17 Burst results for "jonathan fields"

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:13 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The bargain that they want to continue to make moving forward So there's a lot of people resigning from jobs. Many of them without knowing what the next step is my my big concern with that. Is that if you do that before. Actually doing the work understand. What is the impulse for. That makes me come alive and then look at the work that you're doing and say how can i make this as good as it possibly can be now. What are all the different ways. That i may be able to reimagined or reorient. The work that i'm doing maybe even outside of my job description but there are opportunities within the place that mad to actually express this thing and we have to just really make it as good as it can be in. How can i do that. I and maybe that actually gives me a lot closer there. If we're not doing that work first and then we just jettison ourselves from the place we are and we look for something else. That just feels different enough without understanding. Why we're actually saying yes to that new thing. There's a really good chance we're gonna find ourselves eighteen months from now sitting in an office with different paint on the walls and new boss a new team a new product in new brand new service. Feeling the exact same way and that's a huge concern for me. So i really strongly recommend i do the work. Then do the work of optimizing the thing that you're doing now to allow that to come out as much as humanly possible very often get you so much closer to the feeling that you want that. You're actually pretty cool staying and then you don't have to go through the disruption than the pain of the big change and even if it doesn't then look for all sorts of opportunities to do on the side whether it's hobby or devotion or passion or an activity that you do because that can then blend with a much more sparked optimized Job to give you what you need if you get all the way there and you're still not getting it. Then at that point you start to do the exploration of okay. So maybe i have to do something more disruptive but if you do you're leaving that current thing not from a place of dejection and ignorance but from a place of in formation and agency and also chances are psychologically you'll be in a much more emboldened and alive place. Jonathan.

Jonathan
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:28 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I want to bring people together. And we're going to go from point a to point b very often. That impulse comes from you being one of those people so very often. You're among the group that you want to actually then help navigate from point eight point be. That shows up very often early in life as well. So you're the kid on the playground who's bringing all the kids together and say. Hey let's go on an adventure like or let's go do this thing as you grow up very often. It shows up as you being a captain of team or leading you know a club or being student president but it may not show up in those roles but it may show up in all sorts of other ways in your family. I talked to one woman who is now a member of the executive leadership team at giant global consulting firm and even as a young kid. She was the one who is organizing all the family members. He was the youngest of all of her siblings yet. She would bring everyone together figure out the trips. They were going to go on figure out the adventures. They were going to go on whatever it was. She was the one where she just had this impulse to gather organize and lead for no other reason than the fact that there was something in her. That said i love doing this. It gives me the feeling of being alive. So that's the warrior the performer. Which is it appears from the early data. Now that that may be the single most prevalent anti type is all about the impulse to energize in live in or animate and experience interaction or moment that tends to show up early in life in a lot of kids but if if the parents at they'll usually channel it into performing arts which is wonderful when you're younger but then at some point a lot of times apparently then say Kids latching onto that a little bit too much. And i'm freaked out about them wanting to make that their career so let's just pretend it's not actually the central thing that matters to them and they'll start to sean and they'll seru like recommend stifling and pushing them in a different direction so the performers very often Very repressed impulse a lot of people. It's unfortunate because that very impulse shows up can be expressed in so many different ways in a sales conversation as a parent in a group leader in at a board meeting behind a bar. There's so many different ways to channel that to do like incredibly good And fun and exciting work well. Let's hope that anybody listening that has children that are blooming in that archetypes sparky type encourages it and helps it bloom. You mentioned woman that you were referring to that you written about in the book. How did you choose which people in case studies to focus on the bug. They're so fascinating you know. Part of it was trying to source really compelling stories that showed clearly this impulses but part of it also was. It was important to me in selecting the stories to tell a very diverse set of stories. So it was important to me to to tell us out of stories that represented all ages all races all gender identifications all sexual orientations And so when we looked at the stories that we were telling. I wanted this to be a book. Where when people read What's in any given chopped her that they're able to feel seen and if a really homogenous and the way that we're actually selecting the stories and the case studies not only. Is that going to exclude people from. It's just not right. You know it is not that it was never the the right way to be in the world As a writer at something that i'm probably guilty of Being way too ignorant of the need to really be expensive in understanding how are we. How are we telling the different stories and showing broad representation in the work. That i've been doing in the past and for me you know. I think i'm becoming much more aware of my responsibility to make sure that i really invest in. Not because as a human being. It's just the right thing to do. So that was a big part of the way that we did it as well. Yeah thank you for that it is. It is clear that you've done that. And and that work is really important. Jonathan i have one last thing i want to ask you about. And it's something that you write about. In the last chapter of your book you state that reimagining and realigning your current work in a way that makes you come alive. Let you get more of what you need without feeling the need to below anything up you also caution at the beginning of the book for readers to be aware of behaving in an overly disruptive way I think this book has the ability to get people really excited and then wanted to make the change from that moment on. How do you recommend people approach change in their lives. I i love this question. And you're right there when we figure out something or learn something really new that is deeply resonant and really oh this is right Very often the next thing that we do is we look at what we're doing in this case the work that we're doing and if it feels horribly aligned with this thing that we now know is really important to us you know. Are we just say oh. Well i just need to extract myself from the situation immediately. If you're eighteen years old and the stakes are really really low. And you don't have a lot invested in it it. It's probably not a big deal if you do that. You know. I'm fifty five. Got a family i want. I want to live a certain life. I want to be able to devote myself in. Certain ways and financial security is a value that i hold dear. I wanna make sure that. I'm providing much as i can a lot of ways for my family so for me if i decide. Oh i'm just gonna blow it up that causes a huge amount of disruption and pain and we tend to underestimate the pain of that disruption that will cause both on us and also those that look to us for some sense of security and we we overestimate how giddy will feel when we sort of blow it all up and then get the chance to move to the next thing and we tend to be a little bit delusional about how long the process might take to figure out that next thing so one of my big concerns right now actually. We're we're having this conversation. Where a lot of people are kicking around this phrase the great resignation. you know. We're in a moment where society society-wide people are asking the big existential questions and they're realizing the bargain that they made to get to..

sean Jonathan
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:49 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Make maker impulse is really often beautifully. Informed by the mavens quest for knowledge there is a bit of an interesting dynamic. There that can go a touch dark side which is the mavens impulse to know can sometimes be so fierce that it over informs the maker and then you end up getting a little too far down the road of replication instead of creation. Because you know so much about what everyone else is doing. What's come before you the paradigm the history and everything that it can sometimes be a a little bit hard to get that out of your head and allow yourself to step out into the abyss of a place that you really don't know and is genuinely new uncomfortable. I'm wondering if that's that's that resonates. I was wondering if you were reading my diaries. That's really spooky. One thing that i was really struck by was your caution about the quirks of any of the archetype so the three quirks of the maker are boredom with systems in scale disconnection from output disconnection from impact and so for our listeners. I'm going to be very vulnerable here and say that i am. We'll the sport isn't so much vulnerable. Part i am very much a maker. I am happiest in my life when i making something. It could be a podcast. A lesson plan a meal. i just love making things particularly making things from scratch however i tend not to like to replicate or repeat the experience of making something so for example one thing that is always surprising to people and this is the vulnerable part is that i don't like to listen to my podcast. Once they're up. And out i don't like the sound of my own voice. I don't like to revisit. I don't like to then be in a position. Where i'm critiquing what i've already done in made and put out there and then feeling really self conscious about it so i found that i am much better off. Not listening and just hoping and praying that curtis producers putting out the best possible. Podcast can from what we've made together so so there's that and then in terms of the disconnection from out impact and this is something i think a lot of people really suffer from and that is feeling like what you make doesn't matter and no matter how hard you try or no matter how much you work getting better really feel it so so there you have it. Jonathan helped me so so a lot of that. The one really interesting thing And probably the single biggest thing that can make people feel okay if they're feeling that and they have this make. Our impulse is the understanding that actually. There's nothing wrong with you. These are just sort of quirks of the way that you're wired. You're not a sociopath. You're not like disconnected from other people you don't. It's not that you don't care about them. Or what the work does it's that you know for you. The maker is an incredibly process satisfied impulse whereas all of these ten lion spectrum between being processed satisfied and service satisfied the maker happens to be very far over on the process satisfied park meaning. It is very active creation. That is the most satisfying for you. Now the thing that you could go out into the world and make a huge difference for a lot of people you could get a ton of feedback saying it's incredible and you like that. It makes you feel good. You love the fact that like something that you've made is going out and making a difference in people's lives and at the end of the day it's also not the reason you do it society tells you that that's actually not okay. Society tells you that the only valid way to have purpose in your life. Is that if you devote yourself to a life where the the preeminent driver is service to others and for makers and for a couple of other much more heavily processed satisfied impulses that very often causes this underlying fabric of shame because you're not measuring up to that proclamation even though you actually are completely satisfied and you love what you do and you know that work. You're doing actually is making a difference in people's lives so getting comfortable with the fact that this is just relate. The way that i'm wired the work that i'm doing is in fact. Probably making a difference. It's moving others. And i would still do it even if it wasn't because i love the process but doesn't make you a bad person. You're just hired in this way where that's the thing that gets you up in the morning. One thing that really struck me about the one of the aspects of the maker is that you write that. It tends to reveal itself early in life and without much effort. And i'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about how and why that is. I suspect quite a lot of people that listened to design matters are also makers so i think it would be really helpful for them to know more. Yeah i imagine you're right So the maker does tend to reveal itself. People often ask me. You know Is this a nature. Nurture thing is it ordained by some spiritual being is it genetic. Is it environmental. My answer is i have no idea. but my my experience anecdotally through a lot of a lot of people now in a pretty big data set is that we all tend to have these impulses very very very very early in life but they reveal themselves at different rates so the maker tends to show up really early in life because we're given opportunities to express it from the earliest age and then were rewarded when we express an interest in it and then proficiency at it so thinking about when you're little kid and has apparent gonna keep you occupied. They're gonna give you a set of your finger paints or crayons or they're gonna give you block so you can build something you know. Part of the way that you're taught to actually teach a kid to learn manual dexterity and also just keep them occupied is through the process of making through the process of creation. Then when you go to school part of the learning process almost any subject it doesn't matter what it is. Many teachers will weave in making experiences. So you know you're in second grade and you're studying science and the teacher's going to say okay. The homework today is to make a diorama right so we get exposed to this process and then if we do it you know parents love to see us doing it and as a parent it keeps you busy to which is always good and then know when you show up and you're actually creating something and people say of that's awesome. That's great keep doing more of that. We get rewarded at a very early age. So it tends to be socially not just socially acceptable but socially encouraged and were given the opportunity to express it at the earliest days in life whereas other impulses. It's actually the exact opposite. You may have that impulse but you may serve socially feel like it's being repressed until later in life because people may think it's not an appropriate thing to be doing at a young age so one of the the spur types that we haven't talked about as the adviser and the impulse for the adviser is to guide through a process of growth. You know this is the visor. The mentor the coach. The people who play that role you creating a container of safety and trust and then moving people through your knowledge of ideas and frameworks through a process of discovery growth and evolution. You may have an impulse from the earliest days but you also may not have the wisdom the frameworks and the insights to do it in a healthy way and if seven year old you shows up and tries to play that role for other people. You're probably going to get rejected both by the adults around you and potentially by the other seven-year-old to think that you're just trying to take over and be bossy so it's really interesting how they tend to to reveal themselves based on cultural expectations at different rates tug about a few of the other spark a types because there i mean i've read them all and i'm so fascinated by them but some of them feel really foreign to me. The warrior the person who was driven to organize and lead people the performer. Who is a person who in livens any interaction. I'm talking about some of those. Yeah so the warrior as you said the the fundamental impulse there is to to gather organize and lead. There's something inside of you that says.

curtis Jonathan
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I have a feeling we may not be too dissimilar. My primary spark type is the maker. Yes my fundamental impulse and the impulse for maker is to make ideas manifest. It is all about the process of creation. It is a jeep deep impulse to be generative as much as you possibly. Can you have the something from nothing or the a little bit of something to a lot of bit of something. Impulse has woken me up and driven me to exert exert effort from as young as i possibly remember as a little kid cobbling together bikes from a junkyard painting. Jean jackets building houses renovating in college evolved eventually. To building companies building brands writing books building media building experiences. There are a lot of different things that go into each one of those things but the impulse for me. That allowed me to come alive. Was the maker impulse behind all of that eventually. You're bring together teams because you need people to soon all sorts of different roles and have different impulses to really make it work but for me. That's the thing that wakes me up in the morning my shadow spark type which you can think of it as one of two ways. It's either your your next strongest impulse forever. Or it's kind of like you runner up or there tends to be more nuanced relationship. Which is that. Many people do the work of their shadow in order to be able to do the work of their primary better so my shadows bark type is the scientists. The impulse for the scientists is all about figuring things out. I look at something. And i'm like how does that work. But what i've learned over the years is for me. The fascination is less just about going deep into the burning question or the puzzle. Or the quandary. I tend to go there. When i am in a making process and i hit a wall and rather than just feeling like oh i hit all this is the end of it. The maker impulse kicks in and says okay. No big deal still kinda cool. Let me solve this problem. Let me create a whole new thing. That let me get through this moment in time and the minute i figured out the answer i go back to the process of being just hyper genitive and building and making so it's in service of my maker. I liked doing it. I'm good at it but at the end of the day. I don't do it just for the fun of doing it. I do it because it makes me a better maker. And then the last part of my profile the anti spark at type you can think of the archetype as either your least strong impulse for work or the thing that takes the most energy the most effort the most external motivation. If you're on a team and tends to empty you out the most and require the great amount of recovery so for me. That is what i call the essential now. Essential est is all about creating order from chaos. It's clarity it is utility. It's taking big. Data says is taking a huge amount of objects and things like this and somehow organizing them and creating making them usable and clean streamlined. That is amazing work. It's necessary work. I love the fact that it's done because that lets me function as a human being as an entrepreneur as a maker. But when. I actually have to do that work. I just want cry. And of course. I've gotten good at it because you know when you're when you have to do especially in the early stage for example of a company. You're doing everything so over time you just learn to become skilled or competent at it and that makes the experience of a little bit better but at the end of the day making it a little bit better and getting it over with faster and getting a little. Bit of the head of competence. It still doesn't make up for the fact that there's something inside of me where that impulses the most foreign. It's the weakest for me and it just doesn't come close and it never will to the feeling that i get when i'm operating on the other side of my spectrum. Okay so i will tell you my because we're very very similar. Jonathan not exactly similar. But very so. My primary sparky type is the maker. Which i'm not surprised at all what was really surprising to me. Was how accurately described me being maker just without knowing me you just described maker and i'm like wow that's really make the the shadow archetype is the maven. Which is somebody who likes to learn. And i'd love you to talk more about that and my shadow spark type is also the essential est. I hate details so so talk a little bit of a little bit more about the me. The maven yeah and that doesn't surprise me at all so the fundamental impulse for the maven is learning it's knowledge acquisition. You know you look around and you're just like what can i learn to. Maybe what you learn has great application in all sorts of different ways. And that's nice you kind of like that. You know that's cool but you know if that is your primary impulse. You're not doing it because it's going to let you do something else you're doing it. Solely for the feeling that pursuing learning pursuing knowledge gives you so for you. because you're maven. Is your shadows parka. Type it's something that you probably love doing you really good at and we know this from sixteen years of ridiculous research of every person that you have ever talked to and the stunning career that you built where. You're encyclopedic about literally anything that you devote yourself to and at the same time you like. I've also seen with you. It makes a lot of sense that that knowledge acquisition to you it really gets harnessed and it comes out in the context of informing the way that you make and allowing you to create at an entirely different level rather than just creating in the void based out of your own Intuitive feel not that. that's a bad thing but.

Jonathan
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"One being you decide to create this framework when other personality type descriptors already exists. What's different about this methodology. Yeah it's so. I looked at the universe of all these different indexes. And there's some great ones out. There like myers briggs and strength disk and all these different things And they all add little pieces to the self-discovery puzzle. What i didn't see was a tool. That was hyper focused on this one question. What is the fundamental nature of work. That will give me the feeling of of coming alive So you know. It's not about neo. They're two different types of strength assessment on the market right now their strengths finder which is largely about skills and talents. And there's via strings which is largely about character great tools but they don't speak specifically to this one question there's myers briggs. There's the big five really interesting valuable tools that are much more. Generalized personality and relational style tests. And i think again. They had to use relate the puzzle of asking the question. Who am i but this is a very very very narrow focus. The focus of this archetype type is around work. Whether that's the thing you get paid for or not a different question it's about what is the thing that wakes you up in the morning and says i will work really really hard for nothing other than the feeling that it gives me and if i get compensated well for awesome. But he may have i. Didn't i'm still going to do it. Because it gives me that feeling and that feeling is what gets me through life. It's what lights me up. You mentioned that the understanding of these imprint based on more than twenty five million data points from your research. And how did you take that data and develop the spark types from what you amass the data that you amassed. Yes so. The spark types started out as a hunch as as everything does And then i started. Basically looking at list of jobs in industries entitles deconstructing all of them saying what's underneath that what's underneath that what's in the early part of it. The early identification that goes from thousands of possibilities down to ten was really my own internal work and then showing it to different people and talking to a lot of citizen grounded theory research basically talking to tons and tons of people and trying to code their their feedback to me about what was valid. And what wasn't the the reason we developed the assessment was because we had this sort of core ideas and we had a lot of just early anecdotal validation. But i wanted to know if these are real on a much larger scale so we built the assessment for two reasons one so that we could actually expose large numbers of people to the ideas and have that help us understand if it's really valid or not and then how useful it is and i was. I was open to the fact that it might actually show us that it wasn't you know i kind of had to be and the other part of it. Was you know if in fact this is helpful. Then i wanted to know that we were creating something that could then be available to anybody so that they could have a tool to get to this. Get these insights pretty quickly. And that was the reason we developed the assessment and released it out into the world. We've done a follow on survey still preliminary. We're actually looking to build a much bigger data set around it. But i'll share with you in response to asking people how valid and how useful this was. We have ninety three percent of folks telling us that is anywhere from a very to extremely accurate and then we wanted to know. What is the relationship between doing the work of your spark a type and markers for meaningfulness for flow for engagement for express potential and for purpose. And we've got actually really strong statistical correlation with all five of those states which are the places that we all aspire to be. The sweet spot between those five states is what i is. How i define that feeling of coming alive or being sparked how did you develop the questions in the first place. And how did you determine how specific answers would lead you to a specific spark type yet. So the questions were actually the prompts. Were based on those five different markers and this goes back to my obsession with language. This goes back to the the understanding of Psychology like what is the thought line in somebody's head When they're doing something that makes them feel this way. And then developing prompts around that and their ways to do it in a very serve dry way the marketer me the Citizen human psychologist in me was always taught To do everything. You can't understand the conversation that's happening in somebody's head understand the language that they're using and then enter that conversation rather than trying to impose your language and ask them if it fits so a lot of it was tapping this deep obsession with language in psychology to try and figure out. What are those. What are those statements. What are those thoughts and then linked them back to the five different states so the prompt in the assessment are all related to those different states. And then we're trying to make them as longitudinal as possible so that we have people reflecting on through lines that have been with them for her overlong window of time rather than how they might be feeling just you know at the moment that the answer the question because we want some level of stability in the answer. We want them to be robust. How did you originally come up with the ten spark types. Why y ten. I honestly wish it wasn ten it feels so slick it feels so package to me You know and so. I wish it you know. Thirteen or eight or something like that But literally starting with giant lists of jobs and titles and then making less of water the. What when you when you keep asking the question. What's underneath that. The fundamental ways that you exert effort as part of this making list and less and less and less and then seeing where the overlap was and then conflicting complaining. Is this just another way of saying this. Is this another thing. This and then getting to a point where i'm asking. The question is this. A verb is an adjective or adverb. Because i'm looking for the verb is just a way of doing things or is this actually like a fundamental expression of an impulse for for effort so a lot of trial and error and a lot of me just trying to figure out what's real and what's not and then eventually exposing it to people which is always nerve racking experienced both lead ten spargo types are in no particular order the maker. The scientists the maven the essential est the performer. The warrior the siege. The advocate the adviser and the nurture someone to leave it up to you to tell us about. If you've of those spark types in gives a little bit more detail on what it means to be one of these spark types. So i could just go down the list but i'm actually curious about something. Do you know what your profile is. Yes i do. Weaving that at after. Very happy to share. Well i we also need to explain to folks that not only do people have a spark type. They also have a shadow spark type in. So that's a a secondary archetype that is woven into the personality profile. I'm and then also an anti spark a type. So i will. I will absolutely share all three fed. I wanna hear what you have to say. I so i'll share mine and actually i'm curious about yours because that'll that'll talk about three of them..

myers briggs
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"All about asking the right questions understanding who you're making things for understanding. What they want with their motivations are. Is there a way that you would describe the mary design aesthetic. In one sentence. I'm a big fan of inspiring brilliance. That to me. Get to the heart of what we're trying to accomplish. Been at mary it now for several years. What are some of your guiding design principles for me. It's about the holistic nature of design. It doesn't make sense for us to say use zayn the rooms you design the lobby hugh design how housekeeping You design how a guest will feel when they check in. We all have to do it together. So that's the first big thing. I think the other thing is that it has to start with a guest. Need guess desire so closets. Everybody assumed forever that we had to have closets and then it turns out that there is a bit of stress in that. Because you're you're gonna leave something behind so then this open closet came from that it makes the room feel bigger. Gives you a place to put your things. It's very thoughtful. But you don't have that stress of worrying about leaving things behind when we talk about inspiring you. That's things like big architectural spaces a big open space. That makes you feel more inspire down to even things like that. Mary when you go into the guest room you have ted playing on the tv so the minute you walk in. There's this flywheel of we're here to enable you to be more successful to be the best you can. What are you most excited about in terms of the possibility and potential for hotels so there was a time of course hotel decide where the notion was consistency. That if you went to a once it should look exactly the same as mary. Another city and of course we've gone past that because now when you're in a place when you're in johannesburg when you're in louisville when you're wherever you are you want to be in that place i think more than ever. We all want to be immersed in the culture of that place that we go to. How do you imagine the future of hotel design. What is your your vision as we come out of the pandemic the question is what changes are temporary. What changes are durable. I believe one of the rural changes will be this weaving of work and leisure in a way that we just didn't get before before it was your in one mode. You would flip a switch and you go into the other mode. And i think that we're now seeing with more flexible work arrangements with more travel that blends work and leisure that we'll see more business people traveling with their families than we have historically and so there's there's a little bit of finding ways to make the most of the time together when you stayed newly redesigned.

hugh ted Mary johannesburg louisville mary
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:37 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You and i were both in new york and that day. That experienced changed me in a lot of ways. it exists in my dna and it will for my entire life and the experience of knowing somebody who went to work one day and never came home Who was young. He was the youngest partner in the firm at the top of one of the towers With a two and a half year old and a six month old kid married with a new home and never came home. That moment really brought home to me. The fact that we have. One pass through. And i it really. I believe it planted the seed for me to go deeper into my exploration of not just what it means to live a good life but how do you invest yourself in a way that makes you come alive. What are the components of that. And i've been dancing around it. I've been researching an asking questions running experiments ever since in the ideas did begin to coalesce in my last book but then they took on an entirely different life when i started to ask a slightly different question which is are there. A set of identifiable map -able impulses for effort or for work. That gives you that feeling of coming alive or being sparked because if there were and we can identify them and then we could build tools to help people figure out what there's are. Maybe it would help people. Maybe it would help sort of get them to that place of understanding faster and that kind of became my consuming passion last five years. Or so is i if i could identify if these imprint even existed and then if so could build a tool that would both help me research them and at the same time be helpful to other people in that that led to the identify -cation of these ten impulses and once i figured out what the impulses were then started to realize wrapped around each one of them were set of really common patterns of tendencies and preferences and behaviors that formed archetypes. The reason i call them spark at types is just a fun way of saying if the archetype work that sparked you I honestly didn't know if i would be able to see these if existed so it was as much surprise for me as it was for anyone else in you know as i started sharing them with other people and then we ended up building tool and assessment for the basically the entire year of two thousand eighteen. That's now been validated by more than five hundred thousand people and twenty million data points. You know we're at a point where it's like okay. There actually is something here now. It's time for an ad created.

new york
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:07 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"That makes you come alive. And i i wanted to say congratulations and even working on this book for a really long time. And congratulations on bringing out into bringing it out into the world. thank you. I'm i'm super excited yeah i'm just you know so i'll share something. That's kind of interesting and it'll landon interesting with you. This is the first of four books that i've written where i'm actually excited about the physical object of the book itself. Yeah it is beautiful book. Thank you. And i was reflecting on why. That's true and i went immediately back to a conversation that i had on the pike as many years ago with somebody. Who have you had the opportunity to sit down with and become friends with milton. Glaser and i remembered him saying to me. You know the impulse to make and the impulse to creep beauty are related but separate impulses. And i had been so focused just on the impulse to make and never really honored the fact that the impulse towards beauty actually really matter to me as much. I didn't wanna just make stuff. I didn't wanna put things into the world. I want to put things into the world that just that a vote. Something both for me. And for other people as i started to realize that matters when it came to this book for the first time i kind of said you know what it needs to be something different. The the actual physical object of the book needs to be beautiful in a way that i've never paid attention to before soup put a lot more energy into doing that. And it all goes back to that. That moment with milton where that light bulb went on and it took me years to actually act on that. Well i'm looking at the book. Now see really pretty spot varnish beautiful end papers you. You accomplished your goal. Congratulations thank you and a little secret. Actually designed the cover for the book. I was wondering about that. Well done new all these secret talents Gonna have to start talking about design a little bit more in our next interview. Maybe jumping you. Start your book with this statement type. What should i do into google. And there's a decent chance it'll finish your sentence with with my life. Why are so many people so unsatisfied by what they do. That is the question with so many ideas so many books so many offerings so many solutions so many potential ways to solve the problem. There are so many people who are still in a state of anywhere from genuine suffering to just what adam grant is. Now calling languishing you know. Think not so bad not good but is at the state that you wanna serve bring through the rest of your life and i think a lot of it has to do with two things one the circumstances around you and that includes circumstances that you may be born into that are incredibly helpful to your ability to thrive and also really layer on a whole lot of constraints and societal limitations You grapple with like we. We don't step into the planet in equal position but the other thing is our inner world. I think it gets back to that notion of self awareness and line up the thing that we want to do in the world with expectations and with values which isn't necessarily a bad thing if the expectation values are helpful to us but we very rarely do the deeper work and say what actually nurses me like. How do i exert myself. How do i wake up in the morning. How do i invest myself. How to invest my energy. In a way that gives me the feeling of meaningfulness that gives me the feeling of energy and excitement that gives me the feeling expressed potential and purpose that lets me lose myself in flow. We don't do that work there. There aren't many classes in universities or colleges or high schools or grad schools. That say can we just stop for a second and take some time exploring who you actually are. What matters to you. What fills you up. And what empties you out. So how could we ever make decisions about what to say. Yes or no to especially in the context of work and have that actually let us show up and have all this feelings. We still wanna feel. We have no idea what the work is. That gives us those feelings. In the first place. I think some of us just randomly stumbling to it and then we're like wow. This is amazing. This is incredible and then they have their run at it and then five years later. Yeah it ends and they can't replicate it because they never understood why they felt that way underneath a i mean. I think that this book is also helpful for people that sort of suffer from the opposite syndrome. Which is to not feel spark passion about any particular option and feel stuck in not know which way to go and just feel trapped by that feeling which you know is a real dilemma to be in. I've been there. Yeah i mean. I think we've all been there right And i think at different moments in our lives we feel trapped sometimes for different reasons and and some of us may hold a very value of Financial security maybe. We came up in a home that was very unstable or for whatever reason we enter adulthood you know and that becomes this thing where it becomes the solitary driver of effort and it may actually make you incredibly successful in the field that you're pursuing and rise up to the top and then you get there and you look around like why don't i feel the way that i wanted to feel honoring. That value doesn't matter but it's not everything. Yeah no i mean certainly it matters but if it becomes your lead gene. It sort of infiltrates everything. And because that type of lead gene is heavily metabolize very quickly. It's never enough never ever enough. And you just keep spinning and spinning and spinning on that hamster wheel trying to accumulate more and metabolising it nearly the same speed Your book is fueled by the work you've been doing at your company in most recent is spark endeavors where you the chief architect and driving force behind the spark a types that you've developed but i i believe in i might be wrong about this. Ah correct me please. But i believe the foundation of this work really began in your first book where you identified your first five primary sparks which have transitioned evolved since but it seems like you've been doing this research now for quite some time. Yes so the truth is the foundation for this work actually goes back about twenty years As we're having this conversation it's right around the twenty th anniversary of nine eleven..

milton adam grant landon Glaser google
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I recognize that those three things exist To become aware of helpful or empty any one of those domains are any given window in time and three make the decision to allocate energy to try and top them all off and keep them top off for as much as possible. But that's the big picture model. There's a mantra that can stir run in my head that i used to make decisions that i feel like at the end of the day. Laima head on a pillow will just result in good life Without having long term focus. And that is when i'm looking at an opportunity or the chance to invest myself on something last myself. Will this give me the opportunity to absorb myself in activities that fill me up while surrounding myself with people. I cannot get enough love and in some way shape or form making a difference to people who have no idea. This thing is even happening. If i kind of hold you to that then at this point i believe the good life side of is just gonna kinda work. Its way out thing that i read that you've written that's really stayed with me. Is the notion that a good life is not a place at which you arrive. It's a lens through which you see n. create your world and it reminded me a little bit of something that seth godin writes about in regards to happiness and pleasure. That pleasure is something that you always want more of. You can never seem to get enough of but real happiness is being content with what you currently have. I love that in the context of thinking about what it means to live a good life and that that sort of contentment. With what you have. And i'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about how you see that lens of of a good life so if it's a if it's a lens through which you see and create your world. How do you sharpen that lens. Well part of it is how to sharpen the lens but also part of his. Where do you focus the lens to me. A lot of emphasis has been on focusing the lens on happiness and on what people would call capital s success money status power prestige and on the former. Like you said you know. Happiness is a snapshot. it's not the movie. It is something that we love to experience but it's also not sustainable state and research shows now that probably about fifty or so percent of anybody's happiness is based on a genetic set point at a certain level and that can be giddy all day every day that can also be like a little bit melancholy. Now you can do things in your life to move that. But if the metric that we hold ourselves to as we focus our lens on happiness and relief the goal is to be one hundred percent. Happy all the time. It's just not possible and from many of us the closest become is we're we're no longer melancholy all the time and we feel pretty good about that until somebody says. That's actually not good enough. You're not doing okay and you can't stop there. And then all of a sudden we start to judge in shame ourselves and then we drop back into a bad place so happiness. I think is is not necessarily the best place to focus that lens nor is is money power status. I think they're proxies for agency. And that is the thing that i think is worthy of exploring but at the end of the day i i really focused a lot on meaning you know. I want to shift the lens in the direction of meaning because meanings the thing that sustains no matter whether you're happy with your miserable no matter where you have power or control or you don't meaning is the thing that you can be derived from pretty much any and every experience and the experience of meaningfulness is profoundly transformative To your ability to move reached a and say you know what i matter this matter It may not have gone the way i wanted. But because i can derive a sense of meaning. I'm gonna wake up and you know and and do again the next day and feel okay about the way things are big franken. Classic work logo therapy. And it's really to me. That's where we focus lens in terms of how to sharpen the lens. The thing that comes immediately to me are eastern practices on developing cultivating self awareness. So i've had Mindfulness practice for over a decade. Now to do first thing in the morning when opened my eyes. And i started it initially. Because i was pretty much brought to my knees struggling with health issue. I needed to try. And figure out how to find touchstone until i figured out my way through it and it's blossomed out into this thing where you know a sitting daily practice then starts to grow out and its tentacles reach into just a persistent or semi persistent state as you move through the day and you gain the ability to zoom the lens out and look down on yourself almost and say what am i actually thinking about. Where am i focusing. And you can zoom lens into yourself. Say what's happening my inner all right. Now what's happening in the circumstances around me and then be intentional about whether you want to keep the lens focused. There are not so the sharpening side to me is about self awareness. A lot of your understanding of what it means to live. A good life is articulated in your two previous books. Your two bestselling books had live a good life. And your second book uncertainty turning fear and doubt into fuel for brilliance which we talked about at length in our last interview so today and really wanted to focus on your brand new book. It's titled sparked. Discover your unique imprint for work..

Laima seth godin franken
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:13 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Somehow move people to go a little bit here or go. A little bit there It's a big part of why. I've loved entrepreneurship because it's not just figuring out the problem business. It's figuring out the much more wicked problem of people. He said that when you're surrounded by that much money all the time and the stakes are so high. You get a really warped sensibility. About the value of money and the value of life do they become intertwined fee with that point. Yeah there's a. I probably lost myself in that for a short window. It was a pretty short because my body effectively jettisoned me from the career. Pretty quickly Is very easy to get caught up in that. Swirl i mean. I literally remember we were closing a deal. And you know there was an investor who was had said that they were committing twenty five million dollars to this raise and We were closing that evening and we found out that this person was about to get on a plane out at the airport and we had to make the decision whether just send me in a car over to the airport to go get his signature on a piece of paper that would lock another twenty five million dollars and somebody in the room. Which i like this. It's really not worth it for that. And you're like wait what it just you really do when you live in that world. I think it's at least for me. Maybe other people find it much more easy to themselves to truth in reality and like the fact that this is not the world but only this one bizarre representation of a world. It's very easy to lose sight. And i think for a short window i probably did. And then your body gave up on you and then you gave up on this career you quit. You went from making billions of dollars in raising billions of dollars in private equity funds to making twelve dollars an hour as a personal trainer So tell us about that trajectory. Yeah that was a bigger hit to my ego than anything else. A seems like that's what you saw out doing. It's not like the last thing you could do you. You went actively look for a job as a personal trainer a hundred percent true and at the same time. I knew that. Even in the short time that i was in the law which is about five years or so i had built a big chunk of my identity around being that person. So when i go from that you know being able to show particular business card where particular things in there are certain assumptions. That are made to then exiting. Not just that job. But the entire industry deciding. I want to go back into entrepreneurship in the world of fitness and wellbeing. And i want to start at the ground up to really understand what was the dynamic from the most basic point of service. I talked my way into a job as a personal trainer. Making twelve bucks an hour and on the one hand. I was thrilled. I was getting anything to learn an entirely new industry. This re education for me and on the other hand there were still something in me that that was struggling to let go of the fact that dear god what if one of my old clients walks by means sees me stretching out a client in central park wearing my teeth and like running shoes a radio shirt. What are they gonna think. Oh guy couldn't hang it look what he's had to do now and it took a while for me to just really unwind that grasping at a certain identity instead of assumptions and say like nights. Okay like i'm really good with this next journey that i'm going on But it wasn't an instant thing that's that's a really hard one. I ended up quitting job. That i had right when i first started working at a college and had gone from working at a magazine which i love to going to work at a real estate marketing company for twice the money in a car and i hated every single day of it every single day. I cried every day and knew that. I had made this decision based on money and when i quit i ended up getting a job at integral yoga health food store as a cashier and i remember always being somewhat terrified that somebody was going to walk in and say hey are eager all that girl from the marketing z. Y. you buy a cash register and health food store ever all that we're for nothing don't you wonder. Sometimes how many people have not risked stepping out and trying something entirely different just because of that fear of being socially judged by people who like they wanted to be seen a certain way in there is. Oh yeah i mean. I still worry about that. I mean that's part of why didn't come out until i was fifty. Just the fear of my own inner homophobia. How would i be judged. What would you think i mean i. I've spent most of my life primarily worried about that but working on still working on it. I want to continue talking about you. ran a yoga studio for a while and then you know very typical jonathan fields style. You sold it. You are just at heart an entrepreneur And you sold it to pursue your own business which is now called the good life project where you create media. You create tools programs experiences. Podcasts that help people live better. Lives and so this is super basic question. But i'm really curious about the answer. What does living a better life mean to you. So i've been asking that question to a lot of people for batted decade now and i've been trying to figure it out for two to three decades and while every person's hanser has been different there for sure some common patterns. But what i've sort of distill down to for me is three buckets. Think of your life is three buckets one is contribution meaningful work One is connection that the depth and quality of your relationships and one is taliban. How you optimize your mind and your body and to me. A good life is really. It's the ability to..

jonathan fields taliban
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I got an old swing arm. Lamp that we had. And you know bolted it on and thomas off had a paint and that was just. I lost time doing that. I mean you know that. Feeling like almost everybody. I'm sure listening to this knows that feeling for me. This was back in the day where some of the best art on the planet was album covers. You know it was amazing stuff. I mean i remember trying to get as close as humanly possible to the actual album cover knowing absolutely nothing about paint Yet teaching myself. And i throughout so many canvases because that was a bit of a perfectionist. And if i was off by one line i felt like it was just a disaster and our junket and start over but eventually i got pretty good so i started making album covers jean jackets and that earned me my walking around money in high school. My favorite of all time was Molly hatchet flirting with disaster. This like think it was a who did this. Like just wild wild intensely vivid knew it looked like it was bursting off of the cover. It probably took me a couple of months to do that one. But i was so proud of it. I often wonder what happened all those g jackson. I wish i had saved one. I wish you had to say allowing. I was sure you're gonna say your favorite. Was the boston album covered. That was pretty amazing to actually. It was it was probably between the two of them the classic upside down spaceship. Yes awesome i kind of wish you had it so we can it to polish share right. Well you've been an entrepreneur. Pretty much your entire life in addition to selling jean jackets. You also were a self-described lemonade. Stand kid you worked as a dj through college but not only as a dj. You worked building a dj company. So here's the big disconnect for me and something that i know. We touched on in our first interview but i want to go a little bit deeper. What made you decide to go to law school. And become a big time attorney for the us securities and exchange commission with this kind of arts and crafts. Nearly hippy esque upbringing short answer money and not the right reason in any way shape or form You know it was those who knew me at the time. i made. That decision retired of really looked at me and said wait what this is what you're doing But it was a little bit more than that actually. I basically never went to class in. Undergrad i was building this. Dj and mobile lighting and music company. The whole time there. So i was out. You know thursday to saturday night to four am. Dj and moving stacks and speakers equipment and and developing the art. Because it's a real art form. Which i love to this day and i barely ever attended class and when he graduated with the horrible grade point average by the way I was kicking around a couple of different jobs outside sales jobs. I remember driving my car building taking the the elevator top floor and knocking on doors of small businesses where my required role was Hi i'm here to see the president to talk about your long distance telephone service when i finally made the decision to go law school a couple of years after that it was in no small part because i got really curious what i was really capable of intellectually. I knew i had a jones for building businesses and being a amaker but also knew that i really slacked off when you know in terms of really pushing myself In college and i was really curious. And i was looking for a way to to test that and see what i could do and then at the same time develop skills that i knew would equip me to do anything alive so i figured if i went it would make me a better analyzer of ideas and arguments. It would teach me how to write and it would teach me how to speak. Definitely helped with the first. And i love the fact that i don't have to write in any way resembling what i was taught to write as a lawyer now for the rest of my life but it also taught me how to speak and understand arguments and i knew at the end of the day also. I was a kid who money manner to me. It was a symbol of status symbol of prestige a symbol of accomplishment. So i got to law school and worked ridiculously hard. I was very fortunate. Graduated pretty close to the top of my class and then had opportunity presented to me that. Starting me out at the sec. Big federal government agency and then. Linda me and one of the biggest firms in the world working in new york relentless hours and Ending up in a place where my body effectively shut down but it was a. It was a strains decision for me but i think also having grown up in a family where it was fairly bohemian. My dad Had one job his whole life. He is a research professor and we grew up in a town. That was actually. There was a lot of money in the town and they never felt overtly that you know. We were poor family in town because we weren't. We were sort of like middle class. But i was always surrounded by people who had more and could do more because of that and it did something to me that it took me probably decades into life to really unwind after working at the us securities commission. You then went on to become a private equity lawyer. Were you raised in. Launched more than one billion dollars in private equity funds and eve said that you were fascinated with the psychology of how markets moved. Has that influenced the way. You think about marketing. Now oh one hundred percent you know the more of the things you learn really quickly in the world of finance and the markets. Financial markets is marcus. Don't move based on the fact they move based on people's perception of fact which is it's marketing right. It's all about human psychology. You know it's you know you in in the world of branding. This is what you've lived for so much it. You know there's the product there's the thing itself and then there's what rob's around the thing itself they creates the perception of the thing. So i've been fascinated by that and i think my interest in the markets early on was really It was a bit of a red herring. I my real fascination was human behavior. Why do we do the weird things that we do And how do we craft experiences language. That.

g jackson Molly hatchet amaker sec thomas boston us securities commission jones Linda new york marcus rob
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:06 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It is so good to be back with you and thank you. Thank you last time we did this. We were together in this studio. I'm sitting in right now and unfortunately we're a little bit further apart exactly so our interview today is actually as mentioning the second time that you've been on design matters so i actually want to start today's interview by asking you but something i seem to have missed completely in our first interview which i've subsequently regretted ever since so now nine years later i get to ask you about the great twelve day. Cool whip experiment. Can you please tell our listeners. What that was. And what on earth provoked you to do it. Wow so when and our daughter was little kid We were we were talking to her about food and different types of food and natural food and food that was created in laboratories. And how you can tell the difference and she loves whipped cream or loved cream back when she was probably five or six years old back then and we thought it'd be kind of fun to do this experiment one day so we took too little glass ramifications gan's and we made fresh whipped cream in one and we put it in it and then we got to of cool with and we scooped out an equal amount of clue on the other and we just kind of left him out side by side for twelve days and it was sort of a visual test of what would happen. Nature versus science or laboratory and within a matter of that. Half an hour right. You know the whipped cream. The actual team had just just dissolved into a puddle. Twelve days later the cool whip looked identical to the moment that we put it into the ball and we hadn't touched it at all on that day. I kind of looking at it. And i took the ramic in my hand. I turned it upside down. Nothing happened it. Stayed in it. And then i touched it and it was like rock solid. Yeah it was punk. Yes so we got a pen and jewel smiley face and i put. That was one of the first ever blog posts that i put up and it was just sort of like a fun experiment. My recollection is that that post probably much to The unhappiness of the blind people who created cool whip Ranked on the first page of search for cool whip for years. But i did have to go back to the way back machine to find it. But i'm i'm sure that our listeners can can dig it up pretty easily. The pictures are quite extraordinary. And when i was looking at it. I thought well. There's the origins of the visual proof of jonathan's spark a tight and we're gonna talk about that. But i really did think that. Making and of scientists combo was was very appropriate in terms of of how you've now designated the various parts of your personality So our interview today is going to be a little bit different from a usual interviews in that. We don't really need to go back into the deep dive into your origin story but I'd still like to review a little bit of highlights for our listeners. That might not have heard that first episode from from nearly a decade ago. You're okay with that absolutely okay. So you grew up in a suburb of new york in a town called port washington and this is also something new that i learned in researching you for this episode. your town was known as the east egg from the great gatsby which is a beautiful little watertown and your mom was a serious crafts person and a potter. She i think gave you a little old wooden set of paints which was your grandfather's or maybe you founded in your attic. I'm and that's when you. I fell in love with painting so talk a little bit about the kinds of things. Were painting back then as a little boy in east egg long island. Yeah so It's funny because the the mansion that you know the legend is there was one mansion at the top of the egg was the shape of our town that the greek espy was based on. Also which is the stunning stunning estate on the water. But yeah i grew up in a family where the home was just very bohemian artisan My mom lived that life. She embodied it with everything In her and brought me into just the creative jones the creative impulse really really early in life And recognized it in me at the same time and said let's let's feed it in some way so the painting side event probably came a little bit later. My grandpa my recollection is grandpa passed and in cleaning out all of all of his stuff. We and he was a very successful trial lawyer. He was a litigator. He was type of person where every hair was quaffed perfectly. He had his his nails manicured with clear. Nail polish always a beautiful suit and looking at all of his old stuff. We come upon this old wooden box with a latch on the front of it pop open the latch and inside is this paint set is oil paint and acrylic paints and brushes and wood pellets. And all and i was like did anyone know. He was painter and you kind of raised eyebrows. Nobody really knew so. So my mom gave that to me Part of my Inheritance and and her pottery studio was in the basement of our house and it was magical world of of kilns and giant wheels and jurors and jars and jars of chemicals that she would make glazes added but in the corner. There's a little space took a bunch of clay boxes fifty pound boxes of clay and then took an old door and threw them on top of it..

gan east egg long island jonathan watertown washington new york grandpa jones
"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

09:41 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Fbi by social factors or the way that you were parented or whatever reinforcement you've experienced over the course of your right because everyone these different impulses and end spark types has profound value t to you and to the world. There's none that's just sort of like. Oh a lesser than type of thing. So if something inside of you says but but i really want to be something else. Then you're like yeah you you sort of. The work is to deconstruct that. Where's that coming from. You're like why. Why do i perceive this thing. That is inside of me that yearns to to make me work as lesser than in some way shape. It's a heavy thing. Man that you shoulder quite a bit of responsibility because somebody takes this test. It says okay. Here's here's you kind of fall into these categories that becomes self determinative in certain ways because if if then that's the lens through which you're perceiving the world. I am this kind of person. You're gonna make decisions based on like it's not a small thing. Yeah and that's something that i've grappled with and it's probably one of the reasons why initially i resisted doing this one and it's also one of the reasons why i said what i just said which is at the end of the day This is a tool to help you but the tool alone is not determinative of you. Your own self awareness. You're on self-knowledge understanding of who you are in the world If you do the work it's a tool to increase your own level of self awareness and self knowledge ultimate tool in the ultimate arbiter So i'm huge ashley. Looking at this as one tool in a toolbox of a whole bunch of other tools practices pass explorations It doesn't supplant anything else. It's just another thing to give you a bit more insight if it feels right if it feels resonant with it. If it doesn't don't you know don't supplant your own inner voice. And that and i say that in the context not just of the spark taste but of everything of any one of those tools in your toolbox. You know you have to ask the big questions. Am i resisting it. Because of some sense of shame or other social contract or other pathology sure. What is the locus of that interview. Rice is it corrupted or inflow. Of course it is. It's it's influence by your life experience but there's a lot of work that goes into self understanding so that that inner voice can be trusted as intrinsic versus reactive. Yeah that the thing that tends to That i look at a lot is if you take the assessment And then if you look more detailed information that's in the book. How does it land like do literally. I what i look for his embodied response if it's cognitively interesting to you. I'm not entirely sure that we got it. If you've if there is a felt response to this there's something visceral where like your body's tangling or something in you is saying. Oh al yeah like like going all the way back to the beginning of a conversation. Where if you do this and there's something inside of you your whole body screams. This is me. I feel seen like this is so true to me. And the way that have existed in the world then. I think that that's what i love for the single biggest response we see. We're going to isolate a word that people share in response to this work. It's not that they've learned something new. It's validation that they've actually known this the whole rat a construct or a language for that. It's a key that goes into a lock in that key turns in a fluid way dan. It is an emotional thing. You're like that's what i am. I knew all along. Yeah now i can more deeply understand my motivation or this thing that i felt for most of my life but stifled or put away. Because i i any number of reasons. I i learned that it was inappropriate to lead with that or show. It of this actually matters. This ashley is important. Like i can't the weight of not living into this Is not worth the pain that is causing anymore. Do you have a sense of archetypes. Emanating more from nature is nurture. Play a part in this. Are they malleable over. Time due to do these types change. I mean i'm sure if you had decades of performing this test and research you'd have a better sense of that What your got. Yeah and so that last point was was spot on. It's nearly impossible to enter that question from an actual data driven standpoint because we would literally need to track people like from birth through the time that took the assessment To see whether stay things have stayed consistent similar to all the other major indexes but A number of the prompt the assessment. Have ashley designed to be long-term reflective and how people answer from a place of what has been a consistent through line. Then i can identify in my entire life on debt has seemed to show up and be there the whole time. The other thing is that Intuitively anecdotally talked touch a lot of people. Now i've like tunnel of story based in interview based research and the consistent. Thread really does seem to be that this weather. It's like genetic whether it's behavioral whether it's environmental whether it's spiritually endowed. I honestly don't know maybe some blend of all of those. But it does tend to touchdown pretty early in life. And in my mind from what i've seen stay fairly consistent barring some major major disruption in a person's psyche or brain or physiology on the level that literally would rewire them which can happen. If somebody has a psychotic break their brain is not different. The same as it was before somebody has traumatic brain industry. The in injury. The brain is different. But what we've seen is that I do believe that it stays relatively steady state But that has a really interesting at. He'll like Compliment to it. Which is kenneth change over time. Well what if. I take the assessment once and then two years later i take it and maybe my primary my shadow have have switched. Or there's a different answer. Does that mean that. My spark types which in my mind. That's unlikely. I think what's much more likely to happen. Is that the primary constraint to your ability to answer these questions really articulate. Self-aware way has changed so any one of these assessments are limited by the depth and quality of your experiences and your level of self awareness that can change in a major way guaranteed over the last two years. People have experienced things in that lies that forced them into work. Relationships scenario circumstances that they've never experienced before and a lot of people have become much more self aware of how they feel about a lot of different things so if they return to they may actually bring that level of greater depth and self awareness to responding in a way. That's probably more informed. Yeah that's that's that's a very good point and that's interesting Because if you're if you're not self aware and you're living in. Some state of denial irresponsible to these questions are going to reflect the person that you believe yourself to be not necessarily the person that you actually are. Yeah which which leads to a useless outcome. And that's just that's not what this is about. Yeah but anybody who's a parent especially if you have more than one child you learn pretty pretty immediately like kids come out the way they are and of course nurture plays a huge part in it but constitutionally you could see the differences like immediately and those are differences that remain constant throughout their life. Yeah i mean it's funny. Because there's i feel like culturally. We hate the idea that anything about us is fixed that anything about us is not susceptible to change over time. And yet you like miser hazel. They're not changing The there there is a lot about us physiologically. that is what it is That may change over time with gene therapy and other stuff but right now there are certain things that we say. Yeah that's sort of like it is what it is. But when we talk about psychology or brain or or growth or Abilities or capabilities. We hate the notion that we are not entirely evolutionary being. We reject that outright simply. Because we don't wanna feel like you know there's a certain about us that will always be certain way and yet this not necessarily a bad thing you know and we are a certain way in certain domains of life The word trade exists or reason. You know Trait versus state. They're different things so new in the context of the spark of types. Can i give you one hundred percent database answer. That says one hundred percent fixed. It won't change over time. This is a trait. I can't because the data just isn't there and it will you will never be able to actually prove that through data but from everything that i'm seeing it does look like It stays relatively the same through life. And like you said any parent knows like like kids touchdown with certain wiring right that you do what you do right you know..

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"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:52 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Public radio franchises doodo three sixty who is a docent at one of the big museums in new york and we walked around on. I was telling her kind of falling in love with radio and especially public radio. Like you know like i think i might want to get into it and and not do the video thing and and she's kind of like well. Why would you reason and said well massive. Reach and i just. There's something of that vendor and grants reach. Right right simulate and i knew i just like like i had broken something in the conversation and one of missing. She's like she's like yeah reach but she's like the power of audio is it is the single most intimate medium of everything on the planet and the light bulb went on for me. And as an insurer as somebody who's quiet or somebody who has zero need to actually be on screen or be visually recognizable I'm just as happy so like being the wizard behind the curtain It all started to click and my early aspirations really more more radio But an at that point and you know this because you're in really early also everyone was thinking podcast is dying on the vine it literally. It's still is the last gasp and then apple splits out the podcast app and stalls at native on every device and a couple of months later cereal heads and right a universe changes it was a huge inflection point of elevated content meets accessibility. Like seamless accessibility. It wasn't just the app it was that you didn't necessarily have to download these things either like bandwidth expanded enough so that you could scream them and it just became easier and then cars started installing that in their dashboards and sudden. I mean still to this day. It's like every time i get an uber. There's the radio's playing go. Have you ever listened to a podcast. Ninety nine percent of the time they're like nah. I don't do that you know. There's still a ways to go but it it's crazy how much it's grown. I would've never thought that because when we started this it was a weird hobbyist thing to do it right not a cool. I mean we started this. I mean obviously it was just it was it was audio only but you are in hawaii. Right yeah right. So i mean i think thousand twelve right so it was like the same time that i started video. Yeah it's crazy. It's amazing what you must think it's times like what if i'd kept up the video i always split out the audio you can have the longer you could do like the on being model where you have a longer version and audio or whatever who actually did that for about a year. We just ran the audio on youtube channel because we had a bunch of subscribers there. And and i'm actually were now literally as we have this conversation sitting down with my team and were exploring different video formats What i'm trying to figure out actually is. How can we reanimate the video side of what we're doing because we know that youtube is the second or third largest podcast platform. So there's a huge audience there that doesn't want to leave like that platform and actually consume and for long-form conversations. Like this you know. This is beautifully produced. You do an astonishing job. And yet i also know and you know that a lot of people are she just letting this run in the background. Sure you know what i'm trying to figure out is between knowing that not having a strong affinity And also not feeling call is really spend a lot of time visually in front of people. But i really want the ideas and the conversation. Whatever spotlight. I have to share on other people in their ideas and their stories and insights. I want to be able to do that at the biggest scale possible. How do we get back into video in a way. That is because back to what we're talking about again. Maximum sustainable generosity. How do we increase the generosity and the spread of the ideas and the insights and the individuals in a way that is sustainable for me At the same time well a couple of observations on that first of all youtube is also a massive search engine ran they figured out discover ability in a way that podcasting still struggles so a certain video will get recommended to people who are not subscribers of you. And and i it's able to travel across the internet in a way that a podcast episode is not able to so i think that makes it powerful as well and just the visual association creates a deeper emotional connection to the host or the guest. Or what have you. But i think the important point that i want to make is that and this is something i i've always appreciated about. You is that you're never wanna say oh. Everybody's doing this. Like i should do that too. You're always looking for the white space. Like what are people not doing like when everybody's zigging your zagging okay. We're we want to get back into video but like what is the you know. What are people not seeing. What's a new way to imagine how we could make a presence on this platform but do it in a unique way. That is commensurate with your sensibility. Yeah i don't like doing with no good zag oriented you know and i look at. I look at what we're creating here and it blows my mind. I'm in awe of this of what you've built and and you know what you offer to your community and at a simultaneous. I'm my mind is like i'm so but yeah like the android is the god bless but it's a serious ranch in your ability to be nomadic right in the way that you are right right. I mean and that's only we haven't talked about but but at the same time kind of like what is nobody else doing right now. Like if i'm going to step back into video which we are going to. What's nobody else doing right now because again. If i want to step into it. I want to create a different bar I wanted to figure out how to do something. That is Really strongly differentiated in this base. But not just to be different. But in a way that i feel like it's only changes the.

youtube new york apple hawaii
"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Podcast what am i here to do. What should i do with my life. If these are questions you find yourself asking. You're in the right place at the right time because my guest today has essentially devoted his life to helping people answer these questions. His name is jonathan fields and in addition to being a dear friend. A mentor to me. Personally a dad and author of many a bestselling book the man behind the wonderful good life project podcast and community and maker of many other things. Jonathan holds this core belief that we all have an innate impulse or imprint for work that makes us come alive. All of us and over many years spent studying this thinking deeply about this writing about this has divined in evidence based method for helping people discover it. It is this terrain we today tread a fascinating conversation. That will no doubt leave. You inspired to dig deeper which you should all do by taking up. His brand new stunning book sparked which hits bookstores this week. A few more things to add before we dive in. But first we're brought to you today by drum roll please outer no founded by the greatest all time waterman. Kelly slater out on creates high-quality hive ecologically in sustainably fabricated fashionable fairtrade men and women's clothes that fit grade and look even better and also last forever. Lots of companies out there greenwash but outer noun. What's great about known is that they're just the real deal. For example. denham. Denham is one of the dirtiest businesses in the world. Horrible but i know what is making it clean. They repurpose the water and byproducts of development and turn them into building bricks they also harvest rainwater. They air dry. Eighty five percent of their genes to save energy and factory is solar powered. Amazing all of which is neither here nor there.

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:56 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"That changed the quality of what i was doing. It's amazing how connecting something like that to purpose and to a greater sense really changes experience of the day to day job which actually brings me to. So you've written this new book. It's a wonderful book for anybody who is searching at this moment but also a really useful guide for anyone who simply wants to understand why what they're doing is working. I mean that was me quite honestly and the book is called sparked. And here's the thing you start the book by telling people forcefully. Do not take this book and blow everything up so talk a little bit about your book. What are you trying to do with it. Started with that little personal note asking people to sit tight because the book is the outcome of an a number of years worth now and having the core body of work exposed hundreds of thousands of people and what has learned over the years when people discover something that rings really true to them and they realized that the way they're showing up in their daily lives is potentially really misaligned with what they've now known. Is there deeper impulse for work. There's a tendency to say. Oh i need to just walk away from all of this right now. I can't do this for another minute longer. And that's the wrong. Move for many people so i put that in the beginning just to kind of say. Take your time just really deepened into this. And whether that's the right decision for you or not will be revealed over time but for most people it's not. I wrote the book largely. Because i kept getting asked this question. What should i do with my life. And when it get asset is primarily in the context of. How do i find into work. That gives me this feeling of being alive and i started to wonder. There's a lot of academic research in the field which is incredibly wise but also not entirely accessible and not always really easily applied in the real world there's all sorts of spiritual writings and paths. Which can be really useful to but often require people to really buy into that and over an extended period of time. And i didn't see just really direct practical tools to help people understand. What is the inner driver. What is the impulse for me for work. That makes me feel live. And i wondered if there were an identifiable map -able set of impulses that was fairly universal across all people. And what i realize is that there are these really universal and fairly basic impulses but show up in completely unique ways and they evolved. They may change and shift over time in many different ways and kept looking at nearly every job. Could imagine and say what's under that what's under that. What's under that over. And over and over until it distill down to the core impulse for effort and that landed with these ten impulses imprints. I kinda hate the fact that it's ten because it feels way to slip to me. It would have been nicer if it was like twelve or thirteen or nine. But that's where we landed. And then when i started to realize is that built around these impulses for effort that gives you. This feeling of being alive are fairly common set of behaviors tendencies and preferences that form larger archetypes. And i call those spark at types. Just because it's kind of a fun way to say they're the archetypes for work that spark shoe but he also wanted to get really clear on language. So you asked me earlier. What about this idea of do what you love and like you said it's very gray language so when i use the phrase come alive the impulse for work makes you come alive. I'm talking about the confluence of five distinct components. One of them is meaningfulness. Does this work gives you the feeling that it matters that you matter that it's meaningful to you. The second is flow. Does it allow you to more easily. Drop into this sort of blissed out state of flow. Where the world seems to go by time. Fuchs you become hyper generative hybrid. Cognitive hyper creative. So much of the potential that you feel like is out there somewhere actually starts to become accessible to you. The third piece of it is what the business world might call engagement. But what. I sort of distill into more natural language excitement and energy. Do you wake up in the morning excited to do. Even if it's really hard does it. Energize you the. Fourth component is expressed potential. Are you able to do the same. Feel like it is allowing all of you to be brought to the task. You're not hiding or stifling. Anything and the fifth element is purpose and similar to what i shared earlier. I'm talking about purpose to levels. Do you feel like you're working towards something identifiable that is meaningful to you but more broadly feel like you have the general sense of purpose in life. Jonathan can i ask you. How would you articulate the difference between that first element which i think you called meaning and purpose. Are they twins. I actually look at one as the verb and one is the now the purposes the movement towards meaning is the state so purposes about seeking. It is about like i'm here and this is there. And that's where i want to go and the reason that you want to go there is because for some reason that nobody else may understand it's meaningful to you to be at that other place to work towards something it gives you the feeling of meaningfulness so one is more the verb. It's the action it's the direction and one is the feeling that's generated in the pursuit of this thing. So say i read that ten categories that you have laid out. That was very clear. Even before i did any of your diagnostics that are available and really fun to do is really clear what i was but what i didn't really understand i was a maker which isn't a surprise to anybody with whom i share time on this show because i make the podcast and i'm writing a book and what do i do. I work by myself in a room to make things. I love doing that or even better. I work with teams of people to make things but your strategy for helping us to decode where we might find a sense that we're in the right place. It's more nuanced than that. You also introduced this idea. You call it a shadow version of our archetypes. I think it is like you know what a second aspect of myself that i really need to understand. If i'm going to figure out how to channel that first aspect in the right way. And i'll tell you and i misfired on that one. I was like oh. I'm a maker who likes to teach people. Things turns out jonathan. I'm not. I'm not a maker who likes to teach people things. I'm a maker who loves to learn things myself. So i am a maven. That's the name that you give to this category and thinking about that slight nuance actually changes. The way that i think about directing what. I'd like to spend my time doing a love that especially in the context of the maker and the maven so the movement is really interesting. The fundamental impulse for the maven is knowledge acquisition. You wake up in the morning and you're fascinated. It could be a specific topic or just broadly. You're just broadly curious. It's all about learning the challenge with that is. It's not the easiest thing in the world to turn that into a job because you know who's gonna pay you to just sit there and go down the rabbit hole on google or devour books or listen to every podcast on the planet or encyclopedic and domain. You know there's a tremendous amount of value that gets unlocked when that impulse is then partnered even with the secondary impulse that you have or with a group of other people on a team where they sort of. Take that value in this case your domain expert on the team and that were gonna like apply everything that you've learned but for you where you have this maker side that then can create things at the world interact with that create value and that becomes the gateway to earning a living. If in fact that's meaningful to you but there's this other more nuance saying that can sometimes happen with the maker and the maven so the primary. What are your strongest impulse. Shadow is what. I would call either your runner up very often. There's more nuance relationship. It's the work you do in order to do the work of your primary better so your maker could. In fact be not only the way that you create value which allows you to earn a living. It could also be a really effective funding mechanism for your savings impulsive. Just go deep into a whole lot of things and the process of creation. Ken for you actually serve a dual process as a process of learning and discovery. So it actually is serving that mavens impulse in a number of different ways. We're gonna take a quick break care. We'll be back in just a moment with more on finding purpose.

Fuchs Jonathan jonathan google Ken
"jonathan fields" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:40 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan fields" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Jonathan and his team. They feel like kindred spirits to the. Hello monday team like us. They care so so deeply about how people experience their lives. They put their show into the world hoping to add meaning in connection and that really resonates with us at jonathan's been at this a lot longer. He's done a ton of research about what really drives people to do their best work and to live their best lives this year. We were all in lockdown. Jonathan wrote a book about. It's called sparked discover your unique imprint for work. That makes you come alive today. We're gonna talk about that research. He'll map out profiles that help us. Better understand what lights up. And he'll help us figure out where we begin but before we get there. I think it's important to understand. What brought jonathan to this work so i asked him how it all began. Here's jonathan. I think like for most of us my own experience my own stumbling bumbling feeling flatlined and eventually in my case in a very past life in a very past career at this moment ending up so ignoring the call to do something that was so much more aligned with who i am and the way that i really light up in the world that i ended up in emergency surgery after working A ton of hours for the better part of three weeks my immune system shut down i ended up with a pelvic abscess a huge infection and my body that literally ate a whole intestines from the outside in and it came out of that realizing i was a lawyer in a large firm in new york back in the day. I had the job that everyone wanted out of school. You like the prestige. The name the salary and i was dying inside. I mean at that point literally. And i still went back to that job after i covered a few weeks later but i knew things were different. I knew from that moment. Forward that i would be moving on and i started to ask myself. These bigger questions know. Like what would i do. That i felt would really nourish me and fill me up. If i felt like i could support myself in the world doing it because that matter to me i live. New york wants to start a family and it was important to me to be responsible in those areas of my life or at least what. I considered responsible at that moment in time. So for me. A lot of it was really about me reaching a point where i was so mis aligned with what i was doing ahead so abandoned the things that filled me up and the things that will allow me to take care of myself that my body literally rejected my career. You know. I think that a lot of people have that experience that experience that they don't even necessarily realize they're so numb inside that they don't realize how unhappy they are until their physical body tells them in the form of i mean in your case tragically sits down and says listen. Change things in the form of an abscess. You know often. What i hear from people is that they know they don't feel like they're doing the right thing but they don't even know how to begin to ask the question. Just had this conversation yesterday with a good friend. what am i supposed to do. How would i even know. People always say we'll go to the thing that gives you purpose. I don't know how do i begin. And that is the question that has probably been consuming me for my entire adult life. Who fascinating to me is. We have so much education around skills around domain expertise like you can go and get a degree in accounting. You can get a phd in physics but we spend very little time actually asking the questions to ourselves and really deepening into self-knowledge and you know who am i what matters to me what gives me the feeling of being alive. What even is that. How do i deconstruct that. What are the elements of that feeling. The idea of what. Give me a sense of purpose but also what about is sense of purpose and is that the same as different than abroad or feeling of purpose in life so these are actually really really really important questions for us to move through life and feel like we're actually contributing in a way that makes us feel really good and also being nourished you know we're getting something back from the way that we're investing effort in the world that is making us wake up in the morning and feel cited to do it to feel like it matters it genuinely matters to us and maybe to the world at large. I don't really point out the way in which you're talking about larger context of one's life and decouple that a little bit from this idea of career and graduated college in the nineties. I am of a generation of americans that came of age being told if they went to college. Do the thing that you love. Do the thing that you love and that should be your career. I'd love to hear your perspective on whether or not we should love our careers. I think it depends on how you define love if by love. You mean you should be happy for every moment of it and you should wake up in the morning. It just feels incredible. No i think there's a lot of mythology baked into that that sets aspiration that is really hard to hit and also leads to shame. When you don't hit it so now you have bundled failure with shame. But if i love you mean meaning if by lovey mean you wake up and do the thing that is profoundly meaningful to you do the thing that is in service of something you care deeply about do the thing that allows you to lose yourself in flow do the thing that lets you feel like you're fully expressed on every level. You know if by those things you mean love then. Yeah but i don't think we ever parse that. And i think a lot of times we just sort of step into this pollyanna estate. Saying do the things you love. And this is the great phrase rate. Do the thing you love and you'll never work a day in your life. What does that even mean and be. I actually liked to work. Yeah like investing effort to me. Why is work a dirty word. I like working really really hard in the name of something that i cared deeply about. I will work all day every day. I have to pull myself away from work. Because what i do is so nourishing to me. So when did actually the word work. Become a dirty word. And it's because it's bundled with emptiness and when you make the assumption that were a castro always be on some level emptying then yeah. It's tough but the word work itself. There's nothing wrong with working really hard over an extended period of time to do something amazing. So let's go back in your own story for just a second to that moment when you realized that you are better physically for the moment but that your life needed to take a different direction but then so i also realized that i was living in new york city. I didn't wanna live hand-to-mouth at a point. My life wage sort of didn't want to just go back and live paycheck to paycheck. So i showed back up at work. As soon as i could and i stayed there for the better part of a year after that because i was also making a list of things had thought it'd be pretty cool to do with my life if i could figure out how to sustain myself and i knew that that would probably have me stepping into an entirely different world and very likely starting at the most basic level so i knew i want to say a chunk of money to cover that window because i figured it would take me nine months to a year to figure it out to figure out the next window and they wanted to be okay so i kind of put my head down. And what's interesting about. That is that. Even though i was showing up and doing the exact same thing that i was doing before i experienced it really differently because my intent in showing up was not just to sorta like put my head down. Do the grind like do it. I was told. And do my time until i could finally make partner or retire one day. That just wasn't my. I experienced it differently. Because i had a bigger purpose in being there i was envisioning something really big and cool an interesting at i was looking at simply as a funding mechanism for this next big adventure and.

jonathan Jonathan new york New york castro new york city