then we know you're good I'm lucky to do it from the three three free throw line yeah yeah well as it turns out from half court if your odds or roughly one in a hundred right so if you have to do it three times in a row that's one in a million so all you have to do is set up a challenge where the effect size that you're looking for is too big for any normal human and you save your money that way too don't you yes util I remember having on the you Geller quite a bit and we talk a little bit about the James Randi who of course you know help nail him when the he was on the Johnny Carson show long time ago and hi I guess why did they pull after ten years why did they pull the foundation from that they never really went into much of an explanation but I think it was partly that Randy got old okay I thought maybe they got scared somebody was going to quit and now now they have that set up in such a way that there it was that was pretty much impossible it was real cash they had or was it like an insurance policy you know there was a lot of debate about that and it there there isn't really any straight answer because originally they said that it was in bonds of some sort and so people were questioning well what kind of a blind and so they went back and forth and Randy eventually produced a document that said that this was that that the hat you know he had bombs and it was worth ten million dollars or thanks a million a million yeah and then from there I think the company I think it was Goldman Sachs said no that's not a document and that was the last I remember of it now tell me about the books I wars in because the subtitles pretty interesting Ted.

George Laurie Craig Weiler
"journalist speaker" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Your favorites? Three one two nine eight one seven two hundred round pile joins us. Usually once a month. He is an author journalist speaker editor in chief at andt after magazine, and he joins us to talk about space space related news stories and much more. Rod. Welcome back. Thank sir. All right. We do have a question from a listener. This is Jeff go ahead yet. Put producer asked me to start with this question. Hopefully, I'm fifty nine hopefully, everybody, that's at least my aid for members Alan shepherd, taking a six iron and to golf balls and hitting them, Buzz Aldrin, giving himself communion. I'm curious if there other things that astronauts smuggled into the capsule in mercury Jimmy or Apollo. Well, there is kind of interest moment in Germany the time. It was Gus Grissom is the first Gemini plight with a crew in it, and John Young was his was his co-pilot and John decided that Gus ought to have better food that junk they were sending up inside the squeeze tubes. So he smuggled a corned beef sandwich inside. And so once they wrap it or he took it out sit here gusts enjoy your sandwich and the next thing the little chrome crumbs beef floating over the capsule trouble chasing down. So you know, you gotta watch what you take up there. There's one other story that I put in a book, I wrote two thousand five I had some trouble tracking down. Actually, it's not something they smuggled but on Apollo sixteen which was John Young and try to do on the moon surface. The previous light did noticed some heartbeat anomalies. They asked her out there on the lunar surface. They said, you guys more potassium. So they gave Borjas and said Detroit as our it was juice juice on the moon, keep your heart healthy, and all that and young who was kind of he can be kind of character. Anyway, was drinking this orange juice? They had he didn't realize he was on hot mic, and he's talking to the other astronaut lunar module between Boone watts goal during the Charlie I got the farts again. And he goes this big long hair about seven gas and gastric problems. And I'm not gonna have another app an orange again and all this kind of stuff, and he dropped the F the number of times. Control was able to break in and say, I John you're on your hot Mike will get a drink that orange juice more. These guys are like the test pilots are the best of the best though. So that was good moment. Of course, as you put out the golf ball was just stunning. I remember seeing that as a kid on TV thinking that style. You know, that is really that was a great moment. Those are great stories. Thanks. Thanks for the call. Can. I say you're thing about Gus Grissom. Go ahead. Yeah. From Indiana syllabi, I met a man that do and what you reference TIMMY, five the name of that capsule. The Molly Brown and the rebate his liberty bell seven sank in the Atlantic Ocean. I'm going to name it the Molly Brown, they said. No, he then says, well, that's fine on the Titanic. And then they go back and agree on the Molly burns. Yeah. That's a great story question in Purdue or MIT have more mercury. Jimmy and Apollo astronauts. Oh, man. You got me. I think possibly do. 'cause I only member handful Mitee Buzz Aldrin prominent among the but go on Wikipedia do account. Yeah. All right. Jeff, thanks for the call. Thank you take care of that was fun. I just really weird you tell you tell that Corby star. God. That's so funny. That is so funny story, and I can't help. And this is just me. This is the way I think I can't help but picture friend ward going after the. Every time. I hear the name Gus Grissom. I immediately picture Fred ward. I know it's so hard to to think of those guys and not picture the people, right? It is my favorite space movie. But it it's like, John, Glenn, Ed Harris, you know, you can't really separate the size and boy Sam-Chan really Sam Sheppard for God's sake. All those guys. Yeah. What if I love that movie? I really I really do love movie. I have to say my favorite scene was not the stay stuff. But it's win. He's riding his horse up and the x one just sitting there burning. Awesome fuel. Yeah. Nobody else around. And that was such a wonderful spooky moment. I thought. Yeah. Okay. I love this movie right now right now, really funny. One of my memories of the first time, I saw the right stuff and I've seen the right stuff multiple times. But the first time I saw it and the movie for people who may not have seen it. It's it's over three hours long. It's it's a very long movie. And there there there was there was an interview they actually when the first time I thought there was actually an intermission. And that was at the Esquire theater downtown, Chicago, beautiful big seventy millimeter theater. That's the way to see the movie. And I I did not I made the mistake of not going to the bathroom before the movie. And so we get to the scene where where they have to hold their urine. Do another medical experiments on them and stuff. And I was losing my mind. I remember sitting here why why is this seen happening right now? Because this is like, I'm I'm actually feeling what these guys are feeling right now, it's like sense around or something. Just as what my one of my first memories. But that was very close to the intermission. So I made it, okay. Well, and as he's up there. I think that was. Yeah. Shepherd capital. Yeah. Exactly these up there. And you're seeing all these guys emission control and their coffee on the cat and all that. And you're probably sitting there the audience these. I got. Hilarious, man. It was great. All right. So Mike Pence made an announcement that seemed pretty exciting for people who want to get back to the moon last week. What sells a little bit. What the what the VP said? Shocker. So he he came out and made a speech, and this is working with the national space council, which is the group that is also takes active branch to give NASA, you know, overall direction in that line goals and so forth. And they've been talking about trying to get American astronauts back to the mood, and maybe twenty twenty eight for landing, but we don't really have a land or and kind of a and Pence came out and said we're doing it by twenty four we wanna by the end of the second Trump administration. If there is one and for that that and that was a bit of a shocker, and there are a lot of people could myself kind of sitting there jaaz open. And I kind of a mixed feeling of this is really cool. And sure, yeah. 'cause we've seen this happen. Kennedy famously made announcement sixty one sixty two at the moon speeches, and that happened and that worked and there's a lot of reasons for that be having a really good enemy of the Soviet Union. Push Gad's, then Reagan's right it with space station freedom that took. A really long time to happen to turn it on international effort, George H W Bush, George W Bush both tried to do similar things returns the moon, and none of really contracts the money wasn't. There sport wasn't there. So hopefully, this time it will be the the next thing that happened though. Which really did make me feel good and give me hope you said and paraphrasing, and we're we're looking at all options terms, and how to do it. In course, rockets part of the deal. So if NASA can't get together on time and on price that we use the falcon heavy we use Jeff as this new blend rocket. They're gonna be cheaper anyway. And now, you can really make this thing. Rock and roll. What I did think was kind of weird was invoking China, especially Russia because the bad guys that discussion because. Yeah, China's reactive space and they're both doing some some military stuff. But we're not terribly happy about, of course, are weak. But you know, Russia once we pull out. Using the Soyuz or take SpaceX, and you and Boeing rocket rockets and castles up to the national space station. Russia may kind of cease to exist as a human spaceflight car while 'cause we're paying a big part of the rate for them. So I think that was a little little little fuzzy for me, but but the rest of it was really exciting. Yeah. I was surprised when I heard that that was the time that was the timeframe how do you think is NASA gonna feel okay about using the, you know, there's been there's been cooperation between the private companies space is and all that stuff in the past. So is is gonna get along here. Yeah. I mean, they're hardware that that big Arbor's always been built by our space companies so Grenville litter module for the program North American aviation, which came Rockwell built the command module, but two different companies built the Saturn five. So they always use aerospace companies do this work the difference now is instead of cost, plus which means you bid the project, and then you get a fee on top of whatever you spend with massive price overruns, usually because you have to vote to it. Now, it's fixed price, so hey, SpaceX will by rocket. But you gotta do this price. No ups, no extras surprises. And so that that's a very different deal. But even when you when you look at Nassar's internal studies on how things worked out SpaceX that the their own auditing office says look these guys doing it for anywhere from a half to a tenth of what it costs us. So let's just go with it. You know, they know what they're doing. They're putting a lot of their own money into this stuff at least for the early part of the development, depending on on the rock at the. Heavy is older on money so far till this last launch. So you know, that's the way to do business. Now, you can really get things moving quickly at a price. Okay. All right. Well, we'll see what happens. What do you? What do you have any? What were what are some of the things that will be they will block that kind of time line for for for this situation? For the leader stuff. Yeah. They don't have Lander. So they're working on some designs back the constellation program. Two thousand roughly two thousand four hundred two thousand ten so I don't know if they're gonna put one of those out a month balls or go with something with one of the private companies as those has been working quietly on a lunar Lander. It's not human rated at this point. It's cargo, but it would be possible to rewrite our people. I don't think so it's question of how we get down to surface. And are we going straight from literature from earth orbit to loot orbit the service like the follow or we're gonna stop I at the lunar gateway which is the program the Nasr's working on before this announce right smaller space station, run the moon. They are now in the interest of time downsizing that. So that you've got a little more room that a bit sized RV live is bigger station. So, you know, it's kind of feeling like Apollo again where we're raising the trying to quickly and that's fine. As long as it isn't a closed in. Program that says, okay, we're done. And now, we got us to this hardware. That's happened last time, and that's how we ended up with the shuttle. So let's not do that. We get going there. Okay. All right, right. Hang out. Okay. You bet. All right. We got one more story here to talk about with rod. And if you guys have any questions or or comments space related talker tax three one two nine eight one seven two hundred one more second here with with with rod. And and if you guys want to jump in his three one two nine eight one seven two hundred while the Tigers roar in Detroit or Willman kata and the Sox's start the series swinging White Sox Tigers today at noon, WGN, TV sports..

Gus Grissom John Young Jeff Mike Pence NASA golf Detroit Molly Brown Russia Buzz Aldrin Alan shepherd Germany Fred ward Rod editor in chief producer China Indiana Corby andt
"journalist speaker" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Three one two nine eight one seven two hundred we're gonna have a conversation with rod pile. And then we're going to jump into the world of scifi movies. We have the least in most accurate scifi movies. And we also have a list of really underrated side movies that you might have missed. So we'll jump into that we want to hear from you at three two nine eight one seven two hundred. All right. He joins us usually. But once a month to talk all things space related, he's an author is speaker. He is a specialist in the world of space in his new book. God I on the moon. The Apollo eleven fifty anniversary experience sold out and its first print run on the first day. So he must be very happy about that our old friend. Rod pile is here. Nick, how're you man. How are you? I'm pretty happy as you. Yeah. Congratulations on on the success of the book. That's that's really outstanding man. Nice. I I have one book back in two thousand nine within a couple of putting sold like to her and forty thousand copies or something which was definitely high point since that it's been. Substantially less. So this was great. It was really happy. These things are Jimmy successful. They hit the ten thousand Mark. They're pretty happy. Yeah. So done that ready. So yeah. Very happy that I got one more Mesa called heroes space-age. Yeah. Well, I'm looking forward to that one too. You know, and all of your books are greatest in by the way. This Apollo eleven book is really as we mentioned before really beautiful, man. I mean, just just gorgeous coffee table book with lots of great stories and interviews, but really just a beautiful looking book. It's nice when a publisher puts an extra work and little stuff like the embossing on the cover of the title and the extra gloss on the cover and so forth. Just make you wanna pick it up and sort of terrace it 'cause you know, a lot of people don't get books the way they used to it because we don't get exposure to it you see on Amazon is like chronic the cover. Yeah. When you hold it. It's just a different thing. So I think that's really cool. And I also think it's going to be talking about scifi movies layer. I'm going to stay up and listen to that sounds like too much fun. Yeah. Well, I mean, I know that you've worked on on on some. And I was you know, I try to whenever we talk about it and be have articles and perhaps lists of things. I try to stay away from looking at it before the show because I want to do it cold, and I want to react to it. You know, so, but I, but I haven't really looked at the list of the most most accurate and least accurate Cy five movies. And I'm sure you would have a lot to say in that in that in that department. Just for the worst. Okay. Yeah. Black hole. Right. Yeah. Disney's first here's the here's the big distinction of that movie has while you sort of historical. It was the first movie that Disney release that was rated PG. Yeah. I remember it was a big deal. Yeah. And and course, so at the end they go into the black hole, which looks like a big tunnel. Mid Kim foil and cotton candy, and I didn't quite get the very ending look like angels or mobs or something out at the end of the tunnel. So I saw it in seventy nine and then I was doing a world trip, and I eighty when I was I guess twenty two and I was in Thailand. And I just really needed some western exposure Thailand was not then like it is now. Yeah. Thirty years ago. And so I saw the black hole was playing Bangkok. And I thought that can't be as bad as remember see every bit. Yeah. Even tie. It was bad. It's pretty it's pretty bad. It's pretty bad. And I I'm guess I'm guessing that that will be on the list. I would I would imagine. Yeah. We'll give everybody your background real quick. You know, as we do every time you're on. Yeah. So I got instant space race the kid was actually on another an MP. Stationed today. Talk about this. And the host reminded me that I've written about being alive when Meredith four flew past Mars, which was the first deep-space probe. We had the head cameras and Mars went from being this possibly Verdon planet with plants, and maybe some small animals and things we still didn't know to look in an awful lot like the moon, but I was because we've seen in other planet another world. And then I grew up during the space race. So I got to save a lunch and politicians and so forth, which was just a magical time. Yeah. And after a couple years of trying to be an astronomer at UCLA, and which they not too subtly suggested that probably wasn't the best deal to me to be studying. I went into documentaries and writing and started to books about two thousand five and the doing ever since that's fun, magazines you kindly mentioned right? Tell everybody at Astra. Magazine that a group called the national space society's putting out since the eighties, and it's Cordingley and we do. Seventy pages per issue. This coming issue is going to be the first one in twenty five years. It's going to be available to the public which is exciting for me since we have a staff about three I'm the main one of the three, but it's almost one hundred pages dedicated completely to Apollo eleven and the other politicians, and we've got an explicit interview, Buzz Aldrin, and we have you Jim Hansen. Who wrote the first man the autobiography or the biography of Neil Armstrong, and a bunch of other cool special teachers and book excerpts and even an augmented reality feature because it isn't twenty for century. And do these things gotta have Bennett reality. So we'll be of a point your tablet or your cellphone at the magazine. Saturday five will pop up and that kind of stuff. So it's gonna be fun. That's cool. That's that's really really cool. So so you just mentioned it's very exciting that it's now available to the public. How big a deal is at. It was a lot of work. You know, the the NSS is an older group around for about thirty eight years thirty seven years, I guess, and you know, it's a large organization. That's all volunteer run Bricusse paid. So I am a handful of others, but you know, change happens slowly. And and it took a lot of encouragement, and understandably, you know, there's a lot of concerns anymore about piracy and getting on the right platform, and how you got market through tunes, and that kind of stuff, but I think we've got it nailed sorghum to this experiment and hopefully by the end of the year doing that of a regular basis because we'd like to get it outside the immediate membership. There's a large very large membership in the organizational told I think it's about thirty thousand, but you know, we like to get into the public eye because it's our best forward facing tool. Yeah. The purposely organizations to encourage interest in this kind of stuff. So that's why we wanna turn forward is it as there's a website that go to check it out. Yes. Space dot in assessed dot org, and the magazine is in one of the drop down there, and you can see samples of it. You have to join the organization right now to see it. But as I said, hopefully, you'll be able to buy individual issues, let subscribe without necessarily joining the joy bad idea. Because there there are other benefits we have a big conference every year this year it's coming up in June, June six nights and Washington DC. So you get to geek out with another twelve hundred people that are in the same thing you are. And how often do we get to do that? Yeah. It's true. Very true. Okay. Ron hang out. Okay. All right. You bet. All right. Rod pilots with us. He's the best. He is an author journalist speaker an expert in the world of space if you have any questions or comments about the world of space he can answer three one two nine eight one seven two hundred talk and text three one two nine eight one seven two hundred the news after this. Great savings at Macy's Easter.

national space society Rod pile Disney Thailand Nick Amazon Macy Buzz Aldrin publisher UCLA Jimmy Neil Armstrong Bangkok Mars Ron Washington Meredith Astra Bricusse
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis and snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home in sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Neurologically physiologically emotionally that can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone but you'll find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people I talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you can talk about so many other things you have a wonderful. Fedex talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also when something painful happens to us, our brains, get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they had to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? The way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves only see what we want to see and only hear what we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this ball retro report? What is that? Yeah. Really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And this is incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to discussed again. And what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk had had conversations that matter. And again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up BMW's,.

United States cortisol Celeste Headley Fedex Washington BMW ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"A closer look at the week's top stories and the stories you may have missed I'm Sherry Preston. Coming up on the ground in Afghanistan. But I. Why can't people talk to one another more? Does it seem like every conversation that you begin with someone who has a different point of view than you it dissolves into anger or frustration joined by award winning journalist and author Celeste Headley who's written a new book trying to reclaim conversation is called we need to talk. How to have conversations, but matter and she joins us now on perspective. Do you think that the art of conversation really truly has been lost? I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis, and Snapchat and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people, which is a little confusing. But that is the choice we're generally making. There is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Neurologically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people are gonna talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics. I encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you can talk about so many other things you have a wonderful. Fedex talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with fares. Listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dog died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also, you know, something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they had to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves at only see what we want to see an only hear what we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that really excited about this? So basically what retro pork does. And it's is incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it. Came from how it affected us. Why the ERA didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk about have conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up.

Celeste Headley United States Sherry Preston Afghanistan Fedex ERA cortisol Snapchat Washington ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"Lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis and snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Neurologically physiologically emotionally that can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics. I encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple of years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also, something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. Really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And this an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the ERA didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out have conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up.

United States cortisol Celeste Headley ERA Washington ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Closer look at the week's top stories and the stories you may have missed I'm Sherry Preston. Coming up on the ground in Afghanistan. But I. Why can't people talk to one another anymore? Does seem like every conversation that you begin with someone who has a different view than you dissolves into anger or frustration joined by award winning journalist and author Celeste Headley who's written a new book trying to reclaim conversation is called we need to talk. How to have conversations at matter. And she joins us now in perspective. Do you think that the art of conversation really truly has been lost? I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis and snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people, which is a little confusing. But that is the choice. We're generally making. There is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. Sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Neurologically physiologically emotionally that can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more a creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone but you'll find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people going to talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in in respectful way without feeling that they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful Tech's talk that his been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true in much telling us about something painful. Right. They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dog died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also, you know, when something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here, we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. Really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where. Came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out had conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her tax talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming.

Celeste Headley United States Sherry Preston Afghanistan cortisol Washington ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis in Snapchat, and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I worked very early morning hours. Sometimes. I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you neurologically physiologically emotionally, they can lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it. Sometimes you say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find it at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like? We're all like looking at the only people who not talk to people we agree with, especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics. I encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful Tech's talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a. Decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true when someone telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also with something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves at only see what we want to see an only hear what we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again. And what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where. Came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out have conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up BMW's,.

United States Snapchat cortisol Celeste Headley BMW Washington ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"Seven seven. From ABC news. This is perspective. A closer look at the week's top stories and the stories you may have missed I'm Sherry Preston. Coming up on the ground in Afghanistan. But I. Why can't people talk to one another anymore? Does it seem like every conversation that you begin with someone who has a different point of view than you it dissolves into anger or frustration joined by award winning journalist and author Celeste Headley who's written a new book trying to reclaim conversation. It's called we need to talk. How to have conversations, but matter and she joins us now in perspective. Do you think that the art of conversation really truly has been lost? I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis and snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. Sometimes. I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you neurologically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it. Sometimes you say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How did you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like? We're all like looking at the only people going to talk to people we agree with, especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in in respectful way without feeling that they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful tedtalk talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a. Decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dog died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also what something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here what we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk had had conversations that matter. And again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her tax talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up BMW's,.

Celeste Headley United States Sherry Preston ABC Afghanistan cortisol BMW Washington ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"Lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis, and Snapchat and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are good for you near. Logically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we read it sometimes issue say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people going to talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. It's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that congress. Might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics. I encourage people to do so in in respectful way without feeling that they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you can talk about so many other things you have a wonderful talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog. Died. And sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dog died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also what something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right? Because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through to the way people consume the news? Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media. Not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see only here what we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that really excited about this? So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the era didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out have conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her Ted talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you coming up..

United States Snapchat cortisol congress Celeste Headley Washington Ted ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"People talk to one another more? Does it seem like every conversation that you begin with someone who has a different point of view than you it dissolves into anger or frustration here? Joined by award winning journalist, author Celeste Headley who's written new book trying to reclaim conversation. It's called we need to talk. How to have conversations, but matter and she joins us now in perspective. Do you think that the art of conversation really truly has been lost? I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with taxed with emails and texting and emojis in snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. Sometimes I'll go home and take an app, and I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying. Home in sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you neurologically physiologically emotionally that can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dreaded sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to you? Maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people who are gonna talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently. Took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful Ted talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say. So you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with fares. Listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true and so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes I response to say, oh, you know. My dad died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going to exactly the same thing you went through. But also with something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through to the way people consume the news? Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see and only we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes it easier. But it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with the spell retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro pork does. And it's is incredible investigative journalism unit. Takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of? Different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk had had conversations that matter. And again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you consumers have filed nearly one hundred complaints about parked BMW's bursting into flames calls for an investigation or growing.

Celeste Headley United States cortisol BMW Washington Ted ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"It's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis in Snapchat and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people, which is a little confusing. But that is the choice we're generally making. There is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. Sometimes. I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated a new, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you neurologically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it sometimes as you say, we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like? We're all like looking at the only people who are gonna talk to people we agree with, especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in in respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful Tech's talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a. Decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know another one. I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dog died a couple of years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also when something painful happens to us, our brains, get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? To the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see and only hear what we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. This is incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what Richard report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out have conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her tax talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming.

United States Snapchat cortisol Celeste Headley Washington Richard ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Lost? I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis, and Snapchat and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people, which is a little confusing. But that is the choice. We're generally making. There is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. Sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Neurologically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it. Sometimes you say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to you? Maybe people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people going to talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics. I encourage people to do so in an respectful way without feeling that they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful tedtalk talk that his been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I love your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also, something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? Due to the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here. What we want to hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where. It came from how it affected us. Why the ER a didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out had conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming up BMW's, catching fire. Confronted executive on the dangerous string of incidents on perspective. After this when it matters most. He's right there for you. Good evening from Charleston from Philadelphia. From cattle forget when history is made. Do you have a message for America when we're all searching for answers screaming tonight from Hungary right there. Ask the secretary to tackle ISIS. I and when American jobs are on the Llamas a bear market news. And and coach I she leads the charge. Because he reports to you ABC's world news tonight with your mornings. I news. Good Morning, America. We want to get right to that. Breaking news for just the headlines always digging deeper reporting, the facts deserve,.

United States America Snapchat cortisol ISIS ABC Hungary Washington Celeste Headley secretary BMW Charleston executive Philadelphia ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"I don't think it's lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis, and Snapchat and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people, which is a little confusing. But that is the choice we're generally making. There is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I worked very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home and sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you near. Are logically physiologically emotionally that can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it. Sometimes issue say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people to talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how that congress. Sation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in a respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also with something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they had to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? Due to the way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here what we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does. And it's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where that all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out had conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her text talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank.

United States Snapchat cortisol congress Celeste Headley Washington Sation ninety second two years
"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"journalist speaker" Discussed on KOMO

"Lost. I think we're losing it. And we're kind of losing it by choice. Right. Because we are choosing not to pick up the phone. We're choosing to try to replace actual conversation with text with emails, and texting and emojis and snap chats and anything that we can do to avoid talking to other people which is a little confusing, but that is the choice where generally making there is something that is really refreshing about going out and talking to someone I work very early morning hours. And sometimes I'll go home and take a nap. And I'm just like, you know, I just feel like staying home in sleeping today. But when someone goes out, and you talk to other people something is is rejuvenated in you, isn't it? Yeah. And that's actually scientifically trackable any conversation that you have whether it be with someone that you've known for a long time and love or even the ninety second chat, you have with a barista or your grocery store clerk, those are all good for you. Noor. Are logically physiologically emotionally, they can all lower your cortisol levels. They can all increase your cognitive abilities. In other words, they're making you even think better making you clearer making you more creative because that's what human beings are designed to do. So we sometimes we dread it. Sometimes issue say we're tired, and we feel like we we can't get into a conversation with someone. But you find that at least half the time. If you actually just go ahead and do it. You'll feel better afterwards. How do you find people to talk to maybe even people you don't agree with because it seems like we're all like looking at the only people are to talk to people we agree with especially when it comes to politics. You know, it's interesting. I recently took a train trip around the entire United States all the way from Washington DC around the entire edge of the continental US. And I thought it would be difficult to get people to talk with me. But in fact, it really wasn't I find that it's fear that usually keeps people from approaching others are reaching out or talking fear of how. Conversation might go. So if I'm the one that initiates it, and if I ask them questions about themselves about what they know about what they love about what they're proud of people are happy to talk with you people open up pretty quickly. You don't have to talk about politics hyphen encourage people to do so in in respectful way without feeling like they need to win a debate. But you don't have to you could talk about so many other things you have a wonderful Tech's talk that has been viewed over nineteen million times. And you've got ten tips on carrying out a decent conversation. And they really are. Excellent. I mean, you could put this in front of anybody who's not quite sure what to say to someone else. And you know, if you don't know what to say say, you don't know and another one I loved of your tips was don't equate your experience with there's listen to what they have to say rather than thinking of what you're going to say next. Yeah. And you know, it's interesting because this is especially true. When so much telling us about something painful, right? They say their dog died and sometimes our first response to say, oh, you know, my dad died a couple of years ago. It was horrible. I know how you feel and that's the wrong thing to say. And part of that is that a they may not be going through exactly the same thing you went through. But also, something painful happens to us, our brains get very busy immediately in softening that pain for us. And it's a good thing that the brain does that right because if we actually remembered real pain for the rest of our lives, we would be dysfunctional. But what that means is that two years after losing your beloved pet. You actually don't remember what that felt like anymore, and you need them to tell you you need them you need to be a witness for what they're going through and hear what they have to say rather than offering up. What you think is a similar experience? Does this carry through? The way people consume the news. Do you think today? Well, okay. So technology and social media are not to blame. There. Simply making it easier for us to indulge our desire to sort of isolate ourselves and only see what we want to see it only here, we wanna hear and find the people who agree with us technology makes that easier, but it didn't it didn't start it. Right. Okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it. Can you tell us a little bit more about the the PBS series that you're you're going to be helping with this fall retro report? What is that? Yeah. I'm really excited about this. So basically what retro port does it. It's just an incredible investigative journalism unit that takes some of the issues that are still around today. But we may have forgotten where it all started. For example, the equal rights amendment is something that's beginning to be discussed again in what retro report does is. It goes back and re reports that to explain where it came from how it affected us. Why didn't pass originally to give you context about what's going on all kinds of different topics in some surprising stories that again have sort of been lost a history. Okay. Celeste Headley, an award winning journalist speaker author of the new book, we need to talk out had conversations that matter, and again, I encourage everybody to take a look at her Ted talk because it really has some great tips on how to carry on a conversation. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. Coming.

United States cortisol Celeste Headley Washington Ted ninety second two years