35 Burst results for "jonathan"

First Lady Jill Biden in Arizona to Visit Navajo Nation

Mike Broomhead

00:14 sec | 22 hrs ago

First Lady Jill Biden in Arizona to Visit Navajo Nation

"Visiting the Navajo Nation today. In Friday. The highlight Corona virus vaccination efforts and visit a vaccination site shall also meet with Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and give a radio address. Your number more than 15 minutes away from today's top stories

Jonathan Nez
Golden Knights Clinch Playoff Berth With 5-2 Win Over Sharks

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Golden Knights Clinch Playoff Berth With 5-2 Win Over Sharks

"The golden knights became the NHL's first team to clinch a playoff berth when they defeated San Jose five to two winners of eight straight Vegas has gotten fat this season at the sharks expense going seven oh versus San Jose in the second period mark stone's power play goal pulled Vegas even at two two then at nineteen ten off a backdoor play Alex Tuch wristed the puck into an open net to give the knights the lead for good Jonathan Marchessault led the way for Vegas with two goals and two assists I'm Bruce Morton

Golden Knights San Jose Vegas NHL Mark Stone Alex Tuch Sharks Jonathan Marchessault Knights Bruce Morton
PwC's Chair: Business Leader's Role in America's Racial Reckoning

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:42 min | 3 d ago

PwC's Chair: Business Leader's Role in America's Racial Reckoning

"Afternoon. I'm trying to think k. Part opinion writer for the washington post. Welcome to washington post live or another installment in our series race in america. Business leaders are becoming more and more vocal on social and political issues and nothing exemplifies that better than the rising opposition to voter restrictions across the country just yesterday in a two page ad right smack in the middle of the washington. Post the new york times and the wall street journal. A who's who of corporate america philanthropy and hollywood declared quote. We stand for democracy. One of those signatories is with us. Today tim ryan. Us chair and senior partner of pw c. u. s. mr ryan. Welcome to washington. Post live and he's jonathan. Thanks it's great to be with you today. Thank you so on april. First you you said. We oppose any changes in election. Laws that result in suppressing law lawful votes especially given their historical use to suppress boats of color. That was april first. Why take such a stand the jonathan because it's important one of the things that business leaders need is. We need certainty. We need a strong democracy. We want people to work in our country invest in our country and we know that democracy is one of the biggest strengths that we have. It's important for us to during the weekend to make this economy strong at one of the things that make makes this economy. Strong is democracy wherever single person regardless where they come whether they're rich or poor with her black white. They had the ability to vote in our country. And if that's important that we need to speak out let people know about it

Washington Post Mr Ryan United States Tim Ryan Washington Jonathan The Wall Street Journal New York Times Hollywood
Wildfires Can Contaminate Outdoor Marijuana Crops

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 d ago

Wildfires Can Contaminate Outdoor Marijuana Crops

"As more states. Pass laws permitting. Marijuana use the legal barriers to growing cannabis are crumbling but wildfires. Pose risks to many outdoor growers in california and the pacific northwest. Jonathan vodka is ceo of front range biosciences a colorado based biotech company that breeds hemp and provides nursery expertise to cannabis growers. He says wildfire smoke in temporarily block out sunlight that can shorten the time. The plant spends growing branches and leaves. It can stunt the growth it can even with a photosensitive plant like cannabis closet it to go into early. Flowering that can reduce the overall yield soot. An ash can also settle onto leaves and soil. Some of it can be cleaned off but much is still unknown about how wildfire smoke can affect the plants in the longer term fought says smoke could taint the flavor or even worse if buildings or structures that contain lead or fire retardants burn than you can actually ended up with even much more toxic types of compounds that can contaminate your crop as the climate changes. Wildfires are getting more extreme law. Gore's ac new opportunities as canada's laws change they may also face growing

Jonathan Vodka Front Range Biosciences Pacific Northwest Colorado California Gore Canada
Panthers beat Lightning 5-3 to move into 2nd in Central

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 d ago

Panthers beat Lightning 5-3 to move into 2nd in Central

"Brandon Montour Patrick corn question Jonathan Hoover does scored in the first period of the Panthers five three verdict over the lightning the Panthers grabbed a two nothing lead in the opening period on mon towards first goal with Florida at eight forty one AM bar cause rebound chance off his own shot on the power play that went in off for quest at twelve thirty one Sam Bennett had two assists to help Florida jumped one point ahead of Tampa Bay for second place in the central division obviously there is a big rivalry between Tampa Florida and you know it was an intense game it seems not only are there so it definitely felt yeah and that the balance Sergei Bobrovsky stopped twenty eight shots in the win I'm Dave Ferrie

Brandon Montour Patrick Corn Jonathan Hoover Panthers Sam Bennett Florida Tampa Bay Tampa Sergei Bobrovsky Dave Ferrie
Make Love of Your Self Perfect

Tara Brach

01:43 min | 6 d ago

Make Love of Your Self Perfect

"Welcome french. it's a pleasure to be with. You and i wanted to start by honoring you just really the quality of effort and earnestness and and dedication to practice. I feel like we're all kind of helping each other along and the atmosphere is just. It's sweet and beautiful. So i wanted to start with a quote. This is thomas merton who once said of what avail is it if we can travel to the moon if we cannot cross. The abyss separates us from ourselves. This is the most important of all journeys and without it. All the rest are useless. I'm starting with this because it feels like. That's what we're doing that we gather here and in a sense or crossing the abyss. There's so much conditioning to cut us off from ourselves and cut us off from each other. And we're in this practice that is really Bringing an intimacy with the life. That's here and you could feel that as jonathan spoke yesterday. This such a powerful talk on meeting difficulty all those challenging weather systems befriending wings of and kindness and then the beautiful metta meditations yesterday with devon and then just now with with law that really keep inviting us into this heart space

Thomas Merton Jonathan
White Army Officer on Video Threatening Black Man Is Charged

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last week

White Army Officer on Video Threatening Black Man Is Charged

"In northwest Washington. W T. O P. Now at 12 51 soldier in South Carolina is facing criminal charges after a video of a confrontation with a black man. White non commissioned army officer Jonathan Pentland has been charged with third degree assault after he was caught on a viral video accosting and shoving a black man in a neighborhood near Fort Jackson in Columbia. South Carolina. Thean incident has led to protest what we watch way came out today because I wanted to make my voice heard, so people know that this is not okay. We can no longer stand by and just let it happen. The black man told the soldier.

T. O P. White Non Commissioned Army Jonathan Pentland South Carolina Thean Washington Fort Jackson Columbia
Soldier Charged After Video of Confrontation With Black Man

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | Last week

Soldier Charged After Video of Confrontation With Black Man

"In South Carolina is facing criminal charges after video of a confrontation with a black man. White non commissioned army officer Jonathan Pentland has been charged with third degree assault after he was caught on a viral video accosting and shoving a black man in a neighborhood near Fort Jackson in Columbia. South Carolina. Thean incident has led to protest what we watch way wanted way came out today because I wanted to make my voice heard, so people know that this is not okay. We can no longer stand by and just let it happen. The black man told the soldier. He was barely walking in his neighborhood and not bothering anyone. Jim

White Non Commissioned Army Jonathan Pentland South Carolina Thean Fort Jackson Columbia JIM
Soldier charged after video of confrontation with Black man

America's First News

01:55 min | Last week

Soldier charged after video of confrontation with Black man

"Are investigating a soldier caught on video accosting and shoving A black man in a South Carolina neighborhood. 42 year old Jonathan Pentland was arrested Wednesday and charged with Third degree assault. A Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott, credited the person who recorded the encounter. Very disturbing video that form that we're not gonna tolerate or conducting in Richmond County and message I want to give is that when something like that happened Sheriff Department's on that very swiftly. And we're gonna hold those responsible for those accountable. We're not gonna let people be bullies in our community. And if you are and you're gonna answer for it, and that's what we've done in this case. Space first came to our attention on Monday when I give his responded and took initial report. They did a good job at that point because they didn't rush to make judgments. They took the information have asked our investigators Investigators got yesterday. But the wrong with most valuable pieces of evidence we had was the video. I want to thank whoever is responsible for that video. Thank you for doing that. That shows we're talking community can do when we work together, taking videos reporting stuffed us. Our initial call came from a citizen that lived in that community who saw the confrontation and call, the sheriff's department reported The Ducks. That's what we asked our citizens to their When there's something going on in the community called. Let us respond that we could get involved and we can take care of it. And that's what happened in this case. Now the video doesn't show it started the conflict throughout the three minute video, though Pentland Continuously demands that the other man leave the neighborhood getting in his face at one point, pushing the man who almost falls to the ground. Officials at Fort Jackson, the army's largest basic training facility, said Wednesday they are Looking into the incident. On the

Jonathan Pentland Sheriff Leon Lott Sheriff Department Richland County Richmond County South Carolina Ducks Pentland Fort Jackson Army
White Army Officer Seen on Video Threatening Black Man Now Arrested

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last week

White Army Officer Seen on Video Threatening Black Man Now Arrested

"Non commissioned officer is charged with third degree assault following a video showing him accosting and shoving a black man in a South Carolina neighborhood. Staff Sergeant Jonathan Pentland was charged today. The video posted Monday on Facebook and shared thousands of times show a white man identified as Pentland, demanding a black man leave the neighborhood before threatening him with physical violence. Officials at Fort Jackson, where Pentland his station say they're looking into the incident. As our Justice Department officials

Staff Sergeant Jonathan Pentla Pentland South Carolina Facebook Fort Jackson Justice Department
Little Red Fashion for Kids and Teens With Jonathan Joseph

Dressed: The History of Fashion

02:05 min | Last week

Little Red Fashion for Kids and Teens With Jonathan Joseph

"We are chatting about the future of fashion education for kids we were recently contacted by dressed listener. Jonathan joseph about his incredible new educational startup for kids and teens which is called little red fashion. Yes and honestly i friends. I can't emphasize this is. This is literally fashion's future in the making and one of the cool platforms for little red. Fashion is that fashion is for everyone and as their mission states quote our goal is to help shape the future of an industry too long plagued by issues related to negative body. Image elitism color ism racism and more and we are here to ensure that the next generation fashion leaders and creatives learns from the mistakes of the past and is even more inspired and empowered than ever from books in both digital and print format apps including sketchbooks optionality and also digital mentor ships. Little red fashion is combining the best of both physical and online education materials to quote make fashion history accessible and fine which we love and then using quote materials and arts literacy and stem fields based on fashion to teach in new ways in quote and we cannot wait to welcome jonathan joseph to the show to discuss his vision and what we can expect from little red fashion very very soon. Welcome jonathan jonathan. Thank you so much for joining us today on dressed relief. Thank you so much for having me able. I'm such a fan of the show. I love the work that you've is stupid and i'm so honored to join your leicester's pantheon of dressed guests. How yeah. i'm excited to dive into everything. We're building the fashion Be the first of our kind as the children's fashion ed tech and elgin company histories super exciting. Something i'm really passionate about. And honestly i am really honored to have this platform out because just let other with our bishen. I think of january. Nobody's been working on this for years.

Jonathan Joseph Jonathan Jonathan Ed Tech Elgin
White Army Officer Charged With Assault After Shoving Black Man

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last week

White Army Officer Charged With Assault After Shoving Black Man

"Army non commissioned officer is charged with third degree assault following a video showing him accosting and shoving a black man in a South Carolina neighborhood. Staff Sergeant Jonathan Pentland was charged today. The video posted Monday on Facebook and shared thousands of times show a white man identified as Pentland, demanding a black man leave the neighborhood before threatening him with physical violence. Officials at Fort Jackson, where Pentland his station say they're looking into the incident. As our Justice Department

Staff Sergeant Jonathan Pentla Pentland Army South Carolina Facebook Fort Jackson Justice Department
Advice for White Parents Raising Black Kids

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:30 min | Last week

Advice for White Parents Raising Black Kids

"Rebecca carol. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me okay. So i had to get in touch with you after reading your incredible incredible op-ed in in our paper in the washington post headline is as a black woman raised by white parents. I have some advice for potential adopters. Let's start from the fifty thousand foot level. Why write this piece so as soon as people started talking about. How bill racial reckoning. I thought well are. We reckoning or are we reckoning right and transracial adoptees particularly black transracial adoptees have an integral perspective on race and reckoning. We have lived especially adult. Black adoptees have lived in this foundational dynamic which we are trying to trying to be connected and trying to also be who we are while also mitigating often. Times are white families racism and so that perspective. I think is really important in this moment as we try to build on reckoning with race and changing the way that we talk about race and racism.

Rebecca Carol Washington Post ED
Will Smith Movie Pulls Out of Georgia Over New Voting Law

BBC World Service

02:04 min | Last week

Will Smith Movie Pulls Out of Georgia Over New Voting Law

"Of the South. But is this Hollywood verses? The South? Will Smith's upcoming movie Emancipation is canceled. Filming in Georgia in protester law changes being made by Republican politicians there. The newsroom's Jonathan Savage. Tell me more It all stems from new rules that affect how elections air running Georgia Nick No. One of the controversial provision is the 81, who wants to vote in elections by post will need to provide identification, such as a social Security card or a driver's license, then, until no identity checks have been carried out by providing two matching signatures. Republicans who run George of the state. See it will reduce the chance of fraud. These changes. But Democrats who won the state in the presidential election for the first time in more than 25 years, say the new laws will restrict voting on disproportionately affect black voters. Now, the will Smith film in question is called Emancipation. It's based on the true story of a slave who flees a plantation. And joins the northern Army in the American Civil War. Of course, the synergy between the subject of the movie on the dispute over the new laws can't be mistaken. In a statement, will Smith on the director Antoine Fuqua said. We cannot in good conscience provide economic support to a government that enacts regressive voting laws that are designed to restrict water access. And Jonathan. How was it that Georgia, particularly as a state became so important in the film, and it's a very simple answer. Nick Tax breaks up to 30% filmmakers saved money Georgia gets valuable jobs and investment and it works well for all parties. So movies like Ju Manji Contagion. Black Panther TV shows like The walking dead and stranger things all filmed in Georgia. All in all, in 2017 alone, the industry has an economic impact in Georgia, off $9.5 billion on the cost of the state, estimated to be somewhere north of $100 million would open up the absolute figure on that, but clearly there's a lot of money in it. Indeed,

Jonathan Savage Georgia Smith Hollywood Northern Army Antoine Fuqua Nick Tax George Ju Manji Jonathan
Prosecution Rests, Cardiologist Says Police Killed George Floyd

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:37 min | Last week

Prosecution Rests, Cardiologist Says Police Killed George Floyd

"Today on day. Eleven just ten miles away. From where more jessica is now on day. Eleven of the trial of derek. Dirk for the murder of george floyd the rested its case after calling three more witnesses. George floyd younger brother described his memories of life with george something that minnesota law allows the victims families to do in murder trials. Defense did not ask any questions of george. Floyd brother cardiologists dr. Jonathan rich testified. That heart disease had nothing to do with the death of george. Floyd he said that. George floyd died because the police crushing his body against the pavement deprived him of oxygen. Toward floyd died from a pulmonary arrest. It was caused by low oxygen levels and those low oxygen levels were induced by the prone restraint and positional a six nations that he was subjected to. I believe that. Mr george floyd death was absolutely preventable where they're critical points in time doing during his subdural and restraint on the ground when you feel measures could have or should have been taken that would have preserved his life. Yes i do. I think there were several junctures. Actually would you tell us about those short. The i of course was to not subject to that initial that initial prone restraint positioning that he was subjected to. I mean that is first and foremost so if that was not the case i don't think he would have died.

George Floyd Jonathan Rich George Floyd Pulmonary Arrest Dirk Derek Mr George Floyd Jessica Minnesota Heart Disease
Red Wings upend Hurricanes with 3-1 victory

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Red Wings upend Hurricanes with 3-1 victory

"The red wings play spoilers as Adam Ernie and Filip Zadina scored two quick third period goals in a three one victory over the hurricanes Sam Gagne added to clinching empty netter and Jonathan Bernier finished with thirty seven saves wings forward Dylan Larkin says Bernier what's the story after not being moved at Monday's trade deadline he was stressed and and he wants to be a red wing and and he showed it tonight and I know incredible performance showed up with a professionally as Howard prepares no matter what he's facing Bernie eight like Carolina until Nino Niederreiter maybe two one was sick so six to play the loss keeps hurricanes at Tampa Bay tied atop the central division with fifty eight points each team has fifteen games remaining I'm Dave Ferrie

Adam Ernie Filip Zadina Sam Gagne Jonathan Bernier Dylan Larkin Red Wings Netter Bernier Nino Niederreiter Bernie Howard Carolina Tampa Bay Dave Ferrie
George Floyd's brother sheds tears on the stand

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last week

George Floyd's brother sheds tears on the stand

"George Floyd's brother testified in the trial in Minneapolis of the former police officer accused in his death he's the younger brother in the family aloneness Neil below it he testified he looked up to his Big Brother and George Floyd looked out for him he used to make the best banana mayonnaise sandwiches and he used to make syrup sandwiches because George can cook the prosecution showed colonus Floyd a picture of his mother with a young boy was my older brother Joe likes it yes both also doctor Jonathan rich a cardiology expert echoed earlier witnesses testifying it wasn't a drug overdose or a heart condition that killed George Boyd it was the truly the prone restraint and positional restraints that led to his at sixty ation take from court TV I met Donahue

George Floyd Colonus Floyd Minneapolis Jonathan Rich Neil George Boyd George JOE Donahue
Changing Work Environments and Availability Bias

Developer Tea

02:01 min | Last week

Changing Work Environments and Availability Bias

"Into start things off today. I wanna play a little game. I want you to mentally or even allowed as long as other people are not looking at you. Strangely to answer the following questions as quickly and as intuitively as possible first question is name a brand of computer the second question name a make or model of a car and the third question name the color of a piece of clothing. If you're like most people those three things that you named you have come into contact with very recently. Maybe you're looking at somebody with that piece of clothing on that's blue or maybe you own like i do an apple computer or maybe you just saw a commercial about one. Maybe it's possible that The car make and model that you listed was something that you own yourself or maybe you just read an article about tesla today for whatever reason. It's likely that you came into contact with those three things. Of course that doesn't mean that it's impossible for you to have recalled something that you haven't come into contact with but when your brain is given this task it fills in blanks with things that it believes. A relevant and relevance is a very topic when it comes to our brains and that's what we're talking about in stays episode. My name's jonathan cottrell. You're listening to developer. T my goal on this show is to help. Jordan developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. This is the second part of a discussion. We started last week about this big transition as you transition. We're all making at the end of a global pandemic things are changing in the workplace for virtually everyone

Tesla Jonathan Cottrell Apple Jordan
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

03:13 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Trump supporters in terms of having trump flag and being out there and doing all the You know stop the steel nonsense and all this kind of stuff there there. Those aren't the people. I'm talking to but in a way that's in a way the story i mean i would say that. There are many mitt. Romney equivalence out there. So i guess part of the point i would make i in your question. Is that that. Seventy two million is not a monolithic Not non-olympic right. Everybody didn't support or not support biden for for different reasons. And that's kind of partially what. I'm what i'm finding is that some people were angry about the Economic fallout of the of the pandemic. And they worried that the democrats were going to instill further shutdowns which we're going to further the pain. I realized that that doesn't seem logical to somebody who's a democrat. But if you're living in the middle of michigan and your libertarian like people i've been interviewing they see democrats and governor whitman people at what comes to mind for them is destroy our business like that and part of the issue is. They're living in an area where there's no there's no counter narrative to that echo chamber in a particular way so part of the reason that they south this election how many of them because they don't like trump didn't provide because they worry that that democrats were according to their narrative cheap their schools closed or not help. Their small businesses and democrats are doing things to help them right now. But i would say that for me. Those are the people that i'm if we wanted to think about how to talk to people. You're you're not. I mean i you know. There's a lot of research that by twenty thirty percent. People are on the extremes on both sides right. And but i do think that if you think about our common problems right now are common problems like we want to end this pandemic and so the more people who are invested in doing community public health better. We want to expand the affordable care. Act so the more people who signed up for the affordable care act the better including people who don't maybe agree with us ideologically like go down lists or many problems in which i'm thinking about ways to expand that narrative and and maybe bring in people i think is is in our interest and i think part of the issue is polarization makes it harder. I mean we are totally at a loss of how to how to talk to people. But we don't see. The polarization is pushing people in different camps. And sometimes they're radical and sometimes they're people who i mean i in a way i've been doing public conversations on social media with some of the people. I'm talking about here to just try to say. Hey let's let's figure out how we can talk to people and and when you hear this it's not like they're saying i support kids in cajun's but i do wish sometimes that we had a better counter narrative for specifically some of those things i mean that's what we're doing now but the economy schools things like that so so part of the issue for me is create a landing space a guide a plank for.

Trump trump twenty thirty percent Romney Seventy two million democrats both sides michigan democrat biden affordable care
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Somebody gave me another person who works in schools said If he didn't support that they felt school. Shutdowns completely wanted to work on when to work on reopening schools that put you in the trump camp. Because you're anti it so they just don't feel like there's a camp for them right now it's not. It's not that they're becoming running out there so much. It's more that there. There's a feeling of hopelessness among the people who i felt. Were kind of the people. We kinda all worked together with to create a future and people have explained it to me. It it actually. I've really been thinking a lot about this. And i had this conversation and i actually started because i sent you a note and i said the media's getting this all wrong and i do feel that way in a certain way because the media is telling the story of the extremes but really the scariest thing that's happening right now in our country is that on both sides of the centrists. Look at the republican party. If you're even. I mean let's say he's not really a centrist in many ways there's a kind of open war on people who are even willing to relate to other side and maybe there's a democratic version of that as well and so really the the story of what's happening to now for me is happening in the middle and and that's kinda why is that right and so and we started talking about this Because i'm trying to figure out and how do how do we all talk to each other. And i'm struggling with this because i'm part of the eighty one million who voted for joe biden. Because you know what. I like joe biden but to what. President trump did as president of the united states was so offensive and immoral. Amoral everything that we are that i was taught we were supposed to be against as americans in terms of upholding the constitution. He incited an insurrection. United states capitol and then sat back as you know. The violence ensued so for me and a lot of the eighty one million the idea of even being able to talk to the seventy four million. Who voted for trump is something. That doesn't quite compute. How do you talk to someone who voted for somebody who did all of the things that we saw over four years. And that's what got our conversation going. And so i'm please tell me what. How do we do that well. I of course. I hope is clear. I'm in no way excusing any of them. Her horrific stuff and and some of the people i spoke with are not are.

joe biden United states seventy four million republican party trump both sides President eighty one million over four years americans united
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"And so part of the story of tennessee was a story. Where in the very beginning of the rollout of the twenty twelve twenty thirteen twenty fourteen. We were on the ground doing focus groups and in the first few months of that process. Everybody conservative liberal white black. Everybody was like this is awesome. I'm finally going to get healthcare. Finally getting get help paying for my prescription drugs so the first couple of months it was everybody was like i'm down with us. Thank you for this assistance. And then the disinformation machine took over the one we know all too well because of the pandemic and among the central narratives of dense information can't machine are a kind of story of black people are going to take stuff for that's yours. Immigrants minorities are gonna cut in front of you in line. There's not going to be enough to go around. And so the minute that narrative spread we literally saw people change their mind about the affordable. Care act and we were doing a focus group in tennessee and there was a gentleman who was literally dying obliterated liver failure a man in his early forties who was who was dying and he could hardly walk in tremendous pain. This guy needed medical attention. And we were doing this group. And i was saying. You know the affordable care act will help with this and this and this and the guy said i know this thing could save my life but as he put it ain't no way i'm signing up for a program that's gonna benefit mexicans and welfare queens I'm not going to support a program even if it might help me. If those benefits might also go to who i see as undeserving racial others and in a way. That's why i called the book. Dine of whiteness is because that's the trade off right that to maintain this idea this notion this at the think of this psychological and not material wage of whiteness were literally even on death's doorstep willing to trade weeks and months of their lives and.

first few months first couple of months affordable care act twenty twelve twenty thirteen weeks months tennessee mexicans Care act early forties
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

06:00 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"And this is cape up the one stat. That's vexed me since election day. Is this twelve million. Twelve million more. Americans voted for donald trump's reelection than did in twenty sixteen. They did so in spite of charlottesville kids in cages and his bungling the response to the pandemic. How can the eighty one million who voted for president. Biden talked to or deal with the seventy four million who voted for trump. Is that even possible. Dr jonathan mezzo is the author of dying of whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing. America's heartland he and. I have been talking about these questions for weeks today. We're bringing our conversation to you. Metal talks about what he's learned from the new.

trump donald trump Twelve million twelve million seventy four million Biden charlottesville jonathan mezzo America eighty one million today twenty sixteen one stat dying of whiteness Dr Americans
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

03:47 min | 2 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Jonathan mezzo welcome. Back to the podcast. Third time i'm a regular honored to be back so the second time you're on it was to put the response to covid into context and why people were not taking the please wearing masks seriously. Now we're after the election. When eighty one million people voted for joe biden and seventy four million people voted for donald trump. ten million more than voted for him in two thousand sixteen. And so i've been dying to talk to you. Because there's there's a conversation to be had in this country right now About how do we move forward when we have a split like this in our country. And i want to start the conversation by actually going backwards for those who have not listened to the first our first conversation about your book dying of whiteness. Just in a thumbnail. Because i know you know how you can do it. Talk about why wrote dying of whiteness. And the important message that you're getting across in that book sure absolutely will. Dying of whiteness is a book that i started actually before trump became president and kind of tracks the the rise of of trump in in in where i live tennessee kentucky. I'm also from kansas city so kansas and missouri and what i saw was the rise of kind of politics on one hand promised to make america great again but did so on the billy on the lifespans of everybody including its own supporters. So what i did in the book. Is i just tracked the rise of kind of anti immigrant anti government pro gun politics in in the rural midwest. And i'm a. I'm a physician also so i applied to public health plans and i asked the question. What happens if the politicians you vote for block for example medicaid expansion in your own state or undermine the on the public school system that your kids go to or make it very easy for anybody to get again with no background check and i really just tell the story of how the policies that were supposed to make america great again and did in some ideological ways ended up being as dangerous for rural white people in the in the midwest and south as best as or not wearing seatbelts in their car or secondhand smoke they literally became disease risk factors the actual policies that shortened lifespans of many lower income people including white supporters. So in the book. I talk about how those particular politics and up shortening white lifespans by anywhere from a month to a couple of years in some instances and i go around and really ask people why is it. Why are you supporting policies. That are so bad for your health and your lifespan. And i come up with a bunch of different answers but one is that the investment in this idea of what it means to be white as being on top of a particular hierarchy that has to keep everybody else down ends up being a kind of Siren call for people that causes them to really forget all the other tenants of of what we might. Otherwise think of as so interest and creates kind polarizing rhetoric of us versus them that propels support for these politics even when they're killing their own supporters.

trump donald trump Twelve million twelve million seventy four million Biden charlottesville jonathan mezzo America eighty one million today twenty sixteen one stat dying of whiteness Dr Americans
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:12 min | 4 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"John asa. Thanks so much. For coming on the podcast. Thank you so much. Jonathan grade the bigger right so you just started a bus tour a six day bus tour. If i remember right where are you going. And what kind of reception have you been. Been getting because it's been a one day already so far. Yesterday we were out in in madison and augusta and we will be hitting not just every major city but <hes>. Several dozen small towns will be very visible in rural georgia. And this is the health jobs and justice bus tour across the state in the program that we are encouraging folks to get out and vote to support is one that ensures every georgian has great healthcare that we invest in economic recovery and job creation infrastructure clean energy and that we passed major criminal justice reform at a new civil rights act and that is galvanizing our coalition. There is movement like energy in georgia. Right now and as. You've heard me talk about jonathan. The situation in georgia is unusual. Because you've got a young jewish son of an immigrant running alongside a black preacher. This is not how democrats have been running in the south for the last couple of decades of talk more about that. Because i've heard you say that in television interviews <unk>. Mostly in television interviews. And you know you both. You and reverend warnock who. You're talking about another person. Who's been on the podcast of your both sons of the south but for you in particular you were born and raised in georgia. As you just said you jewish-american and for a lot of people. The south has not been hospitable to african americans or jewish-americans. Talk talk about your your <hes>. Your childhood your upbringing a did you endure wild antisemitism there in georgia not wild anti semitism up but it's something that pops up from time to time in the life of any jewish person. I think that. Because i don't wear a keep up right a yarmulke because i'm not outwardly. Observant <hes>. I would not attract the same sort of over a of anti-semitism might who's judaism is more apparent externally or as a black person might in the south. But i think that when i inflict on my childhood so i was bar mitzvah at the temple which is a a reform synagogue in atlanta and one of the interesting things about the history of the temple is that it was nineteen fifty seven when dr king established the elsie in atlanta and it was nineteen fifty eight when the temple was bombed and from the late nineteen fifties through the civil rights movement of the early and mid nineteen sixties and all the way through the present day there has been an alliance between blacks and jews in georgia and when i first sat down to have a meal with congressman john lewis because my first ever exposure to anything like public service was working as a very very young man in his office where he wanted to talk to me. You were in high school. That's why it's had very very young man that exactly. I mean we ever had for about ninety minutes. He wanted to talk about that alliance. He wanted to talk about how he marched. Alongside rabbis and jewish activists. Here was a young jewish man in his office. He wanted to talk about the necessity of nurturing and strengthening that alliance and not taking for granted that that would happen on. Its own and so i- i reflect often as you've heard me reflect about how he is looking down on us right now in georgia smiling.

georgia jonathan kaye john asa reverend warnock senate augusta Jonathan madison united states John jonathan atlanta dr king
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Reverend Al Sharpton Welcome to the PODCAST for the first time, , a bank you I'm glad to be with you Jonathan Your Book. . Up was really terrific, , it really was, , and hopefully we can squeeze in as much as we can talk about it. . One of the things that you write about that I found very interesting. You . coined this term Tae Liberals who are they they are people that call themselves progressive. . And they sit around the arising and philosophizing and strategized, , but never really get into the fight they don't get the hamster. . Months then not registered voters they're not engaged with people and it's Sorta like they sit in these elite circles than these Paula conversations sipping <unk>, , critiquing what all of us that are under front lines in the trenches doing, , and they don't do anything themselves than they can afford to come with the most unrealistic impractical kind of stands because they don't have to go out and deal with families that are victimized of people that are outraged and that's why I said the del real problem because they will go for what is radically the most best sounding thing that is totally impractical in totally plays on the emotions of one. Thing. . . You write in the book you write quote a lot tae liberal may mean well, , but his lack of empathy or understanding of the basic inequalities that go hand in hand with bigotry racism and economic disparity make him suspect to anyone struggling to get a foothold in the American dream I'd go so far as to say that if lots liberals had a better sense of these issues and they're black and Brown and immigrant brothers, , there'd be no need for someone like me I think that <hes> the reason I wrote that as because I'm often asked why do people reach out to me they reach out to be because We have an organization that not only deals with the obviously organizing a protest in working with their legal in media needs what that really understand. . It feels their pain and their rage 'cause we HAPP that thing and that rate and a lot of the lottery liberals seed Bam as a radical like on a chess board rather than real people lost their son to police violence or lost their a nephew on their cousin who had no preparation for that know nothing about. . Nothing about anything that many of them don't even have to means to go. . And take care of funeral expense and not liberals just see them as objects get to some politically field theory that they've been playing with. . Elite of discussions and I think that that is why they got. . You notice they never connected to the people in the community on the base that usually just analyzing something in saint quarters. . In their privileged status because many of them, a , privilege themselves. . So they can experiment with risk fathers because they're not taking that risk when I read that passage in the book I wrote in the margins Bernie Critique because that was my big critique of Bernie Sanders when he ran in two thousand sixteen and then again, , this go round in two, , thousand twenty well, , I had challenged Bernie and sixteen and I think he did better in eighteen of and I think he started to get it and I give me the turn of there's a lot of credit for that but I think that a lot of the indication that your critique and mind to him was right is The black vote how does he explain that will getting the Black Vote I. . think that people you can say all you want <unk> liberal will explain to me why the progressives in quote don't get the black vote it is not because that blacks are anti progressive is that there's no connection and there's no involvement with a lot of <unk> Ale see another the different aid you know common related all of that but a lot of these that call themselves progressive totally removed from the people that they wanNA speak speak on behalf of people they don't speak to

Reverend Al Sharpton Jonathan Kmart
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:18 min | 7 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"I'm Jonathan Kmart and this cape up in his new. BOOK RISE UP CONFRONTING A COUNTRY AT THE CROSSROADS Reverend Al Sharpton Confronts a lot of issues and we talk about most of them. Of Liberals Republican, Pimps, toxic masculinity, the black community we talk about the front relationship between blacks and the Lgbtq community can how sharpens accepting heart helped me years ago and given the state of our nation today Sharpton explains why it's imperative that you rise up. Here at all right now. Reverend.

Reverend Al Sharpton Jonathan Kmart
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Is that the formulation of Whiteness. That were latching. Latching onto is not really working out very well for white people either and so I think part of the issue is not to deconstruct anybody. But to say that we've gotten ourselves into this position position where the formulation of whiteness that we have on one hand is incredibly violent towards other people and also it's killing white people too and so wouldn't it be great to step back and at the end of the book I I give some examples of how I think that might happen. But I think there's so much evidence about how for example societies where more people can advance are better and healthier societies where. It's easier for people to get to work. In communities and economies do better business says says that that have the most divergent viewpoints and diverse viewpoints ended up being more productive and creative because different people bring different things to the table and so in a way. Hey you know I I I guess part of the issue is how does this moment where we're at a crisis read a crisis of Whiteness. Right now among other things. How can we use this to step back and create a better formulation formulation? That's more more horizontal and distributive that works better for everybody including White Americans. You're talking about President trump and the you know the the form of whiteness that he is that he is pushing and that you said this is a formulation of of whiteness that is incredibly incredibly violent towards towards other people and that gets to the last chapter in your book last thought is all about the castle doctrine and for for some listeners. That might sound familiar because we became familiar with that term as a result of the shooting of of Trayvon Martin in Florida where that was has sort of the stand your ground. Send your ground law but it's all part of the castle doctrine that You have a right to defend defend and yourself and defend your home. And you use the example hyper extreme example of castle doctrine that played out in Missouri with with a young woman who somehow got a gun and ended up killing herself and in. Correct me if I'm wrong and retell the story but I do think the castle doctrine ended up not just being able to defend your home but being being able to defend yourself wherever you are even in your car rate and so the story I tell it and the book was a story. That happened while the Ferguson Kazan protests. Were taking place in in Missouri about a young woman from Ferguson. who was a bartender who basically had not been a gun owner before and and then there was all of this quote unquote racial tension at the time and she said I'm going to get a gun to get ready for Ferguson? which was comment? That was open to interpretation after about what she meant had but basically bought bought a gun and was driving around in the streets. She was the passenger in a car waving this gun around saying she was getting ready for Ferguson and the car ended tragically rear ending another car. The gun at that time was pointed at her head and very tragically. She lost her life at at her Byron. The hat and so the story tell is why. Why was there a gun in that car in the first place and part of the issue as about this idea that basically as as the the framework goes a man's home is his castle? which usually initially if you think about like the Heller decision from two thousand eight people were familiar with that? Meant you can keep a gun in your house to to protect yourself against intruders. But what we've seen. Is this logic of protecting yourself against others and often against racial others has led to the expansion of this so-called Castle doctrine so that people can carry guns basically the person themselves becomes becomes the castle. And so you can take take a gun in your car. You can take a gun if you're George Zimmerman just walking around and so this idea of basically the this notion of whiteness as something. The thing that needs to be defended by castle against other people was one that I really try to interrogate in the book. And basically say you know what. What does that mean? What messages messages that sand and and who are who are the victims while the victims obviously are people like Trayvon Martin and there's a lot of literature that shows you you know who gets shot by stand your ground laws And it's it's mostly a young black men but but it's also a risk to just the people who are carrying the guns right that they feel like they have to be on guard all the time and so part of the issue is I felt like this was a powerful metaphor for the kind of America that people people are trying to build that is protected in castle and not collaborative In a way. That's very racial is and and the hope in using. That story is in the conclusion inclusion. I turned toward other models that we could be building that are not the castle doctrine. They're the they're the drawbridge something like that. You know other words like let's let's let's let's work backwards from this because building castles is is just GonNa kill us all Jonathan. LemMe in our conversation with this question in politics picks and particularly democratic politics as I said earlier. There's a lot of focus on reaching out to those forgotten. Voters read white voters who may have voted twice for President Obama and then voted for president trump. And I keep thinking doesn't even make sense and for the Democratic Party to reach out to those voters. Are they even reachable. That's what my thinking is an and in reading your book. The one question that keeps coming to mind especially in our conversation is given everything that you've written about and all these questions that I've asked you and in the dangerous time at least to the way it feels to me that we are in this country. Are you you hopeful. And Are you hopeful that we can get past this. Very turbulent time that we're in to to a point where at a minimum we start to acknowledge the role that raise in white supremacy plays in just about everything that we do in this country as American. Well it's it's funny. But as a researcher I feel like all of those things are possible given the fact that I've been working on this project for quite some time. Now Oh and doing a follow up project now. I think it's important to note that many of the people I spoke with were not crazy. They were not completely an educated. Did they often knew exactly what they were talking about. You know more so than many of my liberal friends in New York about the affordable care for example and and and so you know. I think it's important to note that I feel like there's a lot of stereotyping on all sides but one of the stereotypes was that you know people were the beverly hillbillies or something like like that and and I. I think that's that's very unfortunate right because the people I talk to and recount their stories in the book are making calculated decisions nations. That are not crazy right. Some people told me I know. I'm suffering from this policy. But would I really care about. Is the long game of politics care about you. Know not having abortion in this country country which whether or not you agree with that at least it was strategy. Some people felt like they'd been put in a bucket of being deplorable by the Democrats and they had no other place to turn. And I and I think we've seen recent elections and places like Louisiana and Kentucky were people I mean I think people are making reason decisions and so it it it. It's hard for me because I think that there are two ways to argue that question right on one hand. I really do think that it would not cost the Democrats to reach each out at I. I think it's a big mistake to give up and say that people are too far gone. I'm I I think that If you can stay true to your ideals and your policies and instill acknowledged the fact that people like the people I talked to in the book are I mean honestly genuinely suffering. I mean. Read The gun chapter of the book. And and I it's it's quite powerful and so on one hand. I think that there needs to be some kind of acknowledgement of that and I think for example you can see now. President President trump is reaching out to black and Latino voters. You've Jonathan have written about this. Yeah and and and I think that's a very important strategy whether or not he gets the votes it shows that he's trying I to create a coalition for everyone. I don't I don't think it's GonNa win and votes but I still think it's an important strategy and I think the Democrats need a strategy like that and on the flip side right. Of course I I think it's important to note that you know white suffering is is just one form of suffering and so to think really very very very deeply Lee about how can we craft a democratic message that acknowledges and reaches out to people and tries to address these issues but also acknowledges as I mentioned in the book kind of the violence. That's being done in the name of the formulation of Whiteness. Jonathan Mezzo author of dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing America's heartland and also the director Vanderbilt University Center for Medicine Health and society? Thank you very very much for being on the PODCAST and for writing your book. It's been my thank you. Thanks for listening to Cape Up Tune. In every Tuesday you can find us on apple podcasts and stitcher and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us. I'm trying to think K.. Part of the Washington Post you can find me on twitter twitter at Cape Heart Jay..

President Jonathan Mezzo Ferguson. Trayvon Martin Missouri America Vanderbilt University Center f Washington Post President Obama New York twitter Democratic Party President trump George Zimmerman Heller Lee beverly hillbillies apple Florida researcher
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"This was was at the center of a lot of controversy because it turned out after the ad ran it was also the gun that That a number of high profile mass shooters including Adam Lanza used I am and so they had to withdraw the ad I think and it's at the center of a legal case right now but what I do in the book is I just I just basically untapped unpack the the language of that advertisement and show how what's being sold is a gun as a marker of a a kind of threatens masculinity that's being returned turned up kind of privilege being returned literally using the language of the ad through through through the symbol of the semiautomatic weapon. And I just I I just track that through and talk about what. What does that mean right and the other thing that you do? Jonathan is that you un- you impact the symbolism of that ad but you also walk the reader through the history of gun ownership in the country writ large and who could own guns and who could own guns is all wrapped up as with everything in race. There is a concerted effort to keep guns out of the hands of African Americans particularly after slavery rate at Nyu. And and what. When I just mentioned that I think the word privileges was racially coded term? That's exactly what I mean that there's about two hundred year history in this country of basically affording the right to carry a weapon in public to white Americans often and white men and denying it to everyone else particularly African Americans and that goes back to pre colonial times when landowners could carry muskets and they let their white workers carry muskets in order to quell rebellions as they put it from negroes and Indians and that went all the way through of of course in slavery You know th the debates about who could carry a gun were often very often aligned with race and particularly in the period after the civil war are everything from John. Brown's raid to Klu Klux Klan raids to other you know the aftermath of Nat Turner. All these factors were all about out trying to disarm African Americans and show that basically carrying a gun in public was a white prerogative and what I do in that section of the book is basically track that history up through to the present day where even though ostensibly you would think that the second amendment apply to everyone. I use that history to show how for example open in carry it. White White Open carry People are seen as patriots who can walk through Walmart or go to starbucks but I show all these examples of African American men usually who have permits and just go to buy something at the store ended up getting tackled their shot. And so this this idea of who of you know AH carrying a gun being a racial prerogative. We have modern day. Examples philander Casteel in Minnesota at had a license for open carry told the police officer officer that he was reaching for the permit and that he had had a gun and he got killed and you have an example of a Of a white man who was walking in a Walmart with a might have been a semiautomatic weapon he had a weapon openly carrying it in this Walmart and he he got out alive and I'm thinking about the black man in the Walmart who was carrying a toy gun that looked like an assault rifle. Will someone called the cops. The cops come in and he's killed No there's so many stories like that and again. It's a fine line because I'm not arguing. The book that I think everybody should carry a weapon. I think we are not doing. See many guns. And this goes back to Malcolm X.. And Robert Robert Williams of the end up Lacey. Pe- book called Negroes with guns. This idea that basically who does the Second Amendment apply to and on paper it basically is not racially coded language but in practice. I I have a lot of examples in the book and many that I've accumulated sense of of basically white man there. There's a story in the book for example about a man in Atlanta. Who just walks around at a a youth youth baseball game holding his air fifteen over his head and screaming? Here's my gun and there's nothing you can do about it and all the parents the baseball players are hiding in the dugout. They're terrified and the police come in. They're like hey you know there's nothing we can do about it. How nice the but it's protected In in in terms of particular particular kind of carry laws So there's a racial politics two to how plays out because I kept thinking you know. Try that as non white man and see how far how far you think we know the answer the answer to that and I want to talk to because you you sort of alluding to the the castle doctrine that I want to talk to you in a little bit but I do want to get to the third area that are you focusing on in the book and that's tax cuts and the state of Kansas and how Kansas used to have a great reputation for its schools people would moved to Kansas to go to Kansas schools. And then Governor Brownback Sam Brownback becomes the governor slashes taxes X.'s. And all hell breaks loose. You you write early. Budget cuts overwhelmingly impacted schools and low income minority districts but these initial initial cuts were not enough to fill the gaping holes in state budget soon as thoughtful. Kansas state legislature told me quote the fire that we set in the fields burned burned all the way up to the home. I mean that was that was. What are these Zito and you do research like this and every Mo- every you know you you have moments where people say things that are just so clear so clear? And I think that was really one of those moments where I was interviewing someone and it was like this fantasy that I think a lot of legislators and conservative voters and you know parents even who sent their kids to public schools in Kansas had that we could do things that were similar into healthcare going to penalize people who are taking from the system in an undeserving way in schools was a very powerful marker of that. I mean as you mentioned Kansas. I'm from Kansas City. The and I kind of saw this happening. As I was growing up Kansas people would move to Kansas because they always had a a a key because Kansas always had a top ten public school system and every metric he can think of fourth eighth grade reading and math High School graduation rates. All these things were phenomenal for public school system in Kansas and part of the reason Kansas is this oh strong was because of changes that the state had made literally investing in the Public School System in the aftermath of the Brown versus board of Education Decision in the nineteen fifties and and Kansas were very proud of their public schools and then along comes brown back kind of fueled by a kind of you know. Koch Brothers Libertarian Conservative. Republican ethos of a steady in times of prosperity and he started cutting everything but the biggest cuts were to the famous Kansas school system. And I think think initially when I talk to people they were like. Oh it's not going to affect us that much and I found some pretty interesting kind of urban myths from parents. I would talk to that. Oh we're just penalizing the minority districts because they're using all the tax dollars. People told me Sam on party buses. Challenge any of these like like. Hey where's your evidence for the Party bus. Well it's funny because people kept telling me that the Black School Jasser wasting money on these party buses and so I called the. I called the black school districts and I said Hey did you guys have any party buses and they'd be like you know. We hardly have money for textbooks. Like what are you talking about. You know we can barely get you know lunches for the the students and so there was this kind of urban myth going around kind of profligate minority districts that I think fueled people's rationale about what was being cut but unfortunately just like healthcare. We're all connected right so the minute you start taking money away from the school system in one area the entire system starts to suffer. And that's certainly what happened in Kansas. which is that? The first effects were seen and minority and low income districts. But then the the just started to be a system wide. So all of a sudden you know everybody's dropout rates started to increase. Graduation rates started to go down and Kansas Tennessee. She is a predominantly white state. And so the people who were getting hit by this this politics the most Were were white students. They had by far the biggest dropout rates by far the biggest just drops in competence competency exams and when that started happening I think for many cans was a bridge too far so that was when people started saying. Hey wait wait a minute. What are we doing here so I think when the issues started to hit home all of a sudden there was a massive mobilization and people who had been supporters of Brown bags policies started to turn and and the Kansas Story? I show you know for better or worse. Here's an example of of a point where people really started to see how the policies affected them in part art but also started to get a broader set. So I interview a lot of legislators and and and school district people who basically say you know what we realized is that we have a social social responsibility For something like a school district to to make to make the system better for everyone and so- Kansas Voted Incense Republicans. And it's still having that debate right now. In fact you write that. The Kansas experiment with Brownback is something that president trump is trying to do on the national level. And get that right. Well I mean the scary thing about all the examples in in my book. Are that in a in a different planet other than ours. He might think these are examples of what not to do right Tennessee. Hennessy blocked healthcare reform with no backup plan and people started dying. Missouri started to give everybody could get a gun and what happened injury and death rates skyrocketed. All these kinds of suicide partner violence police shooting etc.. Kansas cut it schools and people started to really suffer and so in a in a different university would think well. Gosh let's find a model that worked somewhere else and try to nationalize that right. I mean New York for example for New York is forty seventh in the out of fifty states in terms of gun injury and death in many categories. Let's think about what New York's doing and maybe keep people safer or or California has a better school system Other states and other countries obviously better healthcare systems and so that it in fact what we see is the opposite right which is that all of the policies policies I talk about in these southern states are ones that the trump administration has tried to nationalizing so This idea of cutting away. The public school system became one of the core markers of the kind of many of these devos initiatives which are taking money out of the common full of a public schools. Of course we know what happened with healthcare and gun so in a way the the states become kind of canaries in the coal mine I think for for for for the nationalization of of politics and policies that have been very toxic at state levels so you in addition to talking about taxes in Kansas and guns in Missouri and healthcare in Tennessee. You do dude throughout the talk a lot about just overall about race in how we talk about it or don't talk about it or the mistakes we make and I'm going to put you and Tony. Tony Morrison in the same within the same question. Oh my God why I mean you have a quote from Tony Morrison where you where she says to restore whiteness to its former status as a marker of national identity number of white Americans are sacrificing themselves. And that gets to the the overarching argument in your book. And now. Here's something that you write that I think a lot of people either. Don't get get or understand or had not even realized and you write my findings in this book suggest that we make a wrong turn when we tried to address racism mainly as a disorder of people's brains or attitudes or try to fix the problem simply by attempting to sensitize people or change their minds. I mean it's it's it's such a obviously complicated issue and I'm just first of all honored to be part of the conversation. We're having as a country about this and I I would say I come down in a couple of ways I mean you know i. I tried very hard in my book to be respectful of the people that I was interviewing and I didn't want to pathologies anybody at all. Based on their identity. I tried to judge people based on their deeds not on the category that I put them into do and and I think it's important to note that you know there are different ways to be white in this country and so unfortunately right now. President trump has co-opted a particular narrative of Whiteness is whiteness under attack and white victimhood and all these factors and from that I feel has done all of these things that are counter to the interests of our our nation including to too many people who are extensively his supporters so to push back on that part of what would I argue is that we have to articulate a different model of Whiteness In other words it's the responsibility of white America if there is such a thing and of course that's many things you know. White America has not often had to define itself right. Because it's the invisible norm or the control group but right now if you don't agree with the model of Whiteness. The president trump is articulating. It's incumbent to articulate a different model of whiteness and just to be clear I don't think that means that people need to apologize as for who they are. I don't think that that means that you know that anybody is given any particular status but I will say the part of the argument of my book..

Kansas Governor Brownback Sam Brownba Kansas school Public School System Kansas Story President trump Kansas City Tennessee Adam Lanza Klu Klux Klan Walmart Nat Turner Jonathan president Brown Robert Robert Williams Tony Morrison Party
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part and welcome to Cape Up Healthcare in Tennessee guns in Missouri tax tax cuts in Kansas professor. Jonathan Metal at Vanderbilt University focuses on those three areas in his book dying of Whiteness. How the politics six of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland using compelling data and focus groups metal shows how white people are willing to die rather than be connected a two or finance policies. They believe are giving resources to people bayview as undeserving find out more about this important book right now. Jonathan Mental. Thank you very much for being on the PODCAST. Hey It's great to be here. Okay I've been raving about your book for months now and it is really an important book. The name of the book is dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland it land. And you start off the book by telling the story of Trevor Talk About Trevor sure will basically the the the impetus for the book came from a series of focus groups that Some colleagues of mine and I were doing in kind of rural Tennessee. Where we were talking to medically ill poor White and black Americans about the affordable care act and we just found some very dramatic stories which I recount in the book but I think probably one of the most powerful stories was is one of a man named Trevor who called Trevor in in the book. who was suffering from liver failure and a bunch of other chronic conditions. And he really would have benefited from this was in the year. Twenty eleven at the time. What the what? The affordable care act potentially was offering which was increased access to physicians financial help. Because he was under you know in the facing medical bankruptcy and this was in a focus group and I basically asked You know what you're feeling about the affordable care act. And he told me I realized that I realized that something like the affordable care act might be beneficial for me but I have to tell you. There's no way I'm supporting or signing up for a program that is he put it. Benefits benefits Mexicans and Welfare Queens. That was a quote I heard a lot and basically the the idea was that even if this program might benefit me. I'm not going to support a program. Graham that might also benefit by his estimation kind of undeserving immigrants minorities and the reason that was important was because again. It was a refrain that I heard quite right often that I'm you know we don't we don't want to be part of a program that might not just benefit us but other people and in this case you know. Here's a guy who's he's on. Death's doorstep literally literally on death's doorstep and so part of the jumping off point of the book is how powerful is this idea about kind of what it means to be white in America and this idea that basically weekly to be to be white means to have to block the advance of other groups and in in a way that the call of whiteness because of stories like this where people literally literally traded their lives at rather than sign up for social programs support programs that they felt like might go to benefit other people who were undeserving to the pointed ended the focus groups when you were talking to either all white groups are all black groups who had a colleague who you worked with an African American man who he taught out to all black groups and you talk to the all white groups for obvious reasons but talk about that will we just wanted people to feel comfortable. Obviously Racist Racist Right Marker powerful marker in the south where we're doing are doing our research and so we really wanted to get people's honest opinions About I mean. Obviously I'm a race scholar. So is my colleague Derek Derrick Griffith and so part of the issue as we just we wanted to get the real stuff the real the real responses and so I think part of part of the issue was that but also you know because races such important dividing line in places like Tennessee where we were doing the research we really wanted to see. We really wanted to compare. We asked every Group the same questions and the focus groups were pretty interesting about the first fifteen or twenty minutes of the groups. Were just general questions you know. How do you define health? What do you do to to to to maintain your health and it's interesting that Race really wasn't a factor in those early questions so everybody would joke around and say stuff like you know. I try to keep my weight down around but then I walked by. McDonald's mcrib is on sale for ninety nine cents and everybody would kind of laugh and everybody you know I would. We would all laugh. I mean I personally loved the mcrib awesome. Now go on. I mean I did said Skip Vida But anyway you know so for the first twenty minutes or so when we would ask general questions about health there really were no race race dividers right. And we're also socioeconomic class but we can talk about that later but then about twenty minutes into each group we would ask this question and so who benefits from healthcare reform and. It's important to note that we were doing these interviews in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. This was a time when Tennessee was really debating. I'm should they should. We expand Medicaid should we create To basically except the affordable care act rejected. That was something very much on people's minds and what we found was when we asked this question who who benefits from healthcare reform the almost to a person the African American men would say things like everybody. Does you know we are society benefit. If more people are insured. Sure not just black people. That's what they would say But really everybody and so this idea that we get from the African American focus groups was was. You know. It's kind of the attitude you want people to have if you're going to create a national healthcare system which is if we get the most people in the system. It benefits the most people when we would ask the groups of particularly lower income white Americans against we got a a range of opinions but one that seemed to dominate was. As I mentioned this idea that basically I don't want to be part of a system where the benefits that could be going to me are going to as they put it undeserving. Immigrants Minorities which tapped into a lot of these things about you know building a wall and keeping people Out and so really. I think that the profound racial difference we found in these groups was really that one group really had a very a very broad idea about Menendez's Monette work at risk. All the things you would want people to have when you're creating health insurance and for for the White Americans we spoke to an you know. Of course I'm a white American myself myself In these groups people people would basically it was the sense of kind of limited resources and privileges are being taken away from me and and and that was important both because it it spoke to an ideology which was just countered to the idea of creating a national health care system it was important because it tapped into historical tensions ends about other times to democratize health. Care you know Johnson and Truman administrations. you know desegregation things like that but it was also important because the ideology the of blocking the affordable care act was one that we didn't just here in the groups that was how the entire state voted. We elected politicians who decided not to expand Medicaid not to create competitive insurance marketplaces. And so in a way that ideology we felt a from a political standpoint was was quite dominant in terms of how the state ultimately voted and decided what to do Well on that larger point of you know the the white focus groups looking at the idea the of their resources going to quote unquote undeserving. People but you also make a point of in here. It's on page one. Seven where you're talking about. President trump and his hammering away at the at the affordable care act that obamacare and you're right trump essentially asked lower income white people to choose less coverage and more suffering over a system that linked them to Mexicans Welfare Queens and to healthier longer lives and it was that that were that verb linked them. The idea of being connected to these people was a was a bridge too far right. I mean it's it was one of the more powerful points and something I couldn't advantage before doing these focus groups but basically the idea I mean think about it. If you're an you know I'm I'm not. I hope people see this. I'm not trying to totally really slam. All the people I interviewed. I feel like there were remarkable stories of bravery just about what it means to stay alive in a part of the country where there's no social safety net. But but I will say that at this idea came came up again and again. which was this kind of particular form of white identity as what I'm holding onto? It's kind of keeping me alive. But what if I smoke three packs of cigarettes a day and I as people that tell me I I live a healthy diet. Things like that and I'm in a network where my good health is dependent on a healthy African American person or Latino person who maybe jogs every day and doesn't smoke you know in a way there's a sense of dependence ends up being in a in a broader social network where my actions are related to other people's actions who it frightens me to be dependent on and so there was. There's all this underlying tension about about what it meant to be in really in a a a healthcare system is a web people are connected and and you're dependent on a certain certain number of people being healthy one got if one person cost ten dollars for just a checkup and one person cost ten thousand dollars because they need a kidney transplant. Supplant it balances out right so in a way your actions are connected to the actions of other people and I think that that anxiety there's an underlying anxiety about what does it mean to be dependent dependent on people who who At least my formulation of Whiteness tells me I'm superior to In the Democratic Party. There's this big debate. That's going going on about health care and Medicare for all. And you've got candidates who for Medicare for all and then there's folks who have medicare for all who wanted and then others others who want to tinker with the affordable care act and you had a very interesting warning that you say not a warning but just sort of a sign for people the pay attention to both early in the book and then later on in the book where you right. I talked to white men like trevor who vigorously resent government intrusion into their lives in fear their tax dollars will go toward lazy minorities even as they themselves suffered the consequence of restricted access to healthcare these types of attitudes complicate kate attempts to sell healthcare reform in rural America and might doom progressive calls from Medicare for all the warning in that is folks folks. This isn't just a conversation about healthcare and this just isn't a conversation about money. This is a conversation about identity city in for for the very people who a lot of Democrats say the Party needs to win over and twenty twenty. Those are the same people who are very resistant to the idea of Medicare for all from your argument a system that would connect them to people they view as undeserving irving and after four years of president trump..

America Trevor Tennessee Medicare Jonathan Kaye Cape Up Healthcare President Jonathan Mental Jonathan Metal Vanderbilt University Democratic Party twenty twenty Welfare Queens professor Kansas Derek Derrick Griffith
"jonathan" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on LadyGang

"You can follow Jonathan at Jonathan Bennett on Twitter or at Jonathan Bennett on Instagram Jonathan. No, I haven't Jonathan d Bennett right here. What's he for dick Jonathan big dick yet? Oh, yeah. And you have so many things for sale of so many things where everything your body. You can both come at a price. But everyone has a price William Scott. Oh my. Cute, though, the cookbooks good really, feel very proud of it, it was a lot of work, but it, we turned out, really, well, the burn cookbook, you can get on my Instagram. Everything's available on my Instagram. Burnt cookbook. We have a Wednesday Rosa, which is a wine. With point wines. You can get for girlfriends can't sit with us. And then we have pride top that are amazing through tipsy elves. Check them out. I partnered with them. So that's available right now, four prime go get him now because I know there's a lot of prize left for the rest of the month we have on Wednesdays. We wear rainbows. We. Yup. We have to function. Rainbows to get function regulation, Hoti. Get in loser. We're gonna pride like all these. So they're super fun. No, your special hustle. Amanda. For. It's like so mad. She didn't think of these things, I think I think, fairmont's, so. You're like you know, we have a very big thing coming up in the works that will be in October. That's huge that you're not why can't see where it is. But just trust. What is it rhyme it coming out over third it with horn? It rewind in. It's really good. Really good. Stay tuned. Cape next Tuesday..

Jonathan d Bennett dick Jonathan William Scott Twitter Rosa Amanda horn
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Pam Jonathan Kaye part and welcome to Cape up for the past few months. I've been working on something new. Between sit downs and a civil rights retreat in California in January and the faith and politics institutes, civil rights pilgrimage to Alabama in March. I've had the privilege of talking to a variety of civil rights leaders a few of them, you know, many of them you may not, but they're all significant voices. We need to hear their stories. More importantly, we need to heed the lessons of their experience. Because we won't have many opportunities to hear from them much longer. If we're going to understand the civil rights movement of the nineteen fifties and sixties, and how it affects our lives still these are the voices to listen to people like Andrew Young who was with Dr king when he was assassinated. And then I remember he used to say, but. You know, some of us are not going to make it to forty. He said, but if we make it afford it we make a hundred. Well, he didn't make it to forty. So it becomes me. Almost an obligation for me to keep doing whatever I do as long as I can do it, and I'll be eighty seven of the month. And I don't know I make a hundred or not, but you can't waste the experience. We've had. Andrew Young is right. We can't waste their experience. And so for two months each week here on Cape up. We're going to hear their voices. Listen to their stories and try to understand how we can move forward from here. We're calling the series voices of the movement and it will start on April fourth. So make sure you subscribe to Cape up or find it on Washington Post dot com slash podcasts.

Dr king Cape Pam Jonathan Kaye Andrew Young Cape up Alabama California Washington two months
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Eighteen and we'll see where we go after that but democrats wake up it is at the local level i can just tell ya four years in a row jonathan i vetoed a de fund planned parenthood bill every year if i were not the governor virginia that would be law today and all twenty plus women's health clinics in virginia would be shut down gone we would have hb to like legislation in the commonwealth of virginia that would be law today in virginia what would you say the let's this fastforward i know you don't wanna fastforward pass 2018 but i still would have has whereas did to 2020 let's say you got into the race how one of the knocks against you would be oh well i mean he is clinton era he he you know he was the guy he raise money for the clintons he's tied to the clintons he's a clinton guy and the party needs to move forward rely wh how are we going to move forward if we keep harkening back to to the clintons what's your what's your response to that well pushback a venue pushback first of all what i say is i need to be judged on my four years as governor not who my relationships are i have been very close friends and dorothy night with the clintons for many years we have vacationed together they have been great to our five children i never ever jonathan walkaway from my friends i am the most loyal person you will ever meet i am with you in good times i am with you in bad times and that is a trait that everybody will talk about and i'm proud of that but i've just hypothetically if ever it i'm running on a platform of what i believe in and what my value system and judge.

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"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"And it is call advance persistent threat and cozy bear which was a line would some of the intelligence unit and russia i mean they were active jonathan the aren't they not only they not only got your number so to speak imagine you being a dnc staff they had show telephone number that your emails they had access to your personal information if you're a dnc jonah and in some cases because we provided uh we did the initial a gathering of data to give to the white house to give people and they had all with a hat and they went after the people they threaten they harassed her this was not so i would not mind every day was like i have my my from foyer him until about seven thirty eight o'clock that was i was dealing with the hackett a m one a am 'cause i got all my brief appearance and then i had the somehow the summon the courage i think i ate a lotta open able to summon the courage of was not spin in its i was not popeye to sail on i was i was definitely an old male and i will give my courage up and then i'll go over the dnc in only a small number of staffers new the days that we were being attacked how the russians were going back in air would apt twenty eight and twenty nine to steal out data and by the time they got through our data and the d triple see data i do believe that they had corrupted how system and we couldn't turn off our system people keep saying well why don't you turned over to fbi because we could not turn our service oval that's all we had that how new jonathan kaye part was somebody we had to target i'm using you as a metaphor 'cause i know we would never target a journalist.

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"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"How much of the of the mistreatment of you you think is structural that that's how the party organs are treated by presidential candidates and how much of it do you think liz race or was a generational i looked at it as generational because you know i'm gonna make fun of my friends but here's the difference at thank of it is you know uh is not an attack is just to acknowledge in the obvious i come from the school where i walk into your neighborhood jonathan in i i woke up to your door knock on it and and say we need your help we need you to vote i also come from the school that when jonathan is actively engage that we give you resources like buttons and bumper stickers in other khanna campaign paraphernalia including the issues in the platform to get people excited um i do not come from the campaign where we look at two computer model and and then suggest edge everyone in jonathan neighborhood because they look a certain way will vote a certain way i don't like that i liked up i like to go and talk to people i like to really figure out what people a joint and so both model should complement each other one is not better than the other uni both in a campaign and i thought hillary's campaign was missing that element of requesting help but as you know what it was like it's like when bernie sanders said to me he said these polls you trust the polls this was a big washington post this week in the weekend that i talked a burning the week i idea the washington post had come out remember this is after labor day what hillary's layton biwott been margin sao don't you believe that i knew the polls were you know basically a titan in the end and i just wanted them the respect my gut because my gut wet where my button win let's talk about the gut goals where the buck goes okay my but went the florida.

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"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Pitting typically white working class voters against african americans right and it is simply the rebuilding of that um and so for those who and when look when donald trump santa farms audience is rallies and say i'm going to give you your country back tantrums having a conversation about race he's feeding into some rationing anxiety and when democrats say i'ma give you a raising the minimum wage we are ceding you know at it as post to engaging in that conversation we're seeding the ground formal racial conversation about the future of america to download to donald trump and he or she who defines a debate winds debate i don't know what the answer is down because i was vice we can't we can't continue to see that conversation to them and look i don't bashar beat up on working class voters white voters who who do see a tremendous change happening in their country and their anxious about that ryan there in their right to be anxious about i mean you will let them to be anxious outright but so my point is not to bash people who are anxious about the change that are happening the country but democrats have to give them alternative vision by because ultimately jonathan america's and getting wider right at the thing america's not is not getting wider and so you know part of the the empathetic discussion that i've been trying to have on the podcast with with other folks is there is anxiety there is heard there is fear about what's to come some of it irrational some of it rational some of it not just affecting working a working class whites there are folks working class african americans working class latino americans and asianamericans and these are issues that span that span raise but when it comes to this thing i'm going to give your country back i wish democrats could come up with a with some kind of line that incorporates your country hasn't left you.

african americans america ryan donald trump bashar jonathan america